Research

 

 

Research Interests

 

Prof. Kelly's present work includes studies of the electrochemical and chemical conditions inside localized corrosion sites in various alloy systems, corrosion in aging aircraft, atomistic and continuum modeling of electrochemical processes, development of embeddable corrosion microinstruments, as well as the use of microfabrication methods to probe the fundamentals of localized corrosion.

 

Current Projects

 

1. Intergranular Corrosion of Al-Mg Alloys for Naval Applications


Sponsor: ONR
Researchers: Mary Lyn C. Lim, Piyush Khullar, Stewart C. Hahn, Noah Oakland, Cameron Reynolds

 

Project Descriptions:Al-Mg (5XXX) alloys are currently used as lightweight substitute for construction of marine structures. Although categorized as marine grade, alloys containing 3 wt. % Mg, when exposed to standard service temperatures for extended periods of time, can become susceptible to intergranular corrosion (IGC) due to sensitization or precipitation of the more anodic β (Al3Mg2) phase at the grain boundaries. This corrosion phenomenon can progress undetected through the alloy and may cause structural instability, reducing service periods, and leading to early catastrophic failures. The overarching goal of this project is then to develop a cross-discipline, fully integrated, quantitative model of IGC in Al-Mg alloys. In order to develop a prediction model, it is necessary to acquire fundamental knowledge of IGC in this alloy class, particularly from the propagation mechanism and kinetics standpoints. Focus is placed on understanding the detailed roles of critical metallurgical, chemical, and electrochemical parameters on IGC propagation in several Al-Mg alloy compositions and cold work tempers under full immersion conditions. Effort is also placed on identifying the chemical and electrochemical origins of stable IGC propagation, taking into account the heterogeneous grain boundary metallurgy, the continuously changing occluded fissure chemistry, and local electrochemistry, which upon completion, will enhance accuracy of life predictions for structural integrity studies. Work aimed at identifying key atmospheric variables, quantifying their effects on IGC kinetics, and understanding the mechanistic influence of diurnal cycles on IGC is underway in order to provide a more robust scientific basis for the prediction model.

Publications:

a. Journal Paper:

  • M.L.C. Lim, J.R. Scully, and R.G. Kelly, “Intergranular Corrosion Penetration in an Al-Mg Alloy as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, Corrosion 69 (2013), p. 35-47.
  • N. Birbilis, R. Zhang, M.L.C. Lim, R.K. Gupta, C.H.J. Davies, S.P. Lynch, R.G. Kelly, and J.R. Scully, “Quantification of Sensitization in AA5083-H131 via Imaging Ga-Embrittled Fracture Surfaces”. Corrosion 69 (2013), p. 396-402.
  • D. Mizuno and R.G. Kelly, “Galvanically Induced Intergranular Corrosion of AA5083-H131 under Atmospheric Exposure Conditions: Part 1- Experimental Characterization”, Corrosion 69 (2013), p. 580-592.
  • D. Mizuno and R.G. Kelly, “Galvanically Induced Intergranular Corrosion of AA5083-H131 under Atmospheric Exposure Conditions: Part 2- Modeling of the Damage Distribution”, Corrosion 69 (2013), p. 681-692.
  • S. Jain, M.L.C. Lim, J.L. Hudson, and J.R. Scully, “Spreading of Intergranular Corrosion on the Surface of Sensitized Al-4.4 Mg Alloys: A General Finding”, Cor. Sci. 59 (2012), p. 136-147.

b. Conference Proceeding:

  • M.L.C. Lim, J.R. Scully, and R.G. Kelly, “Critical Electrochemical Conditions for Intergranulal Corrosion in Sensitized AA5083-H131”, NACE Department of Defense Virtual Corrosion Conference (September 16-17, 2013).
  • J. Buczynski, G.J. Shiflet, and R.G. Kelly, “Characterization of the β-phase (Al3Mg2) in 5XXX Aluminum Alloys”, Department of Defense Corrosion Conference 2011 (July 30-August 5, 2011), La Quinta, CA.
  • E. Bumiller, and R.G. Kelly, “Integranular Corrosion in AA5XXX: A Case for Continuous Attack with a Discontinuous Active Path”, Department of Defense Corrosion Conference 2011 (July 30-August 5, 2011), La Quinta, CA.
  • L. Chen, X. Wang, D.E. Brown, and R.G. Kelly, “Integrated Effects of Grain Boundary Characteristics on the Behavior of Intergranular Corrosion in 5XXX Alloys”, Department of Defense Corrosion Conference 2011 (July 30-August 5, 2011), La Quinta, CA.
  • M.L.C. Lim, J.R. Scully, and R.G. Kelly, “Studies of Intergranular Corrosion Penetration in AA5083 as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, Department of Defense Corrosion Conference 2011 (July 30-August 5, 2011), La Quinta, CA.
  • D. Mizuno and R.G. Kelly, “Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of AA5083-H131 in Contact with 4340 Steel under Atmospheric Exposure Conditions,” Department of Defense Corrosion Conference 2011 (July 30-August 5, 2011), La Quinta, CA.
  • D. Mizuno, Y. Shi, and R. G. Kelly, “Modeling Galvanic Interactions between AA5083-H131 and Steel under Atmospheric Conditions,” COMSOL Worldwide Conference, (October 14-15, 2011), Boston, MA.

c. Presentations:

  • 224th ECS Meeting, October 27th – November 1st, 2013. San Francisco, CA: “Accelerated Atmospheric Corrosion Testing of Steel and AA5083”, P. Khullar and R.G. Kelly.
  • 2013 Department of Defense Virtual Corrosion Conference, September 16th – 17th, 2013. “Critical Electrochemical Conditions for Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized AA5083-H131”, M.L.C. Lim, R.G. Kelly, and J.R. Scully.
  • NACE Risk Management of Corrodible Systems, June 18th – 20th, 2013. Washington, D.C.: “Corrosion Damage Modeling of Intergranular Corrosion on Al-Mg Alloys in Marine Service”, M.L.C. Lim, R. Matthews, M. Oja, R. Tryon, R.G. Kelly, and J.R. Scully.
  • NACE 2013 Corrosion Conference, March 17th – 21th, 2013. Orlando, FL: “Potential Dependence of Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized AA5083-H131”, M.L.C. Lim, R.G. Kelly, and J.R. Scully.
  • NACE 2012 Corrosion Conference, March 11th – 15th, 2012. Salt Lake City, UT: “Modeling of Intergranular Corrosion Penetration in AA5083 as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, M.L.C. Lim, R. Matthews, M. Oja, R. Tryon, R.G. Kelly, and J.R. Scully.
  • COMSOL Worldwide Conference, October 14th – 15th, 2011. Boston, MA: “Modeling Galvanic Interactions between AA5083-H131 and Steel under Atmospheric Conditions,” D. Mizuno, Y. Shi, and R. G. Kelly.
  • 220 Meeting of Electrochemical Society, October 9th – 14th, 2011. Boston, MA: “Electrochemcial Characterization of the β-phase (Al3Mg2) in 5XXX Aluminum Alloys”, J. Buczynski, and R.G. Kelly.
  • 220 Meeting of Electrochemical Society, October 9th – 14th, 2011. Boston, MA: “Experiments and Modeling of Intergranular Corrosion Penetration in AA5083 as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, M.L.C. Lim, S. Jain, R. Matthews, M. Oja, R. Tryon, R.G. Kelly, and J.R. Scully.
  • 220 Meeting of Electrochemical Society, October 9th – 14th, 2011. Boston, MA: “Modeling and Measurement of Atmospheric Galvanic Corrosion of AA5083-H131 in Contact with 4340 Steel”, D. Mizuno, and R.G. Kelly.
  • NACE 2011 Department of Defense Corrosion Conference, July 31st – August 5th, 2011. Palm Springs, CA: “Characterization of the β-phase (Al3Mg2) in 5XXX Aluminum Alloys”, J. Buczynski, G.J. Shiflet, and R.G. Kelly.
  • NACE 2011 Department of Defense Corrosion Conference, July 31st – August 5th, 2011. Palm Springs, CA: “Integranular Corrosion in AA5XXX: A Case for Continuous Attack with a Discontinuous Active Path”, E. Bumiller, and R.G. Kelly.
  • NACE 2011 Department of Defense Corrosion Conference, July 31st – August 5th, 2011. Palm Springs, CA: “Integrated Effects of Grain Boundary Characteristics on the Behavior of Intergranular Corrosion in 5XXX Alloys”, L. Chen, X. Wang, D.E. Brown, and R.G. Kelly.
  • NACE 2011 Department of Defense Corrosion Conference, July 31st – August 5th, 2011. Palm Springs, CA: “Experiments and Modeling of Intergranular Corrosion Penetration in AA5083 as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, M.L.C. Lim, R. Matthews, M. Oja, R. Tryon, R.G. Kelly, and J.R. Scully.
  • NACE 2011 Department of Defense Corrosion Conference, July 31st – August 5th, 2011. Palm Springs, CA: “Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of AA5083-H131 in Contact with 4340 Steel under Atmospheric Exposure Conditions”, D. Mizuno and R.G. Kelly.

