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Cognitive Science Current Approved Courses
for Spring 2015   

Previously Approved Courses

 

Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 3005:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  Any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Smyth

PSYC 3006-1:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 (with C or better)
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Second part of a two-part series. Emphasis on inferential statistics (t-tests and ANOVA) and issues in experimentation.
**Course May Meet Second Writing Requirement**
Instructor:  Schmidt

PSYC 3006-2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 (with C or better)
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Second part of a two-part series. Emphasis on inferential statistics (t-tests and ANOVA) and issues in experimentation.
**Course May Meet Second Writing Requirement**
Instructor:  von Oertzen

PSYC 3435:  Educational Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2150 (with grade of B- or above highly recommended) and PSYC 2700
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies; and proposed reforms for American education.
Instructor:  Willingham

**Cognitive Science majors may directly enroll in only one 4000+ Psychology course without permission of the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator. Include three ranked choices in an email request for permission to enroll to the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator with a copy to the Cognitive Science Coordinator. **

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams

PSYC 4290:  Memory Distortions
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th year Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. The consequences of these memory problems range from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony. We will look at different kinds of memory errors as a tool for investigating how memory works.
Instructor:  Dodson

 

PSYC 4559-2:  The Relationship Between Music and Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or 2300 and PSYC 3005
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors 
Description of course contents:  Language and music are two uniquely human skills that help us to communicate to others about the world around us and about our emotional experiences. In this course, we will explore the ways these two skills are similar and ways that they are different, focusing on the topics of sound, rhythm, melody, syntax, meaning and emotion, and evolution and development. 
Instructor:  Getz

PSYC 4559-3:  Social Psychology, Cognition, and Law
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or 2600 or equivalent and PSYC 3005 or equivalent 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The legal system is designed by people in order to serve people by, for instance, deterring bad behavior, incentivizing good behavior, and providing a sense of order and justice. But does it always do a good job at serving these purposes? Can cognitive and social psychology inform the system to better serve its goals? Topics include traditional psychology and law issues (e.g., eyewitness memory, jury decision making) as well as research relevant to much less studied areas in psychology and law (e.g., causal reasoning, the psychology of contracts and property).
Instructor:  Gilbert

PSYC 4606:  Cognitive Biases in Anxiety and Related Disorders
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 3410 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  This course examines cognitive processing biases in anxiety and related disorders.  To understand, for example, why a person with social anxiety sees only the one scowling face in a room full of smiles, we consider automatic processing of emotional information.  The course critiques cutting-edge research on how these processes contribute to anxiety and related problems, and if it is important to change the processes to reduce psychopathology.
Instructor:  Teachman

PSYC 4755:  Social Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 4755 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2200
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  A broad perspective on the expanding field of social neuroscience. An overview of novel empirical attempts to illuminate the neural mechanisms underlying social phenomena. Topics include, but are not limited to, social perception, social cognition, person perception, attitudes, and interpersonal processes. Emphasis on understanding the reciprocal interaction between brain function and everyday social behaviors.
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 5310:  Developmental Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 5310 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  We will examine the development of language from a number of perspectives. In addition to studying the acquisition of speech in children with normal hearing, we will review the acquisition of spoken and signed language in deaf, autistic, mentally retarded, and aphasic individuals. We will also examine the acquisition of language-like systems of communication in nonhuman primates.
Instructor:  Bonvillian

PSYC 5325:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 5325 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3005 or Graduate Standing
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  Several approaches have been used to investigate relations between mind (or cognition) and brain.  For example, the case study perspective focuses on cognitive deficits of patients with localized brain damage, and the cognitive neuroscience perspective attempts to determine the neurobiological substrates of cognitive processes in normal humans, usually by means of structural or functional neuroimaging.  Both of these perspectives will be covered in this course, and one of the goals will be to attempt to integrate findings from different approaches to studying mind-brain relations.
Instructor:  Salthouse

PSYC 5559-2:  The Early Development of Social Brain Functions
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2700 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  One fundamental question in psychology is what makes humans such intensely social beings. This course will deal with this question by looking at the developmental and brain origins of our social capacities. In particular, on the basis of a review of the recent literature, we will examine the development of social brain functions in infancy and identity the principles that underlie their development. Moreover, we will discuss how these principles interrelate and to what extent they are in fact specifically social in nature or share properties with more domain-general developmental principles.
Instructor:  Grossman

