University Wide Events February 2013

Choose listing group:    IHGC events     |     University wide events
Friday, February 1

Lecture: Harold Langsam
The Intuitive Case for Naive Realism

12:30 - 1:30 pm
114 Cocke HallMap >

Harold Langsam, Professor (J.D., Harvard, Ph.D. Princeton). Before joining the faculty in 1995, he was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell University. Harold Langsam specializes in Philosophy of Mind, and Epistemology. He is currently working on issues relating to consciousness and epistemic justification.

Wednesday, February 6

Medical Center Hour:
Eating Disorders—An Invisible Epidemic

12:30 - 1:30 pm
Jordan Conference Center Auditorium Map >

Brooks Brodrick PhD, SMD 2013, UVA, and Junior Board Member, National Eating Disorders Association
Robin L. Munn MA MSW, Charlottesville VA, Board Member and Past Board Chair, National Eating Disorders Association
Amy K. Chestnutt MPH, Eating Disorders Education Coordinator, Women’s Center, UVA

Thursday, February 7

Guest Lecture: Scott Lash
What kind of Modernity is Chinese Modernity?

3:30 - 5 pm
2015 Ivy Road, Dynamics Room 400Map >

Scott Lash is a Professor at Goldsmith’s College, University of London and Director of its Centre for Cultural Studies.

Friday, February 8

Guest Lecture: Shixiong Ni
Topic: US-China Relations

3:15 - 5pm
Wilson 402Map >

Shixiong Ni is a Professor of International Relations at Fudan University.

Sunday, February 10

Conference: Richard J. Gunst Colloquium in Jewish Studies
Reading Across Borders: Moving Scriptures, Moving Texts - Day 1

9:30 am - 5pm
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidescope RoomMap >

The focus of the conference is on reading across a variety of borders. Each presentation will be followed by both a religious studies and a literary scholarly response.

During the conference, we hope that these literary responses will gradually generate a conference theory, or observations about how patterns of interpretation move across borders. These borders might include those of Scripture and commentary; moving from one scriptural canon or to another or from one book to another; moving from literature into film; and moving from literature in one language and culture to another.

Monday, February 11

Conference: Richard J. Gunst Colloquium in Jewish Studies
Reading Across Borders: Moving Scriptures, Moving Texts - Day 2

9:30 am - 5pm
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidescope RoomMap >

The focus of the conference is on reading across a variety of borders. Each presentation will be followed by both a religious studies and a literary scholarly response.

During the conference, we hope that these literary responses will gradually generate a conference theory, or observations about how patterns of interpretation move across borders. These borders might include those of Scripture and commentary; moving from one scriptural canon or to another or from one book to another; moving from literature into film; and moving from literature in one language and culture to another.

Monday, February 11

CORE 2013:
From Biography to Local Knowledge with Clare Terni

7 -9 pm
Monroe Hall 116Map >

This seminar is designed for students who have already spent some time abroad and are interested in exploring how to move beyond their personal anecdotes to a narrative story that is relevant and meaningful to other audiences -- be it a prospective employer, academic major, or public debate (at home or abroad). For more information on these seminars, see the full CORE schedule.

Wednesday, February 13

Medical Center Hour:
Deafness and Community: Representations of Cultural Resistance

12:30 - 1:30 pm
Jordan Conference Center Auditorium Map >

Christopher Krentz PhD, Associate Professor of English and Director, American Sign Language Program, UVA
Rebecca Garden PhD, Associate Professor, Center for Bioethics and Humanities, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse NY

Wednesday, February 13

Scholars' Lab Speaker Series: Gretchen Gueguen
Do Digital Archivists Dream of Electronic Records? Born Digital Collections in the Small Special Collections Library

3 - 4 pm
Alderman Library Scholars' LabMap >

The information age has ushered in the biggest changes in human communication since the rise of printed text. The dynamic and ephemeral nature of electronic communication presents stark challenges to the fundamental principles of the archival practice. Join us for a look at how the tradition of collecting and creating archives is facing this paradigm shift and how the historical record will be shaped for the future.

Wednesday, February 13

Reading: Jaimy Gordon
Author of Lord of Misrule

8 - 9:30 pm
U.Va. Bookstore Map >

The U.Va. in MFA Creative Writing Program is pleased to welcome writer Jaimy Gordon to grounds this week as a Rea Visiting Writer. Gordon won the 2010 National Book Award in Fiction for Lord of Misrule and will give a reading this Wednesday evening at the U.Va. Bookstore and craft talk on Thursday in the English Faculty Lounge.

Thursday, February 14

Craft Talk: Jaimy Gordon
Author of Lord of Misrule

2 - 3:30 pm
Bryan Hall 219A (faculty Lounge) Map >

The U.Va. in MFA Creative Writing Program is pleased to welcome writer Jaimy Gordon to grounds this week as a Rea Visiting Writer. Gordon won the 2010 National Book Award in Fiction for Lord of Misrule and will give a reading this Wednesday evening at the U.Va. Bookstore and craft talk on Thursday in the English Faculty Lounge.

