December 18, 2017

Fall 2017 Events

Upcoming events for the Fall 2017

 

Tuesday, November 7, 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., NEW CABELL 236

“Russian Transition from Communism to Authoritarianism”

Dr. Svetlana Savranskaya, Senior Research Fellow at George Washington University’s National Security Archive

This lecture is co-sponsored The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Refreshments will be served

Poster

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Wednesday November 8th-Friday November 10th,  Miller Center

US Presidents Confront the Russians: A Century of Challenge 1917-2017

This Ambassador William C. Battle Symposium is organized by the Miller Center and co-sponsored by CREEES.

Conference Program

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Thursday, November 16, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 187

“Blueprinting the Madhouse: The Mental Institution as Physical Space in Russian Literature”

Madelyn Stuart, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Fall 2017 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

Colloquium Event Poster

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Past Events

Thursday, October 5, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 032

“What is Communicative Competence?”

Prof. Mark Elson, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Fall 2017 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

Colloquium Event Poster

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Tuesday, October 17, 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 309

“Polish Culture Under Nazism and Stalinism: Cultural Losses of 1939-1956″

Dr. Łukasz Michalski, Director of Państwowy Instytut Wydawniczy [The State Publishing Institute], Warsaw, Poland

This lecture is part of the Polish Lecture Series, funded by the American Institute of Polish Culture and Lady Blanka Rosensteil.

Poster

 

Spring 2017 Events

zeislertalkposter (2)

PAST SPRING 2017 EVENTS

Thursday, March 2, 5:00 p.m., Hotel A, Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation

“The East is Red? Imagining China in People’s Poland and East Germany”

David Tompkins, Associate Professor of History, Carleton College

Organized and sponsored by CREEES as part of the UVa Polish Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Corcoran Department of History and the Center for German Studies.

poster

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Thursday, March 16, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Cabell 058

“Russian Virginia In and Out of the Classroom: A Roundtable”

Prof. Edith Clowes, Alex Kozoyed, Veri Silva, Alex Moree, David Peters, University of Virginia

This roundtable is part of the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

Colloquium Event Poster

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PolishLectureSeriesspring2017poster (1)

 Thursday, March 30, 5:00 p.m., Hotel A, Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation

“The Sixties Behind the Iron Curtain: Youth Culture and the Global Sixties in Poland

Malgorzata Fidelis, Associate Professor of History, University of Illinois at Chicago

Organized and sponsored by CREEES as part of the UVa Polish Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and by the Corcoran Department of History.

poster

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UVA Slavic Forum 2017, REConstructions, Memory and Imagination posterFriday, March 31 – Saturday, April 1, Panels held in New Cabell Hall, Information Desk in NCH 262
RE:Constructions: An Interdisciplinary Forum on Memory and Imagination
This forum is devoted to the intersections of memory and imagination in constructing identity, history, traditions, and futures. Traditional applications of the terms memory and imagination have emphasized a barrier between the concepts based on the premise of accuracy. Memory should be a record, one that, if occasionally faulty, remains primarily truthful. Imagination cannot be faulty because it is nebulous, fictive, unconcerned with veracity. However, cognitive scientists have demonstrated that the same neural processes underlie both memory and imagination. Memories are as much constructs as imagination. Despite the seeming differences between memory and imagination, they both affect every sphere of human experience and endeavor. In this forum, speakers will explore the role of memory and imagination in literature, history, politics, and identity.
The forum is organized by the Society of Slavic Graduate Students and co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, CREEESthe French DepartmentDepartment of Art, and the Center for Global Inquiry + Innovation.

 

Keynote speakers:
Friday, March 31, 6 p.m., Maury 209
Topic: LGBTQ Activism in Russia.
Maria “Masha” Gessen, Russian journalist, author, and political activist; contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and The Washington Post; author of groundbreaking books on Russian politics, society, culture, and historyFor more information see speaker’s bio at www.prhspeakers.com.

 

Saturday, April 1, 5:30 p.m., Maury 209
“The Texture of Translingual Memory, or Nabokov in the Attic”
Maxim D. Shrayer, Professor of Russian, English, and Jewish Studies at Boston College.

