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Spring 2011

 

Cognitive Psychology

 

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, attention, memory, and language.
Instructor:  Willingham

PSYC 3005:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 1010 and any 2000-level PSYC course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  To be officially enrolled in PSYC 3005, registration is required for BOTH the lecture and a lab section. Otherwise, you will be dropped from the class.  Instructions on how to add the lecture or lab section or how to change lab sections will be given during the first lecture.
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (PSYC 3005 and PSYC 3006).
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 (with C or better)
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors, CogSci Majors
To be officially enrolled in PSYC 3005, registration is required for BOTH the lecture and a lab section. Otherwise, you will be dropped from the class.  Instructions on how to add the lecture or lab section or how to change lab sections will be given during the first lecture.
Description of course contents:  Second part of a two-part series. Emphasis on inferential statistics (t-tests and ANOVA) and issues in experimentation.
**Course May Meet Second Writing Requirement**
Instructor:  Freeman

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 (with C or better)
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors, CogSci Majors
To be officially enrolled in PSYC 3005, registration is required for BOTH the lecture and a lab section. Otherwise, you will be dropped from the class.  Instructions on how to add the lecture or lab section or how to change lab sections will be given during the first lecture.
Description of course contents:  Second part of a two-part series. Emphasis on inferential statistics (t-tests and ANOVA) and issues in experimentation.
**Course May Meet Second Writing Requirement**
Instructor:  Schmidt

PSYC 3490:  Development in Infancy
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2700 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors.
Description of course contents:  After consideration of the sensory, motor, and homeostatic equipment of the newborn, the following lines of development during the first two years of life are traced in some detail:  locomotor, perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development.  The effects on development of environmental influences, including parental behavior, are considered, as well as the effect the infant has on his caregivers.
Instructor:  Keen

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4111:  Language Development and Disorders
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.Either PSYC 4111: Language Development and Disorders (Bonvillian) or PSYC 5310: Developmental Psycholinguistics (Bonvillian) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will focus on language and cognitive development in persons with disabilities. Among the populations examined will be children with autistic disorder, children with Williams syndrome, deaf children, developmentally dysphasic children, adults with aphasia, and children with severe mental retardation. In addition to spoken language development, the course will examine the acquisition of sign communication skills.
Instructor:  Bonvillian

PSYC 4120: Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams

PSYC 4499:  Psychology and Law:  Cognitive and Social Issues
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or 2600 and PSYC 3005 and 3006
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Examines issues for which cognitive and social psychology may be able to inform the legal system. Topics include eyewitness testimony, recovered memories, line-ups, expert testimony, jury selection, trial tactics, jury instructions and the use of statistics in the courtroom.
Instructor:  Spellman

PSYC 4559-3: Cognitive Aging
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Survey of topics related to the effects of aging on cognition, including historical background, methodological issues, the role of health, disuse, and environmental change, and neurobiological factors.
Instructor:  Salthouse

PSYC 4559-5: Arousal and Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None  
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  It is a common belief that while our memory for emotional or arousing things may be very good, our judgments and performance may be impaired by high arousal. But is this actually true? Does emotional arousal enhance memory but impair other cognitive processes? This seminar course focuses on the interplay between arousal and cognition in memory, judgment, decision making, perception, problem solving and other processes.
Instructor:  Trammell

PSYC 4559-7:  Pleasures of the Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None      
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Perception is the means by which we become aware of the world and of ourselves. This seminar presents an overview of theories about perception including the following perspectives: philosophy, physiology, Gestalt psychology, cognitive psychology, ecology, and artificial intelligence. 
Instructor:  Kubovy

PSYC 4690:  Self-Knowledge
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None      
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with some of the major viewpoints in psychology on the nature of the unconscious, the nature of the conscious mind, and self-knowledge.  There is not enough time in one semester to cover all areas in psychology relevant to self‑insight.  The course is thus a selective one.  The topics will include psychoanalysis, modern research on awareness and consciousness, self-perception, and implicit versus explicit mental states.  Some of the more popular areas related to self‑insight will NOT be covered, such as hypnosis, meditation, drug experiences, and other altered states of consciousness.

There will be a midterm, final, and three projects meant to illustrate theories of self-knowledge.  For example, one project will involve keeping a dream diary and analyzing one of your dreams.  The purpose of each project is to teach you, in a practical way, more about psychology and to demonstrate the potential of each approach for improving self‑knowledge.  The projects will not radically improve your self‑insight; in fact, they probably will not increase your self‑knowledge at all.  You will be asked to approach each project critically and to evaluate its usefulness in a written report.  Thus, the projects are designed to teach you something about psychology, not make you better people or solve any problems you might be having.  Finally, the emphasis of the course will be on normal human functioning and not mental problems or disorders.  The instructor is a social psychologist not a clinical psychologist and has not trained to do therapy or psychological counseling. Thus, do not take this course if your goal is to solve personal problems.  
Instructor:  T. Wilson