PSYC 5559-3:  Bayesian Data Analysis
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Basic knowledge of probability and statistics
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS.  Due to broad applications of Bayesian statistics, students in (Quantitative) Psychology, Sociology, Political Sciences, or Computer Sciences are equally welcome.
Description of course contents:  This course will provide a practical introduction to Bayesian statistics, with an emphasis on applications in social sciences.  Classic and modern Bayesian methods will be introduced.  Bayesian estimation for several widely used models in psychology will also be discussed.
Instructor:  Tong

PSYC 5720: Fundamentals of Item Response Theory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 3006 or 4006
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th year Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  This course is designed to introduce you to the basic concepts of item response theory (IRT) and their application to substantive psychological problems of measuring traits and abilities using tests, scales, and measures. IRT techniques are extremely useful for evaluating existing measures and developing new measures. These methods can be used with a variety of assessments, in many areas, such as psychology, education, health, and business, where measures of cognitive ability, achievement, attitudes and traits are of interest. We will also explore topics such as differential item functioning (DIF), where items are used differently by different groups (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, SES, etc.).
 
By the end of this semester you should be able to: a) understand and apply the principles of IRT in your own research and in evaluating the research of others, b) perform and interpret IRT model analyses for dichotomous and polytomous data, using various IRT programs, and c) communicate IRT research findings to an audience of psychologists.
Instructor:  Schmidt

EDLF 5500-1:  Cognitive Psychology of Education
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions: None  
Description of course contents:  The purpose of this course is to
comprehensively examine the cognitive information processing system and its implications for instructional design. The course will review the literature in the area of cognitive educational psychology.  Specifically, the topic areas of human cognitive architecture, schema theory, cognitive load theory, and social cognition will be examined.
Instructor:  Cameron

 

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Neuroscience

 

PSYC 2200:  Neural Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  One approach to understanding human behavior is to consider ourselves from a biological perspective. This course attempts to do so by examining how the brain guides behavior. The first portion is an overview of the structure and function of the central nervous system. With this knowledge, we then examine how the brain controls a variety of higher behaviors, including learning and memory, sex, emotions and sleeping.
Instructor:  Brunjes

PSYC 2210:  Animal Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  How animals perceive their environment, find food, select mates, form social groups, communicate, and learn complex tasks. Theory and methods from comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, neuroethology, and animal cognition.
Instructor:  Meliza

**Cognitive Science majors may directly enroll in only one 4000+ Psychology course without permission of the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator. Include three ranked choices and reason for request in an email asking for permission to enroll to the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator with a copy to the Cognitive Science Coordinator. **

PSYC 4559-1:  Behavioral Epigenetics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or equivalent
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors
Description of course contents:  We will discuss basic concepts in epigenetics and the role this molecular modification plays in development, behavior, and disorder. Emphasis will be placed on landmark papers and the emerging role for the interaction of nature and nurture.
Instructor:  Connelly

PSYC 4755:  Social Neuroscience
* Note:  PSYC 4755 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors /Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  A broad perspective on the expanding field of social neuroscience. An overview of novel empirical attempts to illuminate the neural mechanisms underlying social phenomena. Topics include, but are not limited to, social perception, social cognition, person perception, attitudes, and interpersonal processes. Emphasis on understanding the reciprocal interaction between brain function and everyday social behaviors.
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 5265:  Functional Neuroanatomy
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3170   
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  An overview of the structure of the vertebrate nervous system with an emphasis on the mammalian brain.
Instructor:  Brunjes

PSYC 5325:  Cognitive Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 5325 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3006 or Graduate Standing 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  Several approaches have been used to investigate relations between mind (or cognition) and brain.  For example, the case study perspective focuses on cognitive deficits of patients with localized brain damage, and the cognitive neuroscience perspective attempts to determine the neurobiological substrates of cognitive processes in normal humans, usually by means of structural or functional neuroimaging.  Both of these perspectives will be covered in this course, and one of the goals will be to attempt to integrate findings from different approaches to studying mind-brain relations.
Instructor:  Salthouse

BIOL 3250:  Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020
Description of course contents:  An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary perspectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphases on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Instructor:  Menaker

BIOL 4270:  Animal Behavior Laboratory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3250 recommended
Description of course contents:  Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field.
Instructor:  Kawasaki

BIOL 4310:  Sensory Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3170 or PSYC 2200
Description of course contents:  Examines the anatomy, physiology, and molecular biology of many sensory modalities such as vision, audition, and chemosensation. General features of sensory systems are described.
Instructor:  Provencio

BIOL 4320:  Signal Transduction:  How Cells Talk to Each Other
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010
Description of course contents:  This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment.  This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans.  Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment.
Instructor:  Deppmann

