Fall 2006 Courses

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES | GRADUATE COURSES

PHIL 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY [3]
Mitch Green (T R 0930-1020 + disc sec)
A general and non technical introduction to the main traditional problems of metaphysics, ethics, and the theory of knowledge as they are to be found in the writings of historical figures (such as Plato, Descartes, Pascal, and ]ohn Stuart Mill) and contemporary authors. Among our questions will be: How can the will be free in a world governed by physical laws? Is the rightness or wrongness of an act a matter of the conventions of the society in which that act is performed or can morality transcend social norms? Is the mind so related to the body that it could survive the latter's death or are 'mind' and 'brain' two ways of referring to the same thing? Can belief in God be given a justification, rational or otherwise? This course is intended for those making a first approach to the subject, either to gain an idea of its scope or in order to lay a foundation for further study.

PHIL 141 FORMS OF REASONING [3]
James Cargile (Sect 1: M W F 0900 0950)
James Cargile (Sect 2: M W F 1000 1050)
A philosophy course with a practical aim: to develop the student's ability to recognize and evaluate arguments. The course will not cover symbolic logic in any detail (for this take PHIL 142 or PHIL 242), but will concentrate on actual arguments given in ordinary language. Some time will be spent studying those fallacies, or errors in reasoning, which occur most frequently in discussion and argument. The goal of this course is to give the student a Working knowledge of logic which has an application to daily life.

PHIL 151 HUMAN NATURE [3]
Harold Langsam (M W 1200 1250 + disc sec)
This course is concerned with the question of whether there are characteristics that all human beings have in common other than the obvious biological similarities. In particular, we shall address issues such as the following: I ) is rationality a part of human nature, and, if so, what is the nature of hunian rationality, and how does the rational part of human beings relate to their other characteristics? 2) what is the relation of human nature to morality: is it in the nature of human beings to act morally and/or to recognize moral obligations, or, on the contrary, are moral requirements in some sense contrary to our nature? 3) are human beings social animals: is it natural for human beings to live with others in societies and be governed by political institutions, or are such living arrangements contrary to our nature? Readings will include both contemporary and historical writers.


PHIL 153 INTRO TO MORAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY [3]
James Cargile (M W 1100 1150 + disc sect)
What is moral philosophy? One way to answer this question is this: taking at its point of departure representative views within a culture on such matters as (a) the scope of morality (how, for example, it relates to law and etiquette), (b) the demands and ideals of morality (what morality asks us to do and to be), (c) the nature of morality (what the source, character and legitimacy of these demands and ideals), and (d) the connection between living morally and being individually well off, moral philosophy seeks first to make these issues clear and then to answer the several questions that arise and to do so within a comprehensive framework that shows how these several answers Fit together. Here are some of the questions: Is seeking to live virtuously an essential part of trying to live as well as we can? What is involved in seeking to live virtuously? If this has something to do with moral demands, what are moral demands? Are these simply social conventions backed by the sanctions of public approval and disapproval, conventions which we internalize in the form of conscience, or are there some other way of explaining them or of showing them to be valid? What claims can such demands legitimately or reasonably make against our desires or prospects for happiness? Are there moral facts or objective values? What is political philosophy? Much the same sort of answer is in order here. We begin with more or less received opinion about (a) the form a government should have in order that it legitimately exercise coercive control over those who come within the effective scope of its actual power, (b) the limits of the legitimate exercise of this power, and (c) the notion of legitimacy itself. The uncertainty and indeterminacy of received views on these matters invite the fundamental questions of political philosophy. When, if at all, is the exercise of coercive state power legitimate? What is political legitimacy? Is the state necessary? For what ends? In this course, we shall try to make clear and to try to answer these questions through reading some classic and some contemporary texts. Two short (5 6 page) papers, a mid term and a final examination.

PHIL 161 INTRODUCTION TO METAPHYSICS [3]
Brian Pinkston (T R 1530 1645)
This class will introduce central notions in metaphysics, including: Existence, universals, concrete particulars, and modality. It will also introduce related concepts, including: Realism/nominalism vis a vis universals; substance, substrata, and 'bundle' theories of concrete particulars; propositions; states of afflrs/facts/events; possible worlds; persistence through time; and personhood.