PSYC 5559-2:  Machine Learning and Data Mining
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None      
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  While most psychological studies ask "is something different between groups?", in this course we will introduce quantitative methods to answer the question "what is different between groups?", ie., we ask which part (or combination) of our data maximizes the chances to distinguish between given groups. To make a computer answer this question, we will introduce some foundations of machine learning and play with some of these techniques. 
Instructor:  Von Oertzen

 


 

 

Neuroscience

 

PSYC 2200:  Introduction to Psychobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  After an overview of brain structure and organization, the course examines what we know about the biological bases of perception, learning and memory, emotion and psychopathology, as well as the regulatory behaviors: sleep, thirst, eating, sex, and those associated with psychoneuroimmunology.
Instructor:  Hill

PSYC 3220:  Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  6 credits in Psychology, including PSYC 2200
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors /Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  This seminar will examine the neural basis of learning and memory. We will study brain systems that mediate different types of learning and memory as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms that allow these systems to acquire and store information. The course will begin with a historical overview of learning and memory research in psychology and transition into modern studies in behavioral neuroscience. Topics will include memory consolidation, neural plasticity, cellular competition for memory storage, the role of neurogenesis in learning and memory and mechanisms of retention and forgetting. We will also discuss disorders that produce memory impairments in humans and current attempts to model these in animals and develop treatments.
Instructor:  Wiltgen

PSYC 4500-1:  The Greatest Discoveries, Ideas, and Experiments in the History of Neuroscience
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or a course in Neuroscience
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors/Minors
Description of course contents:  The aim of this seminar is to examine the ideas and observations that have had a major impact on our understanding of brain function in general and of the ways the nervous system supports behavior and experience. The issues and questions whose pursuit leads to paradigm shifts are typically very simple: Are nerves independent? Why and how are they charged electrically? How do they get excited or inhibited? How do they communicate with each other and with the world? Are chemicals involved? If so, how so? How do sensory systems capture information from the physical world and how do they convey that information to the brain? Are they accurate or do they distort the world? If so, is that good or bad? How does brain function generate movement, perception, learning, memory, thinking, motivation, arousal, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera?
Instructor:  Best

PSYC 5200:  Modern Studies of Synaptic Plasticity and Memory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 and PSYC 4220
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss contemporary research on synaptic plasticity and memory. Students will present journal articles each week in which new techniques are used to study how the brain acquires and stores information.
Instructor:  Wiltgen

PSYC 5559-1:  Affective Neuroscience
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  Affective neuroscience is the study of the neural bases of emotion. The main goals of this course are: a) to provide an introduction to the major contemporary theories of emotion; b) to provide an introduction to theory and research into the neuroanatomical and neurochemical correlates and substrates of emotion and affective psychopathology; and c) to provide an introduction to the practical, methodological and inferential challenges facing affective neuroscience as a discipline. The course will involve a combination of lecture, discussion, and, where possible, demonstrations. Graduate and advanced undergraduate students are welcome.
Instructor:  Coan

PSYC 5559-2:  Neuropharmacology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 4200 or PSYC 7200 or BIOL 3170
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  The discipline of neuropharmacology is concerned with the effects of drugs that exert action on the central and autonomic nervous systems. It also provides us with the tools in understanding the neural mechanisms underlying complex behaviors and functions such as pleasure, stress, emotions, memory, and attention, as well as deficits such as movement and affective disorders and schizophrenia. This course builds on the principles of nervous system structure and function acquired in prerequisite courses and examines the current literature and models on drug action in the brain.   
Instructor:  Erisir

BIOL 3250:  Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020
Description of course contents:  An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary perspectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphases on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Instructors:  Friesen

BIOL 4340:  Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3170 or an equivalent course
Description of course contents:  The course content will focus on three areas of neurobiological research: conduction of the nervous impulse, sensory physiology, and synaptic physiology.
Instructor:  Mellon

BME 3636:  Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation
Credits:
 3
Prerequisites:  CS 1110 and BME 2101 or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This is an introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks.
Instructor:  Levy


 

Linguistics   

 

ANTH 2400:  Language and Culture
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course is a survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava

ANTH 2430:  Languages of the World
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  One year of foreign language or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity.
Instructor:  Dobrin

ANTH 5041:  Linguistics Field Methods
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  None
Description of course contents:  In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava

ANTH 5440:  Morphology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  One Linguistics course (preferred) or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course provides an overview of recent morphological theory, focusing on recurring themes that have arisen as the subfield has sought to find its place within the generative paradigm. The issues we will cover fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate morphology to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation) and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology, a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct component of grammar. Students will do weekly or biweekly problem sets and give a class presentation on a common morphological category or means of formal expression.
Instructor:  Dobrin

EDHS 5020:  Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  EDHS 501 and 505
Description of course contents:  Examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual, and acoustic aspects of voice, speech, and hearing.
Instructor:  Loncke

LNGS 2220:  Black English 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None, but some background in Linguistics (e.g., ANTH 2400, LING 3250) helpful
Description of course contents:  An introduction to the history and structure of Black English. The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the phonology and grammar (morphology and syntax) of what has been termed Black English Vernacular or African American Vernacular English. We will also be concerned with the external and sociolinguistic factors which led to the emergence of this variety of English, as well as its present role in the African-American community and its relevance in education, employment, and racial stereotypes.
Instructor:  Elson

