• <h2><strong>Carr's Hill</strong></h2>
		Carr's Hill</strong></h2>

    Carr's Hill

    Carr's Hill
    Tuesday, April 21

    noon - 4 p.m.

    Located on the hill above the corner of Rugby Road and University Avenue, Carr’s Hill is home to the University's president. Currently, the home is occupied by U.Va.'s Eighth President, Teresa A. Sullivan and her husband, Douglas Laycock.

    In 2009, the University celebrated the centennial of Carr’s Hill, as designed by the New York architecture firm McKim, Mead and White. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house was part of the late 1890s-to-1900s building campaign that also included Cabell, Rouss, Cocke, and Garrett Halls and the North Portico and Rotunda interior.

    Please note: Carr’s Hill is a private home, and only certain areas are open.

    Image: Carr's Hill, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>University of Virginia Gardens</strong></h2>

    University of Virginia Gardens

    Tuesday, April 21

    Tours begin on the Rotunda steps - Lawn side at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

    The Garden Club of Virginia restored the University’s Pavilion Gardens with proceeds from Historic Garden Week, beginning with the West Pavilion gardens in 1947. Restoration included the surrounding serpentine walls, an original part of Jefferson’s Academical Village. The Garden Club of Virginia hired noted Colonial Williamsburg landscape architects Alden Hopkins and Donald Parker to design the Colonial Revival gardens. The West Pavilion Gardens were restored between 1947 and 1953 and the East Lawn between 1960 and 1965. Work in the gardens continues to be supported by the Garden Club of Virginia.

    • Pavilion Homes —East Lawn

    • Pavilion IV: Larry Sabato
    • Pavilion VI: Bob Sweeney and Lili Powell
    • *Student Room, TBA

    *Living on the Lawn in one of the original student rooms designed by Thomas Jefferson is an honor accorded to students in their final year of undergraduate study at the University.

    Image: Serpentine Wall in Spring, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Edgar Allen Poe Room</strong></h2>

    Edgar Allen Poe Room

    Tuesday, April 21

    Poe registered at the University of Virginia on February 14, 1826, the second session of the University. He lived in Room 13, West Range and was an active member of the Jefferson Literary Society. The University’s Raven Society maintains Poe’s room on the West Range as recognition of his time here.

    Image: Edgar Allen Poe Room, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library</strong></h2>

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special Presentation at 2 p.m.

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special presentation at 2 p.m. in the Auditorium by Timothy and Genevieve Keller, "Rural, historic, and scenic: Enduring qualities of the Piedmont's cultural landscape." Sometimes rural, historic and scenic mean the same thing, but the distinct qualities of each and the criteria for planning for them differ in significant ways. The Kellers will address the particular challenges for landscape preservation, assessment, and enhancement in Central Virginia. Pioneers in cultural landscape preservation, J. Timothy Keller, FASLA, and Genevieve Keller, Honorary ASLA, are founders and principals of Land and Community Associates, a firm that focuses on integrating innovative cultural landscape theory and practice with historic preservation and land use and community planning. Tim Keller is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Design, Iowa State University and the Albemarle County At-Large Planning Commissioner. Genevieve Keller is Vice-President of Preservation Virginia (formerly APVA) and serves on a number of boards and commissions in Virginia.

    A selection of items from UVA's Special Collections related to the cultural landscape of the Piedmont will be displayed 30 minutes before and after the 2:00 p.m. presentation.

    Image: Railings within the Harrison Institute, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Morea Garden and Arboretum</strong></h2>

    Morea Garden and Arboretum

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Located on Sprigg Lane, off Emmet Street just north of Alumni Hall, the Morea Garden features a special selection of shrubs and trees surrounding a historic Federal period home. The house is named after the mulberries cultivated for experiments with silkworms.

    Morea was built by John Patten Emmet, one of the first professors chosen by Mr. Jefferson for the University. The large old trees and a beautifully landscaped botanical collection were started by The Albemarle Garden Club in 1964. Morea was the runner-up for the Garden Club of Virginia’s Common Wealth Award in 2005 and 2006. Tours will be limited to the gardens.