PHIL 162 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW [3]
David Tabachnick (T R 1230 1345)
This introduction to the philosophy of law will focus upon several key philosophical issues which arise in legal theory and practice. The course will examine the relationship between law and morality through the debate over legal positivism and natural law theory, the obligation to obey the law and the moral justification of civil disobedience, judicial decisions and legal reasoning, political liberty (e.g. paternalism, expression, privacy, property, and rights), justice (e.g. affirmative action and torts), and punishment (questions concerning the right to punish and who (if anyone) may be justifiably punished).

PHIL 163 INTRODUCTION TO MORAL PSYCHOLOGY [3]
Ayca Boylu (T R 1100 1215)
Aristotle did not envision a person who is trying to become good only as a person who is trying to obey certain pre¬defined general rules. Rather he envisioned her as a person who is trying to get better in establishing a good character by making use of her practical wisdom so as to see all the relevant values in particular situations. At this point, it becomes crucial to question whether in becoming a better person phenomena such as emotions, love, desires, and pleasures are forces that have no connection to apprehending values. For if they are blind forces then they threaten the attempts of the person who is trying to become better but if they are closely related to our apprehension of values (if they are/involve for instance the pronouncements of what we take to be valuable), they might have a major role for our becoming a better person. Our investigation therefore will consist in shedding light on the way in which these phenomena figure in the life of a person who is trying to become a better person.
     There will be two lectures and one discussion section each week. Readings will be drawn from both classical and contemporary sources. Required written work will be two short papers, a midterm, and a final examination. This course is suitable for students who have done little or no previous work in philosophy.

PHIL 207 KNOWLEDGE AND REALITY [3]
Brie Gertler (T R 1230 1320)
This course examines our basic understanding of reality, and what this understanding tells us about the nature of the reality thus known. What can we know about the world? How can we know it? And what is the nature of the reality thus known? We will examine influential answers to these questions, including: (1) skepticism, which denies that we can have genuine knowledge of external reality; (11) idealism, which claims that the known world is dependent on, or even limited to, our own minds; and (Ili) realism, which maintains that we can achieve knowledge of a mind independent reality. The course will introduce philosophical methodology, and will familiarize students with some key issues in epistemology and metaphysics. Readings will be taken from both historical and contemporary philosophers; these include Descartes, Hume, Russell, and Putnam, among others.

PHIL 211 HIST OF PHILOSOPHY: ANC AND MEDIEVAL [3]
Antonia Lolordo (M W 1200 1250+ disc sec)
This course surveys the history of Western philosophy from its origins to the Middle Ages. We will read and discuss some works of Plato and Aristotle; of post Aristotelian philosophers like the Skeptics, Stoics and Epicureans; of a few of the major medieval philosophers, both Christian and Islamic. Major themes are the scope and limits of human knowledge, the nature of reality, and the way to achieve human happiness. The course is designed for students who want a basis for more advanced work in philosophy and for those who do not plan to go on in philosophy but believe that some knowledge of the history of philosophy is essential to a liberal arts education. Requirements are a midterm exam, a take home final, and a number of short writing assignments.

PHIL 242 INTRO TO SYMBOLIC LOGIC [3]
Paul Humphreys (M W 1000 1050 + disc sec)
A basic introduction to the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic. The aim of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of both sentential and quanti fier logic. The emphasis is on developing an ability to carry out proofs within these systems and on developing an ability to translate sentences of natural language into symbolic notation. The course will acquaint the student with the concepts of formula, proof, interpretation, and validity. ere will be weekly homework assignments, two midterms, and a flnal exam. Students will use logic software that will allow them to develop greater expertise with the material.

PHIL 245 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE [3]
Paul Humphreys (M W 1200 1250 + disc sec)
The course will focus on scientiflc method as a route to knowledge. Typical topics to be investigated are: how scientiflc claims can be demarcated from other types of knowledge: why science appears to progress while other fields do not; scientific explanations; the contrast between natural and social sciences; scientific realism and instrumentalism; the relationship between the philosophy and the history of science. Topics will be illustrated with historical and contemporary examples, ranging from Greek astronomy to current social sciences, but no background in any particular science will be presupposed. Requirements include weekly assignments, a term paper, and a final examination.