Maxim D. Shrayer, a bilingual author and translator, is a professor of Russian, English, and Jewish Studies at Boston College. Born in Moscow in 1967 to a writer’s family, Shrayer emigrated to the United States in 1987. He has authored over ten books in English and Russian, among them the internationally acclaimed memoirs “Leaving Russia: A Jewish Story” and “Waiting for America: A Story of Emigration,” the story collection “Yom Kippur in Amsterdam,” and the Holocaust study “I SAW IT.” Shrayer’s “Anthology of Jewish-Russian Literature” won a 2007 National Jewish Book Award, and in 2012 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Visit Shrayer’s website at www.shrayer.com.

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Wednesday, April 12, 5:00 p.m., NAU 211

“Russian Art in the United States”

Wilfried Zeisler, Curator of Russian and 19th Century Art, Hillwood Museum

Founded by Marjorie Merriweather Post (1887-1973), heiress to the Postum Cereal Company, which later became General Foods, Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens houses over 17,000 works of art. The collection includes one of the largest and most important collections of Russian art outside Russia, comprising pieces from the pre-Petrine to the early Soviet periods. Through Hillwood’s collection, this lecture will explore the history of acquiring imperial Russian art in the United States.

Organized and sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Carl H. and Martha S. Lindner Center for Art History (McIntire Department of Art).

poster

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Thursday, April 13, 2:30 p.m., MINOR 125

“QUR’ANIC EXEGESIS AND MYSTICAL EXPERIENCE: SUFIS AND THE QUR’AN”

CSC Speaker Series: Professor Alexander Knysh

Alexander Knysh is Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Michigan and Principal Investigator of a research project on Islamic Studies at the St. Petersburg State University, Russia.

Co-sponsored by CREEES.

poster

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Thursday, April 13, 4:00 p.m., NEW CABELL 309


“Brothers and the Family Plot: A Comparative Approach to the Nineteenth-Century Russian and English Novel”

Anna Berman, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies, McGill University

Family concerns drive the plot of most nineteenth-century English and Russian novels, yet the family plots in the two traditions differ greatly. Why are there virtually no English novels that focus on a pair of brothers, while brothers are common in the Russian novel? Russian authors were keen readers of the English, regarding them as a model for writing about family, so this paper explores the way the historical conditions in the two nations shaped their family plots.  The English, who honored primogeniture, viewed brothers as a source of rivalry that did not fit their family ideal. By contrast, the Russians split estates among their children, opening up a space for multiple brothers.  I will argue that this has implications for the structure of the novel, as the English created vertical, generationally focused plots, while the Russians created a new kind of lateral family plot.

Organized and sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Co-sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

poster (pdf)

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Friday, April 14, 12:00 p.m., NAU 211

“A Clash of Islams: Sufism and Salafism in the Northern Caucasus”

CSC Speaker Series: Professor Alexander Knysh

Alexander Knysh is Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Michigan and Principal Investigator of a research project on Islamic Studies at the St. Petersburg State University, Russia.

Co-sponsored by CREEES.

poster

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Thursday, April 20, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., CABELL 058

Confession(s) in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment

Prof. Julian Connolly, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

Colloquium Event Poster

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Sunday, April 23, OLD CABELL 113

Yiddish Song Workshop with Grammy-winner Lorin Sklamberg (Klezmatics)

Free and open to the public. Contact: Joel Rubin, joelerubin@virginia.edu

Organized by the McIntire Department of Music. Co-sponsored by the UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Center for German Studies.

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Wednesday, April 26, 12-1:30 pm, NEW CABELL 236

“The Semer Record Label: Jewish Music in Nazi Berlin, 1933-1938” 

Colloquium with Lorin Sklamberg (YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, New York).

Organized by the McIntire Department of Music. Co-sponsored by the UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Center for German Studies.

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Thursday, April 27, 8:00 p.m., OLD CABELL HALL

UVA Klezmer Ensemble Concert with special guest, Grammy-winner Lorin Sklamberg (Klezmatics)

Directed by Joel Rubin, the Klezmer Ensemble focuses on the music of the klezmorim, the Jewish professional instrumentalists of eastern Europe, as well as related Jewish and other East European traditions from the 18th century to the present, including Yiddish song.