    Image: U.Va. Gardens, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>University of Virginia Gardens</strong></h2>

    University of Virginia Gardens

    University of Virginia Gardens

    Tuesday, April 21

    Tours begin on the Rotunda steps - Lawn side at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

    The Garden Club of Virginia restored the University’s Pavilion Gardens with proceeds from Historic Garden Week, beginning with the West Pavilion gardens in 1947. Restoration included the surrounding serpentine walls, an original part of Jefferson’s Academical Village. The Garden Club of Virginia hired noted Colonial Williamsburg landscape architects Alden Hopkins and Donald Parker to design the Colonial Revival gardens. The West Pavilion Gardens were restored between 1947 and 1953 and the East Lawn between 1960 and 1965. Work in the gardens continues to be supported by the Garden Club of Virginia.

    • Pavilion Homes —East Lawn

    • Pavilion IV: Larry Sabato
    • Pavilion VI: Bob Sweeney and Lili Powell
    • *Student Room, TBA

    *Living on the Lawn in one of the original student rooms designed by Thomas Jefferson is an honor accorded to students in their final year of undergraduate study at the University.

    Image: Serpentine Wall in Spring, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Edgar Allen Poe Room</strong></h2>

    Edgar Allen Poe Room

    Tuesday, April 21

    Poe registered at the University of Virginia on February 14, 1826, the second session of the University. He lived in Room 13, West Range and was an active member of the Jefferson Literary Society. The University’s Raven Society maintains Poe’s room on the West Range as recognition of his time here.

    Image: Edgar Allen Poe Room, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library</strong></h2>

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special Presentation at 2 p.m.

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special presentation at 2 p.m. in the Auditorium by Timothy and Genevieve Keller, "Rural, historic, and scenic: Enduring qualities of the Piedmont's cultural landscape." Sometimes rural, historic and scenic mean the same thing, but the distinct qualities of each and the criteria for planning for them differ in significant ways. The Kellers will address the particular challenges for landscape preservation, assessment, and enhancement in Central Virginia. Pioneers in cultural landscape preservation, J. Timothy Keller, FASLA, and Genevieve Keller, Honorary ASLA, are founders and principals of Land and Community Associates, a firm that focuses on integrating innovative cultural landscape theory and practice with historic preservation and land use and community planning. Tim Keller is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Design, Iowa State University and the Albemarle County At-Large Planning Commissioner. Genevieve Keller is Vice-President of Preservation Virginia (formerly APVA) and serves on a number of boards and commissions in Virginia.

    A selection of items from UVA's Special Collections related to the cultural landscape of the Piedmont will be displayed 30 minutes before and after the 2:00 p.m. presentation.

    Image: Railings within the Harrison Institute, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Morea Garden and Arboretum</strong></h2>

    Morea Garden and Arboretum

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Located on Sprigg Lane, off Emmet Street just north of Alumni Hall, the Morea Garden features a special selection of shrubs and trees surrounding a historic Federal period home. The house is named after the mulberries cultivated for experiments with silkworms.

    Morea was built by John Patten Emmet, one of the first professors chosen by Mr. Jefferson for the University. The large old trees and a beautifully landscaped botanical collection were started by The Albemarle Garden Club in 1964. Morea was the runner-up for the Garden Club of Virginia’s Common Wealth Award in 2005 and 2006. Tours will be limited to the gardens.

    Image: U.Va. Gardens, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Carr's Hill</strong></h2>
		Carr's Hill</strong></h2>

    Carr's Hill

    Carr's Hill
    Tuesday, April 21

    noon - 4 p.m.

    Located on the hill above the corner of Rugby Road and University Avenue, Carr’s Hill is home to the University's president. Currently, the home is occupied by U.Va.'s Eighth President, Teresa A. Sullivan and her husband, Douglas Laycock.

    In 2009, the University celebrated the centennial of Carr’s Hill, as designed by the New York architecture firm McKim, Mead and White. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house was part of the late 1890s-to-1900s building campaign that also included Cabell, Rouss, Cocke, and Garrett Halls and the North Portico and Rotunda interior.

    Tours of the gardens will be given by Master Gardener John Sauer, Carr’s Hill gardener for Presidents Hereford, O’Neil, Casteen, and Sullivan.

    Please note: Carr’s Hill is a private home, and only certain areas are open.

    Image: Carr's Hill, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Edgar Allen Poe Room</strong></h2>

    Edgar Allen Poe Room

    Tuesday, April 21

    Poe registered at the University of Virginia on February 14, 1826, the second session of the University. He lived in Room 13, West Range and was an active member of the Jefferson Literary Society. The University’s Raven Society maintains Poe’s room on the West Range as recognition of his time here.

    Image: Edgar Allen Poe Room, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library</strong></h2>

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special Presentation at 2 p.m.

