Master of Science in Nursing
Program Description
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General Information
Nursing has been one of the professional disciplines of the University of Virginia since 1901, when a three-year diploma program was first offered to high school students under the aegis of the University of Virginia Hospital and the Department of Medicine. Today, as one of the 10 independent schools of the University with a full-time faculty of560 and an enrollment of 500 undergraduate and graduate students, the school offers the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, and, as a department of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing.
The first baccalaureate degree in nursing, the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education, was offered in 1928 for the first time through the School of Nursing Education in the Department of Education, made possible by an endowment of $50,000 from the Graduate Nurses' Association of Virginia in memory of Sadie Heath Cabaniss, Virginia's outstanding pioneer nurse. The purpose of this degree program was to train registered nurses for teaching, supervisory, or administrative positions. The present baccalaureate program was established in 1950 as a four-year course, with a curriculum consisting of a two-year academic concentration followed by the two-year nursing major. In 1953, a Department of Nursing was established to administer the diploma program and the two baccalaureate programs: the Bachelor of Science in Nursing and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. Three years later, in 1956, this department became the School of Nursing. The Master of Science in Nursing Program, initiated in 1972, currently offers nurse practitioner preparation in primary care, acute care, and psychiatric mental health nursing as well as clinical specialist preparation in several areas of concentration. The primary care nursing program prepares family nurse practitioners and pediatric nurse practitioners. The acute care program prepares clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners to function in acute care settings. A post master's program (non-degree) that prepares nurse practitioners in primary care, acute care, and psychiatric mental health nursing is also available. Both clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner preparation are offered in psychiatric-mental health nursing.
A master's degree program in health systems management began in 1996. The Master of Science in Nursing Program also offers specialty preparation in Community/Public Health Leadership.
The school offers two additional joint degrees: an M.S.N.-M.B.A. program in collaboration with the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, and an M.S.N.-M.A. in Bioethics in collaboration with the School of Medicine, the School of Law, and the Department of Religious Studies.
The Ph.D. in Nursing Program, begun in 1982, is designed to prepare scholars and researchers committed to expanding the base of nursing knowledge. Major components of the program include nursing, research, cognates, and electives.
The School of Nursing is a member of the Council of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing of the Southern Regional Education Board. The School of Nursing is accredited by the National League for Nursing and by the Virginia State Board of Nursing. The school was first accredited by the National League for Nursing Education in 1941 and appeared on the first list of accredited nursing schools issued by the League.
In addition to actively participating in the leading national nursing organizations, the school has an active chapter, Beta Kappa, of Sigma Theta Tau, the international honor society of nursing. Both graduate and undergraduate students are eligible for membership.
Address
School of Nursing
University of Virginia
P.O. Box 800782
School of Nursing, McLeod Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22908-0782
(434) 924-1431

Facilities and Resources
McLeod Hall  Located in the eastern part of the University Grounds, near the University of Virginia Medical Center, the school occupies McLeod Hall, a modern five story building with classrooms, clinical learning laboratories,  seminar rooms, and a computer laboratory. The School of Nursing draws upon the multiple resources of the University's 10 academic divisions and the University of Virginia Health System in offering its graduate programs in nursing. The programs are further strengthened by the facilities and personnel of a wide variety of Virginia hospitals, community health centers, health departments, and private physicians' offices.

Claude Moore Health Sciences Library  This library primarily serves the faculty, students, and staff of the University of Virginia Health System, which includes the Schools of Medicine and Nursing and the hospital.
The library is a modern facility with small group meeting rooms, audiovisual viewing rooms, typing rooms, microcomputers, and photocopy machines. It maintains well-developed collections of books, journals, reference materials, and audiovisual materials in medicine, nursing, and related areas.
The Health Sciences Instructional Resources Center, on the first floor of the library, maintains a substantial collection of videocassettes and other media. A variety of players, projectors, recorders, monitors, and a cluster of microcomputers are available for use in the center, and a small collection of equipment is available for use outside the center. The library also houses an extensive historical collection.
The resources in the Health Sciences Library are augmented by materials in Alderman and Clemons Libraries, the Science/Technology Information Center, various departmental libraries (e.g., biology, psychology, physics, chemistry, engineering, and law) and libraries of the departments and clinics in the School of Medicine.

Computer Services  In addition to the computer resources available to all University students, the School of Nursing provides computer resources for students and faculty in McLeod Hall. A computer laboratory on the third floor of the building includes terminals connecting to the University mainframe computers and personal computers for data and word processing.

University of Virginia Health System  The University Hospital, together with the Kluge Children's Rehabilitation Center, comprise a tertiary-care teaching facility with over 673 beds. Approximately 27,000 patients, from a wide geographic area, are cared for each year on the inpatient units.
The hospital provides a stimulating, challenging learning environment for graduate students. As a regional medical center, the hospital serves a diverse group of patients whose health care needs are often complex. In addition to general medicine, all major subspecialty services are available, including cardiology, endocrinology, hematology/ oncology, nephrology, neurology, pulmonary, and rheumatology. Surgery departments include thoracic-cardiovascular surgery, plastic surgery, neurosurgery, urology, orthopedics, gynecology, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, and general surgery. In addition to medical and surgical units, there are a number of critical care areas: a medical intensive care unit, a surgical intensive care unit, a burn center, and a coronary care unit.
As with adult services, all major pediatric subspecialties are available to children and adolescent patients. A pediatric intensive care unit and a neonatal intensive care unit with an air-ground Emergency Transport System serve critically ill children and neonates from central and western Virginia and surrounding areas.
Over 335,000 patients are seen annually in the clinics at the Health Sciences Center. The Outpatient Department houses medical and pediatric specialty clinics. The Primary Care Center includes over 126 examining and consultant rooms, a patient education center, playrooms for the children of adult clients, and short-term beds for temporary observation. Medicine, family practice, dermatology, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, and the oncology service see patients in this facility.
An additional 58,000 patients are seen annually in the Emergency Room. Patients range from the non-acute to the severely injured or critically ill. Radio and telemetry communication with all local rescue squads helps to provide pre-hospital care and stabilization of patients.
The psychiatric facilities of the University of Virginia Health System include inpatient, outpatient, emergency, and consultation-liaison services. Clinics for children, adolescents, families, and adults offer a range of diagnostic treatment, consultation, and educational services, including individual, family, and group therapy on an outpatient basis.
The Kluge Children's Rehabilitation Center has both an intermediate care inpatient unit and multiple outpatient clinics for children and adolescents with a variety of orthopedic and chronic conditions. The center provides medical treatment, physiotherapy, education, occupational therapy, training in the activities of daily living, training in speech and hearing, and vocational guidance. Family services are provided through psychological and genetic counseling and medical social work.
The hospital is registered by the American Medical Association as meeting hospital standards, is on the approved list of the American College of Surgeons, and is approved by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association as acceptable for the training of interns, as well as for various residencies and fellowships. In addition, the hospital is fully accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals.

Cooperating Clinical Institutions and Agencies
The School of Nursing cooperates with other institutions and agencies to provide research and clinical learning opportunities for students. It utilizes health departments, community hospitals, outpatient facilities, industries, schools, geriatric care facilities, mental health care facilities, and tertiary and ambulatory clinical services for patients of all ages. Students have the opportunity to function in advanced practice roles under preceptor guidance.

Advising and Counseling
Cooperation and personal attention mark the relations between faculty members and students. Each graduate student is assigned an academic faculty advisor by the associate dean upon admission to the school, and students are encouraged to avail themselves of this resource. The School of Nursing Office of Admissions and Student Services provides assistance and serves as a source of information for other support resources. The Department of Student Health and the University Counseling Center are available to assist the student through individual and group counseling sessions.

Additional Expenses
In addition to tuition, fees, and expenses as outlined in chapter 2, graduate students in nursing should anticipate the following additional expenses:

Field Trips  Students are responsible for expenses incurred while on field trips.

Travel to Clinical Facilities  Many of the clinical facilities used in the master's and post-master's programs are a distance from the medical center. Transportation costs to and from these facilities must be borne by the student.

Medical Instruments  A complete set of diagnostic instruments must be procured by students admitted to the nurse practitioner program. The cost of these instruments is assumed by the student.

Hospital Insurance  The Student Health Service does not provide for the expense of hospital care. The University requires that all students carry hospitalization insurance for year-round coverage. A preferred risk group insurance program sponsored by the University is available; for an additional premium, the dependents of married students are included. Students or parents may substitute a plan comparable to that offered by the University.

CPR Certification  Students are required to obtain certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for adults children, and infants prior to entering clinical courses. Certification must be maintained throughout the program, and validation must be presented each year. Students must complete the American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers course.

Immunization Titer Requirements:  The School of Nursing requires documentation of a positive antibody titer for Hepatitis B, rubella, and varicella for all students who practice in a clinical setting. No student will be permitted to enroll in clinical courses without providing this documentation. Information regarding the vaccine and antibody titers can be obtained from the student's local health care provider, district health department, or from Student Health.

MMR, TD, and PPD  Documentation of current measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) immunization and tetanus booster (TD) is required for all students in clinical courses. Tuberculosis testing (PPD) is required on an annual basis for all students enrolled in clinical courses.

Dissertation Completion  Doctoral students are responsible for all expenses incurred in completion of the dissertation.

Financial Aid
General information regarding financial aid for all students is provided in chapter 3. In addition, there are some sources of financial aid specifically designated for students in the school of nursing. The School of Nursing Office of Admissions and Student Services provides assistance to students needing financial aid.

Fellowships  A number of small grants, including duPont and Virginia State Fellowships, are available to full-time graduate students of outstanding merit in the School of Nursing. To apply for these grants, a student must complete the School of Nursing Financial Aid Form and be enrolled as a full-time student.

Federal Nurse Traineeships  A limited number of federal nursing traineeships are available for full-time (nine credits per semester) graduate nursing students. These awards may include tuition, fees, and/or stipends. To apply, students must complete a School of Nursing Financial Aid Form, which can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Student Services.

National Research Service Awards (Predoctoral)  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services sponsors a national program of individual predoctoral and postdoctoral nurse fellowships. The intent of the awards program is "to prepare biomedical, behavioral, and nurse scientists who will address continuing problems in health-related research of importance to the public." The student's qualifications, the advisor's credentials, and the merit of the proposed area of research are the primary criteria upon which awards are based. Interested doctoral students may obtain application forms from the School of Nursing Grants Administrator or by contacting the National Research Service Awards Program, Division of Nursing, BHPr, HRSA, Parklawn Building, Room 5C-26, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, (301) 443-6333.