The performance will feature special guest singer and multi-instrumentalist Lorin Sklamberg, hailed by legendary music critic Robert Christgau as “one of the premier American singers in any genre” with a voice that is “transcendent, ethereal and sensual” (All Things  Considered, National Public Radio).

Besides being a founding member of the Grammy-winning, trailblazing Yiddish-American roots band, The Klezmatics, Sklamberg has performed on 50 albums and is known for his work with the Semer Ensemble, Alpen Klezmer, Susan McKeown, the Nigunim Trio, Sklamberg and the Shepherds, the Zmiros Project, and in Drawing Life, a multi-media song cycle. He has composed and performed for film, dance, stage and circus, and has produced a number of recordings of world and theater music. Sklamberg has taught and lectured from London and Paris to Kiev and St. Petersburg. He is also the Sound Archivist of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York and former coordinator of KlezKamp: The Yiddish Folk Arts Program.

Tickets for the Klezmer Ensemble performance are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Tickets for University of Virginia students are free if reserved in advance at the Arts Box Office. Tickets are available in advance or at the door.

Organized by the McIntire Department of Music. Co-sponsored by the UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Center for German Studies.

Fall 2016 Events

***POSTPONED***  Collective Memory from American and Polish Perspective ***POSTPONED***

Dr. Lukasz Michalski, Institute of National Remembrance, Poland
Organized by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies as part of the UVa Polish Lecture Series.

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Wednesday, November 16, 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., MONROE HALL 124

“The Samuel Lubelski White Slavery Trial of 1914: Human Trafficking, Migration, and National Difference at the Polish-German Border”

David Petruccelli, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna

David Petruccelli is an historian of twentieth-century Europe; his current project, “A Scourge of Humanity: International Crime and Policing in Interwar Europe,” explores the emergence of international networks for fighting transnational crime in the 1920s and 1930s. It forms the basis for this talk, which considers how discourses of trafficking and migration drove nationalist sentiment in Poland and Germany during the First World War.

Organized and sponsored by CREEES as part of the UVa Polish Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Corcoran Department of History, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, and the Center for German Studies at UVa.

poster

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Wednesday, November 16, 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m., NEW CABELL 132

Slavic Graduate Student Workshop: What You Can Do with Your Second Slavic Language

Adrienne Harris, Associate Professor of Russian, Baylor University

Organized by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and co-sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

poster

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Wednesday, November 16, 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m., NEW CABELL 236

“North Asia between the Second and the Fourth World: Indigenous Writers on the Soviet State and North America”

Ivan Sablin, Senior Research Fellow, and Lilia Boliachevets, Research Assistant, Center for Historical Research at the Higher School of Economics, Saint Petersburg

Organized by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and co-sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

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Tuesday, November 15, 4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m., NEW CABELL 236

“Fighting the Fascists through Film: Soviet War Myths and Ukrainian Land on Post-Soviet Russian Screens”

Adrienne Harris, Associate Professor of Russian, Baylor University

Adrienne M. Harris is associate professor of Russian at Baylor University.  She holds the PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures from the University of Kansas.  She publishes on Soviet collective memory of World War II, gender, heroism, soldiers’ memoirs, war poetry, and Czech film.  She is currently drafting a monograph entitled Martyr, Myth, and Memory: The Dynamic Image of Zoia Kosmodemianskaia, a Soviet Saint.  She was recently elected to the board of the Association for Women in Slavic Studies and she serves as the Vice President of SEEFA, the Slavic, East European and Eurasian Folklore Association.

Organized by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and co-sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

poster

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Thursday, November 10 (note the new date), 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 236
An Analysis of the Meaning of the Conjunction a in Russian with Attention to Its Implications for Second Language Acquisition and Russian Language Pedagogy

Mark Elson and Maria Ivanova, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Fall 2016 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

colloquium events poster

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Thursday, November 10, 8:00 p.m., Old Cabell Hall

Klezmer Ensemble

The University of Virginia McIntire Department of Music presents the UVA Klezmer Ensemble on Thursday, November 10th at 8:00pm in Old Cabell Hall.

