In the wake of the white-supremacist terrorism of August 11-13, we wish to highlight and paraphrase some of the comments of Ian Baucom, Dean of Arts and Sciences:
Be assured that the Art Department remains a space where all can pursue the dialogue that counters the lies of racism, anti-semitism, homophobia, and nativism.
We are prepared to stand up for and support those who have been singled out as targets for hatred. The courage of free thought opposing cowardice and bigotry endures and persists here despite violence.



Current students

Elizabeth Dwyer

BA, Art History, Italian minor, University of California, Los Angeles, 2009
MA, Art and Architectural History, University of Virginia, 2012
PhD candidate
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Elizabeth is a fourth-year doctoral candidate specializing in the early modern portrait. In 2009 as an Ackerman Scholar, she received her BA summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA. In 2012 as a Presidential Fellow, she received her MA from the University Virginia where she examined the integration of patrons in scenes from the life of Christ. Now her dissertation, "Portraits and Visions in Renaissance Veneto," documents the origins and significance of this understudied iconographic pattern, which she terms the visionary portrait. To assist in this research, Elizabeth received the RSA-Patricia H. Labalme Grant, in addition to University grants from the Society of Fellows and the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures. She also received the Floyd L. Moreland Scholarship and Kress Foundation Fellowship to study at the City University of New York's Latin/Greek Institute and Middlebury's German School. She has presented selections of her research at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Giorgio Cini Foundation and annual Renaissance Society of America conference.

While completing her dissertation, Elizabeth served as a guest curator at the University's Fralin Museum of Art. Drawing from the permanent collection, she created a two-part exhibition entitled Figures for the Soul. Inspired by an eighteenth-century critique of Albrecht Dürer, the installations examined the evolving aesthetic of his religious prints and those of his Dutch successor, Hendrick Goltzius. Elizabeth has interned at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Victoria & Albert and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, in addition to serving on the Student Advisory Committee of the Hammer Museum. She has also served as a research and teaching assistant and received the departmental award for excellence in the classroom.