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The Academic Program
       

Spring 2013 East Asian Courses

Note: Always consult your advisor to be sure a specific course meets program requirments.

Areas of Study:
American Studies / Anthropology / Architectural History / Art History / Chinese / Chinese Literature in Translation/ Commerce / East Asian Studies/ Education / Graduate Business / History / Japanese / Japanese Literature in Translation/ Korean / Korean Literature in Translation/ Tibetan / Politics / Religious Studies


American Studies:

TBA

Anthropology

TBA

Architecutural History:

TBA

Art History

ARTH 2862: Arts of the Buddhist World- India to Japan
3 Credits, Daniel Ehnbom
TuTh 5:00PM - 6:15PM
Surveys the Buddhist sculpture, architecture and painting of India, China and Japan. Considers aspects of history and religious doctrine

ARTH 3591: Art History Colloquium: Monuments of Japanese Art
3 Credits, Dorothy Wong
TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

The courses focuses on key monuments and artistic traditions that have played a central role in Japanese art and society. Topics range from art and architecture of Shinto and Buddhism of the classical period, late Heian court art, Zen paintings and garden architecture, and also decorative paintings and woodblock prints of the later period.

 

ARTH 3861: Chinese Art

3 credits, Dorothy Wong
TuTh3:30pm-4:45pm

The course is a survey of the major epochs of Chinese art from pre-historic times to the modern period. The course intends to familiarize students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts. It also introduces the major philosophic and religions traditions, Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism that have shaped cultural and aesthetic ideals, Chinese art theories, and the writing of leading scholars.

 

The course fulfills the Non-Western Perpsectives requirement.

Chinese:

CHIN 1020 Elementary Chinese
4 Credits
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50, 11:00-11:50, 12:00-12:50, 1:00-1:50, 2:00-2:50
Prerequisite: CHIN 1010 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test). Chinese 102 is the
continuation of Chinese 1010. It is a 4-credit elementary level course in Modern Standard Mandarin
Chinese. Those who take this course should have taken Chinese 101 or the departmental placement test
in order to be placed in 1020. Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. The course helps students gain constant training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills on a daily basis. Students are expected to attend the class five days per week. Homework and quizzes are
completed on a weekly basis. In addition to daily preparation, two-hour individual lab work per week by
working on digital files is required outside of the class.

CHIN 2020 Intermediate Chinese
4 Credits
MTuWThF 9:00-9:50, 10:00-10:50, 11:00-11:50, 12:00-12:50
Prerequisite: CHIN 2010. This is the continuation of CHIN 201. Native or near-native speakers of Chinese
are not eligible for this course. The goals of this course are to help students improve their spoken and
aural proficiency, achieve a solid reading level and learn to express themselves clearly in writing on a
variety of covered topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary. These goals are approached
through grammar and reading-writing exercises, classroom drills, listening and speaking activities, and
written quizzes and exams.

CHIN 2060 Accelerated Intermediate Chinese
4 Credits
MTuWF 1:00-1:50
This course is specifically designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Mandarin Chinese, but with reading and writing ability equivalent to a student who has completed CHIN 102. The course focuses on reading and writing Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students: (a) achieve a basic level of reading competency with a vocabulary of 1000 characters; (b) express themselves clearly in written Chinese on a variety of topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary. Prerequisite: CHIN 106 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).

CHIN 3020/5020 Readings in Modern Chinese
3 Credits
MWTh 10:00-10:50am, 11:00-11:50am, , Hsin-Hsin Liang
MWF 1:00-1:50pm, Wenyi Chu
CHIN 3020/5020 is the continuation of CHIN 301/501. Native and near-native speakers of Chinese are not
eligible for this course. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) are equally stressed.
Students are required to listen to audio tapes everyday and actively participate in class activities. Student work is evaluated on the basis of daily attendance, exercises, dictations, quizzes, oral performances and exams. The class is conducted mainly in Mandarin Chinese.

CHIN 3025: Language House Conversation
1 Credits, Ran Zhao
Day/Time TBA
For students residing in the Chinese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission..