Employment  Opportunities for employment are available in the University of Virginia Health System. Interested students should contact the Division of Nursing.
Graduate assistantships are available for doctoral and master's students. These assistantships involve working directly with faculty in teaching, research, or service activities. Assignments involve 10 to 20 hours per week of work. To apply for graduate assistant employment, students should contact the associate dean.
Master of Science in Nursing
The central purpose of the University of Virginia is to enrich the mind by stimulating and sustaining the spirit of free inquiry directed to understanding the nature of the universe and human existence. The philosophy of the School of Nursing is consistent with that of the University as it prepares leaders in health care.
Nursing is both a profession and a discipline that is responsive to changing health needs. It is concerned with human experiences and responses to birth, health, illness, and death within the context of individuals, families, groups, and communities (ANA, 1995). Nurses, often in collaboration with other health care professionals, promote the optimal health care and comfort of individuals and groups through the systematic application of nursing knowledge.
The faculty believes that education is based on humanistic approaches that foster critical thinking and promote awareness of social and cultural diversity among individuals. The faculty views each student as a unique person with special talents, abilities, needs, and goals. Cultural diversity, varying life experiences, and changing socioeconomic factors effect each student differently. To this end, faculty endeavor to provide an environment to assist students in realizing their full potential. The acquisition of professional knowledge and the development of clinical competence occur through active involvement of the student in the learning process. Students assume primary responsibility for learning, while faculty provide educational opportunities for knowledge acquisition and professional role development. We believe that an atmosphere of shared growth and inquiry offers the maximum potential for development.
Baccalaureate education in nursing is the basic preparation necessary for the practice of professional nursing. This education provides the foundation for the development of professional knowledge, critical thinking, ethical decision-making, leadership skills, and the independent and interdisciplinary pursuit of high standards of health care. Master's education prepares the nurse for advanced practice with an emphasis on health promotion, disease prevention, primary care, and the management of acutely and chronically ill persons, or for specialty practice in the areas of management and public health leadership. Doctoral education prepares the nurse scholar to influence health care through leadership in education, policy, practice, research and knowledge development.
Implicit in the practice of professional nursing is accountability for professional growth and practice, demonstration of leadership, and commitment to the development and application of nursing theory and research. Life-long learning leads to the optimal development of both the individual practitioner and the discipline of nursing.

Characteristics of Graduates M.S. in Nursing Menu
The disciplinary and professional domains of nursing give direction to current and evolving nursing practice. Advanced practice nurses demonstrate in-depth knowledge and skills in nursing and health care systems with diverse populations. Components of their roles are expert clinical practice, assessment of outcomes, research, teaching, collaboration, and consultation within health care systems. Nurses prepared through graduate nursing programs with advanced practice knowledge, critical thinking, and decision-making skills can function in a variety of nursing roles. Examples of such roles include clinical nurse specialist, nurse practitioner, nurse educator, and nurse administrator. Nurses implementing these roles demonstrate specialized knowledge and skills. For example, nurses engaged in advanced clinical practice conduct in-depth assessments and demonstrate expertise in judgment and decision-making for purposes of health promotion/disease prevention, intervention, and follow-up in specified populations. Implementation of a particular role may emphasize some role attributes more than others and reflect the advanced practice nurse's area of expertise.
Graduates of the M.S.N. program are expected to:

1. integrate theoretical and research based knowledge in an advanced nursing practice specialty;
2. provide care and comfort to individuals, families and groups experiencing complex health care needs;
3. provide care that reflects sensitivity to differences among culturally and ethnically diverse populations;
4. assume a leadership role in establishing and monitoring standards of practice to improve patient care in collaboration with other nursing experts;
5. use ethical principles to guide decision-making in nursing practice;
6. evaluate clinical practice in relation to professional practice standards and relevant statutes and regulations;
7. apply the research process to improve clinical practice and contribute to knowledge development;
8. engage in self-directed and purposeful activities in seeking necessary knowledge and skills to enhance career goals;
9. examine economic, political, and social forces affecting nursing care delivery in complex health care systems;
10. promote multidisciplinary collaboration to ensure quality, cost effective care;
11. contribute to the development of peers, colleagues, and others to improve patient care and foster the growth of professional nursing;
12. act as change agents to create environments that promote effective nursing practice and patient outcomes.

These core characteristics are in accordance with professional standards of advanced practice nursing specialties.
Applicants are offered admission to the Master of Science in Nursing Program on the basis of intellectual capacity, clinical and academic performance, maturity, clarity of goals, and other qualities appropriate to graduate study in nursing. Not all of these qualities are measured in absolute terms, and the decision to make an offer of admission is based on a balanced appraisal of the total application record. Applicants with limited relevant clinical experience may be admitted and gain that experience while enrolled in Core/preclinical courses.

Admission Requirements  The applicant must:

1. have completed a baccalaureate degree in nursing from a nationally accredited school;
2. have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in undergraduate study;
3. provide validation of health assessment skills;
4. be licensed as a registered nurse;
5. demonstrate satisfactory performance on the Graduate Record Examination;
6. submit three satisfactory academic and professional recommendations;
7. submit a clear statement of educational and professional goals;
8. be available for a personal interview with a member of the faculty if requested;
9. have completed an undergraduate statistics course;

Note: Relevant experience (determined by the track to which the applicant is applying) is a prerequisite to enrolling in GNUR 550 and 551. Otherwise qualified applicants who have not passed the NCLEX may be considered as special students pending licensure.

Admission Procedures  Applications for admission are obtained from the Office of Admissions and Student Services, Master's Program, School of Nursing. In addition to submitting the completed application, the applicant must:

1. request that official transcripts of all academic work and validation of health assessment skills be forwarded by the institutions to the Office of Admissions and Student Services, Master's Program, School of Nursing;
2. obtain three statements of recommendation from persons who can speak directly to the applicant's ability to pursue graduate study. The statements of recommendation are to be sent by their authors to the Office of Admissions and Student Services, Master's Program, School of Nursing. Forms to be used are in the application packet;
3. take the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants are urged to take this examination as early as possible. Address inquiries to Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, N.J. 08540, or to Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, CA 94701.

Application Deadlines  The School utilizes a rolling admissions process. The completed application and the $40 application fee must be received by April 1 for the summer and fall admission or November 15 for spring admission. Applications received after the deadlines will be considered if space is available.
All correspondence concerning admission should be addressed to the Assistant Dean for Graduate Student Services, Office of Admissions and Student Services, School of Nursing, McLeod Hall, PO Box 800782, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0782.

Matriculation  Once a student has been admitted into the Master of Science in Nursing Program he or she has one calendar year in which to matriculate. A student who fails to begin classes within one year must re-apply for admission.

Special Student Status  Under special circumstances, students with baccalaureate degrees in nursing may complete a maximum of two graduate nursing courses without formally seeking admission to the degree program. Special student status is granted only when there are vacancies available in the courses requested. An application for special student status, obtained from the Assistant Dean for Graduate Student Services, must be submitted two weeks prior to the registration period for the semester in which the student desires to enroll. Admitted students receive enrollment priority. Completion of coursework as a special student does not guarantee admission to the program.
Students wishing to take University of Virginia off-Grounds courses at a University of Virginia School of Continuing and Professional Studies may take a maximum of six credits; these are accepted towards the master's degree if the courses meet program requirements. This is in lieu of taking two on-grounds courses as a special student in the School of Nursing. Decisions about the acceptability of a course are determined by the faculty advisor or course professor, depending on whether the course is a required course or an elective.

Academic Regulations M.S. in Nursing Menu
Degree Requirements
1. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 55 credits of approved graduate courses for students in the clinical specialist tracks; 58 credits for students in the primary care nurse practitioner tracks; 55 credits for course work for students in the acute care nurse practitioner track; and up to 68 credits of course work for students in the combined nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialist tracks. The Health Systems Management track requires a minimum of 39 credits. The Community/Public Health Leadership track requires a minimum of 38 credits. Course requirements are specified under the Program Description section.
2. Satisfactory completion of all course work as specified in the policy on grades, with a final cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B).
3. Completion of all requirements for the degree within five calendar years after matriculation into the program.
4. Enrollment and payment of tuition and fees for no fewer than two regular semesters or the equivalent.

Grades  The standing of a master's student in each course is indicated by one of the following symbols: A (very distinguished), A- (distinguished), B+ (very good), B (satisfactory), B- (acceptable), C (unsatisfactory), F (failure). A minimum grade of B- is required in all courses offered for any graduate degree. If a student receives a C grade in any School of Nursing course, the course must be repeated. A grade of C in any other course requires repeating the course and earning a satisfactory grade or earning a minimum grade of B- in an alternate course. Students who receive more than one C grade are automatically dropped from the program. Any F grade results in the student being dropped from the program. Students in the School of Graduate Nursing are not permitted to take courses on a CR/NC basis.

Incomplete Grades  A grade of incomplete is a non-grade designation given for a course. Incompletes in graduate nursing courses must be removed by the end of the following semester of enrollment or within one calendar year, whichever comes first. Graduate students with two or more outstanding incomplete designations (in the same semester or cumulatively) may not enroll in courses in subsequent terms. An incomplete designation which is not removed by the above deadline or prior to graduation is converted to a F.

Transfer of Credit  Students may receive a maximum of four graduate-level courses (up to 12 hours) completed at other accredited institutions for transfer credit. In order to be considered for transfer, the courses must have been completed with a minimum grade of B.
Credit for transfer courses is determined following an evaluation of each student's course work and overall plan of study. Evaluation of credits for transfer does not occur until after the student is admitted to the program. Information on the procedure for transfer of credit is available from the Office of the Associate Dean.

Application for Degrees  Applications for degrees may be obtained from the Office of the Admissions and Student Services. Students must submit a formal application for conferral of the master's degree to the Office of Admissions and Student Services no later than October 1 for fall, February 1 for spring, and June 1 for summer. A student who has been listed as a degree candidate and then fails to complete degree requirements must reapply. A student who has been registered for a degree and then fails to meet the requirements for the degree must pay a fee of $50 for the preparation of a new diploma.

Acceptance of Degrees  Formal commencement exercises are held only once a year, in May. All those who have completed the program in August or December are invited to attend the exercises the following May.

Voluntary Withdrawal  An official application to withdraw must be approved by the dean of the School of Nursing or the dean's  designate. Withdrawal applications may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Student Services. The application must then be endorsed by the associate dean. Student identification cards are collected at the time of withdrawal.
A student is not permitted to withdraw later than two weeks before the beginning of the examination period in any semester except for providential reasons.
A student who withdraws from the University for reasons of ill health must obtain permission from the Department of Student Health. Subsequent medical clearance from the Department of Student Health is required for readmission.
Readmission After Voluntary Withdrawal  Readmission to the School of Nursing master's program is not automatic. After absence of a semester or longer, a former student must apply for readmission to the School of Nursing associate dean by December 1 for the spring semester or by April 1 for the fall semester. Readmission following a withdrawal or leave of absence is granted only if space is available.

Leaves of Absence  The associate dean may grant leaves of absence to students for either a semester or a session, upon written application stating the reason for temporarily leaving the University.
Program Description
Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) Tracks Program Description Menu
The curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Science in Nursing is designed to prepare nurses for advanced practice roles with opportunities for specialization in an area of clinical concentration. Students in the program complete core courses in nursing theory, research, epidemiology/population-based assessment, health promotion, APN roles, and health policy, specializing in the clinical area of either acute and specialty care nursing, or psychiatric-mental health nursing. Elective credits complement and enhance the program. The program may be completed in two calendar years of full-time study (four semesters and two six-week summer sessions). Full-time study is recommended but part-time study is available.
Program Course Work  The ratio of clinical hours to credits is 4:1. Courses are taught only if there is a sufficient number of students registering for them. Semester schedules published by the Office of the Registrar must be consulted for courses to be offered during a given semester.

