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Cognitive Science Currently Approved Courses
for Spring 2016   

Previously Approved Courses

 

Cognitive Psychology

 

PSYC 2100:  Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  The course will examine historical and current theories that explain how different types of learning provide the foundation for most, if not all forms of an organism's behavior. We will cover these theories by carefully examining the most important research experiments that contributed to our current understanding of the principles and concepts that shape our behavior. The lecture content will focus heavily on experimental findings derived from research of learning processes in human and non-human species. The concept of Learning will be explored from the perspective of theories of Classical Conditioning, Operant Conditioning, and more recent theories of the organization of behavior derived from human studies.
Instructor:  Williams

PSYC 2150:  Introduction to Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science.
Instructor:  Jaswal

PSYC 2210:  Animal Behavior
*Note:  PSYC 2210 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.

Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Studies animal behavior considered from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. Topics include the basic mechanisms of evolution of social behavior in animals with particular emphasis upon mating systems; ecological constraints on modes of animal communication; and quantitative analysis of social communication.
Instructor:  Meliza

PSYC 3005:  Research Methods & Data Analysis I
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisites:  PSYC 1010 or any 2000-level Psychology course and one of the following math courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1210 (Applied Calculus I), MATH 1212 (Applied Calculus I with Algebra), MATH 1220 (Applied Calculus II), MATH 1310 (Calculus I), MATH 1320 (Calculus II), APMA 1090 (Single Variable Calculus I), or APMA 1110 (Single Variable Calculus II). Students with transfer credit or AP credit in one of these courses (e.g., AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC) are exempt from the requirement.
Enrollment restrictions:  To be officially enrolled in PSYC 3005, registration is required for BOTH the lecture and a lab section.
Description of course contents:  Introduction to research methods in psychology, integrating statistical analysis. Emphasis on descriptive statistics and non-experimental research methods. Use of computers for data analysis, experimentation, and report writing. This course is the first part of a two-part series (PSYC 3005 and PSYC 3006).
Instructor:  Smyth

PSYC 3006-1:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 (with C or better)
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors. To be officially enrolled in PSYC 3006, registration is required for BOTH the lecture and a lab section.
Description of course contents:  Second part of a two-part series. Emphasis on inferential statistics (t-tests and ANOVA) and issues in experimentation.
Instructor:  Schmidt

PSYC 3006-2:  Research Methods & Data Analysis II
Credits:  4  (Required lab)
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 (with C or better)
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors. To be officially enrolled in PSYC 3006, registration is required for BOTH the lecture and a lab section.
Description of course contents:  Second part of a two-part series. Emphasis on inferential statistics (t-tests and ANOVA) and issues in experimentation.
Instructor:  Tong

PSYC 3435:  Educational Psychology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2150 (with grade of B- or above highly recommended) and PSYC 2700
Enrollment Restrictions:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies; and proposed reforms for American education.
Instructor:  Willingham

BME 3636/NESC 5330:  Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation
*Note:  BME 3636/NESC 5330 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  CS 1110 and BIOM 2101 or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This is an introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks.
Instructor:  Levy

**Cognitive Science majors may directly enroll in only one 4000+ Psychology course without permission of the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator. Include three ranked choices and reason for request in an email request for permission to enroll to the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator with a copy to the Cognitive Science Coordinator. **

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Linguistics area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams

PSYC 4290:  Memory Distortions
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors
Description of course contents:  Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. The consequences of these memory problems range from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony. We will look at different kinds of memory errors as a tool for investigating how memory works.
Instructor:  Dodson

PSYC 4315:  Psychology of Art
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the application of research and theories developed in the fields of perception, cognition, emotion, personality theory and social psychology to visual art, sculpture and film.
Instructor:  Kubovy

PSYC 4559-3/SYS 4582-1:  Mobile Computing in Health
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  This course provides an introduction to research design and computational methods for non-invasive mental health monitoring using mobile devices such as phones and wearable computing. Students will gain a practical understanding of mobile monitoring aproaches as they relate to mental health.  Topics include estimating health status (e.g. mood) through mobility data, application design, mobile data mining, and emerging issues in mental health.
Instructors:  Chow/Xiong

