Announcements

Announcements

2016-17 Academic Year (through 11/25/2016) Reports of Student-Target Bias-Related Incidents

December 2nd, 2016

Click here to view:
2016-17 Bias Summary

2016-17 Academic Year (through 11/25/2016)
Reports of Student-Target Bias-Related Incidents

The University promotes an inclusive and welcoming environment that embraces the full spectrum of human attributes, perspectives, and disciplines. When people of different backgrounds come together, they exchange ideas, question assumptions (including their own), and broaden the horizons for us all. A University of Virginia community rich in diversity affords every member equal respect and provides a forum for understanding our differences as well as our commonalities.

The University maintains policies on Preventing and Addressing Discrimination and Harassment (http://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/HRM-009), Preventing and Addressing Retaliation (http://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/HRM-010), and preventing and addressing Sexual and Gender-based Harassment and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (http://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/HRM-041).

The University encourages prompt reporting of bias complaints so that it can investigate the alleged facts for possible violation(s) of University policy, including the Standards of Conduct, and refer such complaints to law enforcement to determine whether an independent investigation for violation(s) of criminal law is warranted.

Although the expression of an idea or point of view may be offensive or inflammatory to some, it is not necessarily a violation of law or University policy. The University values and embraces the ideals of freedom of inquiry, freedom of thought, and freedom of expression, all of which must be vitally sustained in a community of scholars. While these freedoms protect controversial ideas and differing views, and sometimes even offensive or hurtful words, they do not protect personal threats or acts of misconduct which violate criminal law or University policy.

The University’s Diversity Council (https://vpdiversity.virginia.edu/diversity-council) includes representatives from the faculty, students and administration, and meets periodically “to discuss and consider forward-looking, proactive strategies, methods, and approaches that will help to make U.Va a more diverse and welcoming environment at all levels.” In addition, the University is establishing new protocol for addressing reports of bias that includes assessment and evaluation by a three member Bias Evaluation Panel composed of representatives of the Office for Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights (https://eocr.virginia.edu/), the Office of the Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer (http://vpsa.virginia.edu/), and the University Police Department (http://www.virginia.edu/uvapolice/). A Bias Advisory Team, composed of representatives from a variety of offices across the University, will also meet periodically starting in 2017 to review bias reports received via the University’s Just Report It online system and explore possible educational programs and other potential responses from a pan-University perspective. A website is also being launched in January 2017 where summary bias report statistics and information will be publicly available.

Below is a summary of all incidents reported through the University’s Just Report It (“JRI”) system (http://www.virginia.edu/justreportit/bias/) as “bias” related or motivated in the opinion of the reporting student, faculty, staff or community member. A total of forty-four (44) specific incidents were reported via JRI.
Reports by Month (Incident Date):
*August 2016: 1
*September 2016: 12
*October 2016: 12
*November 2016: 19

Reports addressed using the University’s Policy on Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (Title IX) are not included in this summary, with the exception of reports indicating a bias target of LGBTQ sexual orientation/sexual identity.

The reports have been classified into one of four categories:
[1] As explained on the Just Report It website, the University defines a “bias” report as “any report of a threat or act of harassment or intimidation – verbal, written or physical – which is personally directed against or targets a University of Virginia student because of that student’s age, color, disability, marital status, national or ethnic origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, veteran status or family medical or genetic information.” There are sixteen (16) reports received via JRI that describe conduct defined by the University as motivated by bias.

Reported Bias Target:
*Race: 6
*National/Ethnic Origin: 4
*Religion: 2
*Gender: 1
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 5
*Political Affiliation: 1
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 12
*Written/Online Harassment: 4
*Discriminatory Treatment: 1
*Threats: 1

Reported Location:
Some reports are counted more than once in terms of conduct type or bias target, as certain reports are described as involving multiple forms of conduct and/or bias targets. In addition, multiple Just Report It reports received concerning the same incident are counted as a single report in this summary.
The University’s definition of bias may not be the definition of bias used by federal agencies.

