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The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia Publications    
   
Collections catalogue

The Museum: Conditions & Spaces
Selections from the University of Virginia Art Museum

Edited by Andrea N. Douglas
Paper, ISBN 0-9706263-1-2 • $35
University of Virginia Art Museum, 2004

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The Museum: Conditions & Spaces - Selections from the University of Virginia Art Museum
   
Exhibition catalogues

Thomas Jefferson's Academical Village:
The Creation of an Architectural Masterpiece, Revised edition

Richard Guy Wilson
123 pages, color and black & white illustrations
Cloth, ISBN 978-0-8139-2830-2 • $24.95
University of Virginia Press, 2009

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The revised catalogue, which accompanied the 2009 exhibition, was been updated to reflect new research from the catalogue that accompanied the original 1993 exhibition.

 
Thomas Jefferson's Academical Village: The Creation of an Architectural Masterpiece, Revised edition
Matisse, Picasso, and Modern Art in Paris:
The T. Catesby Jones Collections at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the University of Virginia Art Museum

Catalogue and exhibition organized by Matthew Affron and John B. Ravenal with Emily Smith
147 pages, color and black & white illustrations
Paper, ISBN 978-0-917046-88-9 • $40
University of Virginia Art Museum, 2009

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The catalogue was published to accompany the exhibition Matisse, Picasso, and Modern Art in Paris: The T. Catesby Jones Collections at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the University of Virginia. The fully illustrated catalogue presents essays by the co-curators and new research by University of Virginia graduate students.

  Matisse, Picasso, and Modern Art in Paris: The T. Catesby Jones Collections at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the University of Virginia Art Museum        
William Christenberry: Site/Possession

44 pages, color and black & white illustrations
Paper, ISBN 0-9706263-4-7 • $25
University of Virginia Art Museum, 2007

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Companion volume of the traveling exhibition of the same name, Christenberry's art focuses on Hale County, Alabama, a place where the artist spent many summers as a child. It is also the heartland of the Ku Klux Klan. His memory of this place, a combination of natural beauty and primal terror, are explored in many of his works. In addition to approximately 50 drawings, the exhibition also featured paintings, photographs, constructions, and objects from the Klan Room Tableau, many of which are included in this book.

  William Christenberry: Site/Possession        
Fernand Léger: Contrast of Forms

Matthew Affron
48 pages, color illustrations
Paper, ISBN 13:978-0-9706263-3-2 • $15.95
University of Virginia Art Museum, 2007

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Between 1912 and 1914, Fernand Léger executed a large cycle of works known as the Contrasts of Forms. The series embraces the genres of landscape, still life, and figure, but at its core are numerous arresting compositions that sweep aside observation to focus on formal principles. The common denominator is a complex vocabulary of mingled cones, cylinders, cubes, and planes, vigorously outlined and scrubbed with color (in the paintings) or with black ink and white gouache (in the works on paper). The Contrast of Forms are essential to two great chapters in the history of modern art in the years before the First World War: first, the development of cubism, and second, the emergence of abstract art. Moreover, they cap the initial, pre-1914 phase of Léger's career when, as critic Douglas Cooper wrote, the artist finds his signature pictorial maneuvers and, in effect, becomes Léger.

  Fernand Léger: Contrast of Forms        
Monica Angle: Loose Leafs

University of Virginia Art Museum, 2005

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Painter, printmaker, book and mixed media artist, Monica Angle has created a luminous body of new work on paper that addresses "my memory of a place or an object as a myth that explains our experience of the world. By focusing on places and objects to which I can only return through memory, I explore how such images become icons in my personal mythologies."

The ten works in the exhibition, dating from 2004, are all composed of monotypes, hand-printed layers of watercolor ink on Japanese paper, over paintings in acrylic on Rives BFK paper. An illustrated catalogue, with an essay by Minnesota-based curator and writer Thomas O'Sullivan, accompanies the exhibition.

Angle received her AB in folklore and mythology from Harvard College and her MS in geography from Pennsylvania State University; she also attended the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, where she pursued printmaking studies. A former resident of Minnesota who recently moved to Buffalo, NY, Angle has shown her work, in both solo and group exhibitions, at university and city galleries in Minneapolis. She has published numerous portfolios and books, most recently "Diminutive Digest," vol. 1, no. 2, Flying Paper Press, 2001 and "Littleneck," Minneapolis College of Art and Design Press, 1999. Her work may be found in such public collections as the Walker Art Center, Minnesota State Historical Society, and the Minneapolis College of Art and Design Library. For more information about the artist, please log on to www.monicaangle.com.

