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Cognitive Science Current Approved Courses
for Fall 2015   

Previously Approved Courses

 

Cognitive Psychology

 

PSYC 2100:  Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  The course will examine historical and current theories that explain how different types of learning provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. We will cover these theories by carefully examining the most important research experiments that contributed to our current understanding of the principles and concepts that shape our behavior. The lecture content will focus heavily on experimental findings derived from research of learning processes in human and non-human species. The concept of Learning will be explored from the perspective of theories of Classical Conditioning, Operant Conditioning, and more recent theories of the organization of behavior derived from human studies.
Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Willingham

PSYC 2300:  Introduction to Perception
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception, and the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception.
Instructor:  Proffitt

PSYC 2301:  Introduction to Perception Lab
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  Simultaneous enrollment in PSYC 2300
Description of course contents:  Lab to accompany the study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception, and the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception.
Instructor:  TBA

PSYC 3005-1:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 3005-2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (3005 and 3006).
Instructor:  Smyth

PSYC 3006:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 (with C or better)
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Second part of a two-part series. Emphasis on inferential statistics (t-tests and ANOVA) and issues in experimentation.
Instructor:  Schmidt

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory
*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The seminar will examine historical and current experimental findings that describe the contribution of neuroanatomical structures in regulating memory formation. An extensive review of the literature will be covered to understand how separate brain regions interact to modify our capacity to learn and remember new information. The literature reviews will also assist in identifying how specific neurotransmitter systems modulate activity in these brain regions during memory storage. Students will learn how to conduct comprehensive literature searches, organize large volumes of information, improve public speaking skills, be introduced to a broad spectrum of neuroscience techniques and gain a better understanding of the interactions that occur between brain structures and neurotransmitter systems to enable new memories to be formed. Students who enjoy learning from non-traditional sources such as journal articles, archives, annual reviews, etc. and are enthusiastic about discussing this information in a public forum are well-suited for this type of seminar.
Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 4559-1:  Going the Distance:  The Psychology of Endurance
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:    
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  This course explores the human capacity for endurance from an ecological perspective.  We will discuss the dynamic relationship between the body and the brain and come to understand how cognitive processes can influence the body and, likewise, how the body can influence cognition. 
Instructor:  Weast

PSYC 4559-2:  Criminal Minds:  The Science of Modern Forensic Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Psychopaths, the insanity defense, violent predators, criminal profiling—such topics feature prominently in the media and the public imagination. Learn about the scientific research underpinning modern forensic psychology, while you learn to critically analyze film and television representations of these topics. 
Instructor:  Guarnera

EDHS 4300:  Psycholinguistics and Communication 
*Note:  PSYC 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. Topics include learnability, microgenesis of speech, bilingualism and variation, and a psycholinguistic approach to breakdowns (i.e., language pathology).
Instructor:  Loncke

 

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Neuroscience

 

PSYC 2200:  A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  One approach to understanding human behavior is to consider ourselves from a biological perspective. This course attempts to do so by examining how the brain guides behavior. The first portion is an overview of the structure and function of the central nervous system. With this knowledge, we then examine how the brain controls a variety of higher behaviors, including learning and memory, sex, emotions and sleeping.
Instructor:  Hill

BIOL 3050:  Introduction to Neurobiology
* Note:  BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) OR PSYC 4200 credits may count for the major, but not both.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2010 and 2020 or BIOL 2100 and 2200
Description of course contents:  Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning.
Instructors:  Condron

BIOL 4190:  Biological Clocks
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 or 3010 or 3020
Description of course contents:  Introduces biological timekeeping as used by organisms for controlling diverse processes, including sleep-wakefulness cycles, photoperiodic induction and regression, locomotor rhythmicity, eclosion rhythmicity, and the use of the biological clock in orientation and navigation.
Instructor:  Menaker

PSYC 4200:  Neural Mechanisms of Behavior
* Note:  PSYC 4200 OR BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) credits may count for the major, but not both.
Credits:  4
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 and Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors /Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors
Description of course contents:  Lectures and discussions on molecular and cellular aspects of neural mechanisms as they relate to behavior. Topics will include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurotransmitters and receptors, neuropharmacology, cortical organization and function, plasticity and neurodegenerative diseases.    
Instructor:  Erisir