*Upper-Class Residence: 1
*Residential College: 2
*Undisclosed On-Grounds Residence: 1
*Public Space On-Grounds: 3
*Public Space Off-Grounds: 8
*Online/Internet: 1
Reports Submitted Anonymously: 1

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 16
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 0

In instances where an alleged perpetrator is unknown, the University’s ability to respond is limited. However, reporting these incidents remains important, as it informs the University’s efforts to prevent future bias incidents, such as public announcements, enhanced or targeted training (e.g., the current development of implicit bias training for students), community forums (e.g., the Provost’s fall 2016 charrette), increased resources, and creation of a bias review team.

In instances where an alleged perpetrator is identified and a policy violation is established, available sanctions may include educational, restorative, rehabilitative, and punitive components. Students facing disciplinary referral may be subject to a range of sanctions including admonition, restitution, no-contact directives, counseling and educational programs, community service, suspension and expulsion. Non-disciplinary interventions and remedies include a host of actions such as increased monitoring, supervision, and/or security at locations or activities where the reported conduct occurred or is likely to reoccur; targeted or broad-based educational programming or training for relevant individuals or groups; academic and/or University housing modifications for student complainants; workplace modifications for employee complainants; and other restorative measures. Employees facing disciplinary referral may be subject to a range of sanctions including informal and formal counseling, transfer of position, removal of administrative appointment, demotion, suspension and termination of employment.


[2] Five (5) reports received via Just Report It describe conduct that is not “personally directed against or targets” an identified student and thus do not meet the University’s definition of “bias,” although the reports describe “a threat or act of harassment or intimidation” that is directed against or targets a group based on one or more protected characteristics described in the University’s definition.
Reported Bias Target:
*Race: 2
*Religion: 1
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 2
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 1
*Written/Online Harassment: 4
Reported Location:
*First Year Residence: 1
*Non-Residential Building: 1
*Public Space On-Grounds: 1
*Public Space Off-Grounds: 2

Reports Submitted Anonymously:
1

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 4
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 1
* Disciplinary Referral/Sanctions: 1

[3] Thirteen (13) reports received via Just Report It, upon review: (a) do not appear to involve any bias-motivated conduct, or (b) involve otherwise protected speech.
Reported Bias Target:
*Race: 4
*National/Ethnic Origin: 2
*Gender: 2
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 1
*Political Affiliation: 4
*Undisclosed: 1
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 8
*Written/Online Harassment: 3
*Discriminatory Treatment: 1
*Insensitive Actions: 1
Reported Location:
*Upper-Class Residence: 1
*First Year Residence: 4
*Public Space On-Grounds: 5
*Public Space Off-Grounds: 1
*Greek Property Off-Grounds: 1
*Undisclosed: 1

Reports Submitted Anonymously: 2

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 8
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 5
* Disciplinary Referral/Sanctions: 1
* Non-Disciplinary Interventions & Remedies: 4

[4] Ten (10) reports received via Just Report It do not describe conduct with sufficient detail to allow evaluation and such information is not readily ascertainable by other means.
Reported Bias Target:
*Race: 3
*National/Ethnic Origin: 5
*Gender: 2
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 2
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 9
*Other Harassment: 1
Reported Location:
*Upper-Class Residence: 2
*First Year Residence: 1
*Academic Building: 2
*Public Space On-Grounds: 4
*Public Space Off-Grounds: 1

Reports Submitted Anonymously: 3

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 9
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 1
*Non-Disciplinary Interventions & Remedies: 1

2015-16 Academic Year (through 2016 Summer Session) Reports of Student-Target Bias-Related Incidents

December 2nd, 2016

Click here to view:
2015-16 Bias Summary

2015-16 Academic Year (through 2016 Summer Session)
Reports of Student-Target Bias-Related Incidents

The University promotes an inclusive and welcoming environment that embraces the full spectrum of human attributes, perspectives, and disciplines. When people of different backgrounds come together, they exchange ideas, question assumptions (including their own), and broaden the horizons for us all. A University of Virginia community rich in diversity affords every member equal respect and provides a forum for understanding our differences as well as our commonalities.

The University maintains policies on Preventing and Addressing Discrimination and Harassment (http://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/HRM-009), Preventing and Addressing Retaliation (http://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/HRM-010), and preventing and addressing Sexual and Gender-based Harassment and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (http://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/HRM-041).

The University encourages prompt reporting of bias complaints so that it can investigate the alleged facts for possible violation(s) of University policy, including the Standards of Conduct, and refer such complaints to law enforcement to determine whether an independent investigation for violation(s) of criminal law is warranted.