d. Posters:

  • P. Khullar, “Improved Accelerated Corrosion Testing of Steel and AA5083”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 17th – 21th, 2013) Orlando, FL.
  • J. Buczynski,”Electrochemical Analyses of Etchants Used to Detect Sensitization of Marine-Grade 5XXX Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys”, Gordon Research Conference (July 8th – July 13th, 2012) Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH.
  • M.L.C. Lim, “Intergranular Corrosion Propagation in AA5083”, Gordon Research Conference (July 8th – July 13th, 2012) Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH.
  • J. Buczynski,”Electrochemical Analyses of Etchants Used to Detect Sensitization of Marine-Grade 5XXX Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 11th – 15th, 2012) Salt Lake City, UT.
  • M.L.C. Lim, “Studies of Intergranular Corrosion Penetration in AA5083 as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 11th – 15th, 2012) Salt Lake City, UT.
  • M.L.C. Lim, “Integranular Corrosion Penetration in AA5083 as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, NACE Department of Defense Corrosion Conference (July 31st – August 5th, 2011) Palm Springs, CA.
  • J. Buczynski,”Electrochemical Analyses of Etchants Used to Detect Sensitization of Marine-Grade 5XXX Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 13th – 17th, 2011) Houston, TX.
  • M.L.C. Lim, “Experiments and Modeling of Integranular Corrosion Penetration in AA5083 as a Function of Electrochemical and Metallurgical Conditions”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 13th – 17th, 2011) Houston, TX.
  • L. Chen, “Integrated Effects of Grain Boundary Characteristics on the Behavior of Intergranular Corrosion in 5XXX-Series Alloys”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 14th – 18th, 2010) San Antonio, TX.
  • B. Kazerooni, “Development of an Electrochemical Method of Detection of Sensitization in Al-Mg Alloys”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 14th – 18th, 2010) San Antonio, TX.
  • M.L.C. Lim, “Prediction of Intergranular Corrosion Penetration Depths in AA5083”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 14th – 18th, 2010) San Antonio, TX.
  • M. Shedd, “The Effects of pH and Phosphate Concentration on Sensitization Detection in Al-Mg Alloys”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 14th – 18th, 2010) San Antonio, TX.

 

Phenomelogy of intergranular corrosion attack:Surface IGC spreading on LS surface (top left) and depth penetration in T direction (bottom left) as a function of exposure time for an AA5083-H131 (SHT/Q), with a degree of sensitization (DoS) of 49 mg/cm2, exposed to 0.6 M NaCl solution, pH 8.3, and applied potential of -0.73 VSCE. The 3D composite structure of AA5083-H131 after Barker’s etching (bottom right) reveals unrecrystallized microstructure, with longer grain widths in the longitudinal (L) and long transverse (T) directions, and shorter grain width in the short transverse (S) direction.


