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Nov. 18- Dec. 1, 2005
Vol. 35, Issue 20
Back Issues
IN THIS ISSUE
Engineering gift will advance IT
Good teachers: Testing won't determine them, Pianta says

Twenty Sorensen grads elected

Bruner named Darden dean
Digest
Headlines @ U.Va.
Duren celebrates centenary
The past and future of public health
What's in the stars for McCormick Observatory?
Exploring space
Modern-day Galileos ponder Saturn's magnetosphere
'When you get a chance to help, help'
'In/Justice' a festival blockbuster
Fifth annual lighting of the Lawn
'Destination: West Main' Exhibit
Organic music

 

Headlines @ U.Va.

THE ‘CRISIS’ IN HIGHER ED FINANCING
[...] The TIAA-CREF Institute, the pension giant’s research arm, brought a high-powered group of college administrators, scholars of higher education and other policy makers together for a two-day conference, entitled  “The New Balancing Act in the Business of Higher Education,” at which they grappled with a dizzying array of big picture questions about the current state and future prospects of the American college system. ... University of California at Berkeley professor [David] Kirp was far more critical of the move to independence from state regulation and financing by U.Va.’s graduate business school, which was made possible in large part by dependence on an executive education program that leaned heavily on proprietary information from the companies of its students — information that UVa instructors could never share with the undergraduate and graduate students they teach. Nothing could be “more antithetical” to the principles of higher education than that compromise, Kirp said. (Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 4)

DUVALL, MARSALIS AMONG ARTS MEDALISTS
The Papers of George Washington, which are being edited by a team of historians and editors at U.Va., received a National Humanities Medal from President Bush in an Oval Office ceremony on Nov. 10. The award was one of several national awards for the arts and humanities announced in an article in the Nov. 9 Washington Post headlined: Duvall, Marsalis Among Arts Medalists. [...] The arts and humanities medals are a coveted acknowledgment of groundbreaking work in arts and scholarship. The nominations are forwarded to the White House by the advisory councils of the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities. ... The editorial team that is working on George Washington’s papers at U.Va. and has completed 52 volumes also will be cited. (The Washington Post, Nov. 9)

RARITIES ONLINE; WITH DIGITIZATION, SPECIAL COLLECTIONS ARE ENTERING A GOLDEN AGE OF USABILITY
[...] Special collections are increasingly finding a home on the Internet
thanks to digitization, but at U.Va., one of the nation’s best, most-innovative special collections programs also has a stunning new physical home. Opened in 2004, the building is actually two libraries in one — above ground sits the Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture, and below ground, where the climate is best for preservation, is the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library — in all, 72,000 square feet of space, with a healthy $26 million price tag dedicated to keeping, using, and showing the remarkable collections of the university Thomas Jefferson founded. (Library Journal, Oct. 28)

AN AUTHOR RESEARCHES THAT AGE-OLD QUESTION: IS THERE LIFE AFTER DEATH?
In her new book, “Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife,” [author Mary Roach] chronicles early attempts to locate the soul through dissection and to weigh it using scales. ... Is there a particular afterlife study that you are impressed by? There’s one still underway at U.Va., where they’ve attached a laptop computer to the ceiling of the operating room, and its screen, which faces the ceiling, shows a rotating series of images. ... [that] you can’t see ... from below. I thought that was a clever way to address that enduring question of, are people who are having near-death experiences actually out of their body or are they actually just having an organic, brain-based hallucination? Have they found anyone yet who has been able to see the image on the computer screen? They hadn’t the last time I spoke with them. (New York Daily News, Nov. 3)


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