Although the expression of an idea or point of view may be offensive or inflammatory to some, it is not necessarily a violation of law or University policy. The University values and embraces the ideals of freedom of inquiry, freedom of thought, and freedom of expression, all of which must be vitally sustained in a community of scholars. While these freedoms protect controversial ideas and differing views, and sometimes even offensive or hurtful words, they do not protect personal threats or acts of misconduct which violate criminal law or University policy.

The University’s Diversity Council (https://vpdiversity.virginia.edu/diversity-council) includes representatives from the faculty, students and administration, and meets periodically “to discuss and consider forward-looking, proactive strategies, methods, and approaches that will help to make U.Va a more diverse and welcoming environment at all levels.”

Below is a summary of all incidents reported through the University’s Just Report It (“JRI”) system (http://www.virginia.edu/justreportit/bias/) as “bias” related or motivated in the opinion of the reporting student, faculty, staff or community member. A total of fourteen (14) specific incidents were reported via JRI.

Reports by Month (Incident Date):
*August 2015: 1
*September 2015: 0
*October 2015: 5
*November 2015: 1
*December 2015: 2
*January 2016: 2
*February 2016: 2
*March 2016: 0
*April 2016: 1
*May 2016: 0
*June 2016: 0
*July 2016: 0

Reports addressed using the University’s Policy on Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (Title IX) are not included in this summary, with the exception of reports indicating a bias target of LGBTQ sexual orientation/sexual identity.

The reports have been classified into one of four categories:

[1] As explained on the Just Report It website, the University defines a “bias” report as “any report of a threat or act of harassment or intimidation – verbal, written or physical – which is personally directed against or targets a University of Virginia student because of that student’s age, color, disability, marital status, national or ethnic origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, veteran status or family medical or genetic information.” There are three (3) reports received via JRI that describe conduct defined by the University as motivated by bias.

Reported Bias Target:
*Race: 1
*National/Ethnic Origin: 1
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 1
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 3
*Physical Assault: 2
Reported Location:
*Public Space Off-Grounds: 3

Reports Submitted Anonymously: 0
Some reports are counted more than once in terms of conduct type or bias target, as certain reports are described as involving multiple forms of conduct and/or bias targets. In addition, multiple Just Report It reports received concerning the same incident are counted as a single report in this summary.
The University’s definition of bias may not be the definition of bias used by federal agencies.

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 1
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 2
* Disciplinary Referral/Sanctions: 2

In instances where an alleged perpetrator is unknown, the University’s ability to respond is limited. However, reporting these incidents remains important, as it informs the University’s efforts to prevent future bias incidents, such as public announcements, enhanced or targeted training (e.g., the current development of implicit bias training for students), community forums (e.g., the Provost’s fall 2016 charrette), increased resources, and creation of a bias review team.
In instances where an alleged perpetrator is identified and a policy violation is established, available sanctions may include educational, restorative, rehabilitative, and punitive components. Students facing disciplinary referral may be subject to a range of sanctions including admonition, restitution, no-contact directives, counseling and educational programs, community service, suspension and expulsion. Non-disciplinary interventions and remedies include a host of actions such as increased monitoring, supervision, and/or security at locations or activities where the reported conduct occurred or is likely to reoccur; targeted or broad-based educational programming or training for relevant individuals or groups; academic and/or University housing modifications for student complainants; workplace modifications for employee complainants; and other restorative measures. Employees facing disciplinary referral may be subject to a range of sanctions including informal and formal counseling, transfer of position, removal of administrative appointment, demotion, suspension and termination of employment.