Thursday, February 14

Guest Lecture: Jack Goldstone
Democratic Transitions: New Insights from Graphic Analysis

3:30 - 5 pm
2015 Ivy Road, Dynamics Room 400Map >

Jack Goldstone is a Professor of Public Policy & Director of the Center of Global Policy at George Mason University.

Friday, February 15

Panel:
Covering China in the Age of Information: Three New Journalists

3:15 - 5:45 pm
Clark 108Map >

A panel featuring Melissa Chan, Isaac Stone Fish, and Susan Jakes.

Monday, February 18

Two-Day Conference
Religious Studies and Rabbinics - Day 1

9:30 am - 5pm
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidescope RoomMap >

The goal of "Religious Studies and Rabbinics" is to promote dialogue between the fields of Religious Studies and Rabbinics. The two fields have a complicated connection to each other with respect to 1) the respective objects of their study 2) their approaches and purposes and 3) how scholars have reflected on their relationship to their subject matter.

On the most basic level, this conference seeks, on the one hand, to provide Rabbinics with a new method and, on the other, to provide a new object of study for Religion. At a greater level of complexity, the conference hopes to provide a forum in which each field can reflect on its objectives in light of those of the other and so come to understand its own purposes in new ways. We ask: What new insights might Religious Studies gain by taking stock of distinctive features of rabbinic texts and religion? And: Can accounts of rabbinic culture be enriched by engaging theories and methods in Religious Studies? In facilitating the conversation, this conference seeks to take stock of the interpenetration between Religious Studies and Rabbinics to date in order to encourage a more deliberate, directed and potentially fruitful exchange between the two fields henceforth.

Tuesday, February 19

Two-Day Conference
Religious Studies and Rabbinics - Day 2

9:30 am - 5pm
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidescope RoomMap >

The goal of "Religious Studies and Rabbinics" is to promote dialogue between the fields of Religious Studies and Rabbinics. The two fields have a complicated connection to each other with respect to 1) the respective objects of their study 2) their approaches and purposes and 3) how scholars have reflected on their relationship to their subject matter.

On the most basic level, this conference seeks, on the one hand, to provide Rabbinics with a new method and, on the other, to provide a new object of study for Religion. At a greater level of complexity, the conference hopes to provide a forum in which each field can reflect on its objectives in light of those of the other and so come to understand its own purposes in new ways. We ask: What new insights might Religious Studies gain by taking stock of distinctive features of rabbinic texts and religion? And: Can accounts of rabbinic culture be enriched by engaging theories and methods in Religious Studies? In facilitating the conversation, this conference seeks to take stock of the interpenetration between Religious Studies and Rabbinics to date in order to encourage a more deliberate, directed and potentially fruitful exchange between the two fields henceforth.

Tuesday, February 19

CORE 2013:
What is Globalization? with Clare Terni

7 -9 pm
Monroe Hall 116Map >

This seminar discusses "globalization" and a range of related concepts that are frequently used but much misunderstood: from global to international, modernization, colonialism, development, and so on. Our goal is to sort through the imprecision and gain a basic proficiency with these terms in order to give students a framework in which to understand and reflect on their own lived engagements, whether near or far. For more information on these seminars, see the full CORE schedule.

Wednesday, February 20

Medical Center Hour:
Science of Improvement: What Will It Take to Improve Quality and Reduce Costs?

12:30 - 1:30 pm
Jordan Conference Center Auditorium Map >

Peter J. Pronovost MD, Professor of Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine, and Surgery, School of Medicine; Professor of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health; and Director, Center for Innovation in Quality Patient Care, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD

Thursday, February 21

French Film Festival:
"Les hommes librres" (Free Men)

7 pm
Charlottesville City Council Chambers Map >

In Paris during WWII, an Algerian immigrant is inspired to join the resistance by his unexpected friendship with a Jewish man. (Trailer) Post-screening roundtable discussion with Prof. Hanadi-Al-Samman (UVA Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Culture) and Prof. Alon Confino (UVA History). Reception to follow.
For the full schedule, see the French Film Festival website >

Friday, February 22

Guest Lecture: Anand Young
"Chin aur Hind: An Indian Subaltern in China, 1900-1901."

