April 28 - June 1, 2006
Vol. 36, Issue 8
Back Issues
IN THIS ISSUE
'Living wage' debate
State of U
Tuition to increase
All aboard! the National LambdaRail
Researchers' treatment reverses Type 1 diabetes
Katherine Shirey wins award

NEWS BRIEFS
Dave Matthews band tickets sold out on first day
Upcoming Inside UVA publication dates
CLICK HERE FOR MORE NEWS BRIEFS

Digest
Block scheduling
Great teachers
Uncovered cistern gives clues of early Lawn life
Commuting makes cents
Lowering barriers
Diversity post
Are your lights on?
Recycle

22nd Annual telethon set for June 3 and 4

Know anyone interested in working at U.Va.?
Lorna Sundberg International Center
Leading the way

 

 

News briefs

DAVE MATTHEWS BAND TICKETS SOLD OUT ON FIRST DA
The two performances by the Dave Matthews Band that will be the grand opening for the 16,000-seat John Paul Jones Arena sold out the same day they went on sale — April 22. For their first show in Charlottesville since the Scott Stadium concert in April 2001, the band will perform on Sept. 23 and 24 with supporting act Robert Randolph & the Family Band as the final stop on the Dave Matthews Band 2006 summer tour.

Be among the first to know about upcoming events at the JPJ arena and ticket pre-sale offers by signing up for “Keeping Up with the Joneses” e-mail alerts at www.johnpauljonesarena.com. The site has a complete schedule of coming attractions. For questions or difficulty registering, contact jpj-inf@virginia.edu.

UPCOMING INSIDE UVA PUBLICATION DATES
• May 19 special graduation issue
• June 2, 16 and 30
• July 14
• Aug. 25 back-to-school issue
Please e-mail news items to insideuva@virginia.edu.

NOTABLE
Faculty Awards and Achievements

  • P. Kenneth Seidelmann, dynamical astronomer and research professor of astronomy, was among a team of Russian and American scientists that received the 2005 International Scientific Cooperation Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal Science. The group was honored for its determination to transcend numerous limitations to collaboration and its pioneering work to advance state-of-the-art space surveillance in both countries for the benefit of the worldwide astrodynamics community and the safety of human activity in space. In 1994, Seidelmann and Russian scientist Dr. Stanislav Veniaminov initiated the first meeting of space mapping authorities from the two former Cold War adversaries. This first meeting grew into an exceptional series of workshops aimed at exchanging information on the mathematical methods and systems used for space surveillance in their two countries, and ultimately on comparing and amalgamating the two countries’ separate space object catalogs.
  • Gregory S. Orr, professor of creative writing, read an essay on National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered.” It discusses how poetry helped him to survive the traumas of his youth, which included the deaths of his brother and mother, and a week in solitary confinement after being kidnapped by vigilantes while serving as a civil rights volunteer in the Deep South. The essay is part of NPR’s national “This I Believe” project, which invites Americans from all walks of life to share brief essays describing the core values and beliefs that guide their lives.

FREE HEARING SCREENINGS IN MAY
When:

  • Monday, May 1,
    8:30 – 11:50 a.m.
  • Friday, May 5,
    1:30 – 4:40 p.m.
  • Friday, May 12,
    8:30 – 11:50 a.m.
    (10-min. appointments)

Where: Colony Plaza, Suite 202, at 2205 Fontaine Avenue (across from Thai ’99 restaurant)

In celebration of “Better Hearing and Speech Month” this May, the Curry School’s Speech-Language-Hearing Center is offering a limited number of free hearing screenings for academic and Medical Center faculty and staff. Schedule a 10-minute screening by calling 924-6354 (until the available times are filled.)