CHIN 4020/7020 Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese
3 Credits, Hsin-Hsin Liang
MWTh 10:00-10:50 AM, 11:00-11:50 AM
This 3-credit course is the continuation of CHIN 401/CHIN 701. Students who have not had CHIN
401/701 are required to take a placement exam. There is no textbook. Students will learn to read or
understand various styles of modern Chinese, including essays, documentaries, prose fiction, and movies.
Readings will be lengthier and more challenging than those in CHIN 401/701. Student work is evaluated
on the basis of dictations, quizzes/tests, oral performance, frequent essays, class participation, and
attendance. The class is conducted solely in Chinese.

CHIN 4030/7030 Business Chinese
3 Credits, Shuang Sun
MoWeFr 2:00 - 2:50 PM
Business Chinese is a one-term language course for business purposes designed for students who have studied Chinese for at least four years in a regular college program or with the equivalent language proficiency. It is aimed to enhance student's Chinese skills in the business context and promote their understanding about the macro and micro business environment and culture in contemporary China.

CHIN 4060 Accelerated Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese
3 Credits, Miao-Fen Tseng
MoWeFr 1:00PM - 1:50PM
Prerequisite: CHIN 3060 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).
The goal of CHIN 4060 is to continue enhancing students' reading comprehension and writing skills by systematically exposing them to formal written Chinese, works of literature, and vigorous writing exercises. By the end of the course the students should be able to read authentic materials with the help of a dictionary and be able to write essays of 500 words in length on assigned topics.

CHIN 4993/8993: Independent Study in Chinese
1-3 credits

Chinese Literature in Translation:

CHTR 3020/5020: Survey of Modern Chinese Literature
3 credits, Charles Laughlin
MoWe 2:00-3:15 PM
A general introduction to modern Chinese literary culture. Examines the major genres through selected readings of representative authors. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement.

CHTR 3850: Documenting Writing and Film in China
3 credits, Charles Laughlin
Tu 3:00pm-6:30pm
A seminar exploring the role of the documentary impulse in modern Chinese writing and film. Beginning with reportage literature and foreign documentaries about China from the early 20th century, the course follows the development of documentary art forms in the People's Republic of China (with some attention to Taiwan as well), culminating in the recent trend of independent documentary film making and its influence on narrative film. Fulfills the second writing and non-western perspectives requirement.

Commerce:

Comm 4390: Global Commerce Immersion: Market Insights in China
4 credits, James Maxham
We 5:00-6:45 PM
A second research-oriented course in the Marketing concentration, curriculum that blends relevant classroom discussions, executive presentations, company visits, and marketing research to explore global consumer behavior, market dynamics, and cross-cultural marketing strategies. The course will expand some of the topics addressed in COMM 3020 and 3330, with special attention given to the different aspects of marketing in specific global markets.

East Asian Studies:

EAST 1010 - 001 (Lecture): East Asian Canons and Cultures
3 credits, Gustav Heldt
TuTh 3:30PM - 4:45PM
An introduction to conceptions of self, society, and the universe as they have been expressed in canonical literary, philosophical, and religious texts in East Asia from earliest times up through modern times. Readings will be in English translation, supplemented by reference.

EAST 4993: Independent Study
1-3 credits, Staff
Independent study in special field under the direction of a faculty member in East Asian Languages, Literatures, and Culture

EAST 4998 - 001 (Independent Study): Senior Thesis
3 credits
Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies or East Asian Languages and Literatures.
A two-semester sequence of tutorial work for students completing a Senior Thesis as part of the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies or East Asian Languages and Literatures.

EAST 4999 - 001 (Independent Study): Senior Thesis
3 credits
Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies or East Asian Languages and Literatures.
A two-semester sequence of tutorial work for students completing a Senior Thesis as part of the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies or East Asian Languages and Literatures.

EAST 8998: (Independent Study): Non-Topical Research: Preparation for Research
1-12 credits
For students in the East Asian Studies Masters program needing non-topical research hours for thesis research.

