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Sept. 23 - Oct. 7, 2005
Vol. 35, Issue 16
Back Issues
IN THIS ISSUE
Harvey first VP & chief officer for diversity & equity
Casteen, Board's diversiity commitrtee condemn acts of prejudice

Rainey to lead $3 billion campaign

Darden: 50 years of developing business leaders
Letter to editor
Digest
Headlines @ U.Va.
Two professors plan to watch their former student rocket into space
Beta bridge art project counters intolerance
Belanger wins MacArthur fellowship
Advisers coach student-athletes to compete in the classroom
University buses to run on biodiesel fuel
Student's vegetable-oil-powered car makes it from Virginia to Alaska and back
Rheuban receives Zintl Award
The price of education

 

Headlines @ U.Va.

YOUNG WOMEN CHALLENGE NOW'S CAMPUS TURF
“Out with the NOW, in with the NeW!” That is the motto of the Network of Enlightened Women (NeW), a fledgling college group in Virginia that wants to change the campus culture of feminism and challenge the agenda of groups such as the National Organization for Women, which has more than 100 official and unofficial campus chapters in the nation. Staking out turf for more traditionally minded women, members of the startup — who number between 20 and 30 — have not formulated a collective issue agenda but do consider themselves social conservatives. As such, they tend to oppose policies backed by their feminist peers who campaign for women in military combat roles, pay equity between men and women and ending gender discrimination in the workplace. The founder and president of the group, Karin Agness, a senior at U.Va., is a history major and aspiring lawyer. She hopes to influence the agenda of the campus women’s studies department, which she says ignores conservative women and their views in the syllabi and in class discussions. (Women’s Enews, Sept. 9)

STEM CELLS FROM FAT MAY ONE DAY BE USED FOR TREATMENT
U.Va. and other researchers say adult stem cells from adipose tissue could eventually be used to treat injured or damaged tissues. “Five years ago we were seen as mavericks,” says Dr. Adam Katz, plastic surgeon at U.Va.’s Health System, co-founder and president of the International Fat Applied Technology Society. Findings suggest adipose-derived stem cells can be used to repair or regenerate new blood vessels, cardiac muscle, nerves, bones and other tissue, potentially helping heart attack victims, patients with brain and spinal cord injuries and people with osteoporosis. ... Findings were presented at the third annual International
Fat Applied Technology Society conference, Sept. 10-13 in Charlottesville. (United Press International, Sept. 6)

SUPPORTIVE FIRST GRADE TEACHERS HELP STUDENTS SUCCEED, STUDY FINDS
Classroom teachers who give instructional and emotional support can improve academic outcomes for first-graders who are considered at risk for school failure, concludes a U.Va. study released Sept. 14. For example, children whose mothers had less than a college degree achieved at the same level as children with more highly educated mothers when they were placed in first-grade classrooms where the instruction was direct and the teacher provided ongoing feedback to the students about their progress. But if these socioeconomically at-risk students did not receive this kind of instructional attention, they scored lower on achievement measures than their peers. (Education Week, Sept. 15)

WORLD'S THIRD SPACE TOURIST PREPARES FOR LAUNCH
U.S. scientist Greg Olsen, who will become the world’s third paying passenger to catch a ride to the International Space Station, said he hopes to do some research in optics and medicine while in orbit and has no anxieties about his mission. “I don’t view it as a risk at all,” said Olsen, who is set to blast off in a Russian Soyuz ship with Russian Valery Tokarev and U.S. astronaut William McArthur from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Oct. 1. … Olsen said he hopes to get on board a spectrometer designed by U.Va. to look at moisture in agricultural areas on Earth and also study clouds. (AP, Sept. 13)


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