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special presentation at 2 p.m. in the Auditorium by Timothy and Genevieve Keller, "Rural, historic, and scenic: Enduring qualities of the Piedmont's cultural landscape." Sometimes rural, historic and scenic mean the same thing, but the distinct qualities of each and the criteria for planning for them differ in significant ways. The Kellers will address the particular challenges for landscape preservation, assessment, and enhancement in Central Virginia. Pioneers in cultural landscape preservation, J. Timothy Keller, FASLA, and Genevieve Keller, Honorary ASLA, are founders and principals of Land and Community Associates, a firm that focuses on integrating innovative cultural landscape theory and practice with historic preservation and land use and community planning. Tim Keller is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Design, Iowa State University and the Albemarle County At-Large Planning Commissioner. Genevieve Keller is Vice-President of Preservation Virginia (formerly APVA) and serves on a number of boards and commissions in Virginia.

    A selection of items from UVA's Special Collections related to the cultural landscape of the Piedmont will be displayed 30 minutes before and after the 2:00 p.m. presentation.

    Image: Railings within the Harrison Institute, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Morea Garden and Arboretum</strong></h2>

    Morea Garden and Arboretum

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Located on Sprigg Lane, off Emmet Street just north of Alumni Hall, the Morea Garden features a special selection of shrubs and trees surrounding a historic Federal period home. The house is named after the mulberries cultivated for experiments with silkworms.

    Morea was built by John Patten Emmet, one of the first professors chosen by Mr. Jefferson for the University. The large old trees and a beautifully landscaped botanical collection were started by The Albemarle Garden Club in 1964. Morea was the runner-up for the Garden Club of Virginia’s Common Wealth Award in 2005 and 2006. Tours will be limited to the gardens.

    Image: U.Va. Gardens, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Carr's Hill</strong></h2>
		Carr's Hill</strong></h2>

    Carr's Hill

    Carr's Hill
    Tuesday, April 21

    noon - 4 p.m.

    Located on the hill above the corner of Rugby Road and University Avenue, Carr’s Hill is home to the University's president. Currently, the home is occupied by U.Va.'s Eighth President, Teresa A. Sullivan and her husband, Douglas Laycock.

    In 2009, the University celebrated the centennial of Carr’s Hill, as designed by the New York architecture firm McKim, Mead and White. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house was part of the late 1890s-to-1900s building campaign that also included Cabell, Rouss, Cocke, and Garrett Halls and the North Portico and Rotunda interior.

    Tours of the gardens will be given by Master Gardener John Sauer, Carr’s Hill gardener for Presidents Hereford, O’Neil, Casteen, and Sullivan.

    Please note: Carr’s Hill is a private home, and only certain areas are open.

    Image: Carr's Hill, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>University of Virginia Gardens</strong></h2>

    University of Virginia Gardens

    University of Virginia Gardens

    Tuesday, April 21

    Tours begin on the Rotunda steps - Lawn side at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

    The Garden Club of Virginia restored the University’s Pavilion Gardens with proceeds from Historic Garden Week, beginning with the West Pavilion gardens in 1947. Restoration included the surrounding serpentine walls, an original part of Jefferson’s Academical Village. The Garden Club of Virginia hired noted Colonial Williamsburg landscape architects Alden Hopkins and Donald Parker to design the Colonial Revival gardens. The West Pavilion Gardens were restored between 1947 and 1953 and the East Lawn between 1960 and 1965. Work in the gardens continues to be supported by the Garden Club of Virginia.

    • Pavilion Homes —East Lawn

    • Pavilion IV: Larry Sabato
    • Pavilion VI: Bob Sweeney and Lili Powell
    • *Student Room, TBA

    *Living on the Lawn in one of the original student rooms designed by Thomas Jefferson is an honor accorded to students in their final year of undergraduate study at the University.

    Image: Serpentine Wall in Spring, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library</strong></h2>

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special Presentation at 2 p.m.

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special presentation at 2 p.m. in the Auditorium by Timothy and Genevieve Keller, "Rural, historic, and scenic: Enduring qualities of the Piedmont's cultural landscape." Sometimes rural, historic and scenic mean the same thing, but the distinct qualities of each and the criteria for planning for them differ in significant ways. The Kellers will address the particular challenges for landscape preservation, assessment, and enhancement in Central Virginia. Pioneers in cultural landscape preservation, J. Timothy Keller, FASLA, and Genevieve Keller, Honorary ASLA, are founders and principals of Land and Community Associates, a firm that focuses on integrating innovative cultural landscape theory and practice with historic preservation and land use and community planning. Tim Keller is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Design, Iowa State University and the Albemarle County At-Large Planning Commissioner. Genevieve Keller is Vice-President of Preservation Virginia (formerly APVA) and serves on a number of boards and commissions in Virginia.

