June 3 - 16, 2005
Vol. 35, Issue 10
Back Issues
IN THIS ISSUE
Finals: year's greatest on-Grounds production
Tight $1.88 billion budget wins Finance Committee backing
Grisham takes on task of replacing the University's 10-year-old Integrated Student Information System
Warner names three Health System leaders to task force
Digest
Headines @ U.Va.
11 employees win Outstanding Contribution Awards
Employees celebrating 5, 10, 15 ... years of service
Popular teens can cave to peer pressure
Series brings 'GardenStory' to life

'Seeing the other' exhibit now on dislay

Information Technology Conference set for June 22
Relay for life to feature marathon production
Student's cross-country bus trip to test viability of alternative fuel
 

 

Headlines @ U.Va.

U.VA. TEAMS WITH UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO TO STUDY CHILDREN’S READING
U.Va. has teamed up with the University of Toledo to begin studying young children’s reading skills and whether regional differences contribute to any challenges they may face. Two professors at the universities are spearheading the study, which has received nearly $3 million in support from the U.S. Department of Educations’ Institute of Education Sciences. The project, which begins in the fall, initially targets 4-year-olds who live in the Toledo area or the rural regions of Appalachia in Virginia and West Virginia. The same children will be studied through the second grade. About 90 teachers and 540 children are expected to be involved. (Toledo Blade, May 18)

SOFKA WILL GO ON PAID LEAVE
Politics professor James R. Sofka, who was accused of behaving inappropriately toward female students, has reached an agreement with U.Va., under which he will take a paid research leave for the 2005-2006 academic year. Sofka has denied the accusations and complained that he has not had an opportunity to defend himself against anonymous and unspecified allegations of misconduct. The terms of the agreement were not disclosed. (The Chronicle of Higher Education, May 13)

HYPERGLYCEMIA SLOWS MENTAL FUNCTIONS IN PEOPLE WITH DIABETES
A temporary rise in blood glucose levels in people with both types of diabetes can interfere with their ability to think quickly and solve problems, according to a U.Va. study published in Diabetes Care.

Health System researchers found that roughly 55 percent of the people in the study showed signs of cognitive slowing or increased errors while hyperglycemic.

“The best way to minimize any negative effects on cognitive functioning is to keep blood glucose levels tightly controlled,” said lead researcher Daniel J. Cox, of U.Va.’s Center for Behavioral Medicine Research. “People who have diabetes should pay careful attention to the warning signs of hyperglycemia so that they can quickly take action to treat it.”

Treatment for hyperglycemia can include increasing insulin or reducing food intake. (American Diabetes Association 2005 and Xagena Medicine 2005)


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