Following are descriptions and required courses for the specific areas of clinical concentration.
Clinical Nurse Specialist: Acute and Specialty Care Track
(55 credits, 560 clinical hours)

This track prepares nurses for advanced practices roles in the care of adults with acute and chronic conditions and allows students to determine the focus of their specialization (i.e.: cardiology, wound/ostomy/continence*, neurology or neurosurgery, general surgery, ER/trauma, pulmonary, transplant, diabetes, geriatrics, etc) and the areas of practice in which they would like to focus their clinical experiences (critical care, acute care, chronic care). Emphasis is placed on providing students with the advanced theoretical knowledge and practice skills needed to care for patients with complex health needs across the care continuum. The roles of clinician, educator and researcher, as well as clinical consultant and leader are key aspects of this track. Evidence based practice, outcomes management, clinical research, and advanced clinical decision-making are emphasized. The required 500 hours of preceptorship meets the recommendation of the National Association of CNS's. At the completion of this program, students are qualified to sit for the American Nursing Credentialing Center certification examination for either the Adult Health CNS or the Critical Care CNS, with the additional option of case management certification.

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Health Assessment 3
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Healthcare 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities 3
GNUR 756 Seminar I: Clinical Decision Making in Acute and Specialty Care 3
GNUR 757 Seminar II: Clinical Decision Making in Acute and Specialty Care 3
GNUR 758 Seminar III: Management of Chronic Illness Across Settings 3
GNUR 759 Practicum I:  Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist 5
GNUR 765 Synthesis Practicum: Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist 5
Elective 6

* The school offers wound/ostomy/continence training with two seminars GNUR 744 and GNUR 745. Practicum experience is obtained through GNUR 795 and GNUR 765.
Clinical Nurse Specialist: Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Track (52 credits, 500 clinical hours)

This area of concentration prepares nurses for advanced practice in the field of psychiatric-mental health nursing. Students complete core nursing courses, core advanced practice courses, and specialty specific courses. Graduates would be able to practice in CNS role, and would be qualified to sit for American Nursing Credentialing Center  CNS certification. A major emphasis is placed on critical consideration, neurostructural, neurochemical, cognitive, behavioral, social, and cultural correlates of psychiatric illness in the context of the advanced practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing. Supervised clinical practice is directed toward applying this emerging scientific knowledge to patient care through psychiatric-mental health nursing interventions with the persistently mentally ill, geriatric, and other specialty populations.  Faculty work closely with students to develop individualized clinical experiences in appropriate settings.

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Adv. Health Assessment 3
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Healthcare 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families and Communities 3
GNUR 770 Biological Basis of Mental Health 3
GNUR 771 Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Seminar 3
GNUR 773 Theoretical Foundations of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 3
GNUR 774 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum I: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner 5
GNUR 776 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum II Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner: 5
Elective 3

Nurse Practitioner Tracks (NP) Program Description Menu
Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Track (ACNP)
This track prepares nurses for an advanced practice role providing direct patient care in medical/nursing subspecialty areas in collaboration with other members of the health care team. ACNPs deliver care along the continuum of critical, acute, and chronic care. Students determine the focus of their specialization (i.e.: cardiology, nephrology, wound/ostomy/continence, neurology or neuro-surgery, digestive health, general surgery, ER/trauma, pulmonary, transplant, etc). In this program, students gain the advanced theoretical knowledge and practice skills needed to manage acutely and chronically ill patients through all phases of their hospitalization and clinical follow-up. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic and clinical decision-making, preparation for prescriptive authority, collaboration with physicians, and outcomes management, as well as evidence-based practice and clinical research. Upon completion of this track, students are qualified to take the American Nursing Credentialing Center certification examination for the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner.
Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Track (ACNP) (55credits,560 clinical hours)

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Adv. Health Assessment 3
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Health Care 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities 3
GNUR 756 Seminar I: Clinical Decision Making in Acute and Specialty Care 3
GNUR 757 Seminar II: Clinical Decision Making in Acute and Specialty Care 3
GNUR 758 Seminar III: Management of Chronic Illness Across Settings 3
GNUR 759 Practicum I: Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist 5
GNUR 765 Synthesis Practicum: Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist 5
Elective 6

Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Tracks Program Description Menu
The curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Science in Nursing prepares nurses for advanced practice as family nurse practitioners or pediatric nurse practitioners. Students in the program complete core courses in nursing theory, research, epidemiology/population-based assessment, and health policy. Courses in advanced pathophysiology, pharmacology, family health promotion, nutrition, and advanced health assessment are also required of all students in the primary care nurse practitioner tracks. Clinical seminars and 672-hour clinical preceptorships are designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to practice as nurse practitioners in primary care settings. Due to the program's rural, underserved focus, one of the two preceptorship rotations occurs outside of Albemarle County.
Combined tracks are available in community and public health leadership and in psychiatric-mental health. Nearly all of the tracks may be completed in four semesters and one summer of full-time study (the combined psychiatric-mental health and family nurse practitioner track requires additional time. At the completion of the track, students are qualified to write the American Nursing Credentialing Center or American Academy of Nurse Practitioners national certification examinations.
Following are required courses for the specific areas of concentration in the Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Tracks.
Primary Care: Family or Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Track (58 credits)

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Adv. Health Assessment 3
GNUR 564 Nutrition in Health Promotion 2
GNUR 566 Primary Care Seminar I 3
GNUR 567 Primary Care Seminar II 3
GNUR 569 Primary Care Preceptorship I 6
GNUR 570 Primary Care Seminar III 3
GNUR 571 Primary Care
Preceptorship II 6
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Health Care 4
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities 3
GNUR 707 Introduction to Health Informatics 2
Elective 3

Primary Care: Combined Psychiatric-Mental Health and Family Nurse Practitioner Track (70 credits, 1000 clinical hours)

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Adv. Health Assessment 3
GNUR 566 Primary Care Seminar I 3
GNUR 567 Primary Care Seminar II 3
GNUR 569 Primary Care Preceptorship I 6
GNUR 570 Primary Care Seminar III 3
GNUR 571 Primary Care Preceptorship II 6
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Health Care 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities 3
GNUR 770 Biological Basis of Mental Health/Mental Illness 3
GNUR 771 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Seminar 3
GNUR 773 Theoretical Foundations of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 3
GNUR 774 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum I: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner 5
GNUR 776 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum II: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner 5
Primary Care: Community & Public Health/Family or Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Track (60 credits, 672 clinical hours)

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Adv. Health Assessment 3
GNUR 566 Primary Care Seminar I 3
GNUR 567 Primary Care Seminar II 3
GNUR 569 Primary Care Preceptorship I 6
GNUR 570 Primary Care Seminar III 3
GNUR 571 Primary Care Preceptorship II 6
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Health Care 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 700 Community Assessment 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities 3
GNUR 711 Managing Care in Systems and Populations 3
GNUR 722 Health Care Systems Planning and Evaluation 3

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Track (PMHNP) Program Description Menu
This area of concentration prepares nurses for advanced practice in the field of psychiatric-mental health nursing. Students complete core nursing courses, core advanced practice courses, and specialty specific courses. Graduates are able to practice in the PMHNP role, and would be qualified to sit for certification in either area. Major emphasis include the neurostructural, neurochemical, cognitive, behavioral, social, and cultural correlates of psychiatric illness in the context of the advanced practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing. Supervised clinical practice is directed toward applying this emerging scientific knowledge to patient care through psychiatric-mental health nursing interventions including prescriptive practice.  Faculty work closely with students to develop individualized clinical experiences in appropriate settings.
Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Track (PMHNP) (52 credits, 500 clinical hours)

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Advanced Health Assessment 3
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Healthcare 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for individuals, families and communities 3
GNUR 770 Biological Basis of Mental Health 3
GNUR 771 Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Seminar 3
GNUR 773 Theoretical Foundations of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 3
GNUR 774 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum I: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner 5
GNUR 776 Psychiatric Mental Health Practicum II: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner 5
Elective 3

Community & Public Health Leadership Track Program Description Menu
As health care shifts from hospital-based to community-orientated systems, new opportunities for nursing leadership are becoming abundant. The Community and Public Health Leadership concentration prepares nurses for specialty practice in promoting the health of individuals, families, groups and communities.  Emphasis is placed on the development of knowledge and expertise in assessing the health status and health delivery systems of communities and designing nursing interventions to better manage care in complex settings. Courses provide the required knowledge and expertise to plan, implement, and evaluate care in community settings, including public health departments, schools and occupational health programs, home health agencies, and community nursing clinics. Care management strategies to ensure continuity of health service delivery for individuals and groups at the local and global levels are emphasized. International learning experiences are available.
Community/Public Health Leadership Nursing Track (38 Credits, 504 clinical hours)

GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes for Health Care 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 700 Community Assessment 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities 3
GNUR 711 Managing Care in Systems and Populations 3
GNUR 722 Health Care Systems Planning and Evaluation 3
GNUR 723 Community/Public Health Leadership Practicum I 3
GNUR 724 Community/Public Health Leadership Practicum II 4
GNUR 792 Resource Management 3
Elective 3

Health Systems Management Track Program Description Menu
The Health Systems Management Track is designed to prepare nurses at the graduate level to manage the delivery of nursing and health services across multiple settings and specialty areas. This program provides a unique educational experience to individuals capable of leadership and innovation in a dynamic health care delivery system. Graduates are prepared to assume leadership positions in a variety of health care settings, including public and private sector hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, and long-term facilities.
The curriculum builds on the theoretical knowledge and clinical experience of the bachelor's-prepared nurse. The program emphasizes content fundamental to management, developing competencies needed to analyze managerial problems, and providing resourceful solutions. Students are given special opportunities to acquire the breadth of management knowledge and skills needed to perform effectively at the business and clinical interface of health care delivery organizations. Management-related experience is recommended. Additional information about this program can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Student Services at the School of Nursing.
Health Systems Management Track (39 Credits)

GNUR 580 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 3
GNUR 585 Epidemiology in Health Care 3
GNUR 586 Research and Biostatistical Processes in Healthcare 4
GNUR 590 Health Policy: Local to Global 3
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities 3
GNUR 707 Intro. to Health Informatics 2
GNUR 711 Managing Care in Systems and Populations 3
GNUR 722 Health Care Systems Planning and Evaluation 3
GNUR 782 Administrative Practicum I 3
GNUR 784 Administrative Practicum II 3
GNUR 792 Resource Management 3
HES 709 Health Care Economics 3
Elective 3

M.S.N.-M.B.A. Joint Degree Program Program Description Menu
The School of Nursing and the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration offer a joint degree program designed to develop  health care agency managers who possess a unique blend of clinical and administrative skills. Graduates of the program are prepared to contribute to health policy development and to assume senior-level positions in hospitals, corporate offices, ambulatory care, and long-term care agencies. The program can be completed in two and one-half years of full-time study. Applicants must be registered nurses holding at least a baccalaureate degree in nursing, and they must meet all admission requirements for both the School of Nursing and the Graduate School of Business Administration. Additional information may be obtained by contacting the School of Nursing Office of Admissions and Student Services.

