Student Financial Services Financial Aid
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Frequently Asked Questions

Question: Why are the Student Financial Services satisfactory academic progress requirements different from the academic requirements for my school?

Answer:  Satisfactory academic progress must comply with federal regulations governing student aid programs.

Question: Why was I denied aid if I am in “good standing” with my school?

Answer: Satisfactory academic progress standards for financial aid purposes may differ from the academic progress policies of the University and of each individual school. Therefore, it is possible that your school may consider you to be in good standing but you may not be meeting the SAP standards for financial aid.

Question: I have a 3.8 GPA. Why did I receive notification for not making satisfactory academic progress?

Answer: Satisfactory academic progress measures students’ academic performance in three areas: maximum time frame to complete a course of study, credit hour completion rate and cumulative grade point average. You must meet the requirements in all three areas to be meeting satisfactory academic progress.

Question: My dean told me that I have only completed 2 semesters but according to the Student Financial Services policy I’ve completed 4 semesters.  Why does Student Financial Services count semesters differently?

Answer: Satisfactory academic progress standards must comply with federal regulation. As a result, SAP standards may differ from the academic progress policies of the University and of each individual school.

Question: I want to withdraw from the University.  How will this affect my SAP status?

Answer:  The satisfactory academic progress policy considers all attempted credit hours in the calculation of credit hour completion rate. Attempted credit hours include all courses in which a student is enrolled after the add/drop period has ended for the term and for which academic credit will be earned. The hours that you attempted during the term in which you withdraw will still be included in the calculation to determine your credit hour completion rate and will also be included in the calculation of maximum time frame. The term will be counted towards the maximum terms of enrollment.

Question: I had to withdrawal for medical reasons. Why is that being counted against me?

Answer: The satisfactory academic progress policy considers all attempted credit hours in the calculation of credit hour completion rate. Attempted credit hours include all courses in which a student is enrolled after the add/drop period has ended for the term and for which academic credit will be earned.

Question: If I am denied financial aid because I’m not meeting SAP, will I still be eligible to attend the University?

Answer: Yes, you are still eligible to attend the University as long as you are meeting the academic progress standards for the School in which you are enrolled.  However, if you are denied financial aid for not meeting the Student Financial Services SAP standards, you are no longer eligible for federal, state, or institutional financial aid. 

Question: I am so far behind in my credits.  What should I do?

Answer:  The satisfactory academic progress policy provides for an appeal process for students who are not meeting the minimum standards. The Student Financial Services Appeals Committee may approve an appeal based upon the student following an academic plan, even if the plan does not provide for the student to meet the minimum standards of the policy at the next evaluation period.

Question: My financial aid has been suspended and I submitted a appeal. Do I still have to pay my bill if I’m hoping to receive financial aid to cover it?

Answer: Yes. All students are subject to the University’s policy for failure to pay financial obligations.

Question: How soon after submitting my appeal will I know the results?

Answer: Students will be notified of the appeal decision of the Student Financial Services Appeals Committee within 30 days of the completed appeal being received.

Question: My appeal was denied but I didn’t mention all of the circumstances that impacted my ability to make satisfactory academic progress. Can I submit another appeal to further explain my situation?

Answer: Students are given one opportunity per term to appeal their financial aid suspension. Therefore, it is critical for students to submit all relevant information that affected their satisfactory academic progress.

Question: If my appeal is denied, what are my options for paying for school?

Answer:  If your appeal is denied your only options for paying your educational expenses is to either pay out of pocket or to apply for a private student loan.

 

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Last Modified: Friday, 06-May-2011 16:30:55 EDT
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