EAST 8998: (Independent Study): Non-Topical Research
1-12 credits
For students in the East Asian Studies Masters program needing non-topical research hours for thesis research.

Graduate Business:

GBUS 8305: Strategic Thinking: Integrating East and West
1.5 credits, Ming-Jer Chen
As economies and businesses become more global, companies worldwide will increasingly need to examine their economic practices and beliefs. The purpose of this seminar is to help participants 1) develop a deep understanding of the strategic concepts and business models underlying foreign (in this case, Chinese) business, based on a thorough knowledge of cultural and institutional differences. Prerequisites: Restricted to Darden Students.

History:

HIEA 1501 - 001 (Seminar): Introductory Seminar in East Asian History: War and Memory in Japan
3 credits, Brad Reed
Mo 6:00-8:30pm
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history. Fulfills the Historical Studies / Non-Western Perspectives / SWR requirements.

HIEA 1501 - 002 (Seminar): Introductory Seminar in East Asian History: Thoughts and Religion in China
3 credits, Cong Zhang
Tu 1:00 - 3:00 pm
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history. Fulfills the Historical Studies / Non-Western Perspectives / SWR requirements.

HIEA 2559-001: Social & Cultural History of Imperial China
3 credits, Cong Zhang
TuTh 9:30-10:45pm
This survey course explores some of the major characteristics of Chinese culture and society in the imperial times and the forces that have shaped them at various historical stages. Topics include intellectual development, institutional and popular religions, urban and rural life, family relations and kinship organizations, and etc. Students read both primary sources (in English translation) and secondary literature and develop their skills at critical thinking, analysis, and oral and written argument. No prior knowledge of Chinese history is required.

HIEA 3112 Late Imperial China

3 credits, Bradly Reed
MWF 10:00-10:50am
Survey of the social, political, and cultural history of China from 10th to the early 20th centuries. Topics include the philosophic basis of state and society, the formation of social elites, the influence of nomadic peoples, and patterns of popular dissent and rebellion, among others. Fulfills Historical Studies and Non-Western Perspective requirement.

HIEA 3172 : The Japanese Empire
3 credits, Robert Stolz
MoWe 2:00-3:15pm
This course is an exploration of Japan's imperial project from roughly 1890-1945. We will start by developing a critical theoretical vocabulary with which we will then focus on three recent and important books on Japanese imperialism in East Asia. At the end of the semester we will also look briefly at anti-imperial and decolonization movements as well as the status of the category of "empire" for analyzing the postwar period. Fulfills Historical Studies and Non-Western Perspective requirement.

HIEA 3559 : New Course in East Asian History: China and the Cold War
3 credits, STAFF
TuTh 2:00-3:15pm

 

HIEA 4993: Independent Study in East Asia
1-3 credits, Bradly Reed

HIEA 5559 : New Course in East Asian History: China's Borderlands
3 credits, STAFF
Mo 3:30-6:00pm

Japanese

JAPN 1020 First Year Japanese
4 Credits, Mieko Kawai
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50, 11:00-11:50, 12:00-12:50
Prerequisite: JAPN 1010, or equivalent.
Introduces the basic speech patterns and grammatical units, including casual, daily spoken style, and the
polite speech used in formal occasions. Emphasizes speaking, listening, and reading. Writing hiragana,
katakana, and 200 kanji are also introduced.

JAPN 2020 Second Year Japanese
4 Credits, Miyuki Kamiya
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50, 11:00-11:50
Prerequisite: JAPN 2010 or equivalent.
Continuation of Elementary Japanese introducing more complex sentence patterns, idioms, and
vocabulary to prepare students for an intermediate-level communication. Reinforces spoken Japanese
skills with writing and reading exercises, and 250 kanji are introduced.

JAPN 3020/5020 Third Year Japanese II
3 Credits, Tomomi Marshall
TuTh 9:30AM - 10:45AM, 11:00AM - 12:15PM
Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Emphasizes comprehension and active reproduction of modern Japanese beyond the basic patterns of speech and writing. Various topics on current Japanese culture and society are introduced.