PSYC 4606:  Cognitive Biases in Anxiety and Related Disorders
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 3410 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors
Description of course contents:  This course examines cognitive processing biases in anxiety and related disorders.  To understand, for example, why a person with social anxiety sees only the one scowling face in a room full of smiles, we consider automatic processing of emotional information.  The course critiques cutting-edge research on how these processes contribute to anxiety and related problems, and if it is important to change the processes to reduce psychopathology.
Instructor:  Teachman

PSYC 4755:  Social Neuroscience
*Note:  PSYC 4755 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors
Description of course contents:  A broad perspective on the expanding field of social neuroscience. An overview of novel empirical attempts to illuminate the neural mechanisms underlying social phenomena. Topics include, but are not limited to, social perception, social cognition, person perception, attitudes, and interpersonal processes. Emphasis on understanding the reciprocal interaction between brain function and everyday social behaviors.
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 5160:  Emotion and Cognition
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 3005
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  The cognition-emotion seminar covers the connection between thinking and feeling in two ways. The first part asks about the causes of emotion, and the second asks about the consequences of emotion. Part 1 concerns the nature and definition of emotion and the role of cognitive appraisals in their elicitation and intensity. Distinctions will be made among concepts such as affect, emotion, mood, and temperament. Part 2 concerns the consequences of emotion for cognition, experience, and behavior. Of interest will be such topics as the effects on judgment and decision-making, processing and performance, and memory and attention, and the role of culture.
Instructor:  Clore

PSYC 5326:  The Neuroscience of Social Relationships
*Note:  PSYC 5326 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 3005.  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170) also recommended 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  
This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end.
Instructor:  Coan

EDLF 5500:  Cognitive Psychology of Education
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  The purpose of this course is to
comprehensively examine the cognitive information processing system and its implications for instructional design. The course will review the literature in the area of cognitive educational psychology.  Specifically, the topic areas of human cognitive architecture, schema theory, cognitive load theory, and social cognition will be examined.
Instructor:  Ruzek

PSYC 5559-1:  Uniquely Human Social Cognition
*Note:  PSYC 5559-1 may be used to fulfill either the Cognitive Psychology or the Neuroscience area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or PSYC 2600 or PSYC 2700 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  One fundamental question in psychology is what makes humans such intensely social beings. In this course we will examine the evolutionary, developmental and brain foundations that underpin our ultrasocial nature.
Instructor:  Grossman

PSYC 5559-2:  Development of Theory of Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or PSYC 2700
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  In this course we will examine theory and research on the origins and development of folk psychology, as well as evidence of mindreading in other species. 
Instructor:  Lillard

PSYC 5720:  Fundamentals of Item Response Theory
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 3005/3006 or PSYC 4005/4006
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th year Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  This course is designed to introduce you to the basic concepts of item response theory (IRT) and their application to substantive psychological problems of measuring traits and abilities using tests, scales, and measures. IRT techniques are extremely useful for evaluating existing measures and developing new measures. These methods can be used with a variety of assessments, in many areas, such as psychology, education, health, and business, where measures of cognitive ability, achievement, attitudes and traits are of interest. We will also explore topics such as differential item functioning (DIF), where items are used differently by different groups (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, SES, etc.).
 
By the end of this semester you should be able to: a) understand and apply the principles of IRT in your own research and in evaluating the research of others, b) perform and interpret IRT model analyses for dichotomous and polytomous data, using various IRT programs, and c) communicate IRT research findings to an audience of psychologists.
Instructor:  Schmidt

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Neuroscience

 

PSYC 2210:  Animal Behavior
*Note:  PSYC 2210 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  Studies animal behavior considered from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. Topics include the basic mechanisms of evolution of social behavior in animals with particular emphasis upon mating systems; ecological constraints on modes of animal communication; and quantitative analysis of social communication.
Instructor:  Meliza

BIOL 3250:  Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 2100 (2010) or BME 2104 and BIOL 2200 (2020)
Description of course contents:  An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary perspectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphases on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Instructor:  Kawasaki

