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UVa Center for International Studies Global Activities Grant Request Form

Please provide the following information when requesting funds from the CIS for global activities that are relevant to UVa's global mission:

1. Your name, title, department or unit, and contact information:

David T. Gies
Commonwealth Professor of Spanish
Cynthia Wall, Chair, Department of English (on behalf of the University of Virginia Eighteenth-Century Study Group)


2. The type of grant you are applying for:

University research initiatives or research groups

The University of Virginia's Eighteenth-Century Group is requesting funding to help underwrite our collaborative symposium titled "The Eighteenth Centuries: An Interdisciplinary Symposium," to be held on UVa Grounds on March 1-2, 2013. We have read the grant guidelines, and believe that this project fits the criteria, beginning with a global focus of historical importance, including multidisciplinary participation and a variety of co-sponsorships, and ending with two "products": an academic, international publication of the proceedings and a series of new departmentally collaborative undergraduate and graduate courses.

The Eighteenth-Century Group comprises faculty members from eleven departments, two programs, and Monticello, and will celebrate its 10th anniversary this year. (Please see attached history). The constituencies represented are: Art History, Economics, English, French, German, History, Music, Philosophy, Politics, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, Religious Studies, American Studies, Bibliography, and the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello.

We use the plural "Eighteenth Centuries" intentionally: Different countries —as well as different disciplines— responded variously to the developments of the Enlightenment, and each country appropriated and adapted the innovations of the others at different rates. The conference will be shaped around the question, "How did different disciplines influence and inform one another during the eighteenth century?" For example, Italy rewrote Richardson, England rewrote Cervantes, and Spain rewrote the comédie larmoyante. Nation states reconceptualized their relations with other nation states. Philosophers and political historians rethought democracy. The sister arts had a few sibling rivalries. Interdisciplinary connections dominated intellectual work. We would like to investigate those connections in order to reorder our sense of how areas overlapped with one another. How did disciplines influence and change one another? What topics and issues crossed international boundaries? How, in fact, did the world become "globalized" (and modernized) during the period now known as the Enlightenment?

3. A detailed description of this project/activity including the purpose, participants, location, dates and other relevant information:

The structure of the conference (sample schedule below) will include four interdisciplinary panels —composed each of one invited speaker, one member of the XVIII-SG, one moderator, and one graduate student— integrated with two plenary addresses (both confirmed). The four panels will cluster around topics such as the senses, revolution, music, science, exploration, cartography, cities, empires, environment, beaux arts, money, things, political configurations, revolution, national identities, representations of self and other, orientalism, time and space, with panel members in each cluster from different disciplines. The clusters will be shaped by the panel members. For example: How do scholars in art history, literature, religious studies, and philosophy think about music in the eighteenth century? Or conversely, in the eighteenth century, how did people in England, France, Italy, and Japan address crime and punishment?

The two plenary speakers are:

Patricia Meyer Spacks, former Chair (English), UVa; former President of the Modern Language Association; former member of the Mellon Foundation. Ms. Spacks is a major scholar of eighteenth-century British literature.

Mary D. Sheriff, W.R. Kenan Distinguished Professor of Art History, UNC Chapel Hill; she has written extensively on eighteenth-century art. Her major publications include J.-H. Fragonard: Art and Eroticism (1990); The Exceptional Woman: Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun and the Cultural Politics of Art (1996), Moved by Love: Inspired Artists and Deviant Women in Eighteenth-Century France (2004), and Cultural Contact and the Making of European Art Since the Age of Exploration.

Day 1 will take place at the Harrison Institute at the University of Virginia. Day 2 will take place at Montalto. All panels are open to the public (we will advertise the symposium through UVa, Monticello, the VFH, the Virginia Festival of the Book, and other appropriate sources). We encourage community and student involvement.

Confirmed panelists include Downing Thomas (French and International Studies, University of Iowa), Martha Feldman (Music, University of Chicago), and Jessica Riskin (History of Science, Stanford U).

We have confirmed funding from various departments at UVa (English, Spanish, Religious Studies, Music, History, Art History, Comparative Literature, and Philosophy), the journal DIECIOCHO, the Humanities Institute, and the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. We have in-kind participation from Monticello/Montalto (host of Day 2; contributions include space rental, set-ups, busses, and cocktail reception). We have an application outstanding to the Jefferson Trust.

Proposed Panels:

  • Bonnie Gordon (Music)
  • John O'Brien (English)
  • Adrienne Ward (Italian)
  • Douglas Fordham (Art & Art History)
  • Jennifer Tsien (French)
  • Richard Will (Music)
  • Sophie Rosenfeld (History)
  • Chad Wellmon (German)
  • Brad Pasanek (English)
  • Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Thomas Jefferson Foundation)
  • David Vander Meulen (English)
  • Maurie McInnis (Art & Art History)

Proposed schedule:
DAY 1 (HARRISON INSTITUTE)
9:00-10:30 Panel 1 (Four panelists, 15-minute talks, 30-minute discussion)
10:30-11:00 Coffee Break
11:00-12:00 Plenary 1: Patricia Meyer Spacks
12:15-1:45 Lunch (participants and invited guests). Solarium (Colonnade Club)
2:00-3:30 Panel 2
3:30-4:00 Coffee Break
4:00-6:00 Free Time (Tour of UVA)
6:00-7:00 Concert
7:00 Dinner (Local Restaurant; TBA)

DAY 2 (MONTALTO)
9:00-10:30 Panel 3
10:30-11:00 Coffee Break
11:00-12:00 Plenary 2: Mary D. Sheriff
12:15-1:45 Lunch
2:00-3:30 Panel 4
3:30-4:00 Coffee Break
4:00-6:00 Tour of Monticello
6:00 Cocktails (Montalto)
7:00 Dinner (Montalto)

4. A brief statement on how the project contributes to UVa
Center for International Studies' mission, and/or how it has
the potential to deepen global learning:

We have read the grant guidelines, and believe that this project fits the criteria, beginning with a global focus of historical importance, including multidisciplinary participation and a variety of co-sponsorships, and ending with two "products": an academic, international publication of the proceedings and a series of new departmentally collaborative undergraduate and graduate courses.

Funds will be used to pay the expenses of the two keynote speakers (travel, housing, honorarium), one luncheon for participants, one open lunch at Montalto (for all participants and audience members), and partial travel and housing costs for invited panel speakers. Additional costs include space rentals, meals, graduate student assistants, and design and publicity.

4. An itemized overall budget and amount requested from CIS:

Confidential


5. Sources of co-funding (pending and/or received):

Confidential