2. Critical Mass Transport and Electrochemical Conditions Influencing Stainless Steel and Repassivation.


Sponsor: OUSD, USAFA, Rolls -Royce
Researchers: Jayendran Srinivasan, Michael McGrath

 

Project Descriptions:Structural integrity analyses for components like aircraft compressor blades that undergo long-term cyclic service in marine environments require estimates of the maximum flaw size that can be expected to develop in such corrosive atmospheres. Such components are constructed from stainless steels, which undergo localized corrosion that manifests as pits that grow to great depths with a large aspect ratio, and therefore cannot be easily detected upon surface inspection. Studying the corrosion damage that results in these situations therefore necessitates knowledge of the critical electrochemical and mass transport conditions that stabilize pitting. This project deals with investigating these critical conditions using experiments and modeling based on diffusional analysis in order to develop a scientifically defendable relationship between the critical mass transport and electrochemical characteristics of stainless steel pitting. Data from experiments on artificial pit electrodes which simulate one-dimensional diffusion are used to provide measurable values for key pitting stability and repassivation parameters. Equations of mass transport are then utilized with appropriate boundary conditions and in conjunction with electrochemical kinetics to estimate the critical local surface conditions that describe stable pitting and repassivation. The effects of metallurgical composition, bulk environment, experimental variables, and the addition of inhibitory anions on these critical conditions are also being studied as part of this project in order to provide an overarching understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms involved in pit growth and propagation.

Publications:

a. Proceedings:

  • J. Srinivasan, M. J. McGrath, and R. G. Kelly: Mass Transport and Electrochemical Factors Influencing Stainless Steel Pitting and Repassivation in Neutral Chloride Media. ECS Transactions 58 (2014) 1-11 – Proceedings of the 224th ECS Meeting, San Francisco, CA, October 27 – November 2013.
  • J. Srinivasan, M. J. McGrath, and R. G. Kelly: Maximum Pit Size Estimation on Coated Aircraft Compressor Blades in Marine Environments using Repassivation Studies on Stainless Steel Artificial Pit Electrodes in Chloride Media. Proceedings of the Department of Defense Virtual Corrosion Conference, September 16 – 17, 2013.

b. Presentations:

  • NACE Corrosion Conference and Expo, March 9-14, 2014, San Antonio, TX: Experimental and Modeling Techniques of Evaluating Mass Transport and Electrochemical Parameters Influencing Stainless Steel Pitting and Repassivation. Research in Progress Session: Passivity and Localized Corrosion.
  • 224th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, October 27 – November 1, 2013, San Francisco, CA: Mass Transport and Electrochemical Phenomena Influencing the Pitting and Repassivation of Stainless Steels in Neutral Chloride Media. Corrosion Division Symposium: Mass Transport Phenomena in Localized Corrosion.
  • 2013 Department of Defense Virtual Corrosion Conference, September 16-17, 2013: Maximum Pit Size Estimation on Coated Aircraft Compressor Blades in Marine Environments using Repassivation Studies on Stainless Steel Artificial Pit Electrodes in Chloride Media. Symposium: Corrosion Fundamentals (presented by Prof. R. G. Kelly).
  • Risk Management of Corrodible Systems Conference, June 18-20, 2013, Washington, DC: Repassivation Studies on Stainless Steels using the Artificial Pit Electrode and Application to Maximum Pit Size Estimation. Symposium: Department of Defense.
  • Office of the Undersecretary of Defense Technical Corrosion Collaboration Meeting, July 24-26, 2012, Charlottesville, VA: Studies on Pitting Observed on 17-4 PH Stainless Steel Aircraft Compressor Blades.
  • Office of the Undersecretary of Defense Technical Corrosion Collaboration Meeting, January 9-11, 2012, Hattiesburg, MS: Corrosion performance of Erosion Coatings for Aircraft Compressor Blades.

c. Posters:

  • NACE Corrosion Conference and Expo, March 9-14, 2014, San Antonio, TX: Experimental and Modeling Studies on Mass Transport and Electrochemical Factors Influencing Stainless Steel Pitting and Repassivation. Student Poster Session, Marcel Pourbaix Category for Corrosion Science.
  • NACE Corrosion Conference and Expo, March 9-14, 2014, San Antonio, TX: Development of a Cyclic Artificial Pit Technique to Investigate Repassivation Kinetics of 316L Stainless Steel in Chloride Media. Student Poster Session, Marcel Pourbaix Category for Corrosion Science.
  • NACE Corrosion Conference and Expo, March 17-21, 2013, Orlando, FL: Studies on the Repassivation of Stainless Steels using the Artificial Pit Electrode Technique and Applications to Maximum Pit Size Prediction on Coated Aircraft Compressor Blades. Student Poster Session, Marcel Pourbaix Category for Corrosion Science.
  • Gordon Research Seminar/Gordon Research Conference: Corrosion – Aqueous, July 8-13, 2012: Determination of Key Electrochemical Parameters for Maximum Pit Size Calculation in Stainless Steel Aircraft Compressor Blades Exposed to Marine Atmospheres.
  • NACE Corrosion Conference and Expo, March 11-15, 2013, Salt Lake City, UT: Corrosion Studies of Erosion Coatings on Aircraft Compressor Blades. Student Poster Session, Mars Fontana Category for Corrosion Engineering.