[2] Four (4) reports received via Just Report It describe conduct that is not “personally directed against or targets” an identified student and thus do not meet the University’s definition of “bias,” although the reports describe “a threat or act of harassment or intimidation” that is directed against or targets a group based on one or more protected characteristics described in the University’s definition.
Reported Bias Target:
*Race: 3
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 2
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 1
*Written/Online Harassment: 3
Reported Location:
*First Year Residence: 1
*Public Space On-Grounds: 2
*Online/Internet: 1

Reports Submitted Anonymously: 1

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 3
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 1
* Non-Disciplinary Interventions & Remedies: 1

[3] Six (6) reports received via Just Report It, upon review: (a) do not appear to involve any bias-motivated conduct, or (b) involve otherwise protected speech.
Reported Bias Target:
*Race: 1
*National/Ethnic Origin: 2
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 2
*Religion: 1
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 2
*Discriminatory Treatment: 2
*Insensitive Actions: 2
*Physical Assault: 1
Reported Location:
*First Year Residence: 1
*Academic Building: 2
*Non-Academic University Building: 1
*Public Space On-Grounds: 1
*Public Space Off-Grounds: 1

Reports Submitted Anonymously: 0

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 1
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 5
* Disciplinary Referral/Sanctions: 1
* Non-Disciplinary Interventions & Remedies: 4

[4] One (1) report received via Just Report It does not describe conduct with sufficient detail to allow evaluation and such information is not readily ascertainable by other means.
Reported Bias Target
*Sexual Orientation/Identity: 1
Reported Conduct Type:
*Verbal Harassment: 1
Reported Location:
*Upper-Class Residence: 1

Reports Submitted Anonymously: 1

Alleged Perpetrator(s) Unknown: 1
Alleged Perpetrator(s) Identified: 0

Apply to Live on the Lawn (2017-2018)

October 31st, 2016

Applications are now available to live on the Lawn. Learn more here.

Personal Safety on Halloween

October 27th, 2016

Dear Students:

As October comes to a close and just over six weeks of classes remain in the semester, I’m reaching out to briefly discuss two important issues. I respectfully ask that you take a moment to read what follows.

This email includes information on:

  1. ADAPT’s Safe Halloween Event
  2. Halloween safety, particularly around alcohol

I recognize that most students do not engage in hazardous drinking. Those who do place their own health and safety at risk, and also impact their friends around them. Each year at this time, we see an increase in alcohol consumption and the often serious consequences that follow.


Below are resources and tips provided by your peers on the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Team (ADAPT) and my colleagues in the Gordie Center at Student Health
. For information on the Halloween safety campaign, please go to the ADAPT Facebook page. The first 1,000 people to sign the ADAPT/One Less/Chi Psi pledge to be an active bystander this Halloween will receive a free water bottle and candy.I am grateful that so many of you understand the importance of being an active bystander, calling 911, or seeking other assistance when you see someone at risk.

Halloween Safety

  • Always carry a photo ID and a fully charged cellphone. Make thoughtful choices in selecting a costume. Be sensitive to how others may perceive your costume.
  • Some people with harmful intentions may take advantage of being unrecognizable in a Halloween costume. Stay in an environment where you can easily get help or move away from someone who is threatening your safety. Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Avoid wearing a costume that does not allow you to see and move freely. Be sure decorations are nonflammable (and use flameless candles).
  • Utilize all safety resources, such as Safe Ride and the UVA/Ambassadors, who provide security in areas near the Corner.

Alcohol Safety

I hope you will avoid alcohol if you are under the legal age to drink. Even if you are of legal age, use of alcohol may pose serious safety risks. If you do choose to drink, several simple precautions can minimize risks to yourself and others.

  • Pace and Space: Sip your drink instead of chugging, alternate with water or soda, and have no more than 1 drink per hour. On average, it takes nearly 3 hours for most people to eliminate the alcohol in 2 standard drinks.
  • Eat before and while drinking: Alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream more slowly when there is food (especially protein) in your stomach.
  • Avoid mixing alcohol with other drugs: Some prescription and over-the-counter drugs (antihistamines and sedatives, for example) can increase alcohol’s effects. Caffeine and other stimulants can trick you into feeling less impaired.
  • Use caution when sick or tired: When you’re sleep-deprived or ill, alcohol enters the body more quickly.
  • Be aware of your environment: Situational tolerance develops when a person consistently drinks the same type of alcohol or in the same location. Changing location or beverage type can cause greater impairment. Avoid “punches” and other drinks you did not make yourself. Punches often include high-concentration alcohol masked by a sweet taste. You should only drink what you mixed yourself or from a container you opened.
  • Stay in a group in which at least one person remains sober and make sure no one is left behind.
  • Consider using a smartphone app such as Find My Friends or Circle of Six to enable you to quickly alert friends to your location and need for assistance. Look out for your friends who are drinking. Use “PUBS” as a guide to the symptoms of alcohol overdose:
    • Puking while passed out
    • Unresponsive to stimulation (pinch or shaking)
    • Breathing (slow, shallow, or no breathing)
    • Skin (blue, cold, or clammy)
  • If you see even one sign of alcohol overdose, call 911. If you are unsure, call the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222 for confidential, expert advice.
  • Students will not face University disciplinary action for seeking medical help involving alcohol, and there is no charge for the rescue squad.
  • Concerned about your drinking? Hoos in Recovery can help. This student group meets weekly to share a meal and provide support for students interested in living sober.