3 pm
Nau Hall, room 211 Map >

Anand Yang is the Golub Professor of International Studies and Director of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington

Friday, February 22

Guest Lecture: John Lie
"What is the K in K-Pop? South Korean popular music and cultural transformation"

3:15 - 5pm
Brooks Hall, 2nd floor conference roomMap >

John Lie is a Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Friday, February 22

French Film Festival:
"Les femmes du sixième étage" (The Women on the Sixth Floor)

7 pm
Charlottesville City Council Chambers Map >

Description: 1960s Paris, a conservative couple’s lives are turned upside down by the Spanish maids in their building. (Trailer)
Post-screening roundtable discussion with Prof. Carrie Douglass (Anthropology), Prof. Andrea Press (UVA Media Studies), Nick Wolters (UVA Spanish), Morgan Fisher (UVA Spanish). Reception to follow.
For the full schedule, see the French Film Festival website >

Saturday, February 23

French Film Festival:
"La grotte des rêves perdus" (The Cave of Forgotten Dreams)

2 pm
Nau Hall 101 Map >

Werner Herzog gains exclusive access to film inside the Chauvet caves of Southern France, capturing the oldest known pictorial creations of humankind in their astonishing natural setting. (Trailer) Post-screening roundtable discussion with Prof. John J. Dobbins (UVA Art History) and Prof. Alison Levine (UVA French). Reception to follow.
For the full schedule, see the French Film Festival website >

Saturday, February 23

French Film Festival:
"La grotte des rêves perdus" (The Cave of Forgotten Dreams)

7 pm
Nau Hall 101 Map >

In the 1950s and ’60s, Henri-Georges Clouzot was one of France’s most acclaimed and successful filmmakers. In 1963, Clouzot began work on a project called L’Enfer (aka The Inferno), a tale of jealousy that leads to madness, and the filmmaker was promised all the time and resources he needed for the picture. However, while the director was meticulously prepared when shooting began, after only three weeks the production was halted and never resumed. Filmmakers Serge Bromberg and Ruxandra Medrea try to answer the question of what happened to a project so full of promise in L’Enfer d’Henri-Georges Clouzot (aka Henri-Georges Clouzot’s Inferno), a documentary which looks into the shadowy history of this lost film. Including interviews with members of the cast and crew and excerpts from the surviving footage. Post-screening guest speaker: Prof. Oliver Speck, Film Studies, VCU and open discussion. Reception to follow.
For the full schedule, see the French Film Festival website >

Sunday, February 24

French Film Festival:
"Le hérisson" (The Hedgehog)

1 pm
Jefferson-Madison Regional Library, McIntire Room Map >

Paloma is a serious and highly articulate but deeply bored 11-year-old who has decided to kill herself on her 12th birthday. Fascinated by art and philosophy, she questions and documents her life and immediate circle, drawing trenchant and often hilarious observations on the world around her. But as her appointment with death approaches, Paloma finally meets some kindred spirits in her building’s grumpy janitor and an enigmatic, elegant neighbor, both of whom inspire Paloma to question her rather pessimistic outlook on life. (Trailer) Post-screening open book group discussion of the novel on which the film was based, L’élégance du hérisson (The Elegance of the Hedgehog) written by Muriel Barbery (2006). Coffee and Belgian waffles will be served, generously provided by Milli Joe Coffee and Gelato.
For the full schedule, see the French Film Festival website >

Tuesday, February 26

Ed(YOU)cation:
Liberal Arts at a Research Institution

6:30 pm
Newcomb Theatre Map >

Student Council’s Academic Affairs Committee will be hosting Ed(You)Cation: Liberal Arts at a Research Institution this month on February 26th at 6:30 pm in Newcomb Theatre. Six undergraduate professors or deans from across the University will have a moderated discussion on the role of liberal arts at a research institution. The speakers will be Dean Zeithaml from the Commerce School, Vice Provost of Research and Architecture professor Bill Sherman, Curry professor Ellie Wilson, Engineering professor Robert Kelly, College professor Claire Cronmiller and Batten professor Eric Patashnik.

Tuesday, February 26

CORE 2013:
Staying Abroad with Sergio Lopez

7 -9 pm
Monroe Hall 116Map >

Calling all international students! By popular demand, we have created a seminar for people who are or are planning to pursue a long-term career, life, and home in another country and language. We will examine issues of identity, relationships, and communication when there is no clear “return” date, and we will discuss specific challenges and alternative paradigms for your experience. For more information on these seminars, see the full CORE schedule.

Wednesday, February 27

Medical Center Hour:
The Last Walk: Our Pets at the End of Their Lives

12:30 - 1:30 pm
Jordan Conference Center Auditorium Map >

Jessica Pierce PhD, Independent Bioethics Scholar and author, The Moral Life of Animals and The Last Walk: Reflections on Our Pets at the End of Their Lives, Lyons CO

Wednesday, February 27

Pages from the Past:
Medieval Manuscripts at UVA

5:30 pm
Harrison/Small Auditorium Map >

Friends of Classics talk sponsored by the Department of Classics. Reception to follow.

Thursday, February 28

Guest Lecture: Sarah Igo
Topic: TBA

3:30 - 5 pm
Watson Manor, University CircleMap >

Sarah Igo is Associate Professor of History, Political Science & Sociology at Vanderbilt University.