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Cognitive Science Current Approved Courses
for Fall 2016   

Previously Approved Courses

 

Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 2100:  Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  The course will examine historical and current theories that explain how different types of learning provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. We will cover these theories by carefully examining the most important research experiments that contributed to our current understanding of the principles and concepts that shape our behavior. The lecture content will focus heavily on experimental findings derived from research of learning processes in human and non-human species. The concept of Learning will be explored from the perspective of theories of Classical Conditioning, Operant Conditioning, and more recent theories of the organization of behavior derived from human studies.
Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Willingham

PSYC 2300:  Introduction to Perception
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception, and the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception.
Instructor:  Proffitt

PSYC 2301:  Introduction to Perception Lab
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Simultaneous enrollment in PSYC 2300
Description of course contents:  Lab to accompany the study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception, and the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception.
Instructor:  TBA

PSYC 3005-1:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 3005-2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Smyth

PSYC 3559 -1 Arts & Sciences and Civic Engagement: The Science and Lived Experience of Autism

Credits: 6 (this is a year long course)
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  
Description: This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.

Instructor: Jaswal

PSYC 5160-:  Emotion and Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS. 
Description of course contents: The cognition-emotion seminar covers the connection between thinking and feeling in two ways. The first part asks about the causes of emotion, and the second asks about the consequences of emotion.  Part 1 concerns the nature and definition of emotion and the role of cognitive appraisals in their elicitation and intensity. Distinctions will be made among concepts such as affect, emotion, mood, and temperament.  Part 2 concerns the consequences of emotion for cognition, experience, and behavior.  Of interest will be such topics as the effects on judgment and decision-making, processing and performance, and memory and attention, and the role of culture.

Instructor:  Clore

PSYC 5328:  Cognitive Aging
Instructor:  Salthouse
Meeting Time: W 9:00-11:30; GIL B001
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions:
If course is full through SIS: Please use the permission list for the course. Do not email professor.
Description: The focus of this seminar will be on the relations between age and cognitive functioning in healthy and individuals with pathologies such as dementia. The topics to be covered will range from methodological issues to neuroanatomical substrates to practical consequences of age-related cognitive changes.

EDHS 4300:  Psycholinguistics and Communication 
*Note:  PSYC 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. Topics include learnability, microgenesis of speech, bilingualism and variation, and a psycholinguistic approach to breakdowns (i.e., language pathology).
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 5559-2:  Introduction to Bayesian Methods
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  
Enrollment Restrictions: 4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS.  Due to broad applications of Bayesian statistics, students in (Quantitative) Psychology, Sociology, Political Sciences, or Computer Sciences are equally welcome.
If course is full through SIS: Please use the permission list for the course. Do not email professor.
Description: This course will provide a practical introduction to classic and modern Bayesian methods, with an emphasis on applications in social sciences. Bayesian estimation for several widely used models in psychology will also be discussed.

Instructor: Tong

 

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Neuroscience

PSYC 2200:  A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  One approach to understanding human behavior is to consider ourselves from a biological perspective. This course attempts to do so by examining how the brain guides behavior. The first portion is an overview of the structure and function of the central nervous system. With this knowledge, we then examine how the brain controls a variety of higher behaviors, including learning and memory, sex, emotions and sleeping.
Instructor: Brunjes

PSYC 3210:  Psychobiology Laboratory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or 4200; PSYC 3005 recommended
Enrollment Restrictions:
If this course is full through SIS: Please use the online wait list. Do not email professor.
Description:  Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, aseptic surgical technique, lesions, behavioral analysis, and histology. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings. Four laboratory hours. Instructor: Meliza

 

PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior
* Note:  PSYC 4200 OR BIOL 3050 credits may count for the major, but not both.
Credits:  4
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 and Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors /Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors
Description of course contents:  Lectures and discussions on molecular and cellular aspects of neural mechanisms as they relate to behavior. Topics will include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurotransmitters and receptors, neuropharmacology, cortical organization and function, plasticity and neurodegenerative diseases.    
Instructor:  Erisir

 