 

Schematic of artificial pit and setup of boundary conditions for diffusional analysis: solving the diffusion equation under these conditions results in a plot relating surface concentration and repassivation potential to diffusive transport, establishing the critical electrochemical requirements for stable pitting.


3. Experimental evaluation and Modelling for Galvanically-Induced Localized Corrosion of AA7075-T6


Sponsor: OUSD
Researchers: Yijing (Cindy) Shi

 

Project Descriptions: This research project addresses the galvanically-induced localized corrosion of AA7075-T6 in contact with several noble materials (i.e., silver, nickel, bis-maleimides (BMI)/carbon fiber composites), under both full immersion and atmospheric conditions. The overall study is composed of two parts. First, a quantitative understanding of the fundamental mechanism for the stability of localized corrosion of AA7075-T6 is sought using electrochemical testing with both bulk samples and artificial pit samples. This understanding is then applied to galvanically-induced localized corrosion of AA7075-T6 under atmospheric conditions using the finite element analysis (FEA) method in order to predict the scenarios under which localized corrosion can be stabilized. Second, the conditions are identified under which the localized corrosion of AA7075-T6 could be mitigated when coupled with the above noble materials through the inhibition of oxygen reduction on the noble materials.

Publications:

a. Proceedings:

  • Yijing Shi and Robert G. Kelly, Experimental Evaluation and Modeling of Galvanic Interactions between Aluminum Alloy 7075-T6 and Noble Materials, ECS Trans. 41 (25), 155 (2012).

b. Posters:

  • Yijing Shi and Robert G. Kelly, “Experimental Evaluation and Modeling of Galvanic Interactions between AA7075-T6 and Noble Materials,” Department of Defense Corrosion Conference 2011, La Quinta, CA, July 30- August 5, 2011.

 

Effect of waterlayer thickness on pitting corrosion:Effect of waterlayer thickness on the potential and current density distribution on Ag-AA7075 interface (boundary 2/3 in the left figure). Ag and were selected under 0.1 M NaCl , pH11 condition, AA7075 was selected with 0.5 M AlCl3.


4. Improved Accelerated Testing for Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of High-Strength Aluminum Alloys


Sponsor: Rolls Royce, OUSD, Alcoa
Researchers: Marybeth Parker, Srishti Shrivastava

 

Project Descriptions: High-strength aluminum alloys such as AA2060 and AA7075 suffer from various kinds of localized corrosion including intergranular attack, pitting, and exfoliation. Because localized corrosion damage rates are difficult to predict, accelerated laboratory tests are necessary to evaluate long term alloy performance and determine lot acceptance. One particularly important role of accelerated testing is to distinguish between exfoliation susceptible and exfoliation resistant alloy tempers. Several standardized tests exist for this purpose (ASTM G34, ASTM G85, ANCIT), but they do not all produce the same exfoliation behavior in a single alloy temper. Several key parameters differ between the tests including the testing temperature, chloride content and pH of the testing solution, and the presence of an oxidizer stronger than oxygen. The goal of this project is to understand the role of these parameters in the exfoliation process. This knowledge will be used to understand why some tests produce exfoliation while others do not for a single alloy temper and to improve existing tests. Current work in this project includes investigating alternative oxidizing agents to use in accelerated tests and understanding the exfoliation mechanism for AA2060-T3.

Publications:

a. Posters:

  • Parker, M. E. "Comparing the Effects of Different Accelerated Testing Methods for Localized Corrosion Susceptibility on Aluminum Alloy 2060" Poster presented at NACE 2014.
  • Parker, M. E. "Understanding Intergranular Corrosion in Al-Li alloys as a Function of Environmental and Metallurgical Variables" Poster presented at NACE 2013.