PSYC 3559-1/BIOL 3559-1:  Introduction to Epigenetics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Enrollment Restrictions:  None
Description of course contents:  This course is a didactic, mechanistic exploration of epigenetics; we will discuss all epigenetic modifications known to date, the processes through which they are established and modified and their impact on the cell and organism.
Instructor:  Connelly

BME 3636/NESC 5330:  Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation
*Note:  BME 3636/NESC 5330 may be used to fulfill either theNeuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  CS 1110 and BIOM 2101 or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This is an introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks.
Instructor:  Levy

BIOL 4310:  Sensory Neurobiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Description of course contents:  Examines the anatomy, physiology, and molecular biology of many sensory modalities such as vision, audition, and chemosensation. General features of sensory systems are described.
Instructor:  Provencio

BIOL 4320:  Signal Transduction:  How Cells Talk to Each Other
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010
Description of course contents:  This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment.  This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans.  Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment.
Instructor:  Deppmann

BIOL 4560-1:  Electric Crawfish:  Elements of Neurophysiology
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  BIOL 3050 (3170) and Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course uses electrophysiological techniques with living crayfish material to examine principles of neurobiological function, including cellular resting potentials, propagated action potentials, neuromuscular physiology, aspects of neuromuscular organization, and sensory neuron physiology and organization.
Instructor:  Mellon

**Cognitive Science majors may directly enroll in only one 4000+ Psychology course without permission of the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator. Include three ranked choices and reason for request in an email request for permission to enroll to the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator with a copy to the Cognitive Science Coordinator. **

PSYC 4755:  Social Neuroscience
* Note:  PSYC 4755 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors /Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors
Description of course contents:  A broad perspective on the expanding field of social neuroscience. An overview of novel empirical attempts to illuminate the neural mechanisms underlying social phenomena. Topics include, but are not limited to, social perception, social cognition, person perception, attitudes, and interpersonal processes. Emphasis on understanding the reciprocal interaction between brain function and everyday social behaviors.
Instructor:  Morris

PSYC 5326:  The Neuroscience of Social Relationships
*Note:  PSYC 5326 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 3005. PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170) also recommended 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  
This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end.
Instructor:  Coan

PSYC 5559-1:  Uniquely Human Social Cognition
*Note:  PSYC 5559-1 may be used to fulfill either the Neuroscience or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  PSYC 2150 or PSYC 2600 or PSYC 2700 
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors and Cognitive Science Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  One fundamental question in psychology is what makes humans such intensely social beings. In this course we will examine the evolutionary, developmental and brain foundations that underpin our ultrasocial nature.
Instructor:  Grossman

PSYC 5559-3:  Research Methods in Human Neuroscience
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:   PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050 (3170)
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience Majors; GSAS
Description of course contents:  A broad perspective on the expanding field of social neuroscience. An overview of novel empirical attempts to illuminate the neural mechanisms underlying social phenomena. Topics include, but are not limited to, social perception, social cognition, person perception, attitudes, and interpersonal processes. Emphasis on understanding the reciprocal interaction between brain function and everyday social behaviors.
Instructor:  Morris

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Linguistics

 

ANTH 2410:  Sociolinguistics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  Reviews key findings in the study of language variation. Explores the use of language to express identity and social difference.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava

ANTH 2430:  Languages of the World
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  One year of foreign language or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  An introduction to the study of language relationships and linguistic structures. Topics covered include the basic elements of grammatical description; genetic, areal, and typological relationships among languages; a survey of the world's major language groupings and the notable structures and grammatical categories they exhibit; and the issue of language endangerment.
Instructor:  Dobrin

SPAN 3000:  Phonetics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Consent    
Description of course contents:  Conducted in Spanish.
Instructor:  Velazquez Mendoza

ANTH 3450:  Native American Languages
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  LNGS 3250 or another Linguistics course
Description of course contents:  Introduces the native languages of North America and the methods that linguists and anthropologists use to record and analyze them. Examines the use of grammars, texts and dictionaries of individual languages and affords insight into the diversity among the languages.
Instructor:  Danziger

EDHS 4030:  Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:
  Examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual, and acoustic aspects of voice, speech, and hearing.
Instructor:  Loncke

