UVaM - University of Virginia Art Museum

About The Fralin

Curators and Lecturers, Spring 2013

Exhibitions | Lunchtime Talks | Saturday Special Tours | Special Lectures | Weedon Lectures

Exhibitions


Traces of the Hand
Master Drawings from the Collection of Frederick and Lucy S. Herman

Curated by
Lawrence O. Goedde
Adjunct Curator of Prints and Drawings and Professor of Art History, McIntire Department of Art

Lawrence O. Goedde is a professor of art history in U.Va.'s McIntire Department of Art. He earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University. His area of expertise includes Dutch and Flemish art of the seventeenth century as well as old master prints and drawings. His research interests focus on landscape and marine painting in the Netherlands during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as still life painting. His publications include the volume Tempest and Shipwreck in Dutch and Flemish Art: Convention, Rhetoric, and Interpretation (Penn State Press, 1989), as well as essays on landscape (in Looking at Dutch Art: Realism Reconsidered, ed. Wayne Franits, Cambridge University Press, 1997), on marine painting (in Praise of Ships and the Sea, ed. Jeroen Giltaij, Rotterdam, 1997), and on still life (in Still Lifes of the Golden Age: the Heinz Family Collection, ed. Arthur Wheelock, Washington, 1989).

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Becoming the Butterfly
Landscapes of James McNeill Whistler

Becoming the Butterfly
Portraits of James McNeill Whistler

Curated by
Emilie Johnson
Luzak-Lindner Graduate Fellow

Emilie Johnson is a Ph.D. candidate in art and architectural history in U.Va.'s McIntire Department of Art. Her primary research focuses on the buildings and landscapes of the antebellum South. As the Museum's Luzak-Lindner Graduate Fellow for the 2012-2013 academic year, she has returned to her art history background with work on The Fralin's prints by James McNeill Whistler.

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Looking at the New West
Contemporary Landscape Photography

Curated by
William Wylie
Adjunct Curator of Photography and Associate Chair for Studio Art, McIntire Department of Art

William Wylie is a professor of photography in the McIntire Department of Art at U.Va. He received his Masters of Fine Arts from the University of Michigan. He has published four books of his photographs, Riverwalk (University Press of Colorado, 2000), Stillwater (Nazraeli Press, 2002), Carrara (Center for American Places, 2009), and Route 36 (Flood Editions, 2010) all concerned with landscape and place. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in photography in 2005 and a Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Professional Fellowship in 2011. His photographs and films have been shown both nationally and internationally and can be found in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Virginia Museum of Fine Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Yale University Art Gallery, among others.

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Ansel Adams
A Legacy

Curated by
William Sherman
Founding Director, OpenGrounds
and

William Wylie
Adjunct Curator of Photography and Associate Chair for Studio Art, McIntire Department of Art

William Sherman is a Professor of Architecture, an Associate Vice President for Research, and the Founding Director of the OpenGrounds initiative of the University of Virginia. As an architect and educator, his teaching and design research examine dynamic cultural and environmental processes in architectural design, ranging in scale from human physiology to global energy flows. Having completed terms as Associate Dean for Academics and the Chair of the Department of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, he teaches studios and courses ranging in focus from sustainable buildings and cities to the design of spaces that encourage the teaching and practice of innovation across disciplinary boundaries. His work has been published internationally and has received numerous awards, including six from the American Institute of Architects, five for Design Excellence at the national, state and local levels and one for Excellence in Education. In 2010, he was awarded the Z Society Distinguished Faculty Award and the ACSA Creative Achievement Award. OpenGrounds provides places and programs that inspire creative research at the confluence of technology, science, the arts and humanities, serving as catalysts for cross-disciplinary research collaborations and new institutional partnerships to inspire the conception, development and implementation of transformational ideas.

William Wylie is a professor of photography in the McIntire Department of Art at U.Va. He received his Masters of Fine Arts from the University of Michigan. He has published four books of his photographs, Riverwalk (University Press of Colorado, 2000), Stillwater (Nazraeli Press, 2002), Carrara (Center for American Places, 2009), and Route 36 (Flood Editions, 2010) all concerned with landscape and place. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in photography in 2005 and a Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Professional Fellowship in 2011. His photographs and films have been shown both nationally and internationally and can be found in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Virginia Museum of Fine Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Yale University Art Gallery, among others.

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Frenemies
Animals in Art

Curated by
Stephen Margulies
Volunteer Curator

Stephen Margulies is a volunteer curator at The Fralin and received degrees from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Virginia. He also studied at the Maryland Institute College of Art and taught at the University of Maryland. He is an artist, essayist, and poet, as well as having been for many years curator of works on paper at the Museum. He has often collaborated with writers, scientists, performers, and artists in connection with his exhibitions.