PHIL 257POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY [3]
John Simmons (T R 1100 1150 + disc sec)
The course will examine a number of related problems in political philosophy, concentrating primarily on debates concerning social justice and political obligation. We will try to answer such questions as: Are governments justified in redistributing income through progressive taxation (or other means)? When (and why) do we have a moral obligation to obey the laws? When is disobedience or revolution permissible? In answering such questions, the course will touch on philosophical problems concerning property, anarchism, punishment, and feminism. Readings will be from both classical and contemporary sources. Course requirements: two short papers, a midterm, and a flnal exam. (This course satisfies the major concentration requirement in Ethics and Social Philosophy.)

PHIL 266PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION [3]
Trenton Merricks (T R 0930 1020 +disc section)
This course will examine a number of different topics that have been of perennial interest to philosophers of religion and philosophical theologians. These topics include arguments for and against God's existence, the problem of evil, the relationship between human freedom and divine foreknowledge, and how to think about personal immortality and the nature of the human person.

PHIL 311 PLATO [3]
Daniel Devereux (T R 1530 1645)
This introduction to the philosophy of Plato will focus on the following questions: What is the nature of virtue?; Why should one be virtuous?; Can the mind or soul exist independently of the body?; What are the conditions required for knowledge as opposed to true beliep; Are there entities that exist independently of the world of our experience? Among the works we will discuss are: the Apology, Protagoras, Laches, Gorgias, Phaedo, Republic, and Parmenides. Requirements: class participation; 2 or 3 careful summaries of arguments in the text; a short paper and a longer, term paper; and a final exam.

PHIL 314 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY [3]
Loren Lomasky (M W 1800 1915)
[cross listed with PHIL 714]
The so called Middle Ages stretch approximately a thousand years, and its philosophers include Christians, Jews, and Muslims in dialogue within their own communities as well as across sectarian lines. This course will not attempt to provide a play by play of all this action but will instead focus on major books by three of the major thinkers of this extended period: Augustine's Confessions, Malmonides' Guide for the Perplexed, Aquinas's Summa Theologica. The course can, then, be subtitled "Two Saints and a Rabbi." These are individuals of surpassing (and continuing) philosophical as well as theological interest. Understanding why that is so is a central goal of the class. Our studies will be historical but will also take these figures as speaking importantly to issues that remain current. Students will write three short (approximately 5 pp.) papers as well as a final exam and, possibly, a midterm.

PHIL 315 RATIONALISTS [3]
Jorge Secada (T R 1400 15 15)
This course is an examination of the metaphysics and epistemology of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz. Topics to be discussed include God, causation, free will, substance and properties, mind and matter, perception and emotions. We will approach Spinoza and Leibniz as developing from or responding to Descartes, so we will spend about half of the semester on Descartes and divide the remaining time equally between Spinoza and Leibniz. We will closely study the following texts: Descartes's Meditations on First Philosophy (we will spend about one week on each meditation; we will, however, also refer to other works and examine in some detail several passages from writings such as the Principles of Philosophy, the Discourse on the Method, and the Objections and Replies to the Meditations); Spinoza's Ethics (in particular Part 1); and several brief works of Leibniz, including his Monadology. Some attention will also be given to other seventeenth century philosophers, such as Malebranche and the Cartesian occasionalists, and we will read some of the secondary literature on all these authors. Course requirements include active participation in class, one term paper (with a graded mid term draft), and several brief quizzes and reading reports. This course satisfies the Colleges' second reading requirement.

PHIL 332 EPISTEMOLOGY [3]
Harold Langsam (M W 1400 1515)
The course focuses on questions in the theory of knowledge. Topics include: scepticism about knowledge of the external world, the sense data theory, the nature of justification, foundationalism and coherentism, naturalized epistemology, a priori knowledge, the analytic/synthetic distinction, induction, the ethics of belief.

PHIL 351 ETHICS [3]
John Marshall (T R 1100 12 15)
This course is a brief history of modern moral theory, i.e., moral theory from Thomas Hobbes to John Stuart Mill. Special emphasis will be given to David Hume and Immanuel Kant. Although the readings are classics in the history of modern ethics, the views and topics to be examined are of current interest and, indeed, are well represented in the writings of contemporary writers. Here are some sample questions: Is morality based on reason or on sentiment? Are reasons for action always dependent on the agent's desires? Are moral values objective? What role do emotional dispositions play in an ideal moral character? In what sense, if any, must moral agents be free? Requirements are four short (500 word) essays, two long (2000 word) essays and a final examination. No prerequisites, but some prior phil¬osophy would no doubt be helpful. (This course satisfies the major concentration in Ethics and Social Philosophy.)