I hope you have a fun and safe Halloween. Following these simple safety tips will help ensure that occurs.

Sincerely,

Allen W. Groves
University Dean of Students

An Important Message from University Dean of Students Allen Groves

September 28th, 2016

Dear Students:

I know your time is valuable as midterm exams are occurring, but I respectfully ask you to take a few minutes to read my message that follows.

On Monday, the publication Inside Higher Education ran a story entitled, “Epidemic of Racist Incidents,” noting that such incidents on American college campuses “have multiplied at the very beginning of the academic year.” No university is immune to this ugly development.

I know the University is not an island separate from the ills of the greater society of which we are a part. However, as a place that takes pride in framing itself as a Community of Trust, we can improve. To achieve the ideals we profess to support will take honest introspection and personal action. The recent charrette hosted by the Provost offers a good start. Racist, misogynistic, xenophobic, and homophobic slurs do not originate in a vacuum. They are a product of learned behavior and, unfortunately, ingrained bias against difference. If we are to rid this community of such ugliness, we each must start with an honest look in the mirror.

A critical step to a truly welcoming and inclusive community also requires us to continue applying the Green Dot strategy of being more than a bystander, just as we have worked as a community to confront sexual and gender-based harassment and violence. “Not on Our Grounds” must also apply to observed acts of all types of bias. When we see something, we need to say something. Community values mean nothing if no one is willing to speak up when they are violated. Reports of such incidents, including anonymous reports, may be made using our Just Report It online system, via www.virginia.edu/justreportit/bias. Such reports are shared directly with the Office of the Dean of Students and the Office for Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights.

Confronting and condemning acts of bias isn’t “political correctness” or inconsistent with our cherished Constitutional ideal of freedom of expression. We can and should be a place where even the most controversial issues of the day may be debated with intellectual vigor and passion, and no offense should be taken as a result. However, hurling a racial, ethnic, or homophobic slur at a passing student in the dead of night doesn’t qualify as protected speech. It should be condemned for the targeted discriminatory harassment it is.

The reputation of a University may be the product of many generations of graduates and faculty, but its character is shaped by the students presently in residence: each of you. I have great confidence in your ability to reject ugliness, bias, and hatred. Every student at UVA earned the right to be here and fully deserves their place in the class. It is incumbent upon each of us to make that clear in our daily actions.

A final note: Yesterday, after I had drafted the above message to you, I became aware of a letter posted at various points on Grounds, purporting to be the Z Society’s endorsement of Donald Trump for President. The Z Society has since disavowed the letter, and it clearly originated from another source. The timing of the letter, the messages contained therein, and the use of a quote attributed to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has upset and angered many students and other members of the community, and they are right to use their voices to express these strong feelings. I join them in that sentiment.

In the wake of the events described above, I ask each of us in the UVA community to refocus our attention and energy on the underlying causes of hateful speech. True change requires sustained personal and collective commitment.

Respectfully,

Allen W. Groves

University Dean of Students

09/02/16 Statement by Kent-Dabney Senior Resident on Bias Incident.

September 2nd, 2016

Dear Kent Dabney,

Sometime early this morning, our dorm was vandalized and hate speech was written on several peoples’ doors, walls, and white boards. The words written were derogatory racial slurs that have no place in our community. There is no excuse for this behavior and it will not be tolerated. I am deeply disappointed and saddened by this act of prejudice and hatred towards our community.

UVA is intended to be an extraordinary community, especially for its First Year Students. It is supposed to be a place in which EVERYONE may feel happy, safe, and able to be their full self. Events like this seriously harm our community. It makes many of our community members (including myself) feel unsafe, unwelcome, and unwanted. To anyone who may feel this way, I sincerely apologize and wish for you to know that I, and the entire Kent-Dabney RA staff, welcome you here, want you here, and hope that you may always feel safe.

