UVaM - University of Virginia Art Museum

Current exhibitions

Joseph Cornell

Joseph Cornell and Surrealism
March 7 - June 8, 2014

Curated by Matthew Affron, Muriel and Philip Berman Curator of Modern Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art & Sylvie Ramond, Director and Chief Curator of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon, France

This international loan exhibition focuses on the work of Joseph Cornell, the American pioneer of collage, montage, and assemblage art in the decades of the 1930s and 1940s. These years span both Cornell’s emergence and maturation as an artist and the heyday of surrealism in the United States. The exhibition will comprise some one hundred objects by Cornell and other artists and it will be accompanied by a significant publication featuring original essays by American and European scholars. It is a collaboration between the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon and The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, which has holdings that include six boxes and fourteen collages, the majority having come as gifts from the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation in 2002 and 2005. The exhibition is scheduled for Lyon beginning in fall 2013. The Fralin Museum of Art will be the second venue.
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Joseph Cornell, American, 1903–1972. Untitled (Juan Gris Series, Black Cockatoo Silhouette), c. 1954–1965. Box construction, 19 5/8 x 12 x 4 3/8 in, 49.85 x 30.48 x 11.11 cm. Gift of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation, 2002.15.3. The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Art © The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Jasper Johns

Jasper Johns
Early Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation
January 17 - May 19, 2014

Curated by Jennifer Farrell, Curator of Exhibitions and Contemporary Art

Jasper Johns (b. 1930) has fundamentally challenged ideas about what art can be by focusing on everyday icons and emblems, or what the artist famously referred to as "things the mind already knows.” While perhaps best known for his paintings, Johns is also widely respected for his graphic work, which has occupied a central role in his oeuvre for over five decades. Johns’ prints not only show a mastery of the various mediums he has engaged, but also a profound sense of experimentation, which has had significant impact not only on his own art, but also on the field itself. Printmaking has allowed Johns to explore various methods for interpreting icons, emblems, and objects—such as numbers, letters, maps, targets, and ale cans—while also expanding the possibilities for printmaking. Several of his prints make reference to the artist’s work in other media, yet they are not mere copies or reproductions. Rather, Johns has consistently returned to such motifs in order to explore new methods and techniques that would allow him to reinterpret and engage these subjects again.
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Jasper Johns, American, b. 1930. Pinion, edition 13/36, 1966. Lithograph, 40 1/4 x 28 in, 102.24 x 71.12 cm (sheet). Publisher: Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, NY. Printer: Zigmunds Priede. Courtesy of the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, 2006.108. Art © Jasper Johns and ULAE/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY Published by Universal Limited Art Editions

Portraying the Golden Age

Portraying the Golden Age
Drawings from the Maida and George Abrams Collection
January 17 - April 27, 2014

Prints from the Collection
May 2 - August 10, 2014

Curated by John Hawley, Luzak-Lindner Graduate Fellow

In his famous Schilder-boeck (1604), the artist and historian Karel van Mander (1548–1606) described how “the making of portraits from life comprises the largest part of the work which occurs in these lands for young painters, and others, and that for this reason and for the sake of profit, many keep themselves to a greater extent or entirely busy with that.” The “others” to whom van Mander, the “Dutch Vasari,” obliquely refers were probably draftsmen and printmakers, whose works could be had for comparatively lower prices than their painted counterparts.
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Jan Lievens ,Dutch, 1607–1674. Bust of a Man Facing Forward, c. 1640–44. Chiaroscuro woodcut, 6 15/16 x 5 5/16 in, 17.6 x 13.5 cm. Museum Purchase with Curriculum Support Funds, 2001.12.3

Oriforme

Jean Arp
Oriforme

Jean Arp’s Oriforme, on long-term loan from the National Gallery of Art, exemplifies the approach to abstraction with which the artist is most closely associated; the sculpture will be on view on The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Entrance Plaza in front of The Fralin beginning March 25, 2013. More >

Jean Arp, French, b. Germany (Alsace), 1886–1966. Oriforme, model 1962, fabricated 1977. Stainless steel, 89 3/4 x 84 1/2 x 23 5/8 in, 227.9 x 214.6 x 60 cm. Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, To the American People in Gratitude—Leon Chalette, Arthur Lejwa, and Madeleine Chalette Lejwa, 1978.22.1.

UVaM's new Object Study Gallery

Object Study Gallery

The Object Study Gallery has approximately 140 objects on view, including Chinese bronzes, ceramics and sculpture; ancient Mediterranean coins, glass and marble sculpture; pre-Columbian ceramics; and African masks and figures. More >

UVaM's new Object Study Gallery