2009 Workshops


2009 Spring CLA and Arthur Vining Davis workshop offerings

Emphathy and Leadership/War and Peace: Lessons from JFK, LBJ and Vietnam

March 21, 2009 to be held at the Forum Room in the Miller Center on Old Ivy Road

James Blight and Janet Lang, of Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies, will conduct a day-long workshop on March 21, based on their more than twenty years of research on the presidencies of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. The morning session will focus on the significance of empathy (and its absence) between the Americans and Vietnamese communists, leading to the escalation of the war in Vietnam. The afternoon session will consider how presidential leadership can lead a nation into war, or keep a nation out of war, by comparing the decision-making of Kennedy, Johnson and George W. Bush. Blight and Lang will draw on several documentary films with which they have recently been involved, including Errol Morris’ “The Fog of War” (2004), and Koji Masutani’s “Virtual JFK” (2008).

*Registration will be LIMITED TO 50

 


DANTE

MARCH 28, 2009
Zehmer Hall

“Teaching the Divine Comedy with Digital Resources”

New ideas for the use of technology in the teaching of Dante’s masterpiece as well as a presentation of teaching materials available on The World of Dante (www.worldofdante.org). There will be a demonstration of the main components of the site followed by shorter presentations.

The presenters will be:

Deborah Parker, Professor of Italian
Duane Osheim, Professor of HIstory
Paul Walker, Professor of Music
Worthy Martin, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Associate
Danny Wasserman, Graduate Student in History

 


GERMAN WORKSHOP

Technologie Im Deutschunterricht
APRIL 4, 2009
Zehmer Hall

*New ideas for the use of technology in the classroom as well as a show of materials and lessons that have been prepared and used with students. A variety of shorter presentations (20 minutes) or longer demonstrations(40 or 60 minutes). If possible participants should bring laptop computers. Speakers will be Dr. Vera Nieuhr, Cynthia Kelly, Charlie Kendrick, Dr. Mine Eren, Andrea Machesney, Karlena Sakas and Graig Childers.

 


Spanish Workshop

From Moriscos to Chicanos: The Frontier in Spain and Americas

April 25, 2009
Zehmer Hall

The presenters will be:

Alison Weber, Professor of Spanish
Fernando Operé, Professor of Spanish
Daniel Chávez, Assistant Professor of Spanish and American Studies

Moderator:
Gustavo Pellón, Associate Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature

 


2008 – Workshops Schedules

THE CENTER FOR THE LIBERAL ARTS
AND ARTHUR VINING DAVIS FOUNDATIONS ARE PROUD TO PRESENT
THE FOLLOWING
FREE 2008 FALL WORKSHOPS FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS

MEDIVAL WORKSHOP – ART, ARCHITECTURE,
MUSIC AND LITERATURE

SEPTEMBER 27, 2008

ZEHMER HALL/ ROOM C/D

This interdisciplinary workshop explores the art, architecture, literature and music of the Middle Ages.
The morning session will include presentations on pilgrimage in English literature,
sites of pilgrimage—like Canterbury Cathedral—and the music of the period.

Applications for classroom use will be discussed during the afternoon session.
Presenters will be Professor Lisa Reilly, Architecture Department,
Professor Elizabeth Fowler, English Department and Professor Paul Walker, Music Department.

 


Classics Workshop

HOMER’S ODYSSEY

OCTOBER 25,2008 ZEHMER HALL ROOM C/D

HOMER’S ODYSSEY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2008
10:00 A.M. TO 3:00 P.M.

Homers Odyssey remains one of the core texts of the western literary tradition and is still, happily, regularly a part of the high-school English curriculum. We at the Classics Project invite English and Social Studies teachers and librarians to participate in a Saturday workshop which, through faculty lectures, will investigate the history behind the poem (Bronze Age, about 1200 B.C.E., but also reflecting the culture of Homer = s own time in the eighth century B.C.E.); the oral nature of the poetry (composed and performed orally for an illiterate audience!); and some major literary themes of the poem. The afternoon will be devoted to a group discussion of successful strategies for teaching the poem to modern high school students.

Teachers are asked to come prepared to share two (2) strategies that have worked well for them as they teach the Odyssey to students of different levels of literary sophistication. The participating faculty will moderate and participate in the discussion, but the teachers know best what works in the classroom, and this is an opportunity for them to share and learn from their experience.

 


French Workshop

Beyond “Demain, dès l’aube . . .”: Victor Hugo for Today’s Students
Au-delà de “Demain, dès l’aube . . .”: L’Actualité de Victor Hugo

Marva A. Barnett
Department of French and Teaching Resource Center

Saturday, November 15, 2008, Zehmer Hall C/D

Registration at 8:30; workshop 9:00-2:00/3:00, with 45-60 minutes for box lunch

If you have a laptop, please bring it along and please make sure it is FULLY CHARGED.
We will be using the laptops for interactive activities during the workshop.
UVA will register and get you a PIN number for use at the workshop during Registration.

Victor Hugo’s lyrical poem of grief and love, “Demain, dès l’aube . . . ,” highly comprehensible to students, is popularly and effectively taught in high-school and college French courses. Written in generally simple language about a subject everyone can understand (a daughter’s tragic death), this poem is more profound and rewarding than it first appears, thus making it a memorable lesson in the power of poetry. Still, Hugo’s work provides a widely richer source of texts, themes, and contemporary relevance for teachers who wish to help students connect their personal interests and values with French culture and literature. Since, like most Romantics, he not only wrote about his personal feelings but also deeply considered the meanings of life, death, and God and fiercely debated social justice issues, Hugo offers ideas about topics of concern today. Since both his poetry and prose are vibrantly direct, students can find his writing lively and fascinating.

In this workshop, you will learn more about Hugo’s personal and social beliefs and will read and discuss some of Hugo’s texts that students have found intriguing. Working together, you will design appropriate pedagogical activities for poems, speeches, and novel excerpts that will engage your students in thinking about such important life issues as love, social justice, and God. You will leave with a broadened knowledge of Hugo’s work, practical activities you can use in the classroom, and a source of further knowledge and inspiration in a Collab site that you can access. Since you will have significant opportunities to work together on teaching ideas and lesson plans, please bring your laptop computer, if you can (and fully charged, if possible).

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