In an effort to provide space for reflection and discussion about this event, myself and all of your RAs will be available throughout the evening on and off of coverage to discuss what happened.

Kent Dabney is our home. Together, we can make this a community more than just a place where we sleep and study. Together, we can aim to be extraordinary. My hope is that we may all move forward with compassion in our hearts, understanding in our minds, and an appreciation for how our actions can impact those around us. Please reach out if you have any questions, comments, or concerns.

If anyone has any information regarding who may have participate in this act, please reach out to myself, your RA, the Dean on Call (434-243-3326) or our Area Coordinator, Daniel Fairley (dwf3f@eservices.virginia.edu).

Sincerely,
Alex Knutson

***********************************************************

Additionally the Office of Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights (“EOCR”) want to remind you all about UVA’s core values, which include honor and diversity. UVA is committed to ensuring that all students have the opportunity to participate in its educational programs, activities, and opportunities in an environment free of bias, discrimination, and harassment. This commitment also extends to UVA residence halls.

As a member of UVA’s residential community and a UVA student, you are expected to treat your fellow residents with civility and respect. UVA strongly prohibits any verbal or written act of harassment or intimidation which targets a UVA student on the basis of age, color, disability, gender identity, marital status, national or ethnic origin, political affiliation, pregnancy, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, veteran status or family medical or genetic information. Please visit the link below to familiarize yourself with UVA’s Preventing and Addressing Discrimination and Harassment policy, which protects students as well as faculty and staff:
· http://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/HRM-009

If you have any questions or concerns, UVA offers numerous resources. Please contact EOCR or the Office of the Dean of Students for more information:
· http://eocr.virginia.edu/ and
· http://www.virginia.edu/justreportit/bias/support-resources/

Virginia/Charlottesville legislation that can impact party hosts

August 10th, 2016

Know the legal risks

Hosts:

  1. Purchasing, Giving, Providing, or Assisting in Providing Alcohol to a Person Under 21
    Class 1 misdemeanor, mandatory driver’s license suspension of 1 year; possible fine up to $2,500, possible jail sentence up to 1 year
  1. Providing Alcohol to an Intoxicated Person
    Class 1 misdemeanor, Up to $2,500 fine and/or one year in jail
  1. Noise Violations (16) –Above 55dB (a normal conversation) between 10pm and 6am
    Class 4 misdemeanor, fine up to $2,500
  1. Unlawful accumulations of garbage, refuse, etc. (5-148)
    Class 1 misdemeanor, fee up to $2500 + fee to clean it up

All students:

  1. Underage /Alcohol consumption/ possession/ purchase
    Class 1 misdemeanor, mandatory minimum $500 fine (max. Of $2500) or 50 hours of community service AND driver’s license suspension of 6 months to 1 year; Possible jail sentence up to 1 year
  1. Possession of open alcoholic beverage containers in public places (17-37)
    Class 4 misdemeanor, fine up to $250
  1. Indecent Exposure (Urinating, etc. in public view of others can result in an arrest for sexual criminal misdemeanor)
    Class 4 misdemeanor, $250 fine and 10 years on the sexual offense registry
  1. Public profanity and drunkenness (17-12)
    Class 4 misdemeanor, fine up to $250
  1. Damaging or Defacing property generally (5-146)
    Class 1 misdemeanor, fine up to $2500
  1. Trespassing
    Class 1 misdemeanor, minimum fine of $500 (up to $2,500)
  1. Obstructing members of the rescue squad
    Class 2 misdemeanor, maximum $1,000 fine
  1. Obstructing Justice – Knowingly obstructing a law enforcement officer in performance of his/her duties
    Class 1 misdemeanor, $500 minimum fine
  1. Assault and Battery – knowingly committing an assault or an assault and battery against a law-enforcement officer
    Class 6 felony, mandatory minimum term of confinement of six months.
  1. Disorderly conduct
    A person is guilty of disorderly conduct, if, with the intent to cause public inconvenience, annoyance, or alarm, or recklessly creating a risk thereof, he or she