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory
*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The seminar will examine historical and current experimental findings that describe the contribution of neuroanatomical structures in regulating memory formation. An extensive review of the literature will be covered to understand how separate brain regions interact to modify our capacity to learn and remember new information. The literature reviews will also assist in identifying how specific neurotransmitter systems modulate activity in these brain regions during memory storage. Students will learn how to conduct comprehensive literature searches, organize large volumes of information, improve public speaking skills, be introduced to a broad spectrum of neuroscience techniques and gain a better understanding of the interactions that occur between brain structures and neurotransmitter systems to enable new memories to be formed. Students who enjoy learning from non-traditional sources such as journal articles, archives, annual reviews, etc. and are enthusiastic about discussing this information in a public forum are well-suited for this type of seminar.
Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4255: Behavioral Epigenetics

Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  :  We will discuss basic concepts in epigenetics and the role these molecular modifications play in development, behavior, and disorder. Emphasis will be placed on landmark papers and the emerging role for the interaction of nature and nurture.

Instructor: Connelly

 

PSYC 5265:  Functional Neuroanatomy
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3170
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  An overview of the structure of the vertebrate nervous system with an emphasis on the mammalian brain.
Instructor:  Brunjes

PSYC 5355-: Neurobiology of Speech and Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, and Biology Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:
An overview of the neural systems underlying production and perception of vocal signals, with a focus on animal models and their application to human communication. Course activities will emphasize discussion and critical review of the primary literature.

Instructor:  Meliza

BIOL 3050:  Introduction to Neurobiology
* Note:  BIOL 3050 OR PSYC 4200 credits may count for the major, but not both.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2010 and 2020 or BIOL 2100 and 2200
Description of course contents:  Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning.
Instructors:  Condron

BIOL 4270 : Animal Behavior Laboratory

BIOL 4340: Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  
Description of course contents:  
Instructor:  

BIOL 4360: Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:
Description of course contents:  
Instructor:  

BIOL 4560: Electric Crayfish: Elements of Neurophysiology

BIOL 5070 : Practical Aspects of Light Microscopy in the Biological Sciences

 

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Linguistics

 

 

ANTH 3480: Language and Prehistory

Credits: 3

Description of course contents: This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics – the study of how languages change over time – and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistory population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA.

Instructor: Danziger 

 

ANTH 4420:  Theories of Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor permission
Description of course contents:  Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava

ANTH 5541: Lauguange Socialization
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents: There is more involved in “learning a language” than acquiring knowledge of its grammatical structures; one also becomes an appropriate and skillful user of language as one is socialized, through communicative encounters with others, into becoming a competent member of a speech community. This course explores the topic of language socialization to reveal how language use at every level—from sound patterns to lexical choices to conversational routines—can contribute to learners’ understandings of what speech is and how it functions. At the same time, socializing encounters shape learners’ understandings of who they are and how they should act or feel, thereby serving as a locus for the transmission of culture. Readings will be drawn from diverse settings and regions of the world. Special attention will be given to language shift and other situations of social change and disjuncture. Course work will involve keeping up with the readings, participating in class discussion, and writing a paper on an individual topic of interest chosen in consultation with the instructor.
Instructor:  Dobrin

ANTH 5541 Topics in Linguistis: Multimodal Interactions

EDHS 4300:  Psycholinguistics and Communication 
*Note:  PSYC 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. Topics include learnability, microgenesis of speech, bilingualism and variation, and a psycholinguistic approach to breakdowns (i.e., language pathology).
Instructor:  Loncke

 

LING 3400:  Structure of English
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include phonology, morphology, and syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures. These topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language, including error correction and feedback.
Instructor:  Crabtree

LNGS 3250:  Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Methodology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages) and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal.
Instructor:  Elson

LNGS 3251:  Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis Discussion
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  Simultaneous enrollment in LNGS 3250
Description of course contents:  Discussion for the course which introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages) and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal.
Instructor:  Staff

SPAN 3000: Phonetics

Credits: 3

Prequisites:

Description of course contents: Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish.

Instructor: Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

 

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Philosophy

 

 

PHIL 2420:  Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  

Instructor: 

PHIL 3330: Philosophy of Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 

Description of course contents:  
Instructor: Langsam

 

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Computer Science

 

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110:  Introduction to Programming  

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I  


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