Directed by Joel Rubin, the Klezmer Ensemble focuses on the music of the klezmorim, the Jewish professional instrumentalists of Eastern Europe, as well as related Jewish and other East European traditions from the 18th century to the present. The ensemble is made up of both undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, alumni, and other members of the greater Central Virginia community. This fall, the concert will feature music recorded in Ukraine and Istanbul before WWI.

more information here

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Sunday, November 6

Film screenings: The Yellow Ticket (4:00 p.m., Old Cabell Hall)  and A Tickle in the Heart (7:00 p.m., PVCC Dickinson Center)

The two screenings are part of the Virginia Film Festival. The Yellow Ticket is a 1918 silent film that takes place in St. Petersburg. Tickle in the Heart is a documentary about three brothers whose parents came from Belarus, and includes a visit back to the country to search for the parents’ home.

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Thursday, October 20, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 236
Future Imperfect: Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky and the Time-Travel Narrative

Reed Johnson, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Fall 2016 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

colloquium events poster

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Friday, October 7, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., NEW CABELL 236
Professionalization workshop: “Teaching Literature”
Dr. Zara M. Torlone, Professor of Classics, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post Soviet Studies, Miami University, Ohio
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Thursday, October 6, 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., 130 Monroe Hall
The Joy of Exile: Ovid in Pushkin’s, Mandelshtam’s and Brodsky’s Poetry
Dr. Zara M. Torlone, Professor of Classics, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post Soviet Studies, Miami University, Ohio
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Friday, September 30 – Saturday, October 1, 2016
Kaleidoscope Room, Newcomb Hall
“Echoes of the Great Terror: Soviet Perpetrators on Trial, 1939-1943″:
An International Conference at the University of Virginia

Offering new perspectives on Stalin’s Great Terror of 1937-38 and, specifically, the role of the perpetrator in Stalin’s USSR, this conference features presentations in Russian and English based on previously unexamined Ukrainian and Georgian archival sources by historians based in Russia, Ukraine, the Republic of Georgia, Moldova, Germany, Canada, and the United States. Participants in the conference include:

Timothy Blauvelt (Ilia State University, Republic of Georgia)
Igor Casu (Center for the Study of Totalitarianism; State University of Moldova)
Olha Dovbnia, Serhii Kokin, Roman Podkur, and Valeriy Vasylyev (National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine)
Marc Junge (Ruhr-Universität, Bochum, Germany)
Andriy Kohut (State Archives, Security Service of Ukraine)
Nikita Petrov (“Memorial” International Human Rights and Humanitarian Society, Russia)
Jeffrey Rossman (Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia)
Andrei Savin (Institute of History, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia)
David Shearer (Department of History, University of Delaware)
Aleksandr Vatlin (Department of Modern and Contemporary History, Moscow State University, Russia)
Lynne Viola (University of Toronto, Canada)
Vadym Zolotaryov (Kharkiv National University of Radioelectronics, Ukraine)

The languages of the conference are Russian and English. Translation will be provided.

For questions, please contact Anna Maxwell (ask4mm@virginia.edu)
Organized by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (CREEES) with co-sponsorship from the Page-Barbour Fund, the Corcoran Department of History, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation.

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Spring 2016 Events

FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 10:00 am, NAU 211

“More than a Metonym: Katyń and the Future of Public History in Poland”

by Dr. Piotr H. Kosicki, Assistant Professor of History, University of Maryland

Piotr H. Kosicki is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maryland. His academic writings have appeared, among others, in Contemporary European History, East European Politics and Societies, and Modern Intellectual History. He has also written for Eurozine, The Nation, The New Republic, and The TLS. He is a past recipient of fellowships from the ACLS, the Fulbright Commission, the Republic of France, the Hoover Institution, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the German Historical Institute in Warsaw. He is the author of two monographs forthcoming in Polish, as well as Catholics on the Barricades: Poland, France, and “Revolution,” 1939-1956 (forthcoming with Yale UP).

Light refreshments will be served.

This event is free and open to the public. Organized by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies as part of the UVA Polish Lecture Series, which was funded by the Rosenstiel Foundation and the American Institute of Polish Culture. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Corcoran Department of History. the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture.

poster

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FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm, NEW CABELL 236 (GERMAN CONFERENCE ROOM)

“Using Digital Lesson Plans in the Russian Language Classroom ”

by Dr. Jill Martiniuk and Sarah McEleney

This talk is part of the Spring 2016 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

colloquium events poster

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APRIL 12-13: Flight and Refuge: The European Crisis in Global Perspective

An Interdisciplinary Conference at the University of Virginia April 12-13, 2016

Tuesday, April 12:
4:00PM-7:00PM New Cabell Hall 236
Refugee Voices: A Panel with Charlottesville Residents Opening Lectures

Wednesday, April 13:
10:00AM-6:30PM New Cabell Hall 236 Roundtable Discussions:
1. The European Crisis—The Crisis of Europe.
2. Global Perspectives.
3. Consequences and Solutions.

