Course offerings, Fall 2015

Please check the Online COD to confirm the following information. Updates can occur at any time and the information here is to be used as a guideline.

Undergraduate students can also register for arah 5000 level courses.

ARAD 3100
Principles and Practices of Arts Administration
Sampson >

Introductory survey of principles and practices of arts administration, as the crossroads of art and audience.

ARAD 3550
Arts and Spirituality
Sampson >

The course is designed as a broad consideration of multiple issues surrounding the Arts and Spirituality. With guest speakers, artists and participatory learning activities, we will investigate some of the many points of contact between spirituality, including religions, and the arts on pre-historic, historic and international levels.

arth 1051
History of Art I
Dobbins >

A survey of the great monuments of art and architecture from their beginnings in caves through the arts of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, Byzantium, the Islamic world, and medieval western Europe. The course attempts to make art accessible to students with no background in the subject, and it explains the ways in which painting, sculpture, and architecture are related to mythology, religion, politics, literature, and daily life. The course serves as a visual introduction to the history of the West.

arth 1500
Introductory Seminars

Introductory Seminars in Art History are small classes for first- and second-year students that emphasize reading, writing, and discussion. While subject varies with the instructor, topics will be selected that allow students to engage broad issues and themes historically and in relationship to contemporary concerns and debates. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Enrollment is capped at 15.

arth 1505
Byzantine Icons: Saints and Sinners
kondyli >

What can an icon do for you? This is a class about the production, function and experience of icons. Beyond religious practices, we will explore how icons transform to powerful tools of political propaganda, self-presentation and identity formation, redemption and resistance. While the emphasis of the course is on icons of the Byzantine period (4th-15th), we will also briefly explore the role of icons in art and religion up to modern times.

arth 1505
Art and Money
Fordham >

There was a time when Andy Warhol's claim that "Big-time art is big-time money" was considered shocking and vulgar. Today that observation might sound perfectly obvious. So what is the history of art's relation to money? How do these two distinct sets of values, the monetary and the aesthetic, relate to one another? In this introductory course we will examine the relationship of artistic to economic value from the Italian Renaissance to the present. While not a uniquely Western phenomenon, the commodification of art plays a particularly important role in modern capitalist economies, and it enables us to think about the relationship of Western art to empire, post-colonialism, and the global art market today. And perhaps most importantly, this course will ask you to assess your own values. What can the fraught, intersecting histories of art and money tell us about the values that we profess, or long to possess, in today's world?

arth 2055
Introduction to Classical Archaeology
Smith >

Introduces the history, theory, and field techniques of classical archaeology. Major sites of the Bronze Age (Troy, Mycenae) as well as Greek and Roman cities and sanctuaries (e.g., Athens, Olympia, Pompeii) illustrate important themes in Greek and Roman culture and the nature of archaeological data.

arth 2056
Aegean Art and Archaeology
Dakouri-Hild >

Introduction to the art and archaeology of the prehistoric Aegean, from the Early Bronze Age to the end of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1200 BCE). Notable sites examined include Troy, Knossos, Mycenae, Thebes, Pylos. The course also examines cultural and artistic connections with New Kingdom Egypt and the Late Bronze Age Levant.

arth 2151
Early Christian and Byzantine Art
Kondyli >

Studies the art of the early Church in East and West and its subsequent development in the East under the aegis of Byzantium. Includes the influence of theological, liturgical and political factors on the artistic expression of Eastern Christian spirituality.

arth 2251
Italian Renaissance Art
Barolsky >

Studies painting, architecture, and sculpture in Italy from the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. Focuses on the work of major artists such as Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.

arth 2271
Northern Renaissance Art (Paintings and Graphics of Northern Europe)
Goedde >

Surveys major developments in painting and graphics in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in the Netherlands and Germany. Includes the rise of Netherlandish naturalism and the origins of woodcut and engraving. Explores the effects of humanist taste on sixteenth-century painting and the iconographic consequences of the Reformation. Emphasizes the work of major artists, such as Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Dürer, Bosch, and Bruegel

arth 2372
Paris, "Capital of the Nineteenth Century"
Betzer >

Examines the places, spaces, practices and representations of Paris in the nineteenth century. Tracing the changing faces of the city, we will study the modern city through architecture and urban planning, painting, drawing, photography, popular imagery and literature. Topics include Paris 'types'; fashion and birth of the department store; Haussmannization; and the 'spectacular' Paris of the panorama, morgue, Opera, and World's Fairs.

arth 2559
Ottoman Art & Architecture, 1300-1926
Phillips >

Art and Architecture of the Ottoman Empire focuses on the bold visual and material culture of the most enduring and expansive of all the Islamic dynasties. From small mosques and settlements in 1300 to the early modern capitals of Istanbul, Cairo, and Damascus, and into the global eighteenth century, this class provides insight into how both sultan and subject sponsored, produced, consumed, and lived with art and objects.