  Monica Angle: Loose Leafs        
A Jeffersonian Ideal: Selections from the Dr. and Mrs. Henry C. Landon III Collection of American Fine and Decorative Arts

104 pages, color illustrations
Paper ISBN 0-9706263-2-0 • $40
University of Virginia Art Museum, 2005

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This catalog was published to accompany the 2005 exhibition A Jeffersonian Ideal: Selections from the Dr. and Mrs. Henry C. Landon III Collection of American Fine and Decorative Arts. The catalog includes essays by Richard Guy Wilson, Commonwealth Professor of Architectural History at the University of Virginia, and Dr. Henry C. Landon. More than 100 full-color photographs of the collection are included.

  A Jeffersonian Ideal: Selections from the Dr. and Mrs. Henry C. Landon III Collection of American Fine and Decorative Arts        
A Short History of Decay
Sculpture by James Welty

University of Virginia Art Museum, 2004

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Taking inspiration from the writer E.M. Cioran, whose aphoristic essays include the phrase "a short history of decay," sculptor James Welty has created a dynamic and intriguing body of work that explores the interconnections between nature, civilization, and human creativity. The exhibition features ten major sculptures, many completed in 2003, including a 45-foot horizontal wall-mounted work related to the Hell, or Ghost, Scrolls of twelfth century Japan, An illustrated catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

A Charlottesville resident, Welty received his B.F.A. from Rochester Institute of Technology, following studies at the Rustin School of Drawing in Oxford, England, and the Chicago Art Institute. He has worked as a lithography instructor at Evanston Art Center and a master printer and collaborator to Frank Stella. His prints and sculpture have been shown internationally, including the Museum's 2000 Hindsite-Fore-Site: Art for the New Millennium exhibition.

  A Short History of Decay - Sculpture by James Welty        
"The Moon Has No Home"
Japanese Color Woodblock Prints from the
Collection of the University of Virginia Art Museum

Essays by Sandy Kita and Stephen Margulies
104 pages, color and black & white illustrations
Paper • $30
University of Virginia Art Museum, 2003

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The strength of the Museum's collection of Japanese color woodblock prints lies in an area that is still considered controversial by many Ukiyo-e ("pictures of the floating world") connoisseurs—the mid- to late nineteenth century. This period of stress in Japanese society marked the end of the peaceful but extremely authoritarian, reclusive, and feudalistic Tokugawa regime and the turbulent beginnings of a Japan that was opening itself to the West. Natural and social cataclysms were matched by the wild and sometimes anguished creativity of the daring and imaginative generations of Ukiyo-e printmakers who came after Utamaro, an artist renowned for the breathtaking elegance and serenity of his "Classical" restraint.

The title of the exhibition comes from a poem inscribed on a print by Yoshitoshi, who is considered the final and culminating master of Ukiyo-e. From his landmark One Hundred Aspects of the Moon series, the print depicts the poet and nun Lady Chiyo, who is best known for a poem in which she tells of her decision to borrow a bucket of water from a neighbor; her own well bucket has been ensnared overnight by morning glories, whose summer beauty she wishes to leave intact. In Yoshitoshi's print, however, she is shown in autumn, transfixed over her fallen well bucket. The inscribed poem states that the poet has now dropped her bucket and spilled its contents, so that "the moon has no home in the water."

Approximately sixty works (including diptychs and triptychs by Kunisada, Kuniyoshi, and Kuniyoshi's extraordinary pupil Yoshitosh) have been selected for exhibition from a collection of three hundred. A catalogue accompanies the exhibition, which was curated by Sandy Kita, assistant professor of Japanese art history at the University of Maryland, College Park, and Stephen Margulies, curator of works on paper.

  The Moon Has No Home - Japanese Color Woodblock Prints from the Collection of the University of Virginia Art Museum        
Reverie and Reality
Photographs by Rodney Smith

University of Virginia Art Museum, 2003

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A retrospective of the powerful photographs of Rodney Smith, a 1970 alumnus of the University, opened at the University of Virginia Art Museum Friday, May 16, 2006. With a blend of spontaneity and composure, these images often include haunting or humorous details. In each painstakingly printed black-and-white print, Smith succeeds in capturing the underlying beauty present in the world around us.