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From Alaska to the Mountain Peaks of Central Mexico
Depicting Native American Life in the Late Nineteenth Century

Curated by
Mary Jo Ayers
Adjunct Curator of Native American Art
and

Diane Boucher
Guest Curator

Mary Jo Ayers has been a docent at The Fralin since 1976, and an adjunct curator of Native American art since the early 1980s. During this time, she has curated several major exhibitions of Native American art for the Museum, given numerous talks on the Astor Collection, and supervised the conservation and growth of the Museum's Native American holdings. Recently, she collaborated with scholar Diane Boucher on an article about the Astor collection that appeared in the fall issue of American Indian Art.

Diane Boucher was educated at University College, London and holds a B.A. and M.A. in the History of Art. From 1998 to 2003, she worked as the research director for the Commission for Looted Art in Europe. Between 2003 and 2009, she worked for a major private collection of British and American Arts and Crafts in Chicago and contributed to a book on the collection, Arts and Crafts Rugs for Craftsman Interiors: The Crab Tree Farm Collection (Norton 2010). In 2010, she began researching the Astor Collection of Native American Art and published the article "Under the Pavement of Broadway": The Indian Hall in the Hotel Astor in American Indian Art Magazine (Autumn 2010). More recently, she has been writing a book titled The 1950s American House, which will be published by Shire Books in the summer of 2013. She is a member of the Volunteer Board of The Fralin and a community docent.

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Lunchtime Talks


Speakers

Corey Piper is a Ph.D. student in the McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia studying American art. He received a B.A. in art history from the University of South Carolina and an M.A. in art history with a specialization in museum studies from Virginia Commonwealth University. Following completion of the M.A., Corey served as a curatorial associate at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Working primarily with the Paul Mellon Collection of French, American and British Sporting Art, he organized several exhibitions, including George Morland: Poet of English Country Life and Scraps: British Sporting Drawings from the Paul Mellon Collection.

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Saturday Special Tours


Lecturers

Mitchell Merling is the Paul Mellon Curator and Head of the Department of European Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. He earned his B.A. From Vassar College and his M.A. And Ph.D. from Brown University where his dissertation focused on the social milieu of Marco Boschini, the Venetian seventeenth century critic. He was a curator at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the John and Marble Ringling Museum of Art.

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Special Lectures


Lecturer

Gladys S. Blizzard Lecture
Luc Sante

Luc Sante is a visiting professor of writing and photography at Bard College, where he has taught in both the Art History and Written Arts programs since 1999. He was born in Belgium and emigrated to the United States as a child, living in New York City for many years and attending Columbia University. He is the author of Folk Photography (2009), Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces 1990-2005 (2007), Walker Evans (2001), The Factory of Facts (1998), Evidence (1992), and Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York (1991). He is the coeditor of O.K. You Mugs: Writers on Movie Actors (1999) and the editor and translator of Novels in Three Lines, by Félix Fénéon (2007). Sante has written introductions to books by Georges Simenon, Emile Zola, A. J. Liebling, Paul Auster, Weegee, Stephen Crane, and Vik Muniz, among others. His essays appear in many publications, including the New York Review of Books and the New York Times Magazine. He is the recipient of the Whiting Writer's Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Grammy Award (for album notes), and an Infinity Award for writing from the International Center of Photography, and is currently a Cullman Fellow at the New York Public Library.

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Ellen Bayard Weedon Lectures in the Arts of Asia

Lecturers

Stanley Abe
Associate Professor, Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, Duke University

Stanley Abe is an associate professor in Duke University's Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. His book Ordinary Images (2002), a study of Chinese Buddhist and Daoist images from the second to the sixth centuries, was the recipient of the 2004 Shimada Prize for distinguished scholarship in the history of East Asian art. One of his most recent publication is "Locating World Art" in The Migrant's Time: Rethinking Art History and Diaspora (Clark Institute, 2011), edited by Saloni Mathur. He is editor of Archives of Asian Art.

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Molly Aitken
Assistant Professor of Art History, The City College of New York

Molly Emma Aitken is an assistant professor of Art History at The City College of New York. She earned her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2001 with a concentration on the art of South Asia. She has curated traveling exhibitions on South Asian jewelry and contemporary folk quilts, and has published numerous articles on Mughal and Rajput painting. Aitken received the College Art Association's Charles Rufus Morey book award in 2011 and the Association for Asian Studies' Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy Book Prize in 2012 for her book The Intelligence of Tradition in Rajput Court Painting (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010). Currently focused on the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, she is looking at Mughal receptions of Rajput court arts in the context of social pleasure.

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