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Oct. 21 - Nov. 3, 2005
Vol. 35, Issue 18
Back Issues
IN THIS ISSUE
Health premiums changing
Rainey: Campaign will be 'defining event' in taking U.Va. to top 10 to 15  

Cooper works to recriut minority vendors

Team, led by Dr. Dan Theodorescu, wins $6 million grant to study prostate cancer
Research hopes to unlock secrets of high blood preasure
Digest
Headlines @ U.Va.
Rolling Stones rock the town
"One-stop' online system allows users to reserve spaces across Grounds for events
'Grandpa Dick' band's No. 1 fan
'Handling Serious Matters Musically'
'The Slaughter of the Innocents' Nov. 4
Despite adversity his art comes from happiness

 

Headlines @ U.Va.

A SKEPTIC’S SEARCH FOR PROOF OF AFTERLIFE ‘SPOOK’ APPLIES SCIENCE TO THE REALM OF BELIEF
Is there such a thing as a human soul or spirit? If so, what happens to it when we die? And is it anything you could prove in a lab?  After spending an awful lot of time around dead bodies for her best-selling 2003 book, “Stiff” — which told the strange true sagas of human cadavers — Oakland science writer Mary Roach takes up these far vaster, more nebulous questions about death in “Spook.” ... And in the last chapter, “Six Feet Over,” Roach reports on the study that most excites her. At the U.Va. hospital, professor Bruce Greyson has set up a computer screen facing the ceiling of a defibrillator-insertion surgery room where patients routinely have “near-death experiences.” During such out-of-body wanderings, people often claim that they float somewhere near the ceiling, watching their own surgery in progress. If so, they will be able to see — and later describe — the image on Greyson’s computer screen, which would not be viewable from elsewhere in the room. (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 10)

SINGLE SEX SCHOOL
From the time they step off the bus each morning until they leave school at day’s end, boys and girls don’t get much of a chance to mingle at Southern Leadership Academy. Struggling with poor academic scores and discipline problems, the middle school adopted single-sex classes three years ago — teaching boys and girls separately. Now, encouraged by signs of improvement, Southern is partnering with Iroquois Middle School to examine taking the next step by becoming Kentucky’s only single-sex public schools. ... Some studies suggest that girls in single-sex schools display more self-esteem and are more interested in math and science. A 2003 U.Va. study by Abigail James and Herbert Richards of the Curry School found that boys in single-sex schools are more likely to study art, music and foreign language. (Louisville, Ky. Courier-Journal, Oct. 17)

MEASURING STATE PROGRESS ON LEARNING
When the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education started issuing report cards for the states on college issues, in 2000, it gave every state an “incomplete” in the category of learning. In other categories, such as participation (do state residents enroll?) or completion (do they graduate?), states had data that could be compared and analyzed. But the center couldn’t find reliable ways to compare learning from state to state. Today, the center is releasing on its Web site a system for measuring student learning, with the idea that it could be used in future national report cards. (Those reports are done every other year.) The analysis — like those for the other categories in the report cards — comes from several subdivisions, which in turn have scores based on a variety of factors. ... The criteria were developed by a team led by Margaret Miller, a professor of education at U.Va., and Peter Ewell, vice president of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems. (Inside Higher Ed, Oct. 13)

SINUS TUMORS CAN BE REMOVED ENDOSCOPICALLY
A study by the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta finds large sinus tumors can be removed endoscopically rather than by facial incisions. ...The study, co-authored by Dr. Mark Jameson of the U.Va. Health System’s Department of Otolaryngology, was published in the
September-October issue of the American Journal of Rhinology. (United Press International, Oct. 6)


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