 

Accelerated Testing of AA2060-T3:Images (a) and (c) show a surface image and a magnified cross-section respectively of AA2060-T3 after testing in ASTM G110 for 24 hours. Images (b) and (d) show a surface image and a magnified cross-section respectively of AA2060-T3 after testing in ASTM G85-02 A2 for 4 weeks. Intergranular corrosion is the underlying attack type for both tests, but exfoliation is only seen after ASTM G85-02-A2 testing (b).


5. Improved Accelerated Corrosion Testing for Carbon Steel


Sponsor: OUSD
Researchers: Piyush Khullar

 

Project Descriptions: Conventional accelerated corrosion test methods such as ASTM B117 are often used to simulate and accelerate the atmospheric corrosion of materials under controlled lab conditions. The discrepancy between lab tests and field exposures is a well-known problem and undermines the use of lab results for corrosion prediction in natural conditions. The poor correlation is the effect of a number of key environmental variables that are not accounted for in ASTM B117. This project aims to improve the co-relation between field exposures and lab accelerated corrosion tests by studying the effect of the “missing” environmental variables on the atmospheric corrosion of steel. Specifically, the work will quantify the effects of TOW, loading density of salt, salt particle size, salt composition, UV light, ozone concentration, and time on the corrosion rate and morphology of steel during laboratory and field exposures. Preliminary results have shown that modifying the standard lab tests by introduction of a strong oxidizer (ozone) leads to accelerated corrosion.

Publications:

a. Presentation:

  • 224th ECS Meeting, October 27th – November 1st, 2013. San Francisco, CA: “Accelerated Atmospheric Corrosion Testing of Steel”, P. Khullar and R.G. Kelly.

b. Posters:

  • P. Khullar, “Effect of Environmental Variables on Corrosion Testing of Steel”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 9th – 14th, 2014) San Antonio, TX
  • P. Khullar, “Improved Accelerated Corrosion Testing of Steel and AA5083”, NACE Corrosion Conference (March 17th – 21th, 2013) Orlando, FL.

 

Improved Accelerated Corrosion Testing for Carbon Steel: Images (a) gives visual comparison of field exposed samples with lab accelerated tests. Images (b) shows Effect of ozone on corrosion rate of carbon steel.


6. Mathematical Modeling of Potential and Current Distributions for Atmospheric Corrosion of Galvanic Coupling in Airframe Components


Sponsor: ONR
Researchers: Gilbert Liu

 

Project Descriptions: The overall goals of this project are to develop a quantitative scientific understanding of the effects of important external variables on the electrochemical potential and current distributions that develop in fastener hole configurations involving a realistic thin film/galvanic couple configuration between a 7050- T7451 component and a CRES 316 fastener, and investigate how these potential and current distributions correlate potential local damages on the metal surfaces in the galvanic coupling. A combination of experimental and modeling approaches are being used to characterize key processes and important external factors in atmospheric localized corrosion. The Laplace equation is used to model steady state potential and current distributions under thin film electrolyte conditions, ignoring ion species diffusion and changes in solution chemistry. The use of the Laplace equation relies on a knowledge or estimation of the electrolyte characteristics (primary conductivity) and its dependence on position and other experimental variables. FEM modeling is applied to numerically determine the potential and current distributions in the thin film at steady state for the range of geometries and environments. To accomplish this objective, a series of appreciate electrochemical kinetics for the CRES 316 and 7050-T7451 alloys were determined experimentally and then served as boundary conditions in the modeling. These kinetics were developed in solutions designed to mimic the chemistry of the cathodic and anodic areas.

Publications:

a. Posters:

  • NACE Corrosion Conference and Expo, March 9-14, 2014, San Antonio, TX: Steady State Modeling of the Influence of Galvanic Coupling on Structural Degradation of Airframe Components. Student Poster Session, Marcel Pourbaix Category for Corrosion Science.

 

Mathematical Modelling of Current and Potential Distributions for Galvanic Coupling:Images (a) shows a generic geometry of galvanic coupling system between AA7050 -T7451 and CRES 316. Images (c) and (d) give simulation results on potential and current distributions in the electrolyte domain by experimentally determined kinetics shown in image (b).

 

 

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