    A selection of items from UVA's Special Collections related to the cultural landscape of the Piedmont will be displayed 30 minutes before and after the 2:00 p.m. presentation.

    Image: Railings within the Harrison Institute, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Morea Garden and Arboretum</strong></h2>

    Morea Garden and Arboretum

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Located on Sprigg Lane, off Emmet Street just north of Alumni Hall, the Morea Garden features a special selection of shrubs and trees surrounding a historic Federal period home. The house is named after the mulberries cultivated for experiments with silkworms.

    Morea was built by John Patten Emmet, one of the first professors chosen by Mr. Jefferson for the University. The large old trees and a beautifully landscaped botanical collection were started by The Albemarle Garden Club in 1964. Morea was the runner-up for the Garden Club of Virginia’s Common Wealth Award in 2005 and 2006. Tours will be limited to the gardens.

    Image: U.Va. Gardens, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Carr's Hill</strong></h2>
		Carr's Hill</strong></h2>

    Carr's Hill

    Carr's Hill
    Tuesday, April 21

    noon - 4 p.m.

    Located on the hill above the corner of Rugby Road and University Avenue, Carr’s Hill is home to the University's president. Currently, the home is occupied by U.Va.'s Eighth President, Teresa A. Sullivan and her husband, Douglas Laycock.

    In 2009, the University celebrated the centennial of Carr’s Hill, as designed by the New York architecture firm McKim, Mead and White. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house was part of the late 1890s-to-1900s building campaign that also included Cabell, Rouss, Cocke, and Garrett Halls and the North Portico and Rotunda interior.

    Tours of the gardens will be given by Master Gardener John Sauer, Carr’s Hill gardener for Presidents Hereford, O’Neil, Casteen, and Sullivan.

    Please note: Carr’s Hill is a private home, and only certain areas are open.

    Image: Carr's Hill, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>University of Virginia Gardens</strong></h2>

    University of Virginia Gardens

    University of Virginia Gardens

    Tuesday, April 21

    Tours begin on the Rotunda steps - Lawn side at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

    The Garden Club of Virginia restored the University’s Pavilion Gardens with proceeds from Historic Garden Week, beginning with the West Pavilion gardens in 1947. Restoration included the surrounding serpentine walls, an original part of Jefferson’s Academical Village. The Garden Club of Virginia hired noted Colonial Williamsburg landscape architects Alden Hopkins and Donald Parker to design the Colonial Revival gardens. The West Pavilion Gardens were restored between 1947 and 1953 and the East Lawn between 1960 and 1965. Work in the gardens continues to be supported by the Garden Club of Virginia.

    • Pavilion Homes —East Lawn

    • Pavilion IV: Larry Sabato
    • Pavilion VI: Bob Sweeney and Lili Powell
    • *Student Room, TBA

    *Living on the Lawn in one of the original student rooms designed by Thomas Jefferson is an honor accorded to students in their final year of undergraduate study at the University.

    Image: Serpentine Wall in Spring, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Edgar Allen Poe Room</strong></h2>

    Edgar Allen Poe Room

    Tuesday, April 21

    Poe registered at the University of Virginia on February 14, 1826, the second session of the University. He lived in Room 13, West Range and was an active member of the Jefferson Literary Society. The University’s Raven Society maintains Poe’s room on the West Range as recognition of his time here.

    Image: Edgar Allen Poe Room, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Morea Garden and Arboretum</strong></h2>

    Morea Garden and Arboretum

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Located on Sprigg Lane, off Emmet Street just north of Alumni Hall, the Morea Garden features a special selection of shrubs and trees surrounding a historic Federal period home. The house is named after the mulberries cultivated for experiments with silkworms.

    Morea was built by John Patten Emmet, one of the first professors chosen by Mr. Jefferson for the University. The large old trees and a beautifully landscaped botanical collection were started by The Albemarle Garden Club in 1964. Morea was the runner-up for the Garden Club of Virginia’s Common Wealth Award in 2005 and 2006. Tours will be limited to the gardens.