M.S.N.-M.A. in Bioethics Joint Degree Program Program Description Menu
The School of Nursing collaborates with the School of Medicine, the School of Law, and the Department of Religious Studies to offer a joint Master's Degree in Nursing and Bioethics. Students follow the nursing option to which they are admitted, take required foundational courses in bioethics, and select from additional bioethics courses guided by their area of concentration and discipline. Graduates are prepared as advanced practice nurses with the scholarly basis for addressing bioethical health care practice and policy issues.
Post Master's Programs
Clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) post master's programs equip master's-prepared nurses with additional knowledge and skills in a defined area. Students who complete these programs are eligible to apply for national certification examinations.
Applicants must:

1. have completed a master's degree in nursing from a nationally accredited school of nursing;
2. be licensed as a registered nurse;
3. submit three satisfactory academic/professional recommendations;
4. submit a clear statement of educational and professional goals;
5. submit validation of basic health assessment skills;
6. be available for an interview if requested.

The School utilizes a rolling admissions process. The completed application and the $40 application fee must be received by April 1 for summer and fall admission or November 15 for spring admission. Applications received after the deadlines will be considered if space is available. All correspondence concerning admission should be addressed to the Assistant Dean for Graduate Student Services, Office of Admissions and Student Services, School of Nursing, McLeod Hall, P.O. Box 800782, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0784.
The standing of a post-graduate student in each course is indicated by one of the following symbols: A (very distinguished), A- (distinguished), B+ (very good), B (satisfactory), B- (acceptable), and C (unsatisfactory). A letter grade of C is considered unsatisfactory and unacceptable for completion of the program.

Incomplete Grades Post Master's Menu
A grade of incomplete is a non-grade designation given for a course. Incompletes in graduate nursing courses must be removed by the end of the following semester of enrollment or within one calendar year, whichever comes first. Graduate students with two or more outstanding incomplete designations (in the same semester or cumulatively) may not enroll in courses in subsequent terms. An incomplete designation which is not removed by the above deadline or prior to graduation is converted to a F.

Post Master's Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program Post Master's Menu
The Post Master's Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Program offers two tracks for students who wish to complete the requirements for PMHNP certification. One track is for those who already possess a MSN degree with a focus in psychiatric-mental health nursing; the other track is for students with a MSN in another clinical area.

Master's prepared nurses in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing desiring Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner preparation complete the following courses: (17 credits, 120 clinical hours)

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Advanced Health Assessment 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 770 Biological Basis in Mental Health/Mental Illness 3
GNUR 776 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum II: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner 3

Master's prepared nurses with a specialty in another clinical area complete the following courses: (33 credits, 500 clinical hours)

GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Advanced Health Assessment 3
GNUR 584 Pathophysiology 4
GNUR 702 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention 3
GNUR 770 Biological Basis in Mental Health/Mental Illness 3
GNUR 771 Psychiatric-Mental Health Seminar 3
GNUR 773 Theoretical Foundations of Mental Health Nursing 3
GNUR 774 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum I: Clinical Nurse Specialist or Nurse Practitioner 5
GNUR 776 Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum II: Clinical Nurse Specialist or Nurse Practitioner 5

Post Master's Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program Post Master's Menu
The Post Master's Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program is designed to provide the master's-prepared nurse with the necessary skills and knowledge to assume the role of a primary health care provider in various clinical facilities. These skills include psychosocial and physical assessment; identification, screening and triage of acute minor illness; nursing and medical management of commonly encountered acute, minor, and chronic illnesses in collaboration and consultation with a physician; knowledge of community needs and resources available for health promotion; health teaching, guidance, and counseling of clients and their families about illness and its prevention; and health promotion, maintenance, and management.
Other areas explored in this program include the changing health care delivery system; the expanded role of the nurse; and nursing issues, particularly as they relate to nurse practitioner practice, reimbursement, and prescriptive authority. Offerings include family or pediatric nurse practitioner tracks.
An essential part of the nurse practitioner program is the 672-hour clinical preceptorship. This preceptorship is concurrent with the nurse practitioner seminar courses and is arranged at a clinical site that reflects the focus of the Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program. Due to the program's focus on rural, underserved populations, at least one of the preceptorships takes place outside of Albemarle County.
The practitioner program is approved by the Joint Committee of the Boards of Nursing and Medicine in Virginia. Students who complete the program are eligible to apply for practitioner certification by this joint committee and are also eligible to sit for national certification examinations.

Nurse Practitioner Program Completion Requirements  The student must satisfactorily complete the specific nurse practitioner program and the clinical preceptorship, and have a minimum grade average of B. Students who complete the nurse practitioner program are eligible for national certification exams.
Required Courses - 31 Credits
GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Adv. Health Assessment 3
GNUR 566 Primary Care Seminar I 3
GNUR 567 Primary Care Seminar II 3
GNUR 569 Primary Care Preceptorship I 6
GNUR 570 Primary Care Seminar III 3
GNUR 571 Primary Care Preceptorship II 6
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2

Post Master's Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (ACNP) Program Post Master's Menu
This program reflects recent developments in the field of health care delivery, creating the need for a new role within advanced practice nursing. The ACNP has a scope of practice beyond that of other acute care positions. ACNPs deliver continuous and comprehensive care within a collaborative model involving patients, families, significant others, nurses, physicians, and other health care providers. The purpose of the ACNP is to provide advanced practice care that meets patient needs across the full continuum of acute, critical, and chronic care services. The short term goal for the ACNP is restorative care, stabilization of the patient, minimizing complications, providing physical and psychological care measures for managing chronic conditions, and assurance of a peaceful death.
Students who complete the program are eligible to take the ANCC examination for Acute Care Nurse Practitioner certification.
Required courses - 29 credits
GNUR 550 Pharmacology 4
GNUR 551 Adv. Health Assessment 3
GNUR 574 Role I: Acquisition 1-2
GNUR 575 Role II: Transition 2
GNUR 756 Seminar I: Clinical Decision Making in Acute and Specialty Care 3
GNUR 757 Seminar II: Clinical Decision Making in Acute and Specialty Care 3
GNUR 759 Practicum I Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist 5
GNUR 765 Synthesis Practicum: Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist 5
Elective 3

Post Master's Wound, Ostomy & Continence Nursing (WOCN) Program Post Master's Menu
Wound, Ostomy & Continence nursing incorporates principles and practices that promote, maintain and restore health for persons with wounds, ostomies and continence problems throughout their lives.  WOC nurses specialize in the care of individuals with disorders of the gastrointestinal track, genitourinary and integumentary systems. The post-masters WOC program includes two didactic classes and one practicum.

GNUR 744 Wound, Ostomy & Continence Nursing 3
GNUR 745 Advanced WOC Nursing 3
GNUR 795 Practicum in WOC Nursing 3
Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing
The School of Nursing is a community of scholars having as its central purpose the enrichment of the human mind. Within this community, the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing Program seeks to prepare scholars who will advance nursing knowledge. Scholarly achievement in nursing is accomplished in a spirit of free inquiry directed toward a better understanding of human existence, especially in relation to health and illness. Nurse scholars must participate in the study of particular phenomena and in the identification of central domains related to these phenomena. This requires that students be well informed about advanced practice in professional nursing.
Nursing knowledge is advanced through association with other disciplines and is often enhanced by the work of other university scholars. Central to the education of nurse scholars is the opportunity to interact with other scholars throughout the university community. Through dialogue and study with these professionals, nurse scholars expand their understanding of health and illness, and the biological, environmental, sociocultural, ethical, legal, philosophic, and historic factors influencing nursing care.
Scholars must be inquisitive, informed, and committed. This requires expertise in the principles and methods of inquiry and an informed imagination for exploring substantive areas in nursing. The ultimate goal of this inquiry is to enhance nursing's contribution to the health of all persons.

Purpose and Program Aims Ph.D. in Nursing Menu
The major purpose of the doctoral program in nursing is to prepare scholars with expertise in selected substantive areas who will contribute to nursing theory and practice through systematic inquiry.
Aims of the doctoral program in nursing are to prepare scholars who will:

1. demonstrate advanced knowledge of nursing, related sciences and humanities, and methods of inquiry;
2. expand the research base of nursing theory and practice; and
3. serve the Commonwealth, the nation, and the world by addressing major nursing and health care issues in a scholarly manner.
Admission Requirements 
1. Minimum of a baccalaureate degree in nursing from an accredited program.
2. Academic record that demonstrates a minimum of a B average.
3. Capacity for doctoral study based upon achievement on the GRE.
4. Three satisfactory letters of reference—two from doctorally prepared nurse educators and one from a current or recent employer—that speak to the applicant's ability to pursue doctoral studies.
5. Current curriculum vitae that reflects professional achievements and productivity.
6. Clearly written essay of no more than 1000 words describing educational, research, and professional goals. This statement must include a specific description of the applicant's focus of study and a researchable topic for development.
7. One or two examples of scholarly work (master's thesis, publications, formal papers).
8. Current license to practice nursing.
9. A personal interview with one or more faculty members.

Admission Procedure  Application forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Student Services of the School of Nursing. The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences prefers to receive one package containing the completed application and all supporting materials. The applicant must:

1. submit official transcripts of all post-secondary academic work. If an institution will not release an official transcript directly to the applicant, the student may request that the transcript be forwarded to the dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences;
2. obtain three letters of recommendation;
3. arrange to take the Graduate Record Examination. All GRE scores must be current, within five years of the date of application. Applicants are encouraged to take these examinations as soon as possible and to send test results to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Address inquiries to Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, NJ 08540 or to Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, CA 94701.

The completed application with fee and all supporting data must be forwarded no later than February 1 for September enrollment.

Special Student Status  When unusual and/or extenuating circumstances prevent an applicant from completing the admission process prior to the established deadline, special permission may be given for the individual to enroll in a maximum of nine credits of course work as a special student. Special Students may take one course per semesterwith permission of instructor.  Completion of course work as a special student does not guarantee admission to the program. Special Student applications may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Student Services in the School of Nursing.

Degree Requirements  To earn a Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree the student must:

1. successfully complete the prescribed program of study, including cognates, electives, and a research grant application;
2. fulfill the minimum residence requirement of two consecutive semesters of full-time residential study during the academic year beyond the requirements for the master's degree. Full-time graduate work consists of a minimum of nine credits of on-Grounds course work per semester;
3. successfully complete a written comprehensive examination;
4. successfully complete all dissertation requirements including (a) writing and defending a dissertation proposal, (b) conducting an appropriate research study, (c) submitting an acceptable written report of the research, and (d) passing an oral final examination on the conduct and conclusion of the dissertation;
5. complete all additional requirements as specified by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the doctoral committee, and the advisor.