**Cognitive Science majors may directly enroll in only one 4000+ Psychology course without permission of the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator. Include three ranked choices and reason for request in an email asking for permission to enroll to the Psychology Undergraduate Coordinator with a copy to the Cognitive Science Coordinator. **

PSYC 4110:  Psycholinguistics
*Note:  PSYC 4110 may be used to fulfill either the Linguistics or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both. Either PSYC 4110: Psycholinguistics (Loncke) or EDHS 4300: Psycholinguistics and Communication (Loncke) may be taken for credit, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, Linguistics and Communication Disorders Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  This course will discuss how linguistic models help us to understand the psychology of language. We will focus on the emergence of language in children, acquisition and development of language, language disorders and neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.
Instructor:  Loncke

PSYC 4120:  Psychology of Reading
*Note:  PSYC 4120 may be used to fulfill either the Linguistics or the Cognitive Psychology area requirement, but not both.
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005 or Instructor Permission
Enrollment Restrictions:  4th years:  Psychology Majors/Minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Linguistics Majors/Minors.
Description of course contents:  For psychologists who study the psychology of reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that …it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear… I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it. Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class, Psychology of Reading, is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The Psychology of Reading course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, education, and so on.
Instructor:  Adams

SPAN 4202:  Hispanic Sociolinguistics
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  SPAN 3000 and 3010 or SPAN 3010 and 3200 or departmental placement
Description of course contents:  This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and biligualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish.
Instructor:  Velazquez Mendoza

RUSS 5032:  Advanced Russian Grammar:  Syntax
Credits:  3
Prerequisites: 
Enrollment Restrictions:  RUSS 2010 and 2020 and Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course is a formal and systematic analysis of the basic syntactic structures of the contemporary Russian literary language with frequent comparison to English (and other, when possible) structures.  The emphasis will be on data, not theoretical principles although the conventional theoretical machinery and language of syntax (phrase structure, complement, anaphora) will be used at all times in class and on assignments.
Instructor:  Elson

ANTH 5401:  Linguistic Field Methods
Credits:  3
Prerequisite:  None
Description of course contents:  In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory.
Instructor:  Contini-Morava

ANTH 5440:  Morphology 
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  One Linguistics course (preferred) or Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  This course provides an overview of recent morphological theory, focusing on recurring themes that have arisen as the subfield has sought to find its place within the generative paradigm. The issues we will cover fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate morphology to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation) and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology, a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct component of grammar.
Instructor:  Dobrin

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Philosophy

 

PHIL 2420:  Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  None
Description of course contents:  A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quantifier logic. The emphasis is on developing an ability to carry out proofs within these systems and on developing an ability to translate sentences of natural language into symbolic notation. The course will acquaint the student with the concepts of formula, proof, interpretation, and validity. Students will use logic software that will allow them to develop greater expertise with the material.
Instructor:  Cameron

PHIL 3330:  Philosophy of Mind
Credits:  3
Prerequisites:  Instructor Permission
Description of course contents:  
This course addresses philosophical issues about the mind, including the following: Does the phenomenon of consciousness pose a problem for a larger naturalistic theory of the world? How should we study consciousness? What does it mean to say that the mind is "physical"? And is it physical? How is your mind related to your body? How is it related to the "external" world? Are our minds housed within our skins, or do they extend to include external factors as well? Is the self a unitary, persisting entity? Is it merely a fiction? Most of the readings will be from contemporary sources.

**This course may satisfy the College’s Second Writing requirement.** Instructor:  Gertler

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Computer Science

 

All Computer Science courses are acceptable except CS 1010 and CS 1020.  Note:  ECE 2066:  Science of Information will count for major credit but does not fulfill the CS area requirement.

The most common introductory-level Computer Science courses for Cognitive Science majors are:

CS 1110 or CS 1111 or CS 1112 (Prerequisites: No Experience and Instructor Permission) or CS 1113:  Introduction to Programming  

CS 1120:  Introduction to Computing:  Exploration in Language, Logic, and Machines

CS 2102:  Discrete Mathematics I  


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