OFF THE SHELF
Recently published books by U.Va. faculty and staff

  • John Norton Moore, Walter L. Brown Professor of Law, and Robert F. Turner, professor of law, co-editors of “To Oppose Any Foe: The Legacy of U.S. Intervention in Vietnam,” (Carolina Academic Press)
  • James W. Ceaser, professor of politics, “Nature and History in American Political Development: A Debate,” (Harvard University Press)
  • Richard Guy Wilson, Commonwealth Professor of Architectural History, editor of “Re-creating the American Past: Essays on the Colonial Revival,” (University Press of Virginia)
  • Walter Jost, professor of English, “A Companion to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Criticism,” (Blackwell Publishers)
  • Justin S. Holcomb, lecturer in religious studies and sociology, “Christian Theologies of Scripture: A Comparative Introduction” (New York University Press)
  • Nicholas C. Edsall, professor emeritus of history, “Toward Stonewall: Homosexuality And Society in the Modern Western World,” (University Press of Virginia)

USE TUITION WAIVER FOR SUMMER CLASSES
Summer session classes are a great opportunity to take advantage of the employee tuition waiver benefit. Class registration begins on May 1 and runs until the first day of classes for each session (May 15 for session 1; June 13 for session 2 and the nine-week session; or July 13 for session 3). However, if you are not already in a degree program, before you can register, you must complete a tuition waiver application and be accepted, which can take up to two weeks. Some classes fill up quickly, so act soon to use your tuition waiver, which will cover the cost of one course during the summer. For more details on the Tuition Waiver Program, visit http://www.hrs.virginia.edu/educben/default.htm or contact Emily Bardeen at ebardeen@ virginia.edu or 924-4343. For details on the Summer Session, visit http://www.virginia.edu/summer or call 924-3371.

ALUMNUS WINS $10,000 POETRY PRIZE
Davis McCombs’ manuscript “Dismal Rock” recently won the 2005 Dorset Prize of $10,000, the largest cash prize in the United States for an unpublished book of poetry. The prize also includes publication of the manuscript in fall 2007. McCombs was a Henry Hoyns Fellow while he earned his M.F.A. in Creative Writing from U.Va. Prize judge Linda Gregerson said, “This beautiful book records the sacraments of labor and the dark equivocations of history in a single swath of tobacco land in south central Kentucky. With infinite patience and luminous particularity, Davis McCombs unearths the traces of those-who-have-gone-before-us through the material world. His poems have the weight of psalms.”

McCombs teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Arkansas.

MAKING HEAADLINES
U.Va. faculty and staff in articles cited in Headlines@U.Va.:

  • Achsah Carrier, research associate at the Weldon Cooper Center, “Economy May Leave Ford Employees Behind,” Associated Press, April 14.
  • Dr. Barry Farr, hospital epidemiologist, “Tracking Hospital Infections/State Law Requires Institutions to Report Number of Patients Who Get Ill,” Baltimore Sun, April 14.
  • Everette Fortner, director of Darden’s Career Development Center, “Career Comes First in Charlottesville,” Business Week Online, April 18.
  • Craig Littlepage, athletic director, “In College Basketball, The Year of the Little Guy/ Upset Wins by Small-Conference Teams Defined the Men’s Tournament. Experts Suggest 6 Ways Those Teams’ Victories Might Alter the Sport,” Chronicle of Higher Education, April 14.
  • Charles Marsh, professor of religious studies, “Religion as Politics/A Partisan View of the Bush Administration,” Fort Wayne (Ind.) Journal Gazette, April 16.
  • Guian McKee, assistant professor at the Miller Center of Public Affairs, “Tent Cities Spur Frustration on Gulf Coast,” Christian Science Monitor, April 10.
  • Abdulaziz Sachedina, professor of religious studies, “Mosques Are Frequent Targets in Iraq,” Associated Press, April 9.
  • Patricia Meyer Spacks, professor of English, “Reading and Writing Get Arithmetic/A New Project Attempts to Quantify the Problems and Opportunities Facing the Humanities,” Chronicle of Higher Education, April 14.
  • Kathryn Thornton, director of the Center for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education, “Science Is for Girls, Too,” Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star, April 13.
  • Robert Louis Wilken, religious studies professor, “Easter’s Meaning Is Being Muddled,” Wichita (Kan.) Eagle, April 16.


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