    • In any street, highway, public building, or while in or on a public conveyance, or public place engages in conduct having a direct tendency to cause acts of violence by the person or persons at whom, individually, such conduct is directed
    • The person in charge of any such building, place, conveyance, meeting, operation or activity may eject there from any person who violates any provision of this section, with the aid, if necessary, of any persons who may be called upon for such purpose.
    • Class 1 misdemeanor, minimum $500 fine

Statement from Patricia M. Lampkin, Allen W. Groves, and Maurice Apprey

April 19th, 2016

To the University Community:

Yesterday afternoon, we learned that one or more individuals, who have not been identified and who may or may not be members of the University community, left chalked statements on sidewalks in two different areas of the Grounds. The statements can only be characterized as racist and transphobic.  We are grateful to those students who utilized the Just Report It online system to alert us of these acts of harassment against members of the UVA community of trust.  A bias-motivated act against any one of us is an act against all.

We might wonder what prompted this person or persons to act with such ugliness and spite. It may have been misplaced anger and resentment, or the thrill of anonymity.  Perhaps it is simply a desire to divide our community and instill mistrust.  Regardless of motive, we condemn these cowardly acts done in the dark of night, and we affirm our support for all members of the University of Virginia community, especially those who appear to be the targets of this uncivil and small-minded act. Likewise, we affirm our values as a community based on trust, mutual respect and diversity in its membership.

Sincerely,

Patricia M. Lampkin
Vice President & Chief Student Affairs Officer 

Allen W. Groves
University Dean of Students 

Maurice Apprey
Dean, Office of African-American Affairs

Major Change in Traffic Pattern at Rugby Road and Culbreth Road near Beta Bridge

March 4th, 2016

Intersection to Become 3-way Stop on Tuesday, March 8

A major change in the traffic pattern at the intersection of Rugby Road and Culbreth Road is slated for Tuesday, March 8, when the City will implement a 3-way stop with the installation of two additional stop signs and bars. Please share this information widely with students and others with a need to know.

As you may know, these signs were previously installed in January 2016, but were removed when Charlottesville Police observed that drivers were consistently running them due to lack of ample warning signage.  When the stop signs are re-installed, an electronic message board and thermoplastic in-pavement signage will notify drivers of the change.  

The new signs will enhance safety in an area that over the years has become tangled with automobiles, pedestrians, buses, and cyclists converging at the gateway to UVA Arts Grounds, Band Building and Culbreth Road Garage, and proximate to neighborhoods with a dense student population – including fraternity and sorority houses.  The three-way stop is designed to slow and better organize vehicles in order to provide improved safety for pedestrians and cyclists. 

Gus Blagden Room Selection Committee

February 8th, 2016

The Committee to select an individual to live in the Augustus Silliman “Gus” Blagden, III, Room 15 West Lawn, is soliciting nominations from the University community. The Committee is looking for an undergraduate student in their fourth year of study at the University. The Scott family, who endowed the room in 1968, characterized the desired recipient as someone who:

  • Selflessly commits their time to serving the University community;
  • Maintains good moral character;
  • Conducts themselves according to a high standard;
  • Displays genuine concern and care for fellow students;
  • May be distinguished by academic merit (but need not be);
  • May be in a recognized position of leadership (but need not be); and
  • Carries these fine qualities with the utmost humility.

Gus was a student at the University in the early 1960’s. During these years, he was beloved and admired throughout the University community. Gene Corrigan, past athletic director at Virginia, knew Gus very well. He wrote that “Gus was a very average student and a mediocre athlete, at best, but was so well respected by his teammates that they chose him to be co-captain of the 1963 Lacrosse Team. He was, above all, a kind, generous and gentle person.” Gus died only a few years after graduation, but he had so affected the people with whom he had contact that this room was endowed and dedicated to his honor.

Nominations for the Gus Blagden room need to be submitted on-line at http://www.virginia.edu/deanofstudents/gusblagden/ and should describe the characteristics and qualities of the nominee that make them worthy of this high honor. Please include any personal stories that shed light on the character of the individual. Nominations must be at least 250 words and should not exceed 500 words. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, February 24 at 5:00 pm. (Nominations will not be accepted after this deadline.) Nominations carry an especially heavy weight as they will be the starting point of consideration for all nominees.