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Summer Session Curriculum

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ANTH 3510: VISIONS OF THE ANDES (in Spanish) | 9:30

See description below under SPAN 445.

 

°ANTH 3520: ANDEAN AND AMAZONIC ANTHROPOLOGY | 11:30

An ethnographic survey of Peruvian Andean and Amazonic cultures, including an examination of recent cultural and social processes in the region. Some attention will be given to ecological issues as well.

 

ANTH 3530: AMAZONIA: INDIGENEITY, SOCIETY, AND THE ENVIRONMENT  | 11:30

This course explores the diverse indigenous societies of Amazonia, covering a broad range of issues from gender, shamanism, and the environment to current indigenous social and political movements.  The course emphasizes ethnographic accounts of Amazonia, with special attention to the unique challenges of conducting research in the region today.

 

ANTH 3540: CRISIS OF THE MODERN SELF  | 9:30

In this course we will study the various social meanings and uses of selfhood.  We will investigate such internal social transgressions as conjoined twining, intersexuality, and serial killings.  We will also analyze, from a variety of ethnographic texts, the human capacity for imagining and living in the world against the dominant modern paradigms of the Self.

 

 

GETR 3500: ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARY AND FICTION FILM  | 9:30
This course will investigate how the First World imagines the Second, Third and Fourth Worlds on screen, while exploring the often fluid boundaries between documentary and fiction in film. We will examine the work of filmmakers from Europe and the U.S. as they look at Latin America, Africa, Oceania, and indigenous communities in the global north. This course will particularly focus on films that test the limits of realist cinematic form, including work by Werner Herzog, Robert Flaherty, and Jean Rouch. Their controversial and avant-garde approaches to visualizing European culture's "others" will be contrasted with examples of more classic filmic anthropology, as well as recent efforts at self-representation by immigrant, aboriginal, and autobiographical filmmakers. Course readings will focus on theoretical issues in documentary film and on the practice of ethnographic and cross-cultural filmmaking. All course readings and class discussions will be in English. Course requirements will include an in-class presentation, a midterm exam and a final paper. Upon consultation with the instructor and with prior approval, students may produce and submit their own documentary or video essay in lieu of the final paper. This course will be offered in Summer 2011.


GETR 3559  REVOLUTIONARY CINEMAS  | 11:30

This course will focus on Marxist approaches to filmmaking in Latin America and Europe, exploring concepts of revolutionary cinema in both political and stylistic terms. Among the topics to be discussed will be the translation of Marx's writings to questions of film form, the influence of German dramatist Bertolt Brecht on "Third cinema" aesthetics, and the connection between Marxism and post-colonial filmmaking. We will consider the impact of the revolutions in the Soviet Union and Cuba on film production, while also tracing the history of leftist and avant-garde film movements in Western Europe and South America. Films by Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Sergei Eisenstein, Jean-Luc Godard, Alexander Kluge, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Glauber Rocha, Fernando Solanas, Humberto Solas, Dziga Vertov, and others. Theoretical texts by Brecht, Eisenstein, Walter Benjamin, and others. All course readings and class discussions will be in English. Course requirements will include regular short writing assignments and a final exam. This course will be offered in Summer 2011.

 

°HILA 3150: PERUVIAN HISTORY: PRE-INCA TO THE NINETEENTH CENTURY | 11:30

A survey of Peruvian history from the earliest human settlements on the Peruvian coast, ca. 7,000 BCE, through pre-Inca and Inca cultures, the conquest of Perú in the 16th Century, subsequent colonization, independence in 1821, the formation of the Republic in the earlier part of the 19th Century, and the War of the Pacific and its aftermath. The course will include weekly on-site lectures, visiting Inca and pre-Inca sites, colonial and republican churches and other buildings, and museums in and around Lima.

 

°HILA 3160: CONTEMPORARY PERÚ: HISTORY, POWER, AND SOCIETY | 9:30

A survey of the historical roots of contemporary Peruvian society in the 19th and 20th Centuries, with special attention given to social structure, gender issues, and distribution of power.

 

 

HILA 3180: FOREIGNERS IN PERU | 11:30

Perú has received more than its share of foreigners. What have these strangers who have arrived before us –travelers, scientists, spiritualists, rebels, diplomats, novelists, essayists, poets, journalists, students– seen? A sullen, depressed, people? Cities of energetic individuals filled with dignity and aspirations? Racial animosities? Christian charity? Social compromises? Corruption? Domestic servants? Dirt? Sex? Beautiful faces? A glorious past? We will see Perú’s past and present through them, as we too train our eyes for our days here.