JAPN 3025 - 001 (Lecture): Language House Conversation
1 credit, Tomomi Marshal
Day/Time TBA
For students residing in the Japanese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.

JAPN 3110 Supplementary Reading in Japanese II
1 Credit, Tomomi Marshal
Mo 10:00-10:50am
The second of a two-part reading course, to be taken in conjunction with JAPN 3020. In-depth study of authentic materials such as newspapers, short essays, and brief articles. Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or equivalent background.

JAPN 4710/5710 Introduction to Literary Japanese (Bungo)
3 Credits, Gustav Heldt
We 2:00-4:30 PM
An introduction to classical Japanese; selections from classical narratives and poetry.

JAPN 4820: Mysteries, Detective Fiction and Business Novels
3 credits, Michiko Wilson
TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM
Reading and discussion in Japanese. Develops comprehension and verbal expression skills at the fourth-year level. Reading selections include some on Japan's bestselling and award-winning writers, Seicho Matsumoto, Miyuki Miyabe, and Ikke Shimizu. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent..

JAPN 4993-001: Independent Study in Japanese
1-3 credits, Michiko Wilson

JAPN 4993-002: Independent Study in Japanese

1-3 credits, Gustav Heldt


Japanese in Translation:

JPTR 3020/5020: Survey of Modern Japanese Literature
3 credits, Michiko Wilson
We 3:30PM - 6:00PM
Introduction to the modern Japanese cannon (1890's to the present). Writers studied include Natsume Sseki, the first modern writer to delve into the human psyche; Mori gai, the surgeon-turned writer; Rynsuke Akutagawa, the consummate writer of short stories; Shiga Naoya, the "god" of "I-Novel" Japanese fiction; Yukio Mishima, whose seppuku suicide caused a sensation world-wide; End Shsaku, the Christian writer; two Nobel laureates, Yasunari Kawabata, the pure aesthetician, and Kenzaburo E, the political gadfly.

Korean:

KOR 1020 Elementary Korean
4 Credits, Junghee Kim
MTuWThF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, 12:00-12:50 PM

KOR 1559:001: Accelerated Elementary Korean
4 Credits, Junghee Kim
MTuWThF 9:00-9:50 AM
This course will cover first year Elementary Korean in one semester. KOR1559 is designed for Korean heritage students who have a Korean language background but who do not have formal training in reading and writing. The focus of the class is to promote students’ literacy skills. Students in this class will start learning basic Hangeul writing and principles, and practice basic sentence structures in order to build fundamental grammar skills in Korean. The course will also cover discussions of cultural topics such as Korean traditions, customs, and Korean culture in order to enhance students’ understanding modern Korean society.

KOR 2020 Intermediate Korean
4 Credits, Teresa Lee
MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 AM, 11:00-11:50 AM

KOR 3015 Language House Conversation

1 crecit, Teresa Lee

KOR 3020 Advanced Korean
3 Credits, Teresa Lee
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM

Korean in Translation:

KRTR 3390/5390: Gender in Modern Korean Film and Literature
3 credits, Susie Kim
Tu 3:30-6:00 PM
The seminar focuses on representations of gender in modern Korean films and literary texts. The course will focus on analysis of the text as well as discussion with an emphasis on critical thinking. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

KRTR 3800/5800: Seminar on Korea: Division North and South
3 Credits, Susie Kim
Mo 3:30PM - 6:00PM
This course examines narratives of division through films and literary texts. Sub-topics will include the Korean War, national division, generational conflict, and gender.

Tibetan:

TBTN 1020/8020: Elementary Tibetan II
4 Credits, Tsetan Nepali
MoTuWeThFr 9:00AM - 9:50AM
An introduction to the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan for beginners with the intention of developing proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Examples are drawn from Tibetan short stories and proverbs, among other sources. Students gain knowledge of Tibetan culture to improve communication skills using a dynamic, interactive format. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 1010 Elementary Tibetan I.

