Degree Programs
Course Descriptions
M.S. in Management Information Systems
Faculty
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Registrar HomeGraduate School of Commerce
General Information
The McIntire School of Commerce has achieved a national reputation in business education and has been cited as one of the top business schools in the country. Founded in 1921 under the guise of the Wilson School of Economics, the name was changed after a substantial donation was made by Paul G. McIntire. A native of Charlottesville and successful businessman, Mr. McIntire attended the University of Virginia for one term before venturing to Chicago and New York to pursue his fortune in the business world. Mr. McIntire felt the purpose of the school should be to provide training for a career in business, affording young people the vast opportunities of the business life.
The McIntire School of Commerce has grown immensely over the years, housing the undergraduate business school and two graduate programs: accounting and management information systems. At the graduate level,  students participate in these innovative degree programs, combining the managerial perspective of an M. B. A. with a sharply defined professional and technical focus. To be successful at McIntire, graduate students must maintain an intellectual enthusiasm for their program of choice. They must have the desire not only to master their field, but also to apply that mastery. Our programs are for people who are both drawn to, and envision being leaders in, these fields because of the opportunities they offer to make a difference in the world of business.
The Master of Science programs are demanding and rigorous. Faculty and staff work very hard in their effort to prepare students for leadership positions and to ensure that the results are well worth the effort. The faculty consult continually with their colleagues in the business world, watching the trends and technologies and bringing those aspects to the classroom. Classroom training is supported by the latest in instructional technology, as well as the school's extensive computer resources. McIntire offers a specialized business education on the cutting edge. Yet, the most distinguishing feature of the graduate programs is the close, lasting relationships between students and faculty. These relationships are in keeping with Thomas Jefferson's original concept of the University. Jefferson felt that the immediate exchange of ideas represented the most effective way to transmit knowledge to the rising generation of leaders. Excellence in teaching is the rule at McIntire.
Graduates depart McIntire as professionals with a strong foundation in their chosen field, the ability to add immediate value to an organization, and an appreciation of the role their profession carries in a rapidly changing world.

Admission
McIntire School of Commerce
University of Virginia
Monroe Hall
P.O. Box 400173
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4173
(434) 924-3571
(877) 349-2620
The Graduate School of Commerce seeks well-rounded individuals who bring exceptional intellectual capabilities along with a passion for their own chosen field. The admissions process looks for evidence of competitive academic performance, work and life experiences, and qualities of character such as motivation, maturity, tenacity, integrity, ability to work with others, self-reliance, and leadership.
All applicants are considered without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, political affiliation, disability, age, sexual orientation, or veteran status.
All foreign students, whose first language is not English, are required to take the Virginia English Proficiency Examination upon arrival in Charlottesville. This is not a substitute for the TOEFL examination required for admissions.
All candidates are encouraged to visit the McIntire website (www.commerce.virginia.edu) to obtain detailed information on the individual graduate programs, admissions requirements and procedures, and to take advantage of the online admission services.
Please see individual program descriptions for information on specific admission and program requirements.

Financial Aid Information
Departmental Financial Aid  The Graduate School of Commerce offers a range of financial aid for graduate students, including fellowships based on need, academic merit, and GMAT scores. Research assistantships are also offered, which entail working a pre-determined number of hours each semester for a faculty member. Teaching assistantships, awarded based on academic merit and an interview, offer tuition remission, a discount on books, and a stipend. Please note:  Due to the cohort driven, executive format of the McIntire Graduate Programs, the School does not honor the University of Virginia Tuition Waiver program for University employees.

Loans  In addition to the fellowships and assistantships, prospective students may apply for financial assistance through the Office of Financial Aid to Students. All awards from federal loan or employment funds are need- based. To apply for assistance, submit a University financial aid application to the Office of Financial Aid to Students by March 31. For further information or applications, contact the Office of Financial Aid to Students, P.O. Box 9021, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22906, (434) 982-6000.

Veterans' Benefits  The Registrar's Office is the University liaison with the Veterans Administration in matters concerning educational benefits available to veterans and war orphans under the provisions of Chapters 34 and 35 of Title 38 USC (Cold War G.I. Bill). This office provides information and furnishes application forms on request. Please address inquiries regarding educational benefits available through the Veterans Administration to the Registrar's Office, Carruthers Hall, (434) 924-4138.

Tuition Waiver Program  Due to the executive format of the MS degree programs, tuition waiver programs are not applicable to the Graduate School of Commerce.

General Requirements
Transfer of Credit  The Graduate School of Commerce requires students to complete 30 credit hours of graduate level work in-residence. Because of the cohort, lock-step format of the programs, transfer credit is not given.

Enrollment Requirements  Students must carry a minimum of 9 credit hours to be considered a full time student at the University of Virginia. Departmental program policies may vary as to the minimum semester credit hour requirements within each program.

Grading Policy  See individual programs.