 

MDST 3005: ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARY AND FICTION FILM | 9:30

See description above under GETR 3500.

 

MDST 3015 REVOLUTIONARY CINEMAS | 11:30

See description above under GETR 3559.

 

*PHIL 2420 INTRODUCTION TO SYMBOLIC LOGIC | 9:30

This course introduces the concepts and techniques of modern formal logic, including both sentential and quantifier logic, as well as proof, interpretation, translation, and validity. This course can be used to satisfy the logic requirement for the philosophy major.

 

PHIL 2661   GOD | 11:30

This course studies the philosophical conception of God and some of the main issues arising around it. It will include a brief survey of this notion, and it will examine the notion itself, considering God’s perfection and attributes (omnipotence, omniscience, benevolence, simplicity, immutability, immateriality, eternity, and necessity), and whether one can define God. It will also look at arguments for God’s existence and against it, and it will discuss whether God’s existence is compatible with human freedom and moral responsibility, and with the existence of evil. Finally, the course will examine briefly the role the notion of God can play in the discussion of such philosophical issues as the foundations of natural necessity and the meaning of human life. This course requires no previous acquaintance with the subject.

 

PHIL 2662 GOD AND FREEDOM | 11:30

This course will study the relation between God and human freedom. Among issues to be examined are the compatibility of foreknowledge and human free agency, and whether the existence of God entails that all truths are necessary. The course will survey various conceptions of human freedom, of Divine omniscience, and of the relation between God and creatures. Authors to be read and discussed may include Plato, Aristotle, St Augustine, St Anselm, Aquinas, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Kant. This course can serve as an introduction to the subject and has no prerequisites.

 

PHIL 2751: ETHICS OF VIOLENCE | 9:30

This course will study ethical and philosophical issues surrounding conquest, genocide, terrorism, and war, giving particular attention to those involving cultural identity and difference. It will be articulated around the following three themes: the European conquest and occupation of the Americas from the 16th to the 19th centuries; the terrorist activities of the Peruvian Shining Path in the 1980s and 90s; and the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001 and their aftermath. The course may serve as an introduction to moral and political philosophy. No prior courses in philosophy are required.

 

PHIL 2752: ETHICS OF THE CONQUEST OF THE AMERICAS | 9:30

A survey of the moral and political thinking of Spanish philosophers in the 16th Century (Vitoria, Las Casas, Suárez) around the question of the justification and legitimacy of the conquests of México and Perú. The course will also study related issues regarding encounters between different cultures, the limits of cultural relativism, and cultural identity; and political and ethical authority. It will include an examination of some contemporary authors. This course is suitable both for students with no previous background in philosophy, as well as for philosophy majors and minors.

 

PHIL 2755: ETHICS AND FILM | 11:30

An exploration of movies as a medium for ethics. The course will focus on the nature of the moving image and its potential for self-reflection and moral awareness. It will examine ethical issues as they arise in contemporary films (for instance, Allen’s Crimes and Misdemeanors, Almodóvar’s Talk to Her, and Lynch’s Elephant Man). Among authors read are Kant, Mill, Emerson, and Nietzsche. The course can serve as an introduction to philosophy and has no pre-requisites.

 

*PHIL 3150: DESCARTES, SPINOZA, LEIBNIZ | 11:30

A survey of the metaphysics and epistemology of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. The course will give special attention to issues concerning the nature of mind, space, and matter; substances and their properties; causation; freedom; the relation between metaphysics, science, and theology; and the existence of God. This course can be used to partially fulfill the history of philosophy area requirements for the UVa philosophy major, and has as a pre-requisite some prior acquaintance with philosophy at the College-level, or instructor permission.

 

*PHIL 3310: METAPHYSICS  | 11:30

Examines central metaphysical issues such as time, the existence of God, causality and determinism, universals, possibility and necessity, material objects, identity, and the nature of metaphysics. This course can be used to fulfill the metaphysics and epistemology area requirement for the UVa philosophy major, and has as a pre-requisite some prior acquaintance with philosophy at the College-level, or instructor permission.