As he writes in his artist statement: "Even while photographing for the world of fashion, my interest is not in what is new or fashionable, but rather what endures and is graceful, stylish, and beautiful."

Smith's first exhibition at his alma mater, it included 40 photographs and was organized as a retrospective look at his intensive career.

After receiving his bachelor's degree Smith earned a master of divinity degree from Yale University in 1973, where he also studied photography with Walker Evans. His publications include "In the Land of Light" and the award-winning "The Hat Book." He has shown his work at the Robert Klein Gallery and The Pucker Gallery, both in Boston; Gallery Zur Stockeregg, Zurich; and the Witkin Gallery, New York. He has worked on assignment for BMW, IBM, Kodak, Starbucks Coffee and Visa. His fashion clients include Bergdorf Goodman, Saks Fifth Avenue and Ralph Lauren, and among his editorial clients are The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Esquire and GQ.

The exhibit was organized by Jon Stuhlman, the 2002-03 Museum-McIntire Department of Art Graduate Fellow.

  Reverie and Reality - Photographs by Rodney Smith        
Our View: Charlottesville and Albemarle County, A Teen Photography Competition

108 pages, color and black & white illustrations
Cloth ISBN 0-9745028-0-4 • $25
Oakwood Arts, 2003

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This book includes the winning selections and honorable mentions in all six categories of the 2003 Charlottesville, Albemarle County Teen Photography Competition/Exhibition. Over 100 photographs by talented young photographers, with more than half in full-color, offering an often unique, and always beautiful, view of the Charlottesville/Albemarle region.

  Our View: Charlottesville and Albemarle County, A Teen Photography Competition        
To Delight the Eyes & Transport the Viewer
Dutch Landscape Prints of the Golden Age

University of Virginia Art Museum, 2002

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In the 17th-century Netherlands, landscapes emerged as an entirely new class of images in European art. Before that time, landscapes had served simply as backgrounds or settings for religious and secular scenes. However, their portrayal, often quite naturalistically, as subjects in their own right marked a clear departure from former practice.

This exhibition from the Museum's Old Master prints collection was organized by Tanya Paul, the 2001-2002 Museum-McIntire Department of Art Graduate Intern.

"Ultimately, what this exhibition seeks to accomplish is to recognize and explore this significant development in landscape imagery," said Paul. "These works provide a unique view of both the artistic and cultural climate of the Netherlands in its Golden Age." Among the earliest proponents were Pieter Bruegel and the artist known as the Master of the Small Landscape. Bruegel was noted for his Alpine landscapes while The Master of the Small Landscape introduced the indigenous, often seemingly unremarkable, landscape as a subject.

From these early developments, the depiction of the natural landscape blossomed into a distinct and influential genre. Numerous artists followed the works of the Master of the Small Landscape in depicting the countryside around them. The unremitting flat and low horizon that distinguishes the Dutch countryside typifies these images.

By contrast, another group of artists followed the lead of Bruegel and looked farther south, to Italy, for inspiration in its rocky, mountainous terrain.

During this period, landscape prints were often published in series so buyers could enjoy a vicarious trip through the local countryside without leaving home. The University of Virginia Art Museum owns two complete series, one by Jan van de Velde, the other by Claes Jansz Visscher, both in the exhibit. Other artists featured in the exhibit include Hendrik Goudt, Allart van Everdingen and Willem van Nieulandt.

  To Delight the Eyes & Transport the Viewer - Dutch Landscape Prints of the Golden Age        
Elements:
New Work by Jan Aronson

University of Virginia Art Museum, 2001

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Described as form and energy in motion, Jan Aronson's luminous explorations of nature work on many levels. Often in the form of triptychs, her gorgeous cloud formations respond to both our emotional and mystical states in their sometimes serene, sometimes tumultuous, yet ever-changing imagery. Her landscapes, inspired by her travels throughout the world, from New England to Peru, from Kenya to the Caribbean, reference place as both a physical location and an abstract metaphorical site. In these recent works, Aronson shows a command of media ranging from drawing and pastel to watercolor and oil. The sumptuous colors and vibrant forms stimulate our senses and lead us to contemplate the grandeur of nature and our place in the natural world. A catalog, with an essay by Jonathan Goodman, accompanies the exhibition.