PHIL 353 ANCIENT ETHICAL THEORY [3]
Rebecca Stangl (T R 0930 1045)
This course is a systematic introduction to the most prominent ethical views in the ancient world, beginning with Platonic and Aristotelian ethics and continuing through the debates between Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics in late antiquity. Particular topics to be discussed include: eudalmonism, the nature of virtue, the role of emotion in the moral life, justification and the appeal to nature, and the relation between self and other concern. Some time will also be devoted to thinking about the similarities and differences between ancient and modern approaches to ethical life and theory.

PHIL 361  AESTHETICS [3]
Mitch Green (M W 1400-1515)
The course will examine some central philosophical issues raised by artistic activity. We shall pursue such questions as whether there is an 'aesthetic attitude' that differentiates our approach to works of art from the approach we take to other things; whether artistic value is entirely in the eye of the beholder or whether there is such a thing as being wrong in one's judgment concerning an artwork; what, if there is any such objectivity in aesthetic evaluation, the criteria might be for arriving at proper evaluations; whether an interpretation of an artwork can ever be said to be incorrect, and, if it can, whether artist's intentions are ever relevant to that interpretation; whether the artist's representation of the world is in conflict with, or complements, that of the scientist; what role the metaphors in which artists often deal play in transfiguring our understanding of ourselves and environment; what our treatment of art objects can tell us about objects, and about the constituents of the world more generally.
     Readings from philosophers, historians of art, and philosophically minded practitioners of the arts. Among our authors will be Aristotle, M. Beardsley, O.K. Bouwsma, S. Cavell, R. Collingwood, A. Danto, G. Dickie, M. Duchamp, N. Frye, E.H. Gombrich, N. Goodman, E. Hanslick, D. Hume, I. Kant, P. Kivy, Plato, A. Schopenhauer, L. Tolstoy, K. Walton, H. Wolfflin, R. Wollheim, and P. Ziff.
     Course requirements: Three papers, two shorter (5 to 8 pages) and one longer (8 to 12 pages), and an in-class final examination. The studentâs participation in class discussion will be a factor in grading.

PHIL 365 JUSTICE AND HEALTHCARE [3]
John Arras (T R 0930 1045)
This course will examine the implications of several influential theories of justice (e.g., utilitarian, Rawislan, libertarian, communitarian, feminist) for a broad range of questions bearing on the allocation of health care and scarce medical resources. The course begins with the articulation and application of the above theories to the debate over rights to health care. (is there a right? If so, what are its nature, grounds, and limits?) Next comes an assessment of various options in health care reform, including close attention to the problem of rationing health care (e.g., by cost/benefit criteria, ability to pay, advanced age, etc.). We then will turn to problems of justice and organ transplantation: Who shall receive vital organs in a context of scarcity? How should organs be acquired? (by gift alone, a market in organs, presumed consent, a communitarian imperative?) Finally, the course will present questions of justice posed by new genetic knowledge via the human genome project.

PHIL 490H  HONORS PROGRAM [15]
Daniel Devereux (TBA)

PHIL 493,494  INDEPENDENT STUDY [3,3]
Daniel Devereux (TBA)       


PHIL 498T  SENIOR THESIS [3]
Daniel Devereux(TBA)


PHIL 504 GLOBAL JUSTICE, HEALTH, AND HUMAN RIGHTS [3]
John Arras (W 1900 2130)
This seminar is designed primarily for the benefit of 4th year bioethics students, but there is usually room for a number of graduate and professional students as well. The course will include an extended discussion of theories of global justice (Singer, Beitz, Pogge, Rawls), the duty to assist the needy in distant lands, and the limits of any such duty. A focal point for this discussion will be the duties of citizens of developed nations vis a vis the international AIDS epidemic, both with regard to the provision of life saving drugs and the conduct of biomedical research. The latter topics may include a discussion of the intellectual property rights of pharmaceutical companies in a time of plague. Other likely topics include the ethics of human development and international feminism (Sen, Nussbaum), the human rights movement as a vehicle of global justice (Shue, et al.), and the ethics of multi culturalism and intervention in the affairs and customs of other peoples that allegedly threaten human rights and welfare. (Instructor permission required) There will most likely be short weekly response papers and an extended term paper of roughly 20 30 pages.