PHIL 5450:  Language and Logic
*Note:  PHIL 5450 may be used to fulfill either the Linguistics or the Philosophy area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  At least one course in symbolic logic:  PHIL 2420 or equivalent
Description of course contents:  This course will examine, with the aid of classical readings and technical work in formal semantics and pragmatics, topics that have received the most intensive treatment in the field. These include the relation of truth to meaning; sense and reference; the relation of thought to language; speech acts, presupposition and implicature; the relation of conventional meaning to what is communicated in a given utterance.
Instructor: Green

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:   PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Linguistics or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4111:  Language Development and Disorders
*Note:  PSYC 4111 may be used to fulfill either the Linguistics or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4111: Language Development and Disorders (Bonvillian) or PSYC 5310: Developmental Psycholinguistics (Bonvillian) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will focus on language and cognitive development in persons with disabilities. Among the populations examined will be children with autistic disorder, children with Williams syndrome, deaf children, developmentally dysphasic children, adults with aphasia, and children with severe mental retardation. In addition to spoken language development, the course will examine the acquisition of sign communication skills.
Instructor:  Bonvillian

PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading   
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Linguistics or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors 
Description of course contents:   For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process.  If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does.  I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process.  Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process.  The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use.  This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc.  All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think.  We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams

SPAN 3200:  Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 3010 or equivalent  
Description of course contents:  What does it mean when we say we “know” a language? What knowledge do we have of the language(s) we speak? How do those pieces work together in a linguistic system? These are some of the fascinating questions that linguists investigate and that we will work on together as we begin to think like linguists. I invite you to join me in the exciting discovery of language as applied specifically to Spanish as we explore the sound system, word formation, sentence structure, language changes, and language variation of the Spanish language. Together we will discover how language and linguistics are an integrated part of our everyday lives. Students will be assessed on their participation, reflective writing, problem sets, presentation, and exams. Conducted in Spanish.
Instructor:  Scida

SPAN 4201:  Hispanic Dialectology and Bilingualism
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: SPAN 3000 or 3200 or Departmental Placement 
Description of course contents:  This course focuses on the geographical
distribution of the main dialectal varieties of modern Spanish from a phonological point of view (and, to a lesser degree, also from a lexical and a morphosyntactic perspective). It presents some of the ongoing bilingual contacts between Spanish and other languages and, in general terms, it discusses the historical phenomena that shaped the current geographical distribution of the modern Spanish varieties spoken across the Hispanic World. Conducted in Spanish.
Instructor:  Velázquez-Mendoza

SPAN 4530:  Second Language Acquisition  
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: SPAN 3010 and SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another
course in Linguistics 
Description of course contents:  How do people learn a second language? How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different? Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language? How does one measure “success” in second language acquisition? How do we define “competence”? I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions. Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition. Conducted in Spanish.
Instructor:  Scida


Philosophy

PHIL 2330:  Computers, Minds and Brains
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  Can computers think or have experiences roughly like ours? Over the last three decades different approaches to answering this question have been developed, including classical Al, neural nets, varieties of non-reductive physicalism, and neurophysiological eliminativism. All have something to say about what does and does not make humans special. The possibility also arises of transcending human nature and abilities using artificial intelligence and artificial life, rendering humans obsolete. These and other issues will be addressed through readings in philosophy, cognitive science, and computer science. No previous knowledge of philosophy is required.
Instructor:  Humphreys

PHIL 2420:  Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic.  The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic.  The emphasis is on developing an ability to carry out proofs within these systems and on developing an ability to translate sentences of natural language into symbolic notation.  The course will acquaint the student with the concepts of formula, proof, interpretation and validity.  Students will use logic software that will allow them to develop greater expertise with the material.
Instructor:  Cargile

PHIL 3320:  Epistemology
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  None
Description of course contents:  Studies problems concerned with the foundations of knowledge, perception, and rational belief.
Instructor:  Gertler

PHIL 5450:  Language and Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  At least one course in symbolic logic:  PHIL 2420 or equivalent 
Description of course contents:  This course will examine, with the aid of classical readings and technical work in formal semantics and pragmatics, topics that have received the most intensive treatment in the field. These include the relation of truth to meaning; sense and reference; the relation of thought to language; speech acts, presupposition and implicature; the relation of conventional meaning to what is communicated in a given utterance.
Instructor:  Green

PHIL 5460:  Philosophy of Science
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  At least one of PHIL 2330, 2420, 2450, 3310, 3320; a strong science background; or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  Science gives us a special kind of understanding of the world. This seminar will focus on some of the ways it does that, including scientific explanation, discoveries of causal relations, the use of different types and levels of representation, inductive inferences, a commitment to scientific realism, the use of formal theories, and so on.  
Instructor:  Humphreys


 

Computer Science

 

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  ECE 2066: Science of Information will count for credit but does not fill the CS area requirement.

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  (Previously CS 101)

CS 1120:  From Ada and Euclid to Quantum Computing and the World Wide Web     (Previously CS 150)

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I  (Previously CS 202)


                 

 




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