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Get Grounded: Step Up!

Step Up! Bystander Intervention Program

Alcohol and Other Drug Resources

Basic principles for dealing with an intoxicated/high person

  • Alcohol and other drugs affect judgment and a drunk/high person is not rational. Do not attempt to reason with the person.
  • Avoid being confrontational or aggressive. Joking, kidding, bargaining, and enlisting the help of friends can be more effective. Speak clearly and calmly and to try to coax the person to a quiet place to calm down.
  • If a person becomes violent, destructive and/or uncooperative, you need to prevent harm to yourself and others. Call for assistance, up to and including the police.

Guidelines for immediate care of someone who has passed out

  • Check for signs of alcohol poisoning to determine if the situation is an emergency (see section below).
  • BAC can continue to rise after one stops drinking. Never leave a person alone to sleep it off.
  • Call an RA or sober friend to help assess the situation.
  • Roll the person onto left side and prop head up. Make sure the airway remains open in case of vomiting.
  • Stay in the room and monitor physical signs at least every 10 minutes to ensure symptoms are not worsening.

Symptoms of alcohol poisoning

If even ONE sign is out of normal range, or if vital signs are slowing, call 911 IMMEDIATELY. Remember P-U-B-S

  • Pulse: Should be between 50 and 140 beats per minute, not irregular
  • Unresponsive: Does not respond to a firm pinch.
  • Breathing: Should be at least 9 breaths per minute, not slow and shallow
  • Skin: Should not be cold, clammy or blue

U.Va. Emergency Room procedures

  • U.Va. Emergency Department and Student Health Clinicians do NOT notify police or university officials in the event a University student is seen for an alcohol-related incident
  • Parents/guardians are NOT notified by clinicians without student permission unless a situation is deemed life threatening
  • Any 911 call from Grounds will result in a University Police response. The officer's primary emphasis is the care of the student. Follow up investigation will take place only in exceptional circumstances.
  • There is NO charge for ambulance services in Charlottesville.

What to avoid:

  • DO NOT encourage a very intoxicated person to eat or drink anything. It can induce vomiting.
  • DO NOT give the person a cold shower. The shock could cause the person to pass out and result in injuries.
  • DO NOT try to restrain the person without (sober) assistance.

U.Va. Resources:

National Resources:

Depression/Suicide Ideation Resources

Symptoms of depression may include:

  • Feelings of sadness, irritability or frustration
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in normal activities
  • Insomnia or excessive sleeping
  • Changes in appetite — can also lead to noticeable weight loss or weight gain
  • Agitation or restlessness
  • Indecisiveness, distractibility and decreased concentration
  • Fatigue, tiredness and loss of energy — even small tasks may seem to require a lot of effort
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt, fixating on past failures or blaming yourself when things go wrong
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions and remembering things
  • Frequent thoughts of death, dying or suicide
  • Crying spells for no apparent reason

Warning signs of suicide include:

  • Observable signs of serious depression:
    • Unrelenting low mood, pessimism, hopelessness, desperation, anxiety, withdrawal, sleep problems
  • Increased alcohol and/or other drug use
  • Recent impulsiveness and taking unnecessary risks
  • Threatening suicide or expressing a strong wish to die
  • Making a plan:
    • Giving away prized possessions
    • Sudden or impulsive purchase of a firearm
    • Obtaining other means of killing oneself such as poisons or medications
  • Unexpected rage or anger

Action Steps:

  1. LISTEN.
  2. Take it seriously. Remember - depressive/suicidal behavior is a cry for help.
  3. Speak with the individuals in private. Voice your concern - let them know you care.
  4. Do what you can to give the person HOPE.
  5. Encourage the individuals to get help. It is NOT a sign of weakness to ask for help. In fact, it
    1. is a sign of STRENGTH. Offer to go with them to counseling.
  6. Seek out a mature and compassionate person with whom you can review the situation.
  7. Use the QPR Method - Question (about whether the individuals plan to harm themselves;
    1. Persuade (not to harm themselves) and Refer (to a professional). See website for more details.
  8. If suicidal, create a "safety agreement" to not harm themselves.
  9. If suicidal, call 9-1-1 let the individuals know that you will be contacting 9-1-1. Do not leave
    1. them alone. Engage other bystanders if need be.
  10. If the individuals say they are going to take their own life, find out their intentions in terms of
    1. how they plan on doing it. This gives insights about risks to others, as well as more time and
    2. information to plan an intervention. Get as much information as possible.
  11. Notice actions/behaviors. Be observant of any medication bottles that may be present; note
    1. other important information.
  12. Separate the individuals from any weapons or firearms if possible.
  13. Be aware of difficult times: holidays, birthdays, major anniversary dates.
  14. What not to do:
    1. Don't assume the problem will take care of itself.
    2. Don't act shocked or surprised at what the person says.
    3. Don't argue or debate moral issues.
    4. Don't challenge or dare the person.