PHIL 542 ADVANCED LOGIC [3]
James Cargile (M W F l400-l450)
This course is designed to acquaint students with those central results in modern logic which have important philosophical implications. The topics covered may include the completeness and undecidability of first order logic; the notions of satisfaction and truth; Tarski's theorem on the undefinability of truth; the consequences of adding identity to first order logic; the Deduction Theorem and the differences between axiomatic and natural deduction formulations of logic; the Lowenheim Skolem Theorem(s). The prerequisites for the course are either a) satisfactory completion of Philosophy 242 or its equivalent, or b) a demonstrated ability to follow abstract formal reasoning. The course requirements will include weekly homework assignments and a final examination.

PHIL 555 HOBBESIAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHIES [3]
Loren Lomasky (T 1800 2030)
Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan remains a seminar work of political philosophy, not so much because of the conclusions it draws authoritarian to the highest degree but for the unprecedented rigor and hard headed rational choice methodology it brings to the discipline. Along with Descartes, Hobbes is a co founder of modern philosophy, and like Descartes his influence is profound and persistent. The first part of the course will involve reading Leviathan in its entirety. We then turn to contemporary works in the Hobbesian tradition. One is David Gauthier's MoralS By Agreement. Others may include works by James Buchanan, jean Hampton, Gregory Kavka, ]an Narveson, perhaps others. Students will write occasional short discussion essays and also a substantial course paper. Participation is an important course component.



GRADUATE COURSES | BACK TO UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

PHIL 504 GLOBAL JUSTICE, HEALTH, AND HUMAN RIGHTS [3]
John Arras (W 1900 2130)
This seminar is designed primarily for the benefit of 4th year bioethics students, but there is usually room for a number of graduate and professional students as well. The course will include an extended discussion of theories of global justice (Singer, Beitz, Pogge, Rawls), the duty to assist the needy in distant lands, and the limits of any such duty. A focal point for this discussion will be the duties of citizens of developed nations vis a vis the international AIDS epidemic, both with regard to the provision of life saving drugs and the conduct of biomedical research. The latter topics may include a discussion of the intellectual property rights of pharmaceutical companies in a time of plague. Other likely topics include the ethics of human development and international feminism (Sen, Nussbaum), the human rights movement as a vehicle of global justice (Shue, et al.), and the ethics of multi culturalism and intervention in the affairs and customs of other peoples that allegedly threaten human rights and welfare. (Instructor permission required) There will most likely be short weekly response papers and an extended term paper of roughly 20 30 pages.

PHIL 542 ADVANCED LOGIC [3]
James Cargile (M W F l400-l450)
This course is designed to acquaint students with those central results in modern logic which have important philosophical implications. The topics covered may include the completeness and undecidability of first order logic; the notions of satisfaction and truth; Tarski's theorem on the undefinability of truth; the consequences of adding identity to first order logic; the Deduction Theorem and the differences between axiomatic and natural deduction formulations of logic; the Lowenheim Skolem Theorem(s). The prerequisites for the course are either a) satisfactory completion of Philosophy 242 or its equivalent, or b) a demonstrated ability to follow abstract formal reasoning. The course requirements will include weekly homework assignments and a final examination.

PHIL 555 HOBBESIAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHIES [3]
Loren Lomasky (T 1800 2030)
Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan remains a seminal work of political philosophy, not so much because of the conclusions it draws authoritarian to the highest degree but for the unprecedented rigor and hard headed rational choice methodology it brings to the discipline. Along with Descartes, Hobbes is a co founder of modern philosophy, and like Descartes his influence is profound and persistent. The first part of the course will involve reading Leviathan in its entirety. We then turn to contemporary works in the Hobbesian tradition. One is David Gauthier's Morals By Agreement. Others may include works by James Buchanan, Jean Hampton, Gregory Kavka, Jan Narveson, perhaps others. Students will write occasional short discussion essays and also a substantial course paper. Participation is an important course component.