    Image: U.Va. Gardens, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Carr's Hill</strong></h2>
		Carr's Hill</strong></h2>

    Carr's Hill

    Carr's Hill
    Tuesday, April 21

    noon - 4 p.m.

    Located on the hill above the corner of Rugby Road and University Avenue, Carr’s Hill is home to the University's president. Currently, the home is occupied by U.Va.'s Eighth President, Teresa A. Sullivan and her husband, Douglas Laycock.

    In 2009, the University celebrated the centennial of Carr’s Hill, as designed by the New York architecture firm McKim, Mead and White. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house was part of the late 1890s-to-1900s building campaign that also included Cabell, Rouss, Cocke, and Garrett Halls and the North Portico and Rotunda interior.

    Tours of the gardens will be given by Master Gardener John Sauer, Carr’s Hill gardener for Presidents Hereford, O’Neil, Casteen, and Sullivan.

    Please note: Carr’s Hill is a private home, and only certain areas are open.

    Image: Carr's Hill, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>University of Virginia Gardens</strong></h2>

    University of Virginia Gardens

    Tuesday, April 23

    Tours begin on the Rotunda steps - Lawn side at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

    The Garden Club of Virginia restored the University’s Pavilion Gardens with proceeds from Historic Garden Week, beginning with the West Pavilion gardens in 1947. Restoration included the surrounding serpentine walls, an original part of Jefferson’s Academical Village. The Garden Club of Virginia hired noted Colonial Williamsburg landscape architects Alden Hopkins and Donald Parker to design the Colonial Revival gardens. The West Pavilion Gardens were restored between 1947 and 1953 and the East Lawn between 1960 and 1965. Work in the gardens continues to be supported by the Garden Club of Virginia.

    • Pavilion Homes —East Lawn

    • Pavilion IV: Larry Sabato
    • Pavilion VI: Bob Sweeney and Lili Powell
    • *Student Room, TBA

    *Living on the Lawn in one of the original student rooms designed by Thomas Jefferson is an honor accorded to students in their final year of undergraduate study at the University.

    Image: Serpentine Wall in Spring, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Edgar Allen Poe Room</strong></h2>

    Edgar Allen Poe Room

    Tuesday, April 21

    Poe registered at the University of Virginia on February 14, 1826, the second session of the University. He lived in Room 13, West Range and was an active member of the Jefferson Literary Society. The University’s Raven Society maintains Poe’s room on the West Range as recognition of his time here.

    Image: Edgar Allen Poe Room, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library</strong></h2>

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special Presentation at 2 p.m.

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special presentation at 2 p.m. in the Auditorium by Timothy and Genevieve Keller, "Rural, historic, and scenic: Enduring qualities of the Piedmont's cultural landscape." Sometimes rural, historic and scenic mean the same thing, but the distinct qualities of each and the criteria for planning for them differ in significant ways. The Kellers will address the particular challenges for landscape preservation, assessment, and enhancement in Central Virginia. Pioneers in cultural landscape preservation, J. Timothy Keller, FASLA, and Genevieve Keller, Honorary ASLA, are founders and principals of Land and Community Associates, a firm that focuses on integrating innovative cultural landscape theory and practice with historic preservation and land use and community planning. Tim Keller is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Design, Iowa State University and the Albemarle County At-Large Planning Commissioner. Genevieve Keller is Vice-President of Preservation Virginia (formerly APVA) and serves on a number of boards and commissions in Virginia.

    A selection of items from UVA's Special Collections related to the cultural landscape of the Piedmont will be displayed 30 minutes before and after the 2:00 p.m. presentation.

    Image: Railings within the Harrison Institute, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Carr's Hill</strong></h2>
		Carr's Hill</strong></h2>

    Carr's Hill

    Carr's Hill
    Tuesday, April 21

    noon - 4 p.m.

    Located on the hill above the corner of Rugby Road and University Avenue, Carr’s Hill is home to the University's president. Currently, the home is occupied by U.Va.'s Eighth President, Teresa A. Sullivan and her husband, Douglas Laycock.

    In 2009, the University celebrated the centennial of Carr’s Hill, as designed by the New York architecture firm McKim, Mead and White. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house was part of the late 1890s-to-1900s building campaign that also included Cabell, Rouss, Cocke, and Garrett Halls and the North Portico and Rotunda interior.

    Tours of the gardens will be given by Master Gardener John Sauer, Carr’s Hill gardener for Presidents Hereford, O’Neil, Casteen, and Sullivan.

    Please note: Carr’s Hill is a private home, and only certain areas are open.