BIOL 4560-1:  Electric Crawfish:  Elements of Neurophysiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3170 or an equivalent course
Description of course contents:  This course uses electrophysiological techniques with living crayfish material to examine principles of neurobiological function, including cellular resting potentials, propagated action potentials, neuromuscular physiology, aspects of neuromuscular organization, and sensory neuron physiology and organization.
Instructor:  Mellon

BME 3636/NESC 5330:  Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation
Credits:
 3
Prerequisites:  CS 1110 and BME 2101 or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This is an introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks.
Instructor:  Levy

 

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Linguistics

ANTH 3450:  Native American Languages
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  LNGS 3250 or another Linguistics course
Description of course contents:  Introduces the native languages of North America and the methods that linguists and anthropologists use to record and analyze them. Examines the use of grammars, texts and dictionaries of individual languages and affords insight into the diversity among the languages.
Instructor:  Danziger

ANTH 3490:  Language and Thought
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of more recent cross-cultural and psycholinguistic research. We highlight the interplay between social intelligence, linguistic structure and general cognition. In the course of the discussion, we consider topics such as the significance of literacy for cognition and the development of language-specific cognitive preferences during childhood. Finally, we ask how our own culturally-particular ways of talking about language might reflect and reinforce some of the unexamined common-sense ideas about the nature of language which underlie most linguistic research.
Instructor:  Danziger

ANTH 5401:  Linguistic Field Methods
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  None
Description of course contents:  In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory.
Instructor:  Dobrin

ANTH 5410:  Phonology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  LNGS 3250
Description of course contents:  An introduction to the theory and analysis of linguistic sound systems. Covers the essential units of speech sound that lexical and grammatical elements are composed of, how those units are organized at multiple levels of representation, and the principles governing the relation between levels.
Instructor:  Dobrin

EDHS 5020:  Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  EDHS 5010 and 5050
Description of course contents:  Examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual, and acoustic aspects of voice, speech, and hearing.
Instructor:  Loncke

LNGS 5000Applied Linguistics for Teachers of Foreign Languages
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  Instructor permission
Description of course contents:  To provide prospective language teachers with the background in descriptive and theoretical linguistics, and thus to enable them to make informed pedagogical decisions, set realistic pedagogical goals, and read scholarship in pedagogy of the type that appears in relevant scholarly journals (eg The  Modern Language Journal). To consider trends in Second Language Acquisition and the relevance thereto of Applied Linguistics in recent years.
Instructor:  Elson

**Cognitive Science majors may directly enroll in only one 4000+ Psychology course without permission of the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator. Include three ranked choices and reason for request in an email asking for permission to enroll to the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator with a copy to the Cognitive Science Coordinator. **

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams

PSYC 5310:  Developmental Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 5310 may be used to fulfill either the Linguistics or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None       
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  We will examine the development of language from a number of perspectives. In addition to studying the acquisition of speech in children with normal hearing, we will review the acquisition of spoken and signed language in deaf, autistic, mentally retarded, and aphasic individuals. We will also examine the acquisition of language-like systems of communication in nonhuman primates.
Instructor:  Bonvillian

SPAN 4202:  Hispanic Sociolinguistics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 3000 and 3010 or SPAN 3010 and 3200 or departmental placement
Description of course contents:  This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and biligualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish.
Instructor:  Velazquez Mendoza

SPAN 4203:  Structure of Spanish
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: SPAN 3015 and SPAN 3200 
Description of course contents:  Seminar in Spanish linguistics. This is an
advanced introduction to the study of fundamental aspects of the sound and grammatical systems of the Spanish language. The course will start by analyzing present-day (syllable, word and phrase) structures of the language, and it will progress toward a more detailed examination of some of the linguistic processes and changes involved in the development of those structures. Prior coursework in linguistics is expected. Taught in Spanish.
Instructor:  Rini

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Philosophy

 

PHIL 3330:  Philosophy of Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  
What is the nature of the mind and why do we find its nature so puzzling? We shall critically examine various theories about the nature of the mind; we shall also discuss the nature of particular kinds of mental states and events, such as beliefs, desires, feelings, sensory experiences, and others. We shall be especially concerned with the relations between the mind and the body, and, more generally, between the mental and the physical. Most of the readings will be by contemporary philosophers.
**This course may satisfy the College’s Second Writing requirement.** Instructor:  Gertler

 

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Computer Science

 

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  (Previously CS 101)

CS 1120:  Introduction to Computing: Explorations in Language, Logic, and Machines  (Previously CS 150)

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I  (Previously CS 202)


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