 

 

*PHIL 3710: ETHICS  | 9:30

History of modern ethical theory (Hobbes to Mill) with special emphasis on the texts of Hume (Treatise, Book III) and Kant (Grundlegung), which will be studied carefully and critically. Among the topics to be considered: Is morality based on reason? Is it necessarily irrational not to act morally? Are moral standards objective? Are they conventional? Is it a matter of luck whether we are morally virtuous? Is the morally responsible will a free will? Are all reasons for acting dependent on desires? This course can be used to fulfill the ethics and political philosophy area requirement for the UVa philosophy major, and has as a pre-requisite some prior acquaintance with philosophy at the College-level, or instructor permission.

 

 

°*PHIL 4993/4995: DIRECTED READINGS AND RESEARCH | 9:30 or 11:30

Independent upper-level study under the direction of a UVa Philosophy Department Faculty member. Topics will be decided by the instructor and the student and may include Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy, Metaphysics, and some areas of Ethics and Political Philosophy. In order to enroll in this course students must have already taken College-level philosophy courses at the 3000-level.

 

RELC 2500: LIBERATION THEOLOGY | 11:30

This course is an introduction to Christian liberation theology with special attention to the writings of Gustavo Gutiérrez and other Latin American theologians.

 

RELG 2600: GOD  | 11:30

See description above under PHIL 2661.

 

RELG 2610: GOD AND FREEDOM  | 11:30

See description above under PHIL 2662.

 

°SOC 2420: CONTEMPORARY PERÚ: HISTORY, POWER, AND SOCIETY | 9:30

See description above under HILA 3160.

 

°SOC 2510: CONTEMPORARY PERUVIAN CULTURE AND SOCIETY

This course is described in a separate section of its own earlier in this brochure.

 

SOC 2890: PERUVIAN SOCIETY AND THE SHINING PATH (in Spanish) | 9:30

See description below under SPAN 4890.

 

°SPAN 4450: VISIONS OF THE ANDES (in Spanish) | 9:30

This course will explore conceptions and representations of Andean people and culture as embodied in writings of diverse genres and in works of art. The course focuses mainly on the Peruvian Andes. Special attention will be given to the Inca past and the Indian culture in Peruvian national identity. Authors to be read may include the Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Tito Cusi Yupanqui, Cieza de León, Guamán Poma de Ayala, Neruda, Arguedas, Cardenal, and Vargas Llosa. Some attention will also be given to painting and film.

 

 

°SPAN 4870: LATIN AMERICAN FICTION OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (in Spanish) | 11:30

A survey of some of the most important Latin American and Peruvian fiction of the 20th Century, with concentration on short stories by notable authors which may include Alejo Carpentier, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, José María Arguedas, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez, Alfredo Bryce, and Julio Ramón Ribeyro. Prerequisite: SPAN 3330 or the equivalent, or permission of the Program Director.

 

SPAN 4890: PERUVIAN SOCIETY AND THE SHINING PATH (in Spanish) | 9:30

After an overview of the recent history and the contemporary social structure of Perú, the course will study the activities of the Partido Comunista del Perú – Sendero Luminoso during the 80s and 90s, focusing in particular on its relations with the Asháninka ethnic group of Central Peruvian Amazonia. Students will research the Asháninka’s struggle against the Shining Path in contemporary news reports, interviews with survivors, and visit the actual area of the confrontation (all costs included as part of the course; the visit takes place during the last full weekend before the end of classes). The last part of the course discusses the Peruvian feature-length documentary, Asháninka, which presents some of the events studied in the course. The film’s director will attend a session and engage with students. Students will read the brief version of the report by the Peruvian Commission on Truth and Reconciliation.

 

°SPAN 4990: CONTEMPORARY PERUVIAN POETRY AND FICTION DIRECTED READINGS (in Spanish) | 9:30 or 11:30

This is a directed reading tutorial focusing on current Peruvian fiction and poetry. Students will study works of distinguished living authors, such as Alfredo Bryce or Antonio Cisneros, as well as the recent writings of emerging younger figures, such as Mario Montalbetti, Rosella Di Paolo, or Santiago Roncagliolo. Students will have an opportunity of meeting and interacting with many of the authors they read. Required course work may include translating from Spanish into English, as well as brief critical analyses or longer interpretative essays. Enrollment in this course is very limited.

 

° These courses are taught regularly.

 

* These philosophy courses can be used to satisfy requirements for a UVa philosophy major. All these courses presuppose some acquaintance with the subject and require at least one prior university-level philosophy course. The Program will usually offer at least one of these courses every year.