Aronson received her BA from the University of New Orleans and her MFA from Pratt Institute. She has served as a visiting artist and instructor in museums, art schools, and universities, and since 1986 has devoted herself to painting full-time. She has participated in over forty group exhibitions, including Group Landscape Exhibition (2000), Winston Wachter Fine Arts, Seattle, and Landscape Revisited (1999), Anne Reed Gallery, New York, NY. Her numerous solo exhibitions include Portraits of Place (2000) at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, and a ten-year retrospective in 1999 at the Thomas J. Welsh Art Gallery, Quick Center for the Arts, Fairfield University, CT.

  Elements: New Work by Jan Aronson        
John Barber, 1893-1965:
Selections from the Archive

Edited and Introduced by David B. Lawall
224 pages, color and black & white illustrations
Cloth, ISBN 0-8139-1395-0 • $45
University of Virginia Art Museum, 1992

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First America, then post-World War I Europe offered Romanian-born artist John Barber the visual stimulations of cultures in change. His observations, enthusiasms, and inquiry are recounted in his art, letters, postcards, and writings on art and artists. This publication of selections from his papers, drawings and paintings marks the establishment of his archive in the John Barber Memorial Collection at the University of Virginia Art Museum. Comprehensive in scope, the collection forms a basis for further research of the life and work of an enigmatic, elusive and intriguing painter who found his own voice amid the cacophony of the international art world from the 1920s into the 1960s.

  John Barber, 1893-1965: Selections from the Archive        
Writer's Eye anthologies

Writer's Eye 2010

72 pages, color illustrations
Paper • $10
University of Virginia Art Museum, March 2011

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The anthology recognizes the winners of the twenty-fourth Writer's Eye competition. Their poetry and prose appears alongside color reproductions of the artwork that inspired them. This annual literary competition invites contestants from third graders to university students and beyond to create original works of poetry and prose inspired by art in the Museum's collection and in its special exhibitions.

Nearly 3.000 individuals participated in the tours, and many others sought out the artwork on their own. A total of 1,226 entries were received. The contestants submit entries in four age-related categories: grades 3-5, 6-8, 9-12, and university/adult. Teachers from local schools and writers judge entries from children in the younger grades. Published writers, Charlotte Matthews and Jack Trammell, judged entries from the high school and university/adult categories this year.

  Writer's Eye 2010        
Writer's Eye 2009

72 pages, color illustrations
Paper • $10
University of Virginia Art Museum, March 2010

To purchase, visit Museum store >

The anthology recognizes the winners of the twenty-third Writer's Eye competition. Their poetry and prose appears alongside color reproductions of the artwork that inspired them. This annual literary competition invites contestants from third graders to university students and beyond to create original works of poetry and prose inspired by art in the Museum's collection and in its special exhibitions.

More than 2,900 individuals participated in the tours, and many others sought out the artwork on their own. A total of 1,140 entries were received. The contestants submit entries in four age-related categories: grades 3–5, 6–8, 9–12, and university/adult. Teachers from local schools and writers judge entries from children in the younger grades. Published writers, Sarah Collins Honenberger and John Casteen IV, judged entries from the high school and university/adult categories this year.

  Writer's Eye 2009        
The Writer's Eye 2008

64 pages, color illustrations
Paper • $10
University of Virginia Art Museum, February 2009

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The anthology recognizes the winners of the twenty-second Writer's Eye competition. Their poetry and prose appears alongside color reproductions of the artwork that inspired them. This annual literary competition invites contestants from third graders to university students and beyond to create original works of poetry and prose inspired by art in the Museum's collection and in its special exhibitions.

More than 2,300 individuals participated in the tours, and many others sought out the artwork on their own. A total of 1,029 entries were received. The contestants submit entries in four age-related categories: grades 3–5, 6–8, 9–12 and university/adult Teachers from local schools and writers judge entries from children in the younger grades. Published writers, Elizabeth Doyle Solomon and Kristen Staby Rembold, judged those from the high school and university/adult categories.

  Writer's Eye 2008        
   
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