Students who enter the doctoral program without a master's degree in nursing are expected to complete all requirements for the M.S.N. in a selected area of concentration in the master's program as part of the requirements of the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing.

Grades  The standing of a graduate student in each course is indicated by one of the following symbols: A+ (exceptional), A (very distinguished), A- (distinguished), B+ (very good), B (satisfactory), B- (acceptable), C (unsatisfactory), F (failure). In general, letter grades are  assigned in all required doctoral courses. In courses where letter grades are not possible, CR (credit) or NC (no credit) may be used with permission from the director of graduate studies to designate student progress. The symbols S (satisfactory) and U (unsatisfactory) are used to report progress on dissertations or special projects. Minimum grades of B-, CR, or S, are required in all courses offered for any graduate degree. If a student receives a C grade in any School of Nursing course, the course must be repeated. A grade of C in any other course requires repeating the course and earning a satisfactory grade or earning a minimum grade of B- in an alternate course. Students who receive more than one C grade are automatically dropped from the program. Any F grade results in the student being dropped from the program. A grade of IN (incomplete) is a non-grade designation given for a course. The IN designation is recorded as an F if it is not removed by the end of the subsequent semester (including summer session) or by the time negotiated with the professor.

Minimal Credit Requirements for Registration and Fees  For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a student must complete a minimum of 57 credits of graduate course work beyond requirements for the master's degree, plus 12 or more credits of dissertation research. Students who enter with prior graduate course work that is accepted in transfer must complete at least 45 credits of graduate course work (two full academic years) beyond requirements for the master's degree, plus dissertation and non-topical research.
After completing course work, a student may pay the research fee (rather than the higher tuition rate) for the semester in which the student defends either the dissertation proposal or the completed dissertation. A student using university resources while working on the dissertation is also expected to pay the research fee. A student working on the dissertation away from the university, without the use of university resources, may register for the non-resident fee. Registration as a non-resident student is permitted only when the student is using no university resources, including faculty time. A student living in Charlottesville or Albemarle County must obtain special permission from the dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences to register as a non-resident student. A student must be registered at the regular tuition rate, the research rate, or the non-resident rate for the semester in which the degree is granted.

Full-Time Course Load  A typical full-time course load consists of nine to 12 credits of course work plus GNUR 997. Each student's plan of study is determined in collaboration with the his or her faculty advisor. GNUR 997 (Non-Topical Research-Preparation for Doctoral Research) must be taken concurrently with other course work until the time a dissertation chair is selected. Credits from GNUR 997 are not counted in the total program hours of credit.

Residency Requirements  Students must be in full-time residential study for two consecutive semesters during the academic year beyond completion of the master's-level course of study.


Length of Time in Program  Students must be enrolled and pay full tuition and fees for at least four semesters or the equivalent. All requirements for the degree must be completed within seven years of the time of admission to the program.

Transfer of Credit  Transcripts of students who have completed a master's degree in nursing or other graduate work are evaluated, and the following credit may be transferred if assessed as equivalent to courses offered at the University of Virginia:

Research Methodology 3 credits
Statistics 3 credits
Cognate area 3 credits
Electives 3 credits

Acceptance of specific cognate and elective courses is determined by the student's faculty advisor. Acceptance of research and statistics courses is determined by the instructor(s) who teach the course(s) in collaboration with the faculty advisor. The process of obtaining transfer credit must be initiated by the student before the end of the first year of study.  

Academic and Dissertation Advising  Upon entry into the program, each student is assigned an academic advisor. The advisor works with the student during the initial stages of program development, guiding and monitoring the student's program of study. The student and advisor have joint responsibility for ensuring that each step in fulfilling degree requirements is completed and that an official record is kept.
At any point in doctoral study, the student may identify a faculty member other than the assigned academic advisor whose research program is more closely attuned to the student's evolving research interests. It is entirely acceptable and appropriate for the student to request a change in academic advisor in such situations. The procedure to do so is described in the Doctoral Student Handbook. The change of academic advisor must be approved by the director of the doctoral program.
A dissertation chair must be selected once an area of study has been identified. With the help of the dissertation chair, the student selects members of the dissertation committee. Dissertation committee members may or may not have been members of the student's comprehensive examination committee. The committee must consist of a minimum of four faculty members of the University of Virginia appointed to the rank of assistant professor or higher. The chair is included as one of the four members. One member must be from outside the School of Nursing and serves as a representative of the graduate committee. Three members must be faculty in the School of Nursing. A fifth member from another educational institution may be added with the approval of the dissertation chair. The purpose of the committee is to guide the student's dissertation research and plan of study. Changes in the dissertation chair must be approved by both the doctoral program director in the School of Nursing and the student. Changes in committee membership must be approved by both the dissertation chair and the student. The dissertation chair may or may not have been the student's faculty advisor. Selection of a chair is dependent upon mutual agreement of the student and faculty member guiding the dissertation research. Dissertation chairs must be faculty members in the School of Nursing. The chair assumes primary responsibility for assisting the student in developing a continued plan of study, monitoring the student's progress, and guiding the student throughout the dissertation process.

Approval of Program of Study  Certification that the student has completed all required and recommended course work for the Ph.D. degree is granted by the dissertation chair and committee at the time of the successful defense of the dissertation proposal. To be officially approved, the certification of completion of course work must be signed by the dean of the School of Nursing and the dissertation chair.

Scholarly Accomplishment: Research Grant Application  Students who matriculate in 1998 and thereafter are required to develop and submit a research grant application. This may be done at any time prior to candidacy, but earlier is better and should be encouraged. The time between acceptance into the program and matriculation is an excellent time to develop an initial application. The student prepares the application with the advisor's help. The application is not an examination but a learning experience. The advisor participates in the application as he or she deems appropriate in accordance with the requirements of the application and the funding agency.

Academic and Workload Credit for the Research Grant Application  Each student is required to register for GNUR 992 and GNUR 993 (Proposal Development Seminar) to develop a research grant application. The courses are directed toward the development of grant applications, with the student product being an application for submission.

Comprehensive Examination: Knowledge Synthesis and Research Program The comprehensive examination may occur within the last semester of course work; but it must be held no later than six months after completion of course work requirements as represented in the plan of study and prior to the defense of the dissertation proposal. The purpose of the examination is to demonstrate the student's ability to synthesize knowledge in  his or her area of expertise, to visualize the long-term development of a program of research in that area, and to place the planned dissertation research in the context of that program of research and the area of knowledge. The procedure is detailed in the Doctoral Student Handbook.

Dissertation Proposal  Once students have passed the comprehensive examination and completed course work, they are eligible to write and defend the dissertation proposal. Prior to the meeting at which the student defends the dissertation proposal, he or she must have completed all courses required by the program and necessary to conduct the research specified by the dissertation proposal. The dissertation chair and committee members are responsible for certifying that all necessary courses have been completed. The proposal must be defended in the presence of the dissertation committee and formally approved by all committee members. Guidelines for the proposal are available in the Doctoral Student Handbook.

Admission to Candidacy  After the research grant application has been developed and submitted (required of those who matriculated 1998 and thereafter), all course work has been completed, the examination has been passed, and the dissertation proposal has been successfully defended, the student is granted candidacy status. Ph.D. candidacy signifies that all doctoral work except the dissertation has been successfully completed and that, if the dissertation research is carried out according to the approved proposal and within the time limit, at the completion of that work the student should be awarded the doctoral degree.

Administrative and Human Rights Approval for Dissertation Research  After the dissertation proposal has been approved, the process of gathering the research data may begin. If the student's dissertation involves the collection of primary or secondary data on human subjects, both administrative approval and human rights approval must be obtained. Guidelines for approval must be obtained from the University of Virginia Human Investigations Committee and appropriate committees of other agencies in which data are to be collected. Every proposal must be judged by the Human Investigations Committee (HIC) to conform to 45 CFR 46: The Federal Regulations Governing Human Experimentation, or they must be exempt from those regulations according to criteria set forth in the regulations. For current information on the application process for HIC approval, the student should refer to the HIC Web page at http://www.hrs.virginia.edu/.

Technical Requirements in Writing the Dissertation  The School of Nursing requires that dissertations be written according to the format recommended by the chair and be consistent with the nature of the research. The student should be consistent in the use of the particular style manual selected throughout the dissertation research. A copy of these requirements is included in the Doctoral Student Handbook.
After making required revisions, the student prepares a final draft of the dissertation and an abstract. Students must adhere to guidelines for the title page and "Physical Standards for the Preparation of Theses and Dissertation." Copies may be obtained from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Office of Enrolled Students, 4th Floor, Cabell Hall.

Final Dissertation Defense
The student must arrange a location, date, and time (approximately two hours) that is satisfactory to all committee members for the oral defense of the dissertation. It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements for the dissertation defense. The final copy of the dissertation must be distributed to committee members within a reasonable amount of time prior to the defense, with a "reasonable amount of time" being defined by those members involved. The oral defense is on the dissertation topic and on relevant contextual considerations raised by the research question and topic. All changes made in the oral defense are resubmitted to the chair of the committee for approval. Following the defense, the student submits the "Dissertation Approval Sheet" to the dean of the School of Nursing for signature. The defense must be completed at least two weeks before the date on which the final copy of the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. In addition, committee members' signatures must be obtained on the Final Examination Form, which is also to be signed by the dean of the School of Nursing and submitted to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Submitting the Dissertation for Inspection and Approval  Three copies of the approved dissertation, all of which must be letter quality, must be brought to the Graduate School Office (Room 438, Cabell Hall) for inspection no later than May 1 if the degree is to be conferred in May, August 1 if the degree is to be conferred in August, or December 1 if the degree is to be conferred in January. These copies are placed in Alderman Library, the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, and the School of Nursing. For more specific details regarding preparation and submission of the dissertation, please see the requirements under the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences description in chapter 5 of this Record. Detailed requirements for doctoral students in nursing are given in the Doctoral Student Handbook.

Application for Degrees  Ph.D. degrees are granted in January, May, and August. The student must be registered for the fall semester to receive the degree in January; for the spring semester to receive the degree in May; and for summer session to receive the degree in August. The student must file the degree application with the dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences on a form available at the graduate school office. All doctoral degree applications must be submitted no later than February 1 if the degree is to be conferred in May, July 1 if the degree is to be conferred in August, or October 1 if the degree is to be conferred in January.
Candidates who do not receive a degree in the session for which their application has been approved must renew their application in proper form at the beginning of the session in which the degree is to be awarded. Candidates who find that they are not able to receive their degree in the session for which their application was approved must remove their names from the degree list by a specific date in the session (see calendar). If this is not done, a duplicate diploma fee is charged by the registrar.