Additional U.Va. Resources:

CAPS Self-Assessments
CAPS Office 434-243-5150

Additional National Resources:

NCAA Mental Health Resources
National Mental Health Information Center
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
Mayo Clinic

Discrimination Resources

Issues to Consider before Stepping Up:

  • Identify the bias: Is it prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, or a combination?
  • Form a goal based on the source of bias:
    1. Change negative beliefs (stereotypes).
    2. Change negative attitudes/emotions (prejudice).
    3. Change discriminatory behavior (with or without changing stereotypes or prejudice).
  • Determine the safest and most effective way to address the bias: Decide when and where to try and address the bias (in private not in public). **When considering how to proceed, always consider the costs and consequences for long-term relationships with everyone involved.
  • Choose a strategy to STEP UP!
    • Reduce the Tension
    • Try to get the person to see others as individuals rather than as members of a disliked group
    • Try to get others to see that the targeted group is similar to others and shares similar goals
    • You can directly address the bias by making the individuals aware of how their statement represents a bias or is inconsistent with their egalitarian values.

      WARNING: Confrontation can make the biased person angry and may cause him or her to lash out or seek revenge. Thus, exercise caution when using this approach.

Action Steps:

  1. Be Ready - You know at some point you will hear or see something that is inappropriate or discriminatory. Think of yourself as the one to STEP UP!, prepare yourself for it and know what you will say. "Why do you say that?" or "Do you really mean what you just said?"
  2. Identify the Behavior - Point out someone's behavior to help them hear what they are really saying. "So, what I hear you saying is that all student-athletes don't care about academics?"
  3. Appeal to Principles - Call on a person's higher principles. "I've always thought you were fair-minded. It shocks me to hear you say something so biased."
  4. Set Limits - Draw a line. You can't control others but you can make others aware of what you will not tolerate. "Don't tell racist jokes or use that language in my presence anymore. If you do, I will leave." Follow through.
  5. Find an Ally/Be an Ally - Seek out like-minded people and build strength in numbers.

Additional U.Va. Resources:

Office of Equal Opportunity Programs
U.Va. Diversity Website
Bias Reporting

Additional National Resources:

NCAA Diversity and Inclusion
Teaching Tolerance
10 Ways to Fight Hate on Campus
American Civil Liberties Union

Disordered Eating/Body Image Issues

Definitions:

Disordered eating consists of the spectrum of unhealthy eating from dietary restraint to clinical eating disorders. All eating disorders are included in disordered eating but not all disordered eating meets criteria for an eating disorder. Types of Eating Disorders include:

  • Anorexia (Anorexia nervosa) (Self Starvation Syndrome)
  • Bulimia (Bulimia nervosa) (Binge/Purge Syndrome)
  • Binge Eating (Compulsive Overeating)

Triggers

Major life changes, relationship problems, depression, desire to maintain control.

Warning Signs:

  • Eating disorders often begin or worsen during transition periods such as starting college.
  • Usually the longer a person has the disorder, the more purposes and functions it serves. It can become the primary means of coping with life.
  • Dramatic weight loss in a relatively short period of time.
  • An intense and irrational fear of body fat and weight gain; hard for person to concentrate on anything besides weight.
  • A misperception of body weight and shape to the extent that the person feels fat even when underweight.
  • Basing self worth on body weight and body image. Obsession with others' weight and appearance.
  • Personality traits such as perfectionism, being obsessive, approval seeking, low self esteem, withdrawal, irritability, and all or nothing thinking.
  • Frequent skipping of meals, with excuses for not eating; food restriction and self starvation.
  • Eating only a few foods, especially those low in fat and calories. Secrecy around eating.
  • Unusual food rituals (e.g., moving food around plate, cutting portions into tiny pieces).
  • Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals.
  • Avoidance of social gatherings where food is involved, or isolating themselves.
  • No menstrual periods or irregular periods.