All Events are Free and Open to the Public.

Sponsored by:
Center for German Studies, Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Center for Global Health, Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, Miller Center, Department of Politics, Department of History, Slavic Department, Department of Germanic Languages and Literature, Jewish Studies Program, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures, Religious Studies, International Rescue Committee, Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies

poster | program

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TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 4:30 p.m., WILSON 301

“Resilience in Social-Ecological Systems of Northwest Eurasia”
University Seminar & Reception

Bruce Forbes
Research Professor, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland

RISES is a four-year research project (2012-2016) funded by the Academy of Finland. The project links indigenous (Sámi and Nenets) oral histories with archaeology, paleoecology and modern ecological and climate studies for a holistic explanation of stable states. We are in the process of producing a state-of-the-art assessment on the relative roles of, and feedbacks between, humans, animals and climate in the structure, function and resilience of past and contemporary systems. 

This event is sponsored by the Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, the School of Architecture Innovations in Practice, the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Department of Environmental Sciences at UVa.

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SUNDAY, APRIL 10 – THURSDAY, APRIL 14

Klezmer Residency with Ilya Shneyveys and Sasha Lurje

Sunday, April 10, Old Cabell 107, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.: Hands-on workshop on instrumental klezmer music and Yiddish song.

Tuesday, April 12, Nau 342, 12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.: Colloquium “The Jewish song collection of Latvian composer Emilis Melngailis, 1899 -1927: sources, song migration and transformation.” Light refreshments. RSVP to Kristin Hilgartner, knh5xx@virginia.edu

Thursday, April 14, Old Cabell Hall, 8 p.m.: Concert: UVA Klezmer Ensemble under the direction of Joel Rubin, with special  guests, Ilya Shneyveys and Sasha Lurje (Riga/Berlin) in collaboration with jazz students of John D’earth.

Latvian musicians, singer Sasha Lurje and multi-instrumentalist Ilya Shneyveys, are at the forefront of the young generation of klezmer and Yiddish revivalists, leading their Yiddish psychedelic rock band, Forshpil (Berlin/Riga/St. Petersburg), into the 22nd century. Based in Berlin Germany, Shneyveys and Lurje are involved in numerous international projects, including Alpen Klezmer, Semer Label Reloaded, Dobranotch, and STRANGELOVESONGS. 

All events are free and open to the public. 

With support from the UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, the Center for German Studies, the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, and the Office of the Provost and the Vice Provost for the Arts

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THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m, MONROE HALL 130

“Kosciuszko: A Man Ahead of His Time”
Documentary film screening
Written and directed by Alex Storozynski

The screening will be followed by a talk by Alex Storozynski and a Q&A with the audience.

Thaddeus Kosciuszko fought for American independence and was decorated by George Washington with and Order of Cincinnatus. Later, he led a Polish uprising against the Russian Empire. Thomas Jefferson called Kosciuszko “as pure a son of liberty, as I have ever known.” Kosciuszko bequeathed his property for the emancipation and education of African-American slaves and named Jefferson the executor. After Kosciuszko’s death, Jefferson walked away from this obligation. Kosciuszko’s will was never enacted.

This film, based on the book by Alex Storozynski, The Peasant Prince: Thaddeus Kosciusko and the Age of Revolution (St. Martin’s Press, 2010), was originally featured on PBS in October 2015.

Alex Storozynski was president and executive director of the Kosciuszko Foundation. Also a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, he was an editorial board member at the New York Daily News, the founding editor of amNewYork, and a former city editor and contributing editor to the The New York Sun.