arth 2559
Minimalist and Conceptual Art from the 1960s to the Present
Robbins >

A survey of the Minimalist and Conceptual Art movements from the 1960s in the Asia, Europe and the Americas. Focusing on the revolt against modernism that was initiated by Minimalism and Conceptualism, this course tracks the progression of these international movements through the sixties and seventies and follows their legacy into the art of present. The course attends equally to the social history, theory and procedures of Minimalism and Conceptualism and places an emphasis on developing skills in the description and analysis of contemporary visual art.

arth 2745
African American Art
Higginbotham >

This course surveys the visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography, prints, mixed media and textiles) produced by those of African descent in the United States from the Colonial period to the present. Presented both chronologically and thematically, the class interrogates issues of artistic identity, gender, patronage and the aesthetic influences of the African Diaspora and European and Euro-American aesthetics on African American artists.

arth 2861
East Asian Art
Wong >

Introduces the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the modern era. Surveys major monuments and the fundamental concepts behind their creation, and examines artistic form in relation to society, individuals, technology, and ideas.

arth 3591
Problems in Roman Art & Archaeology
Dobbins >

This colloquium takes a thematic and a problem-oriented approach to Roman art and archaeology rather than a chronological one. There are many controversies pertaining to the proper interpretation, or even chronology, of well-known monuments, such as the forum at Pompeii. Professor Dobbins employs some of his own research in this problem-oriented study. This colloquium emphasizes discussion and regular writing assignments.

arth 3591
Photography and Cultural Theory
Raymond >

This course explores photographs and theories of the photographic image, tracing Marxist, Foucaultian, and Feminist interpretations of the photograph. The course will focus in particular on photographers who invoke the idea of the boundary of the visible: Ralph Meatyard, Duane Michals, Francesa Woodman, An-My Le, Graham MacIndoe, Paula Luttringer. multi-media works by Rebecca Belmore, Sally Mann, Ana Mendieta, Carrie Mae Weems, and others.

arth 3591
Alexander Calder & World of Modern Art
Turner >

This lecture class will explores the professional and social context for one of the most successful modern sculptors in the twentieth century.

arth 3591
Antiquity and Film
Dakouri-Hild >

The seminar introduces students to perceptions of antiquity in the silver screen, from silent films to 3D ones, looking at a wide variety of cultures (the earliest prehistory to ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and from the Greeks and Romans to the genesis of ancient Israel).

arth 3595
Museum Practicum (Jacob Lawrence)
Turner >

Explores the life and art of Jacob Lawrence, particularly his inventions in narrative art. Many of the classes will be held in partnership with the UVA Fralin Art Museum in order to permit access to thirty panels of Lawrence's "Migration Series" and twelve panels from his "Struggle...From the History of the American People."

arth 3993
Independent Study
Turner >

arth 3993
Independent Study
Dobbins >

arth 4591
Art and Myth
Barolsky >

In this seminar we will explore the ways in which artists of the modern period from the Renaissance to the present interpret ancient Greek and Roman myths . We will explore works by Botticelli, Correggio, Titian, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Boucher, Delacroix, Picasso, among many other artists who interpret these myths. Our principal mythological source will be Ovid's great book, "Metamorphoses."

arth 4591
British Print Culture
Fordham >

This upper-level seminar examines the variety and vitality of printed images in the history of British culture with particular emphasis given to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries prior to the extensive adoption of photography. Students will be encouraged to identify and develop a topic that will culminate in a final research paper.

arth 4591
Greek Sculpture
Smith >

An undergraduate Art History seminar that traces the history and development of ancient Greek sculpture from the Archaic through Hellenistic periods. Students will be introduced to the styles, themes, materials and techniques of Greek sculpture, as well as to its reception by both ancient writers and later artists.

arth 4591
Calligraphy in the Islamic World
Phillips >

In the Islamic world, calligraphy is the first and most important form of art. This seminar focuses on writing in many media, from architecture to book arts to popular souvenirs. We will look at how a canon of artists and styles developed, how calligraphy was produced and consumed, how the symbolic content of a word or phrase could be altered by use of script, and how seeing worked both in highly literate and less literate populations alike.

arth 4591
University Museums Internship
Love & Handler >

This is a two-semester sequence of two three-credit courses. Students will do internships (lasting for an academic year) at either the Fralin Museum of Art or the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection. As interns, students will work approximately 100 hours each semester (7-8 hours per week) in the museum, under the close supervision of museum professionals, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. Space is limited. Application required: to apply please email instructors your transcript, resume, and a one-page essay indicating your interest in museum work and your experience (if any). Deadline May 1st.

arth 4998
Undergraduate Thesis Research
various >

Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department's Distinguished Majors Program.