Actions Steps:

  • Talk to your friend. Keep the discussion informal and confidential, and focus on concerns about your friend's health and your relationship with her/him, not on weight or appearance.
  • Encourage the individuals to be a part of social functions and reassure them that you (and hopefully others) will not pressure them to eat if they do not want to.
  • Let the individuals have as many options surrounding food as possible—for example let them choose the restaurant if you are going out to eat.
  • LISTEN. Find out what other things are going on in their lives.
  • Let them know that you will pass no judgments on them.
  • Ask them what you can do to help make dealing with food easier.
  • Be aware of how you talk about others' bodies - Comments can sometimes slip out but can be unintentionally hurtful or confusing to others.
  • Promote the idea that good nutrition leads to good health and increased performance.
  • Discuss your concerns with a professional. Learn about eating disorders and available local resources. Encourage the individual to seek professional help. Health care professionals are bound by confidentiality.
  • Remember:
    • You are not a professional and will not be able to fix the situation - however, you can offer resources and support.
    • You may be rejected. People with eating disorders often deny their problem because they are afraid to admit they have a problem. Don't take the rejection personally, and try to end the conversation in a way that will allow you to come back to the subject at another time.

Additional U.Va. Resources:

UVA Coalition on Eating Disorders & Exercise Concerns
Women's Center

Additional National Resources:

About Face
National Eating Disorders Association (206) 382-3587
Academy for Eating Disorders (AED)

Hazing Resources

Definition:

"Hazing" refers to any activity expected of someone joining a group (or to maintain full status in a group) that humiliates, degrades or risks emotional and/or physical harm, regardless of the person's willingness to participate (www.stophazing.org).

The University does not condone hazing in any form. The term "hazing" means any action taken or situation created by a member(s) of a student organization toward one or more organization members or toward prospective members (as a part of the new member selection process), that occurs on University-owned or leased property or at University-sponsored or supervised functions or at the local residence of any University student, faculty member, or employee, and that is designed to or produces mental or physical harassment, discomfort, or ridicule. Such activities and situations include, but are not limited to, creation of excessive physical or psychological shock, fatigue, stress, injury, or harm. Student organizations and/or individual members found to have engaged in hazing as defined in this statement shall be in violation of University policy and the University's Standards of Conduct and may also be in violation of the State statute.

Ask yourself:

  • Is there secrecy around the activity?
  • Is there pressure to participate?
  • Is a specific group or individual singled out?
  • Do members justify it as being a "tradition"?
  • Does this activity promote and conform to the ideals and values of the team/athletic department/ university?
  • Will this activity increase long term feelings of friendship between new and initiated members?
  • Take the perspective of your parents - would they be proud? Your Coach? Athletic Director?

The University President?

  • Would you be willing to defend the merit of this activity in a court of law?
  • Does the activity meet both the spirit and letter of the standards prohibiting hazing?
  • Would you invite the Cavalier Daily to cover the activity?
  • Is this activity an actual requirement for gaining membership in the organization?

Action Steps:

  • Don't let others justify hazing as "tradition".
  • BREAK THE SILENCE and voice your opinion.
  • Choose to not participate.
  • Speak with teammates/captains/group members about your concerns.
  • Talk to an administrator/coach/trainer, etc.
  • Work with your team/organization to develop alternatives to hazing.
  • Develop new "traditions" for your team/organization - ones that will promote teambuilding and cohesion.

Additional U.Va. Resources:

University Policy on Hazing
Hazing Hotline for Reporting Incidents: 434.243.HAZE (4293)

Additional National Resources:

Stop Hazing
Gordie Center for Alcohol and Substance Education
Hazing Prevention

Myths & Facts

University of Michigan's See Through the Haze

Relationship Abuse/Violence Resources

Considerations/Warning Signs:

  • 3 key elements are: Intimidation, humiliation, and physical injury.
  • Types include: Physical abuse; Verbal or emotional abuse; Sexual abuse; Stalking or cyberstalking; Spiritual abuse
  • Early warning signs include, jealousy, attempts at monitoring activities, not respecting boundaries, possessiveness, threats of destruction of property, questioning beliefs and choices, and putting the person down.
  • Remember - "Checking up" on someone (control) is not the same thing as "Checking in" (concern).
  • Look for patterns - The Cycle of Abuse normally includes the following stages, which vary in time and intensity.
    1. Stage One - Honeymoon Phase
    2. Stage Two - Normal Phase
    3. Stage Three - Tension Building
    4. Stage Four - Explosion
  • Do not automatically assume that the female is always the victim and the male is always the perpetrator.