This event is free and open to the public. Organized by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies as part of the UVA Polish Lecture Series, which was funded by the Rosenstiel Foundation and the American Institute of Polish Culture. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Corcoran Department of History.

poster

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TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 5:00 p.m., NEW CABELL 236 (German Conference Room)

“Prozhektery: ‘Administrative Entrepreneurs’ and Modernization of Education in Russia
from Peter the Great to Putin”

lecture by Igor Fedyukin

Former Vice-Minister, Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (June 2012 – May 2013)
Associate Professor and Director, Center for History Sources, National Research University – Higher School of Economics (Moscow)
Visiting Fellow, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (Washington, DC)

Check back soon for a full list of sponsors.

This event is organized and sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and co-sponsored by the Corcoran Department of History, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Department of Sociology at UVa.

poster

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MONDAY, APRIL 4, 4:00 p.m., NAU 342

“Sex in the City that Peter Built: Libertinage and the Public Sphere in St. Petersburg circa 1750”

seminar by Igor Fedyukin

Associate Professor and Director, Center for History Sources, National Research University – Higher School of Economics (Moscow)
Visiting Fellow, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (Washington, DC)

Download and read the paper to be discussed at this seminar here.

This event is organized and sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and co-sponsored by the Corcoran Department of History, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Department of Sociology at UVa.

poster

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THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 6:15 p.m., GIBSON 211

“The Real NCIS and the Imperative to Counter the Intelligence Threat Posed by Russia, China and Iran”

A talk by Special Agent Andrew L. Traver
Director, Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS)

As NCIS Director, Mr. Traver leads the agency as it investigates and defeats terrorist, foreign intelligence, and criminal threats to the United States Navy and Marine Corps wherever they operate: ashore, afloat, or in cyberspace. Mr. Traver’s areas of special emphasis include developing and expanding strong partnerships and liaison with law enforcement organizations, security services, and intelligence agencies worldwide, as well as ensuring agile, adaptive, and responsive NCIS support to the Navy and Marine Corps’ enhanced security posture and global engagements.

This talk is sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at UVa.

poster

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., NEW CABELL 236 (GERMAN CONFERENCE ROOM)

“Reader as Writer:
Authorial Instruction in Margarita Meklina’s Short-Story Fiction”

by Dr. Kathleen Thompson

This talk is part of the Spring 2016 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

colloquium events poster

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TUESDAY 3/22/16, 6:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 132

Slavic Film Series: The Parade

Please join us for the second screening of the Slavic Film Series on March 22nd, at 6:30 p.m., in New Cabell 132. We will be screening the film The Parade, the poster for which can be found here.

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FRIDAY, FEB. 19, 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m., NEW CABELL 236 (GERMAN CONFERENCE ROOM)

“The Development and Legacy of the Mathematical Imagination of F.M. Dostoevsky: Reconstructing the Education of the Novelist at the Main Engineering School, 1838-1843″

by  Michael Marsh-Soloway

This talk is part of the Spring 2016 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

colloquium events poster

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THURSDAY, 2/18/16, 6:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 236

Slavic Film Series: Leviathan

Please join us for the first screening of the Slavic Film Series on February 18th, at 6:30 p.m., in New Cabell 236. We will be screening the film Leviathan, the poster for which can be found here.

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WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10, 4 p.m., NAU 211

A discussion of domestic Russian politics
with Ilya Ponomarev

Ilya Ponomarev has been involved in Russian business and politics for over twenty years. A prominent member of the Russian opposition, Mr. Ponomarev played a key role in the protests of 2012 and, in 2014, was the only member of the Duma (Russian parliament) to vote against the annexation of Crimea.

Attendance is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.
Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Charlottesville Committee on Foreign Relations

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Fall 2015 Events

THURSDAY, 11/12/15, 5:00 p.m – 7:00 p.m., WILSON 301

“A Hybrid Horror: The Janowska Camp
and a New Categorization of Nazi camps”

Dr. Waitman Beorn, Executive Director, Virginia Holocaust Museum

This discussion will focus on the Janowska camp outside of Lviv which has been almost completely neglected by scholarly inquiry but which presents a challenge to researchers due to its multi-faceted uses as a slave labor camp, a transit camp, and an extermination site. How does such a space fit into conventional categorizations of Holocaust sites and what makes Janowska exceptional? Moreover, how does Janowska demonstrate its connection to the Holocaust in Lviv demonstrate an intersection of national, regional, and local anti-Jewish policy?
Open to all members of the UVa community and the public.
Light refreshments will be served.