Grade Changes  After it has been submitted to the Office of the University Registrar, no grade may be changed without the approval of the dean.  The dean is not authorized by the faculty to change a grade submitted to the Office of the University Registrar except when an instructor certifies that, because of errors in calculation or transcription, an incorrect grade has been submitted.
McIntire students who wish to appeal a  grade must first attempt to resolve the issue with the instructor of the course. The appeal must be in writing and filed within thirty days of the first class day of the following semester. Absent a satisfactory outcome, the student should submit a written appeal to the Associate Dean for Graduate Programs, who reviews the matter and consults with the Graduate Program Committee. The final level of appeal is to the Dean of the McIntire School of Commerce.

Incomplete Policy  An IN is recorded when reasons known to the professor are judged adequate to justify an extension of time to complete course requirements. An IN may not be used to allow a student to attempt to raise a grade at the end of the term. The time to change the IN to a grade is determined between the student and the instructor, but may not exceed beyond one semester in which the class was taken. Students must enter into a written agreement specifying the remaining requirements and agreed-upon time line. If the agreed time for completion has passed and the student has not met the agreement, the grade automatically becomes an F unless changed by the instructor.
Program Attendance  Given the intensive and cumulative nature of the program,  students are required to attend all scheduled class meetings.  In addition, students are expected to clearly communicate program commitments to all relevant parties (i.e., both family and work relationships). In the event that a student cannot be present for any part of the program, or falls behind for any reason, it is the responsibility of the student to make up dthe work in a manner that is approved by the faculty.  Absence from more than 20%  of any course will automatically result in an evaluation of non-performance ("F").

Leave of Absence  Requests for a leave of absence should be made in writing to the Associate Dean for Graduate Programs and cannot exceed one calendar year. Please note that due to the lockstep, cohort nature of McIntire's graduate programs, permission to take a leave of absence is granted only in rare circumstances.

Withdrawals and Refund Policy
Students may withdraw from any program in the Graduate School of Commerce upon the following conditions:

1. Withdrawals must be submitted in writing to the Associate Dean for Graduate Programs.
2. The withdrawal becomes effective the date it is received.

Refunds
1. All requests for refunds must be made in writing to the Associate Dean for Graduate Programs.
2. The date of the postmark, fax or in-person written request determines the amount of any refund.
3. Refunds are calculated according to the following conditions:

• Refunds are granted automatically when a scheduled course is cancelled.
• If the student withdraws before the first class meeting, a full tuition refund, less a $12.00 processing fee, is granted. If the student has paid for materials, that fee is not refunded.
• For courses of 10 or more sessions, 80% of the tuition is refunded if the student withdraws between the first and second class meetings. A refund of 60% of the tuition is granted for withdrawal between the second and third class meetings. No refunds are awarded after the third class meeting.
• For courses of three to nine sessions, 80% of the tuition is refunded if the student withdraws between the first and second class meeting. No refunds are granted after the second meeting.
• For courses of one or two sessions, no refund is available after the course begins.
• All departmental scholarship and fellowship allocations are rescinded upon a student's withdrawal.

The University bursar in Charlottesville issues refund checks, if applicable. Allow four to six weeks for processing refund payments. Please direct inquiries to the Graduate Programs Office.
Degree Programs
The Graduate School of Commerce, in partnership with Ernst & Young, LLP, offers a unique, customized accounting program for students who want to earn their master's degree while working for Ernst & Young.  Applicants are recruited for the program by Ernst & Young. Upon admission by the McIntire School's admissions committee, students also become employees of Ernst & Young. For additional information, please visit the Ernst & Young website at www.ey. com/careers/masters.

The Master of Science in Accounting—Tax Consulting is an innovative and rigorous program that provides students with a deep and comprehensive understanding of the tax law and of how strategic tax planning can facilitate the achievement of the personal, investment, and business objectives of individuals and organizations. In addition, students are challenged to develop a functional awareness of the context within which competing tax strategies must be evaluated including the underlying business and legal issues, economic ramifications, and financial statement effects associated with each alternative. The program equips its graduates with the technical knowledge, the strategic insight, and the broad array of core competencies required to successfully pursue productive and fulfilling careers in tax consulting.
The Master's Program is designed to meet the needs and objectives of both traditional full-time graduate students and working professionals. The program is conducted in an executive format on the historic grounds of the University of Virginia over a period of 12 consecutive months. Classes begin the last week of May. After this first 5-day session, classes meet every other Thursday, Friday, and Saturday throughout the summer, and on alternate Fridays and Saturdays throughout most of the academic year [September-May]. A second 5-day session is conducted in early January. In order to accommodate the special needs of working professionals, significant breaks occur during the federal income tax filing deadline and during tax season.

Program Prerequisites Students entering the program are expected to have completed the following undergraduate courses:

• Introduction to Accounting I and II
• Intermediate Accounting I
• Federal Taxation I (Principles of Taxation for Business and Investment Planning)
• Federal Taxation II (Taxation of Corporations, Partnerships and Estates) is strongly recommended.