PSYC 4250:  Brain Systems Involved in Memory
*Note:  PSYC 4250 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 2200 or PSYC 4200
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The seminar will examine historical and current experimental findings that describe the contribution of neuroanatomical structures in regulating memory formation. An extensive review of the literature will be covered to understand how separate brain regions interact to modify our capacity to learn and remember new information. The literature reviews will also assist in identifying how specific neurotransmitter systems modulate activity in these brain regions during memory storage. Students will learn how to conduct comprehensive literature searches, organize large volumes of information, improve public speaking skills, be introduced to a broad spectrum of neuroscience techniques and gain a better understanding of the interactions that occur between brain structures and neurotransmitter systems to enable new memories to be formed. Students who enjoy learning from non-traditional sources such as journal articles, archives, annual reviews, etc. and are enthusiastic about discussing this information in a public forum are well-suited for this type of seminar.
Instructor:  Williams

BIOL 4270:  Animal Behavior Laboratory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3250
Description of course contents:  Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field.
Instructor:  Kawasaki

BIOL 4340:  Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) or PSYC 4200
Description of course contents:  The course content will focus on three areas of neurobiological research: conduction of the nervous impulse, sensory physiology, and synaptic physiology.
Instructor:  Staff

PSYC 5200:  Seminar in Psychobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) or Graduate Standing and Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  The class will examine recent scientific articles and theories of brain structure and function.
Instructor:  Brunjes

PSYC 5265:  Functional Neuroanatomy
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) or Graduate Standing
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  An overview of the structure of the vertebrate nervous system with an emphasis on the mammalian brain.

Instructor:  Brunjes

PSYC 5559-1:  Topics in Evolutionary Neuroscience
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: PSYC 2200 or 2210 or 4200 or BIOL 3050 (formerly BIOL 3170) and Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years: Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, and Biology Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  The focus of this seminar is on three major events in the evolution of brains: the emergence of the nervous system in early vertebrates, the emergence of the neocortex and its homologues, and the evolution of primate brains. Emphasis on comparative anatomy and how it reflects behavior.
Instructor:  Meliza

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Linguistics

 

ANTH 2400:  Language and Culture
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course will be a survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication.
Instructor:  TBA

ANTH 4420:  Theories of Language
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor permission
Description of course contents:  Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava

ANTH 5541:  Topics in Linguistics: Pidgins and Creoles
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  In this course we will survey the literature on pidgin and creole languages in order to gain a sense of their history, structure, and sociolinguistic correlates. Pidgins and creoles are born of contact, making their status as languages a subject of debate; they have also raised a number of important issues for linguistic theory (e.g., regarding language origins, language mixing, the nature of linguistic change, and structural complexity). Students will each focus on a particular language or topic in creole linguistics in order to ground their research and contributions to class discussion.
Instructor:  Dobrin

CLAS 3300:  Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single “proto-language,” called Proto-Indo-European.  This course will explore the following questions:  What was this proto-language like?  How do we know what it was like?  By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages?  How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video and Veda back to a common source?
Instructor:  George

EDHS 4300:  Psycholinguistics and Communication 
*Note:  PSYC 4300 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. Topics include learnability, microgenesis of speech, bilingualism and variation, and a psycholinguistic approach to breakdowns (i.e., language pathology).
Instructor:  Loncke

FREN 3030:  Phonetics:  The Sounds of French
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  French 2020 or equivalent    
Description of course contents:  Reviews pronunciation, phonetics, and phonology for undergraduates.
Instructor:  Saunders

LING 3400:  Structure of English
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include phonology, morphology, and syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures. These topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language, including error correction and feedback.
Instructor:  Crabtree

LNGS 3250:  Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  Introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages) and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal.
Instructor:  Elson

LNGS 3251:  Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis Discussion
Credits:  1
Prerequisites:  Simultaneous enrollment in LNGS 3250
Description of course contents:  Discussion for the course which introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages) and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal.
Instructor:  Staff

RUSS 5030:  Advanced Russian Grammar:  Phonology and Morphology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:  RUSS 2010 and 2020 and Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course aims to provide a thorough review and elaboration of the spelling and inflectional morphology of Contemporary Standard Russian. Its aim is to help students, including those who are native speakers, acquire and consolidate a level of proficiency in the structure of Russian suitable for ordinary scholarly and instructional purposes at American universities. Although its content will help students in their preparation for the MA and PhD Russian Language Proficiency Tests at the University of Virginia, such preparation is not the goal of the course.
Instructor:  Elson

SPAN 3000:  Phonetics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Consent    
Description of course contents:  Conducted in Spanish
Instructor:  Velazquez Mendoza/Rini

 

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Philosophy

 

PHIL 3320:  Epistomology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  
Studies problems concerned with the foundations of knowledge, perception, and rational belief.
Instructor:  Langsam

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Computer Science

 

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110 or CS 1111 (experience) or CS 1112 (no experience):  Introduction to Programming  

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I  


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