    Image: Carr's Hill, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>University of Virginia Gardens</strong></h2>

    University of Virginia Gardens

    University of Virginia Gardens

    Tuesday, April 21

    Tours begin on the Rotunda steps - Lawn side at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

    The Garden Club of Virginia restored the University’s Pavilion Gardens with proceeds from Historic Garden Week, beginning with the West Pavilion gardens in 1947. Restoration included the surrounding serpentine walls, an original part of Jefferson’s Academical Village. The Garden Club of Virginia hired noted Colonial Williamsburg landscape architects Alden Hopkins and Donald Parker to design the Colonial Revival gardens. The West Pavilion Gardens were restored between 1947 and 1953 and the East Lawn between 1960 and 1965. Work in the gardens continues to be supported by the Garden Club of Virginia.

    • Pavilion Homes —East Lawn

    • Pavilion IV: Larry Sabato
    • Pavilion VI: Bob Sweeney and Lili Powell
    • *Student Room, TBA

    *Living on the Lawn in one of the original student rooms designed by Thomas Jefferson is an honor accorded to students in their final year of undergraduate study at the University.

    Image: Serpentine Wall in Spring, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Edgar Allen Poe Room</strong></h2>

    Edgar Allen Poe Room

    Tuesday, April 21

    Poe registered at the University of Virginia on February 14, 1826, the second session of the University. He lived in Room 13, West Range and was an active member of the Jefferson Literary Society. The University’s Raven Society maintains Poe’s room on the West Range as recognition of his time here.

    Image: Edgar Allen Poe Room, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library</strong></h2>

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special Presentation at 2 p.m.

    The Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture and the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special presentation at 2 p.m. in the Auditorium by Timothy and Genevieve Keller, "Rural, historic, and scenic: Enduring qualities of the Piedmont's cultural landscape." Sometimes rural, historic and scenic mean the same thing, but the distinct qualities of each and the criteria for planning for them differ in significant ways. The Kellers will address the particular challenges for landscape preservation, assessment, and enhancement in Central Virginia. Pioneers in cultural landscape preservation, J. Timothy Keller, FASLA, and Genevieve Keller, Honorary ASLA, are founders and principals of Land and Community Associates, a firm that focuses on integrating innovative cultural landscape theory and practice with historic preservation and land use and community planning. Tim Keller is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Design, Iowa State University and the Albemarle County At-Large Planning Commissioner. Genevieve Keller is Vice-President of Preservation Virginia (formerly APVA) and serves on a number of boards and commissions in Virginia.

    A selection of items from UVA's Special Collections related to the cultural landscape of the Piedmont will be displayed 30 minutes before and after the 2:00 p.m. presentation.

    Image: Railings within the Harrison Institute, University of Virginia

  • <h2><strong>Morea Garden and Arboretum</strong></h2>

    Morea Garden and Arboretum

    Tuesday, April 21

    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Located on Sprigg Lane, off Emmet Street just north of Alumni Hall, the Morea Garden features a special selection of shrubs and trees surrounding a historic Federal period home. The house is named after the mulberries cultivated for experiments with silkworms.

    Morea was built by John Patten Emmet, one of the first professors chosen by Mr. Jefferson for the University. The large old trees and a beautifully landscaped botanical collection were started by The Albemarle Garden Club in 1964. Morea was the runner-up for the Garden Club of Virginia’s Common Wealth Award in 2005 and 2006. Tours will be limited to the gardens.

    Image: U.Va. Gardens, University of Virginia

    • <h2><strong>Map and Parking</strong></h2>

      Map and Parking

      Parking for U.Va. Garden Week event locations, including Carr’s Hill, Edgar Allen Poe Room, Harrison Institute/Small Special Collections Library, Morea and University Gardens:

      • Paid Parking (hourly parking rate):
      • Central Grounds Parking Garage: 400 Emmet Street; Underneath the U.Va. Bookstore.
      • The Corner Parking Lot: 1501 University Avenue; Enter off of University Avenue, between Finch Store and Little Johns Deli.
      • 14th Street Parking Garage: 104 14th Street NW; Enter off of Wertland Street.

      Garden Week visitors are encouraged to park once and either walk to all destinations or utilize the University Transit Service (UTS) free of charge. Please visit www.virginia.edu/uts for bus routes and schedules.

      Visit the Google Map and get directions to each location.

    Title1
    Title2

    More Information:

    © 2014 by the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia
    facebook icon twitter icon