 Summer Session Spanish Language Courses

The Universidad Antonio Ruiz de Montoya, in conjunction with the UVa Program, is able to offer instruction in Spanish as a foreign language at all levels, modeled exactly on the courses offered at UVa, down to the textbooks and materials, adding the experience of professional language teachers and the environment of a Spanish-speaking country. SPAN 1010, SPAN 1020, and SPAN 1060 courses, as well as the combined SPAN 2010/2020 course, run from 9:30am to 1:30pm and are worth 6 credits each. All other Spanish language courses are worth 3 credits each. SPAN 2010, SPAN 2020 and SPAN 3010 are offered from 9:30am to 11:30am. SPAN 3030 and SPAN 3040 run from 11:30am to 1:30pm. Students will have access to language lab facilities and may be required to complete a certain number of lab hours. Our program, which emphasizes exposure of real-life linguistic interaction, offers the following courses in Spanish language:

 

SPAN 1010, 1020 or 1060: BEGINNING SPANISH | 9:30 to 1:30

An intensive introduction to the Spanish language emphasizing listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to enable students to communicate in Spanish in everyday situations and to read moderately difficult texts in Spanish. These courses must each be taken for 6 credits, from 9:30am to 1:30pm daily during the whole Summer Session. Only one of SPAN 1010, SPAN 1020 or SPAN 1060 can be taken per Summer Session. SPAN 1010 is designed for students with no previous experience with Spanish. SPAN 1020 is designed for students with previous beginning Spanish experience. Spanish 106 is an accelerated introductory level course that combines materials from SPAN 1010 and SPAN 1020. It is recommended for students with previous experience in Spanish, but with scores of 0-325 on the UVa Placement Exam or a placement score of 420-510 on the SAT II.

 

SPAN 2010, 2020: INTERMEDIATE SPANISH

A course for students who have passed first-year college Spanish or the equivalent. The course aims to develop and consolidate listening, speaking, reading and writing skills so that students can communicate fluently in everyday situations. SPAN 2010 or SPAN 2020 can be taken from 9:30am to 11:30am. Students also have the option of taking SPAN 2010 and 2020 in combination from 9:30am to 1:30pm.

 

SPAN 3010: ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR REVIEW | 9:30

A survey of advanced Spanish grammar, including the uses of all verbal tenses and moods, relative pronouns in compound sentences, impersonal forms and the passive voice.

 

SPAN 3025: SPANISH THROUGH THEATER | 11:30

A course designed to develop linguistic competence and vocabulary through the study of theater. Class work will work on developing correct Spanish pronunciation and diction. Students will read and discuss theater plays, attend local productions, and write and perform scenes of their own creation. SPAN 202 is a pre-requisite.

 

SPAN 3030: ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION | 11:30

A course for students who have passed an advanced Spanish grammar course (equivalent to UVa’s SPAN 3010). This is an upper-level conversation course aiming to develop vocabulary, and listening and oral fluency, in a selected range of topics.

 

SPAN 3040: BUSINESS SPANISH | 11:30

A course for students who have passed an advanced Spanish grammar course (equivalent to UVa’s SPAN 3010). This is an upper-level conversation course aimed at developing vocabulary, and communication skills relevant to business and commercial applications.

 

SPAN 3031: SPANISH THROUGH FILM | 11:30

A course designed to develop linguistic competence and vocabulary through the study of contemporary Peruvian film. Students will see and discuss films. Peruvian screenplay authors, film actors, and movie directors will be invited to attend class sessions throughout the term and students will be able to discuss their work with them. SPAN 2020 is a pre-requisite.

 

SPAN 3330: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY ANALYSIS | 9:30

Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or departmental placement. This is a required course for all UVa Spanish majors. Drawing upon readings from different periods of both Spanish and Latin American literature, this course introduces the student to the fundamentals of analyzing narrative, lyric poetry, and drama, and will focus on developing a critical vocabulary that will allow him or her to make convincing oral and written arguments about the relationship between what a literary text says and how it says it. All work will be conducted in Spanish.

Summer Session Intensive Complete Immersion Spanish Language Program

Students in the Summer Session may take an exclusive Spanish-language course load either at the 100-level, at the 200-level, or at a higher level, and request that they be placed in a complete immersion program. As indicated, courses are taken from 9:30am to 1:30pm. Students will have access to the same facilities in the main campus (libraries, computer labs, etc) as all other students in the program. Students who register for an exclusive Spanish language course load will be in a complete immersion Spanish language program and will be housed individually with Peruvian families who will not speak English with them.

 


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Last modified on January, 2010.