Action Steps:

  1. If someone you know is being cyberstalked tell them:
    1. Save all messages and call law-enforcement agencies.
    2. Block the user from your social networking page or from e-mailing you.
    3. If the threats are on the stalker's webpage, save the entire screen including the URL and print it. Bookmarking it is not enough.
    4. Don't confront the stalker. The situation could escalate.
    5. Contact the social networking page in question. The company can take down the website and/or ban the stalker.
  2. Be careful when adding names to email lists, giving real names in public forums, leaving social networking pages unrestricted or sharing passwords.
  3. Encourage any person in an abusive relationship to seek professional help.
  4. Think about your own safety when you approach the situation. You might want to have a friend with you for back up and help.
  5. If the violence is/gets physical, call 9-1-1 right away.
  6. Do not touch the individuals no matter how well you may know them.
  7. Be aware of your tone of voice and volume. Stay calm.
  8. Calmly attempt to separate the individuals without putting yourself in danger.
  9. Be respectful of both individuals and their viewpoints. Listen fully to the concerns.

Additional U.Va. Resources:

Sexual and Domestic Violence Services

Additional National Resources:

National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-7323
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence 1-800-799-7323

Sexual Assault Resources

Definition:

United States law includes two types of sexual assault: sexual abuse and aggravated sexual abuse. Sexual abuse includes acts in which an individual is force to engage in sexual activity by use of threats other fear tactics, or instances in which an individual is physically unable to decline. Aggravated sexual abuse occurs when an individual is forced to submit to sexual acts by use of physical force; threats of death, injury, or kidnapping; or substances that render that individual unconscious or impaired.

Action Steps:

  • Be aware of comments and behaviors from others that would indicate they were intent on having sexual intercourse even if the partner was unwilling.
  • Notice if someone is getting ready to have sexual intercourse with a partner who is incapacitated.
  • Don't pressure or encourage friends to drink or have sex as often or with as many people as possible.
  • Don't joke about sexual assault; comments and jokes that are meant to "ease the tension" or are "just kidding around" can trivialize the severity of the behavior.
  • Know your level of comfort with conversations and talk about sexual behavior. If you find groups or individuals who talk about sexual relationships that are not in sync with how you feel, or the type of relationship you want, don't be afraid to state your position.
  • Many perpetrators are unaware that what they have done is a crime. (They may say, "Yeah, that was messed up, but it was fun.") Let them know that what they did was not right and was against the law.

If you become aware that a sexual assault has occurred or are told of an assault occurring:

  • Believe the person.
  • Tell the victim it is not his or her fault.
  • Encourage a report (to campus or local police, to the Dean of Students, to a campus Health Center counselor, etc.) Realize however, there may be reasons that the person does NOT want to report. Respect that decision.
  • Don't pry or try to get information out of the person if he/she is unwilling to be forthcoming with information…be ready to listen when the individual is ready to talk.
  • If you learn of the perpetrators identity, don't suggest physical or any other form of retaliation.
  • Know available resources.
  • Listen.
  • Be patient.

Additional U.Va. Resources:

Useful U.Va. Resources(PDF)
Sexual and Domestic Violence Services
Sexual Assault Board

Additional National Resources:

The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN)- 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)
National Sexual Violence Resource Center 1-877-739-3895 (toll free)
Male Survivor 1-800-738-4181

In any emergency, do not hesitate to call 911.

General Resources

University Police non-emergency 434-924-7166
Office of the Dean of Students - 434-924-7133
Dean on Call - 434-263-3326
Residence Life - 434-924-3736
Fraternity & Sorority Life - 434-924-7430
Office of African-American Affairs - 434-924-7923

Alcohol or Substance Abuse

Office of Health Promotion - 434-924-1509
Gordie Center for Alcohol and Substance Education (Gordie CASE) - 434-924-5276

Mental Health

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) - 434-924-5556
CAPS After Hours - 434- 972-7004
Ainsworth Psychological Clinic - 434-982-4737
Center for Clinical Psychology Services - 434-924-7034

Sexual Assault or Dating Violence

Office of the Dean of Students - 434-924-7216
Sexual and Domestic Violence Services - 434-982-2774
UVA Women's Center Counseling Services - 434-982-2361
Student Health - 434-924-5362

*The content for this resources guide came from the Facilitator Guide of Step Up! (PDF), a pro-social behavior, bystander intervention program for student athletes, the Mayo Clinic Website, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and the University of Virginia website.