Voluntary Withdrawal  A graduate student may not voluntarily withdraw from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences later than one week immediately preceding the beginning of course examinations. An official application to withdraw must be obtained from the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and must be approved in writing by the dean, with a statement of the reason for the withdrawal. The student must report to the Office of the Dean of Students for an exit interview. All student identification cards are to be deposited with the dean of students at the time of withdrawal. The official withdrawal form is forwarded to the university registrar, who notifies all other administrative offices of the withdrawal action.
A student who withdraws from the University for reasons of ill health must notify the Department of Student Health, and subsequent medical clearance from Student Health is among the requirements for readmission.
Failure to comply with the above regulations subjects the student to suspension from the University by the vice president for student affairs.

Readmission After Voluntary Withdrawal  Readmission to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences is not automatic; after an absence of a semester or longer, a former student must apply for readmission to the Graduate School. To apply for readmission to the University, the student must submit an application to the academic dean's office at least 60 days before the next University scheduled class registration.

Enforced Withdrawal  The student may be required to withdraw from the University if the advisor, the dissertation chair, the responsible department members, and the dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences determine that the student is making unsatisfactory progress toward a degree.

Leave of Absence   The dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences may grant leaves of absence to students for either a semester or a session upon written application stating the reason for leaving the University temporarily.

Program Description Ph.D. in Nursing Menu
Required courses in the nursing field (19 credits) are:

GNUR 800 History of American Health Care Professions and Institutions 1850-1970 3
GNUR 814 Scientific Progress in Nursing 3
GNUR 815 Philosophy of Science and Development of Nursing Knowledge 3
GNUR 860 Vulnerability and Resilience within the Nursing Context 3
GNUR 861 Health Behavior and Health Promotion Research 3
GNUR 862 Concepts and Methods in Health Services Research 3
GNUR 991 Professional Issues in Scholarship 1

Required courses in the research component (20 credits) are:

GNUR 820 Research Methods 3
GNUR 821 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research I 3
GNUR 822 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research II 3
GNUR 823 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research III 3
GNUR 824 Qualitative Research Methods 3
BIMS 710 Research Ethics 1
GNUR 990 Research Practicum 2
GNUR 992 Proposal Development Seminar I 1
GNUR 993 Proposal Development Seminar II 1

Cognate (9-12 credits) requirement includes course work in a single field or combination of fields outside of nursing that complement the student's major scholarly focus.
Electives (6-9 credits) are selected on the basis of individual interest and should complement the total program of study. Cognates plus electives must total at least 18 credits.
Non-topical research (3 or more credits) provides individual advisement about the student's developing research plan prior to the dissertation stage.
Dissertation (12 credits) is a culminating experience that requires the student to plan and implement a research study of significance to nursing.

Ph.D.-M.A. in Bioethics Joint Degree Program Ph.D. in Nursing Menu
The School of Nursing collaborates with the School of Medicine, the School of Law, and the Department of Religious Studies to offer a joint Ph.D. in Nursing and M.A. in Bioethics. Students follow the doctoral program curriculum. Cognates and elective requirements for the doctorate are taken in bioethics, meeting the M.A. degree requirement. Graduates are prepared to engage in continuing scholarship and research that both contributes to the knowledge base of the discipline of nursing and addresses bioethical issues in nursing and health care.

Recommended Plan of Study for Full-Time Students Beginning the Program in an Even-Numbered Fall Semester
Year 1 Fall (even)
GNUR 814 Scientific Progress in Nursing 3
GNUR 815 Philosophy of Science and Development of Nursing Knowledge 3
GNUR 821 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research I 3
GNUR 992 Proposal Development Seminar I 1
Spring (odd)
GNUR 820 Research Methods 3
GNUR 822 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research II 3
GNUR 993 Proposal Development Seminar II 1
Cognate/elective 3
BIMS 710 Research Ethics 1
Summer (odd)
GNUR 862 Concepts and Methods in Health Services Research 3

Year 2 Fall (odd)
GNUR 800 History of American Health Care Professions and Institutions 1850-1970 3
GNUR 860 Vulnerability and Resilience within the Nursing Context 3
GNUR 823 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research III 3
Cognate/elective 3
Spring (even)
GNUR 861 Health Behavior and Health Promotion Research 3
GNUR 824 Qualitative Research Method 3
Cognate/elective 3
Cognate/elective 3
Summer (even)
GNUR 990 Research Practicum(1) 2

Year 3 Fall (even)
Cognate/elective 3
Cognate/elective 3
Spring (odd)
GNUR 991 Professional Issues in Scholarship 1
GNUR 997 Non-Topical Research 1
Recommended Plan of Study for Full-Time Students Beginning the Program in an Odd-Numbered Fall Semester
Year 1 Fall (odd)
GNUR 800 History of American Health Care Professions and Institutions 1850-1970 3
GNUR 860 Vulnerability and Resilience within the Nursing Context 3
GNUR 992 Proposal Development Seminar I 1
Cognate/elective 3
Cognate/elective 3
Spring (even)
GNUR 824 Qualitative Research Method 3
GNUR 861 Health Behavior and Health Promotion Research 3
GNUR 993 Proposal Development Seminar II 1
Cognate/elective 3
Summer (even)
GNUR 990 Research Practicum 2

Year 2 Fall (even)
GNUR 814 Scientific Progress in Nursing 3
GNUR 815 Philosophy of Science and Development of Nursing Knowledge 3
GNUR 821 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research I 3
Spring (odd)
GNUR 820 Research Methods 3
GNUR 822 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research II 3
Cognate/elective 3
Cognate/elective 3
BIMS 710 Research Ethics 1
Summer (odd)
GNUR 862 Concepts and Methods in Health Services Research 3

Year 3 Fall (odd)
GNUR 823 Statistical Methods for Health Care Research III 3
Cognate/elective 3
Spring (even)
GNUR 991 Professional Issues in Scholarship 1
GNUR 997 Non-Topical Research 1

(1) The Research Practicum, GNUR 990, may be taken at any time mutually agreeable to the student and the faculty member. Students may register for GNUR 990 more than once for a total of 2 credits.