PHIL 703 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: MENTAL CONTENT [3]
Brie Gertler (T 1530 1800)
We will discuss a variety of questions concerning the nature of mental content, paying special attention to the following issues: ( I ) The ontological status of mental content: Does mental content relate us to abstract objects? What are the prospects for naturalizing intentionality? (2) The relationship between intentional content and phenomenal character: Are these distinct features of mental states, or is one of these properties reducible to the other? (3) The debate between internalism and externalism: Does mental content depend only on properties internal to the individual? Students will submit a short pr6cis of one of the readings each week, and will do one or two oral presentations. A longer paper will be due at the close of the semester.

PHIL 712 ARISTOTLE'S METAPHYSICS [3]
Daniel Devereux (W 1300 1530)
The course will be devoted to Aristotle's inquiries in the area of metaphysics. We will begin with his brief, early work, the Categories, and focus on the conception of substance, as it is developed in the first five chapters. In connection with the Categories we will compare Aristotle's early views with Platonic parallels, attempting to determine what were the crucial points of disagreement between the two. It is now a common view (which I accept) that the Categories predated Aristotle's development of the matter form distinction, and that this distinction is introduced for the first time in Book I of the Physics. We will spend several weeks on this part of the Physics, concentrating on Aristotle's concept of matter, and on implications of the new distinction for his theory of substance. Finally, we will study carefully the central books of the Metaphysics (Books Vil X), discussing a number of issues i elating to Aristotle's mature theory of substance, including (I) how does the notion of an underlying subject figure in the theory?; (ii) in what sense is form "primary substance"?; (iii) how does definition (and definability) relate to Aristotle's conception of substance?; (iv) are substantial forms particulars or universals?

PHIL 714 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY [3]
Loren Lomasky (M W 1800 1915)
[cross listed with PHIL 314]
The so called Middle Ages stretch approximately a thousand years, and its philosophers include Christians, Jews, and Muslims in dialogue within their own communities as well as across sectarian lines. This course will not attempt to provide a play by play of all this action but will instead focus on major books by three of the major thinkers of this extended period: Augustine's Confessions, Malmonides' Guide for the Perplexed, Aquinas's Summa Theologica. The course can, then, be subtitled "Two Saints and a Rabbi." These are individuals of surpassing (and continuing) philosophical as well as theological interest. Understanding why that is so is a central goal of the class. Our studies will be historical but will also take these figures as speaking importantly to issues that remain current. Students will write three short (approximately 5 pp.) papers as well as a final exam and, possibly, a midterm.

PHIL 716 EARLY MODERN SEMINAR [3]
Antonia LoLordo (M 1530 1800)
This course will be a reading of Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding in its historical and philosophical context. Issues include nativism; composition and identity; free will; substance; the nature of mental content; mechanism; faith and reason; and the relation between epistemology and political philosophy. We will also read some of Locke's influences and the people he influenced, such as Descartes, Boyle, Malebranche, Leibniz and Hume; and a small selection from Locke's political works.

PHIL 753CHALLENGE OF AMORALISM [3]
Rebecca Stangl (M 1300 1530)
Is unethical conduct necessarily irrational? Many philosophers have thought so, and offered various arguments in defense of their position. In this course, we will examine three quite different accounts of the relationship between morality and practical reason, all of which aini, in some way, to vindicate the rational standing of morality: Korsgaard's neo Kantian argument, as presented in The Sources of Normativity; Philippa Foot's neo Aristotelian arguments, as presented in Natural Goodness; and Simon Blackburn's neo Humean account of practical reason, as presented in Ruling Passions. We will begin, though, by considering one recent articulation of the claim that morality is not rationality required: Candace Vogler's argument in Reasonable Vicious.

PHIL 759 POLITICAL AND LEGAL PHILOSOPHY[3]
John Simmons and Jody Kraus (T R 1330-1445)
Description unavailable at this time (to be taught at the Law School).

PHIL 831 POSSIBLE WORLDS [3]
Trenton Merricks (T 1300-1530)
This seminar focuses on the metaphysics of possibility and necessity, along with other related topics. It's central texts are Alvin Plantiga's"The Nature of Necessity" and David Lewis's "On the Plurality of Worlds".


PHIL 894  RESEARCH [3]

PHIL 895  SUPERVISED RESEARCH [3]

PHIL 897, 898, 997, 999 NON-TOPICAL RES [3-12]



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