This talk is part of the UVA Polish Lecture Series and is cosponsored by the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Corcoran Department of History, and the Jewish Studies Program at UVA.

poster

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THURSDAY, 10/22/15, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 236

“Techniques of Concealment in the Eastern Slavic Culture (XVI–XVII Centuries)”

Dr. Maria Ivanova, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Fall 2015 Slavic Colloquium Series.
poster

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FRIDAY, 10/16/15, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., NEW CABELL 236

“Bloody Verses: Rereading Pushkin’s ‘Kavkazskii plennik’”

Dr. John Lyles, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Fall 2015 Slavic Colloquium Series.
poster

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THURSDAY, 10/15/15, 5:15 p.m., NEW CABELL 236

Slavic Film Series: I am from Titov Veles

Please join us for the third screening of the Slavic Film Series on October 15th, at 5:15 p.m., in New Cabell 236. We will be screening the film I am from Titov Veles, the poster for which can be found here.

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FRIDAY, 10/09/15, 2:00 p.m., NEW CABELL 262

“Marketing Yourself for Jobs in the Liberal Arts

Alyssa DeBlasio, Dickinson College (Russian; Film Studies; Philosophy)

For more information about this speaker, please refer to the event below.

This talk is made possible through the generous support of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Virginia.
poster

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THURSDAY, 10/08/15, 5:00 p.m., NEW CABELL 309

Generation M: Merab Mamardashvili and Recent Russian Cinema

Alyssa DeBlasio, Dickinson College (Russian; Film Studies; Philosophy)

Alyssa DeBlasio (PhD University of Pittsburgh, 2010) is Assistant Professor in the Russian Department at Dickinson College, where she also contributes to the Film Studies Program and the Philosophy Department. Before joining the faculty at Dickinson, DeBlasio was Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the Higher School of Economics (Moscow). She is one of a small number of non-Russian members of the Russian Guild of Film Critics and Scholars and has been an accredited reviewer of the Moscow International Film Festival since 2009. She is the recipient of numerous prestigious fellowships and grants for her research on contemporary Russian film, philosophy, and culture, including recent awards from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the U.S. Department of State, Fulbright-Hays, the Yegor Gaidar Foundation, and the American Council of Teachers of Russian. In 2014 she published her first monograph, T​he End of Russian Philosophy (Palgrave Macmillan), which looks at the transition of the discipline of philosophy in Russia from the 1990s through the 2000s. The book was recently included on the long list for the Historia Nova Prize for the Best Book in Russian Intellectual and Cultural History. Her articles have appeared in R​ussian Review, ​S​tudies in East European Thought,​S​tudies in Russian and Soviet Cinema,​K​inokultura​, R​ussian Journal of Communication​, and Epistemologiia i filosofiia nauki ​(E​pistemology and the Philosophy of Science), among other places.

This talk is made possible through the generous support of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and the Department of Media Studies at the University of Virginia.
poster

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WEDNESDAY, 10/07/15, 5:15 p.m., NEW CABELL 236

Slavic Film Series: Forecast 

Please join us for the second screening of the Slavic Film Series on October 7th, at 5:15 p.m., in New Cabell 236. We will be screening the film Forecast, the poster for which can be found here

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THURSDAY, 10/01/15, 5:15 p.m., CLEMONS 201

Slavic Film Series: Daisies (change in date and location)

Please join us for the first screening of the Slavic Film Series on October 1st, at 5:15 p.m., in Clemons 201. We will be screening the film Daisies, the poster for which can be found herePlease note: the screening has been postponed and will no longer take place on September 23rd.

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09/10/2015

CREEES is delighted to announce that the live streaming videos from last March’s UVA conference, ”Centrifugal Forces: Reading Russia’s Regional Identities and Initiatives,” are now available for public view. These videos represent about 90% of the talks given.

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08/22/2015

A list of CREEES-related Fall 2015 courses is now available.

“Centrifugal Forces: Reading Russia’s Regional Identities and Initiatives” videos now available for public view

CREEES is delighted to announce that the live streaming videos from last March’s UVA conference, ”Centrifugal Forces: Reading Russia’s Regional Identities and Initiatives,” are now available for public view. These videos represent about 90% of the talks given.