Cognates and electives may be taken in different terms and years from those shown here. Students are advised to verify when courses they wish to take will be offered. Some courses are offered only in alternate years; others may be affected by such factors as faculty leaves.
Course Descriptions
GNUR 520 - (3) (Y)
Complementary and Alternative Practices and Products
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Provides an overview of CAPP usage patterns in the US and evidence-based information about alternative medical systems, manipulative and body-based practices, biofield, bioelectromagnetics, herbal and natural products, and mind-body-spirit medicine.
GNUR 521 –- (3) (Y)
Herbal Medications & Natural Products
The course focuses on the botany, history, chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology, legal and regulatory issues, manufacturing practices, and clinical parameters of herbal medicines. The purpose of the course is to explore the dilemma faced by conventional health professionals about the integration of herbal products into their practices from a logical and objective perspective in an attempt to prepare those in the health care field for the paradigm shift that is occurring and the major future role that herbal products will play in health care of the 21st century.
GNUR 550 - (4) (Y, SS)
Pharmacology
Prerequisites: GNUR 584, one year of relevant clinical experience, and admission to NP or CNS program.
Builds upon and expands the pharmacologic base acquired at the baccalaureate level and covers the action and interaction of the most commonly used drugs in advanced clinical nursing practice in the ambulatory care setting.
GNUR 551 - (3) (Y, SS)
Advanced Health Assessment
Prerequisites: GNUR 584, one year of relevant clinical experience, and admission to NP or CNS program.
Provides advanced knowledge and health assessment skills used in the primary care setting. Focuses on acquisition, analysis, and refinement of health assessment data as a basis for the development of an accurate data base and problem list. Considers common normal variations and abnormalities characteristic of different developmental, cultural, and ethnic groups. The laboratory portion allows the student to practice advanced assessment skills in a physical assessment laboratory. The course culminates with the student performing a comprehensive history and physical examination.
GNUR 560 - (1-3) (IR)
Special Topics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Selected areas of interest are studied under faculty guidance.
GNUR 564 - (2) (Y)
Nutrition in Health Promotion
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
A required course in the primary care nurse practitioner program focusing on up-to-date nutrition information. Provides essential knowledge for educating people of all ages about sound nutritional practices.
GNUR 566 - (3) (SS)
Primary Care Seminar I
Prerequisite: GNUR 550, 551, 564, 580, 586, 584, 590, 702, and 707.
Focuses on (1) health promotion, health maintenance, and disease prevention for infants, children, adolescents, and their families; (2) nursing and medical management of common childhood illnesses; and (3) reproductive health and sexuality, including common health concerns. Considers issues in primary care and advanced practice role development.
GNUR 567 - (3) (Y)
Primary Care Seminar II
Prerequisite: GNUR 566 and completion of all core and APN courses.
Prevention and management of common acute health problems in selected populations. Explores the role of the nurse practitioner in primary health care. Models of collaboration, consultation, and referral are critically analyzed.
GNUR 569 - (6) (Y)
Primary Care Preceptorship I
Prerequisite: GNUR 566 and completion of all core and APN courses.
Provides experiences in health promotion, problem identification, and management of common health problems, as well as client/family counseling. Emphasizes culturally competent health care within a developmental framework. The clinical experiences foster identification and beginning development of the nurse practitioner role. Direct guidance and supervision is provided by nurse practitioner and/or physician preceptors under the overall direction of the faculty.
Builds on the basic concepts, principles, and skills used by nurse practitioners in the delivery of primary health care, including health promotion and risk reduction, and the identification and management of a broader range of common acute health problems. Students continue to refine their assessment, management, and counseling skills in more complex situations. Role integration continues. Direct guidance and supervision is provided by the physicians and nurse practitioners at the clinical sites under the overall direction of the faculty. A minimum of 336 clinical hours is required.
GNUR 570 - (3) (Y)
Primary Care Seminar III
Prerequisite: GNUR 566, 567, and 569; corequisite: GNUR 571 and 575.
With a focus on Healthy People 2000, the management of chronic illness across the life span, as well as health maintenance and rehabilitation, is emphasized. Strategies are designed to help clients, families, and communities cope constructively with problems associated with chronic illness.
GNUR 571 - (6) (Y)
Primary Care Preceptorship II
Prerequisite: GNUR 569; corequisite: GNUR 570 and 575.
A culminating experience in which practitioner students continue to develop the knowledge and expertise required to provide primary health care to clients, families, and communities. Students increase their levels of responsibility for independent client and family management. Role integration and issues affecting practice are explored with emphasis on legal/ethical issues and establishing practice arrangements. Direct guidance and supervision is provided at the clinical sites by physician and nurse preceptors under the overall guidance of the faculty. A minimum of 336 clinical hours is required.
GNUR 574 - (1-2) (Y)
Role I: Acquisition
Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program.
Introduces the history, competencies, and roles of advanced nursing practice emphasizing role acquisition. Explores models of independent, collaborative, and multidisciplinary practice. Addresses trends and issues that shape advanced nursing practice.
GNUR 575 - (2) (Y)
Role II: Transition
Prerequisite: GNUR 574; corequisite: GNUR 570, 759, 765 or 770.
Prepares students for assuming an advanced practice nursing role. Focuses on role transition and development, marketing oneself as an APN, and regulatory and economic policies that affect advanced nursing practice in the evolving health care system.
GNUR 579 - (8) (SS)
Psychiatric Mental Health/Primary Care Preceptorship
Prerequisite: GNUR 571 and 773.
A culminating experience in which students continue to develop knowledge and skills in all aspects of psychiatric mental health nursing specialty practice. A minimum of 400 clinical hours is required.
GNUR 580 - (3) (S)
Theoretical Foundations of Nursing
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Prepares advanced practitioners of nursing to intelligently interpret current literature on the discipline and its application to practice. Analyzes and critiques nursing literature and selected theoretical works, focusing on nursing theory, ethical principles, historical perspectives, and aesthetics. Emphasizes relating these dimensions to the phenomena arising from the student's own professional nursing practice. Studies the role of praxis, empirics, ethics, and aesthetics in theory development.
GNUR 584 - (4) (Y)
Pathophysiology
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Selected physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms in health and disease.
GNUR 585 - (3) (S)
Epidemiology in Health Care
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Focuses on the distribution and determinants of health-related states or conditions in specified populations and on the application of this study to control health problems. Students are presented with epidemiologic models and methods in order to assess the health of individuals and populations and to study, prevent, or control health conditions, diseases, and injuries. Emphasizes application of methods to improve health care delivery, health policy, and, ultimately, health.
GNUR 586 - (4) (S)
Research and Biostatistical Processes for Health Care
Prerequisite: Undergraduate or graduate applied statistics course within the past five years.
Focuses on the methods of nursing and health care research and biostatistical analysis. Provides a foundation for informed reading and application of research findings, methods, and analytical tools, including biostatistical analyses and interpretation. Emphasizes critical appraisal of health research literature and evidence-based practice.
GNUR 590 - (3) (Y-SS)
Health Policy: Local to Global
Surveys policy decisions related to the organization, financing, and delivery of health care. Examines social, ethical, political, economic, and ideological forces shaping American health policy and the delivery of health care, as well as the roles and influence of providers and consumers of health care services, and government, corporate, and entrepreneurial interests. Emphasizes informed participation in policy-making processes and the impact of health policy on professional practice and health service.
GNUR 700 - (3) (Y)
Community Assessment
Prerequisite or corequisite: GNUR585.
This course focuses on the health of communities and the process of assessment. Analysis of theoretical frameworks, assessment models, health care delivery systems, and special populations as they relate to current health issues. Two hours of seminar and four clinical hours each week (56 clinical hours).
GNUR 702 - (3) (Y-S)
Health Promotion/Disease Prevention for Individuals, Families, and Communities
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Focuses on the assessment of individuals, families, and communities in health and illness. Selected models derived from health promotion/disease prevention and family theories are integrated as a basis for developing and understanding the specific content and process of client assessment. In addition, research foundations of health promotion/disease prevention across the life span are examined. Emphasizes the use of existing knowledge to guide advanced nursing practice in culturally competent interventions for the promotion of health.
GNUR 703 - (3) (SS)
Human Genetics
This course will focus on providing students with a basic understanding of human genetics and its role in pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of disease. Students will interpret basic concepts in human genetics that contribute to an understanding of nursing or related health care problems, as well as apply knowledge of inheritance and immunogenetics in predicting the probable effect of genetics on disease processes. This course will also discuss the ethical, social, political and economic impact of selected genetic diseases, DNA-based genetic diagnosis, and gene therapy.
GNUR 706 - (3) (IR)
Nursing Ethics for Advanced Practice
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Provides an opportunity to examine ethical concepts and theories at they relate to selected situations in advanced nursing practice.
GNUR 707 - (2-3) (Y)
Introduction to Health Informatics
Prerequisite: Basic competence in word processing, electronic mail, spreadsheets, graphics, and library information systems.
Explores the nature and functions of health informatics, the current state of the science, present and future applications, and major issues for research and development. Each student investigates a selected topic in health care delivery or management from the perspective of information science; describes the degree to which current information technology meets identified needs, and proposes directions for further development. Learning methods include readings, seminars, electronic communications, a term paper, and oral and visual presentation. Students who enroll in the course for three credits receive more in-depth instruction on the topics.
GNUR 711 - (3) (Y)
Managing Care in Systems and
Populations
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program.
The focus of this course is on the knowledge and skills essential for nurse managers and community and public health nurse leaders. An overview of management theories, processes, and their implications for nurse managers and leaders in a variety of public and private settings is provided. Financial management concepts and budgeting applications are introduced. The students are exposed to trends in integrated health systems, managed care, and care management for public and private partnerships. Emphasis will be on models that assure provisions of health care by linking people to needed services.
GNUR 722 - (3) (Y)
Health Care Systems Planning and Evaluation
Prerequisite: GNUR 700.
This course will focus on management and leadership strategies for improving the health of communities and individuals. The context and content of community, acute care, psychiatric, long-term care, home health care and public health systems are explored. The emphasis is on concepts and theories germane to planning, implementing, and evaluating health care programs and the provision of health care, to improve health and meet health care needs. Two hours of seminar and four clinical hours each week (56 clinical hours).
GNUR 723 - (3) (Y)
Community and Public Health Leadership Practicum I
Prerequisite: GNUR 585, 700 and 711.
Focuses on the application of specialized knowledge and the development of skills inherent in advanced community and public health nursing practice. Stresses assessment and interventions targeted at the individual, family, group and community/organizational levels. Community and Public Health Leadership interventions are designed in partnership to be consistent with the beliefs and values of the individual, family, group and community.
GNUR 724 - (4) (SS)
Community and Public Health Leadership Practicum II
Prerequisite: GNUR 723.
Focuses on the continuing synthesis and application of knowledge from preceding courses. Emphasizes further development of nursing care management and/or evaluation plans at the individual, family, group, or community/ organizational level.
GNUR 744 - (4) (Y)
Wound, Ostomy, and Continence
Specialty Nursing
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Focuses on the knowledge and skills required for care of clients experiencing actual or potential wound, ostomy and continence problems. Prepares students for the management and rehabilitation of persons with these specific problems. Explores specialized knowledge of assessment, pathophysiology, products, and resources related to wounds, ostomy and continence care. Attention is given to evaluating the impact of selected therapeutic interventions.
GNUR 745 - (3) (Y)
Advanced WOC Nursing
Prerequisite: GNUR 744.
Focuses on the management and rehabilitation of persons with wound, ostomy and continence (WOC) care problems by coordinating and utilizing human, product, and technologic resources. The student will integrate knowledge of setting, role, resources, client education, counseling and advanced care techniques to promote the highest practical level of functioning for the client.
GNUR 756 - (3) (Y)
Seminar I: Clinical Decision Making in Acute & Specialty Care
Prerequisite: GNUR 584, 551, or instructor permission.
Through seminar discussions and lecture, students learn to approach complex clinical situations systematically across the acute and chronic care continuum. Content specific to the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neurologic systems guides students of developing skills in diagnosis, planning, and evaluation of patients with system failure problems. Emphasizes the most frequently occurring risk factors that contribute to the development of health problems; the physiologic, pathophysiologic, behavioral and experiential aspects of the problem; therapeutic interventions for patient management; and approaches to evaluating the outcome of the intervention. Two hours of seminar and 4 clinical hours each week.
GNUR 757 - (3) (Y)
Seminar II: Clinical Decision Making in Acute & Specialty Care
Prerequisite: GNUR 584, 756, or instructor permission.
Through discussions and lectures, students learn to approach complex clinical situations systematically to care for patients with acute and chronic dysfunction of the immune, endocrine, GI, musculoskeletal, and renal systems. Emphasis is given to the most frequently occurring risk factors that contribute to the development of the problem/s; the physiologic, pathophysiologic, behavioral and experiential aspects of the problem; therapeutic interventions to patient management; and approaches to directing and evaluating outcomes. Two hours of seminar and 4 clinical hours each week
GNUR 758 - (3) (Y)
Seminar III: Management of Chronic Illness Across Settings.
Prerequisite: GNUR 574, 584, 550, 551, 580, 585, and 586.
A major focus is the development of specialty knowledge for the care of adults with chronic conditions. Content includes advanced assessment of aging adults, nursing therapeutics and outcomes, adult development as affected by chronic illness, clinical decision-making skills, and specific applications to vulnerable populations. Students will develop a clinical care management model to be utilized in the care of a population of patients who are chronically ill. Multidisciplinary and culturally-appropriate approaches to ethical care are emphasized. Two hours of seminar and 8 clinical hours each week.
GNUR 759 - (5) (Y, SS)
Practicum I: Acute Care Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Nurse Specialist.
Prerequisite: All core and APN courses of the MSN Program, GNUR 756, 757, and 758.
The first APN preceptorship, for ACNP's and CNS students, focuses on the acquisition of expert clinical knowledge in a specialty and the diagnostic and decision-making skills necessary to function in an acute care environment. The focus is on the student's specialty and on the cardiac and pulmonary systems and management of medical patients. (280 clinical hours)
GNUR 762 - (3) (Y)
Immunocompetence in Vulnerable Populations
Examines the immune system and phenomena of concern to nurses who work with immunocompromised individuals. Focuses on the critical thinking and clinical decision-making needed to work with individuals whose immune system is compromised (e.g., cancer, AIDS, transplant, and septic patients).
GNUR 765 - (5) (Y, SS)
Synthesis Practicum: Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist
Prerequisite: GNUR759.
A culminating clinical experience in the role of ACNP or CNS, emphasizing clinical decision making in an interprofessional environment specific to the student's career goals and specialty interest. (280 clinical hours).
GNUR 770 - (3) (Y)
Biological Basis of Mental Health and Mental Illness
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Explores the biological correlates of psychiatric illnesses and examines neurostructural, neurochemical, psychopharmacologic processes relevant to psychiatric illnesses.
GNUR 771 - (3) (Y)
Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Seminar
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Provides a foundation for advanced psychiatric nursing practice based on a biopsychosocial model of mental health and illness. Emphasizes those who have moderate to severe impairments in emotional and/or behavioral functioning associated with major mental illness.
GNUR 773 - (3) (Y)
Theoretical Foundations of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Reviews major theoretical approaches to psychotherapy and psychiatric nursing. The course begins with psychoanalysis and proceeds through current self-help  and social system approaches.
GNUR 774 - (5) (Y)
Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum I: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner
Prerequisite: All core and APN courses, or instructor permission.
Develops clinical competence in assessment and intervention with psychiatric patients. Application of tools assessing milieu, patient symptoms, progress in therapy, patient-nurse interaction, family structure and process, group process, and community placement feasibility. Requires a minimum of 250 clinical hours.
GNUR 776 - (5) (SS)
Psychiatric-Mental Health Practicum II: Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner
Prerequisite: GNUR 774, or instructor permission.
Develops advanced clinical competence in selected areas of mental health-psychiatric nursing. Requires a minimum of 250 clinical hours.
GNUR 782/784 - (3/3) (Y-SS)
Administrative Practicum I/II
Prerequisite: Admission to the M.S.N./ M.B.A. program or Health Systems Management Track within the Master of Science in Nursing Program.
Students integrate and apply administrative and management theory during a 15 week practicum experience. They participate in the planning, operation, and evaluation of a component of the health care system while working closely with a health care leader who serves as their preceptor. Field experiences are analyzed by the student with input from peers, health care leaders, and faculty.
GNUR 792 - (3) (Y)
Resource Management
Prerequisite: GNUR 711.
Emphasizes using quantitative analysis in support of data-based management decisions. Focuses on decision-making from the perspective of health care managers and planners. Students use standardized measurements for quality of care evaluations; large databases, including clinical and administrative cost and utilization data; and the Internet. Data-based decision-making focuses on resource allocation at the individual, unit, organizational, and population level of analysis. Discusses using data to influence decisions relevant to health care clinical and administrative managers and leaders.
GNUR 793 - (1-3) (Y-SS)
Independent Master's Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Individually planned study in nursing specialty, administration, education, or research.
GNUR 794 - (1-3) (Y-SS)
Independent Practicum
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Independent practicum to be established in selected areas.
GNUR 795 –- (3) (SS)
Practicum in Wound, Ostomy  and Continence Nursing
Clinical practicum for students specializing in WOC nursing. (168 clinical hours).
GNUR 800 - (3) (O)
History of American Health Care Professions and Institutions 1850-1970
Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or instructor permission.
Broadens, and then refines through historical analysis, the student's view and understanding of the current health care system. Explores the role that historical inquiry and analysis play in understanding the evolution and status of the health care system; the development of health professions (nursing and medicine) and institutions (hospitals and public health services); and the interplay of intellectual, social, economic, and political events that shaped the current health system.
GNUR 814 - (3) (Y)
Scientific Progress in Nursing
Prerequisite: Master's-level nursing research course.
Through directed readings and seminars in selected areas, students develop an appreciation for, and understanding of, the evolution of nursing's substantive research knowledge and the current state of the science in selected areas. These topical areas are broadly defined as Individual Responses to Health and Illness, Family Responses to Health and Illness, Environmental Influences on Health, and Therapeutic Interventions. Students also become acquainted with exemplary research programs, analyze and synthesize relevant literature, and develop a plan of studies to prepare them for a research career in the selected area.
GNUR 815 - (3) (E)
Philosophy of Science and Development of Nursing Knowledge
Examines various philosophies of science as they have evolved over time and explores their ontological and epistemological implications for the development of nursing knowledge. Extant programs of research in nursing are critically analyzed to determine the philosophical traditions from which they arise and the consequences of those philosophical traditions for the kinds, and extent of, the knowledge produced by those research programs.
GNUR 820 - (3) (E)
Quantitative Research Methods
Prerequisite: Master's-level nursing research course.
Builds on master's level competencies in research methods to provide an in-depth exploration of scientific methods of testing the effectiveness of nursing interventions. Students learn to design experiments and quasi-experiments suitable to the intervention to be tested, the population, and the clinical or other circumstances. They increase knowledge and skills regarding issues of design sensitivity and power, such as sampling, sample size, and measurement. Students integrate into all aspects of research consideration of ethical issues, including protection of human subjects, animal welfare, and scientific integrity.
GNUR 821 - (3) (E)
Statistical Methods for Health Care Research I
Prerequisite: Master's-level nursing research course.
Introduces data analysis for nursing research. Descriptive and inferential statistics are treated with attention to the application and choice of particular statistical tests. Emphasizes statistical problems and issues relevant to nursing research.
GNUR 822 - (3) (E)
Statistical Methods for Health Care Research II
Prerequisite: GNUR 821 or instructor permission.
Applies statistical analysis models and procedures to nursing and health research. Focuses on simple and multiple regression, statistical power analysis, analysis of variance models, and quantitative research synthesis, stressing the application and choice of particular statistical models and procedures. Emphasizes statistical problems and issues relevant to nursing research.
GNUR 823 - (3) (O)
Statistical Methods for Health Care Research III
Prerequisite: GNUR 821, 822 or equivalent, and instructor permission.
Focuses on advanced procedures for data analysis and statistical inference in nursing and health research. Studies major multivariate procedures and their applicability to nursing and health research, and special issues in measurement and statistics often encountered in, and specific to, nursing and health research. Emphasizes using the computer as a facilitative research instrument.
GNUR 824 - (3) (O)
Qualitative Research Methods
Prerequisite: Master's-level nursing research course.
Introduces a variety of qualitative research methods. Discusses the epistemological principles that underline interpretive and naturalistic research, techniques for data collection, and analysis and control of systematic bias.
GNUR 850 - (3) (SI-SS)
Selected Topics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Advanced level individual study of self-selected topics under the guidance and supervision of a faculty member.
GNUR 860 - (3) (O)
Vulnerability and Resilience Within the Nursing Context
Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or instructor permission.
Examines biological, psychological, and social phenomena that contribute to heightened vulnerability or resiliency in individuals, population subgroups, or communities. Emphasizes systematic analysis of current research findings that evaluate specific nursing interventions and their outcomes with selected populations.
GNUR 861 - (3) (O)
Health Behavior and Health Promotion Research
Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or instructor permission.
Focuses on conceptual and methodological issues related to health and illness behavior and health promotion research. Explores directions for nursing science by critically analyzing theoretical foundations of health behavior and relevant research. Examines multidisciplinary perspectives and issues related to health and illness behavior for the advancement of health promotion through nursing research.
GNUR 862 - (3) (Y)
Concepts and Methods in Health
Services Research
Prerequisite: Doctoral standing, a master's-level health policy course (to be taken previously or concurrently) is recommended.
Builds on knowledge essential to conducting health services research, including social, economic, ethical, and political uses that influence health policy. Develops conceptual and methodological competencies related to research on health services organization, financing, and delivery. Uses evaluation research methods to examine the effects of interventions on outcomes, such as quality and cost. Discusses the role of databases and health informatics in service research.
GNUR 990 - (1-2) (Y-SS)
Research Practicum I
Prerequisite: Instructor and advisor permission.
Develops and refines research competency through actual research study. Students must register for GNUR990 one or more times for a total of two credits.
GNUR 991 - (1) (Y)
Professional Issues in Scholarship
Taken near the end of course work, this course provides a synthesis of prior work and incorporates a discussion of professional issues and strategies of scholarship, including grant seeking and grant management, publication, scholarly ethics, and scientific integrity.
GNUR 992 - (1) (S)
Proposal Writing Seminar I
Teaches the mechanics of proposal writing and introduces the student to the art and science of grant seeking. The course provides a hands-on, practical approach to proposal writing, including development and peer review of a proposal.
GNUR 993 - (1) (S)
Proposal Writing Seminar II
Prerequisite: GNUR 992.
Continues to develop and refine the research proposal begun in GNUR 992. Includes incorporating feedback from peers and a professional editorial consultant. The final product is a submitted grant proposal.
GNUR 997 - (3-12) (S-SS)
Non-Topical Research
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty advisor.
Students register for GNUR 997 concurrently with course work until the dissertation proposal is successfully defended. Credits from non-topical research are not counted in the total program hours of credit.
GNUR 999 - (3-12) (S-SS)
Dissertation Research
Prerequisite: Permission of dissertation chair.
A culminating experience that requires the student to plan and implement a research study of significance.
BIMS 710 –- (1) (Y)
Research Ethics
This course provides an overview of ethical issues in research, including the protection of human subjects and the integrity of scholarship. It is designed to meet requirements of the National Institutes of Health for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Such instruction must be included in the program of study as a condition of institutional or individual National Research Service Awards. Information available on the web at: http://www.med.virginia.edu/gpo/research_ethics/home.html.
Faculty
Office of the Dean of the School of Nursing Faculty Menu
B. Jeanette Lancaster, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N., Dean
Doris Greiner, R.N., Ph.D., Associate Dean
Mark Holdren, M.B.A., Assistant Dean for Administration
Theresa Carroll, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Student Services
Clay Hysell, M.A., Assistant Dean for Graduate Student Services