TBTN 2020/8021: Intermediate Tibetan II
4 Credits, Tsetan Nepali
MoTuWeThFr 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Pre-Requisites: TBTN 2010 Intermediate Tibetan I.
Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills.

TBTN 3030/8030 Advanced Modern Tibetan III
3 Credits, Tsetan Nepali
MoWeFr 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Pre-Requisites: TBTN 3020 Advanced Modern Tibetan II.
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan I/II language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan II.

TBTN 3040/8040 Advanced Modern Tibetan IV
3 Credits, Tsetan Nepali
MoWeFr 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Pre-Requisites: TBTN 3030 Advanced Modern Tibetan III.
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in previous courses.

TBTN 8060: Advanced Modern Tibetan for Research and Fieldwork
3 credits, Tsetan Nepali
MWF 12:00-12:50pm
A course in the Advanced Tibetan language sequence stressing mastery of Modern Tibetan as it is currently used in Tibetan communities and in Tibetan-language international media. Emphasis will be placed on fluency in speaking and listening comprehension as well as on the application of a wide variety of grammatical, syntactical, and rhetorical structures. Instruction will utilize Tibetan-language newspaper, journal, radio, and TV sources.

Politics:

TBA

Religious Studies:

RELB 2165: Buddhist Meditation
3 Credits, David Germano, Kurtis Schaeffer
Lecture: TuTh 11:00am -12:15pm

RELB 2450: Zen

3 credits, Paul Groner

TuTh 9:30-10:45 am

Srudies the development and history of the thought, practice, and goals of Zen Buddhism.

 

RELB 2715/5715: Chinese Religions
3 credits, Clarke Hudson
Th 3:30-6pm
This course serves as a general introduction to the religions of China, including Confucianism, Buddhism, Daoism, and popular religion. By emphasizing the reading of primary texts in translation, we will explore the major ideas and practices of these traditions, making special note of the cultural, historical, political and material contexts in which they were conceived and expressed.This course satisfies the Non-Western Perspectives Requirement, and there are no prerequisites.

RELB 3150: Seminar on Buddhism and Gender
3 Credits, Karen Lang
Tu 3:30-6:00 PM
This seminar takes as its point of departure Carolyn Bynum's statements: "No scholar studying religion, no participant in ritual, is ever neuter. Religious experience is the experience of men and women, and in no known society is this experience the same." The unifying theme of this seminar is gender and Buddhism. We will explore historical, textual and social questions relevant to the status of men and women in the Buddhist world from the time of Buddhism's origins to the present day. We will consider the issue of gender in relation to Buddhist views on sexuality, celibacy, and the formation of ideas about compassion, wisdom, selflessness, and non-duality.

RELB 3160 The Religions of Japan

3 Credits, Paul Groner

TuTh 3:30-4:45pm

Surveys the development of Japanese religions from pre-history to modern times.

 

RELB 3559 New Course in Buddhism

3 Credits, Clarke Hudson

TuTh 3:30-4:45pm

RELB 5055 Buddhist Philosophy
3 Credits, Karen Lang
Mo 3:30-6:00pm
Study of the Pali and Sanskritic Buddhist philosophical traditions.

RELB 5480 - 001 (Lecture): Literary and Spoken Tibetan VI
3 Credits, Steven Weinberger
TuTh 12:30-1:45pm
Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, or equivalent.
Advanced study in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present.

RELB 5715: Seminar on Chinese Religion and Society
3 credits, Clarke Hudson
Th 3:30-6pm
Studies Chinese religion and society within the context of a specific period of Chinese history, or in terms of a specific theme. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and popular religion will be covered (along with other forms of religion, as appropriate)

RELB 5810: Literary Tibetan VIII
3 Credits, Steven Weinberger
Examines the Yogachara-Svatantrika system as presented in Jang-kya's Presentation of Tenets, oral debate, and exercises in spoken Tibetan. Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, 5470, 5480 or equivalent

RELB 8310: Advanced Sanskrit/Pali I

1-3 Credits, Karen Lang

Advanced readings in poetry, psychology, or philosophy.