Faculty Faculty Menu
Professors
Barbara Brodie, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N.
Mikel Gray, Ph.D., C.U.N.P., C.C.C.N., F.A.A.N.
Barbara Parker, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N.
Ann Gill Taylor, R.N., Ed.D., F.A.A.N.
Associate Professors
Sara Arneson, R.N., Ph.D.
Valentina Brashers, M.D.
Suzanne Burns, R.N., M.S.N., A.C.N.P., C.S., F.A.A.N.
Doris Glick, R.N., Ph.D.
Ann B. Hamric, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N.
Emily Hauenstein, R.N., Ph.D.
Shelley Huffstutler, R.N., D.S.N., C.F.N.P.
Catherine Kane, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N.
Arlene Keeling, R.N., Ph.D.
Pamela Kulbok, R.N., D.N.Sc.
Elizabeth Merwin, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N.
Kathryn Reid, R.N., M.S.N., C.C.R.N., C.F.N.P.
Juanita Reigle, R.N., M.S.N., A.C.N.P., C.S.
Mary Ropka, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N.
Judith Sands, R.N., Ed.D.
Richard Steeves, R.N., Ph.D., F.N.P., F.A.A.N.
Sharon Utz, R.N., Ph.D.
Assistant Professors
Cheryl Bourguignon, R.N., Ph.D.
Donna Chen, M.D., M.P.H.
Reba Moyer Childress, R.N., M.S.N., F.N.P., C.S.
Deborah Conway, R.N., M.S.
Linda Davies, R.N., M.S.N.
Emily Drake, R.N., M.S.N.
Carolyn Eddins, R.N., M.S.N., C.E.T.N., C.F.N.P.
Sarah Farrell, R.N., Ph.D., C.S.
Kathy Haugh, R.N., M.S.N.
Bonnie Jerome-D Emilia, R.N., Ph.D.
Susan Kennel, R.N., M.S.N., P.N.P.
John Kirchgessner, R.N., M.S.N., P.N.P.
Debra Lyon, R.N., Ph.D., F.N.P.
Carol Manning, Ph.D.
Lynn Noland, R.N., Ph.D., C.P.N.P.
Stephen Petterson, Ph.D.
Dawn Rigney, R.N., Ph.D.
Audrey Snyder, R.N., M.S.N., A.C.N.P., C.S.
Arlene Yuan, R.N., M.S.N., F.N.P., P.N.P.
Instructors
Jeanne Erickson, R.N., M.S.N., A.O.C.N.
Mary Gibson, R.N., M.S.N.
Rebecca Harmon, R.N., M.N., C.S.
Carol Lynn Maxwell-Thompson, R.N., M.S.N., C.F.N.P.
Vickie Southall, R.N., M.S.N.
Anita Thompson-Heisterman, R.N., M.S.N., C.S.
Margaret Willis, R.N., M.S.N., C.S.
Clinical Visiting Professor
June Triplett, R.N., Ed.D.

Retired Faculty Faculty Menu
Judith Bancroft, R.N., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Nursing
Rose Marie Chioni, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing
Jeanne Fox, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing
Carol Gleit, R.N., Ed.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Nursing
Barbara Graham, R.N., Ed.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Nursing

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