Admission Requirements  Admission to the Master of Science in Accounting—Tax Consulting Program is highly competitive. Prior to the matriculation in the Master's Program, candidates must have earned a bachelor's degree with a successful GPA from an accredited collegiate institution and show high promise for success at the graduate level. Other factors considered for admission include letters of reference, strong performance on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), honors, awards, and extracurricular activities. Relevant work experience, if applicable, is also considered.  International students whose first language is not English must also submit a TOEFL scores. A $40 application fee is required which can be paid online with the application. If accepted, a non-refundable deposit of $500 will be required and is credited toward the first tuition payment.
For more information or to access the online admissions services, please visit the website at or contact:

Office of Graduate Admissions
P.O. Box 400173
McIntire School of Commerce - University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4173
(877) 349-2620 [toll-free]

Grading Policy  Grades are awarded only to those students who are registered for, and who complete a course for, credit. The letter grade symbols used for grading graduate students in the Accounting program are: A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F. Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in the program and graduate. All courses are on a credit basis only.

Note: A student who earns six credit hours of sub-standard performance ("C") is placed on probation; a probationary student who earns one additional grade of C is dropped from the program. A student who receives of non-performance ("F") is dropped from the program.

Course Structure, and Faculty Please refer to the website at www.commerce.virginia.edu.
M.S. Accounting Course Descriptions
GCOM 731 - (3)
Strategic Business Advising and Communication
This course is designed to help students develop basic advising competencies while exposing them to the dynamics of strategy, process, technology, and change management advising. The course is structured to integrate theoretical and practical knowledge, simulated experience, and active discussion of three different topics relevant to the total advising experience: (1) the advising engagement lifecycle, (2) various methodological approaches and tools used by advisors in structuring and solving clients' problems, and (3) strategic-thinking and behavioral techniques that facilitate the advising process. Time is also devoted to the active listening, feedback, coaching, constructive conflict, and meeting facilitation skills that make effective communication possible.
GCOM 732 - (1 1/2)
Accounting Policy
The objectives of this course are: (1) to examine accounting policy making at the standard setter (FASB) and regulator (SEC) levels and at the individual company level; (2) to examine the dynamics among corporations (preparers), the accounting profession (auditors), and users of financial statements in accounting policymaking; and (3) to enhance [through case discussions of decisions in financial reporting] the ability to evaluate accounting conventions, particularly with regard to how those decisions reflect economic reality, quality of earnings, and the company's strategies. A major research project requires students to analyze and evaluate a company's accounting policy choices. The specific topics include: FASB's conceptual framework; business strategy and accounting strategy; earnings management; quality of earnings; restructurings; intangibles; research and development; software expenditures; environmental liabilities; contingent liabilities and other liability issues; and interim reporting.
GCOM 733 - (1 1/2)
Business Risk and Business Controls
The objectives of this course are: (1) to understand the various risks that a firm faces in a global economy that may prevent it from achieving its business objectives; (2) to understand how an integrated control framework can be developed to monitor risk; and (3) to understand some consultative methodologies for undertaking a risk and control study of a firm. Numerous cases are discussed. The specific topics include: risk framework; control framework; value chain analysis; critical performance factors; building an ethical climate; crisis management; virtual corporation and risk management; risk and control debacles, and risk and control issues in the marketing function.
GCOM 741 - (3)
Research, Analysis, Writing, and Communication
This course is designed to equip students with the special investigative skills, and the technical tools, techniques, and insights required to analyze, interpret, summarize, and present complex financial, tax, accounting, and business related issues in a manner that is both understandable and supported by documentary evidence. This course has been designed to expose students to the various statutory, administrative, and judicial sources of the tax law. Case studies are used throughout the course to assist students in developing and refining their proficiency in identifying issues, locating and interpreting pertinent authority, and effectively and professionally communicating their conclusions.  Students learn how to use several commercially available research tools [LEXIS/ NEXIS, RIA CheckPoint, etc.], analytical tools [e.g., financial modeling tools and simulation tools], and presentation tools more creatively, more efficiently, and more effectively. This course will assist students in developing and refining problem recognition skills and analytical and legal reasoning abilities. It places considerable emphasis on the development and refinement of effective oral and written communication skills. The course contains short modules on tax procedure, leadership, teamwork, and business ethics.
GCOM 742 - (2)
Tax Jurisprudence: Pervasive Tax Doctrines and Their Practical Application
This innovative course promises to be of interest and immense practical value to all tax professionals—regardless of their areas of practice and specialization. It examines the tax law from a nontraditional perspective: It analyzes the evolution and development of each of the statutory and judicial doctrines that collectively give rise to the "conceptual framework" of the U.S. federal income tax law and then illustrates their practical application to a host of sophisticated and contemporary fact patterns. These familiar doctrines have broad practical application throughout virtually all areas of federal income taxation.  They include: the "realization" doctrine, the "assignment of income" doctrine, the "claim of right" doctrine, the "Arrowsmith" doctrine, the "functional equivalence" doctrine, the "functionally unrelated" doctrine, the two "tax benefit" doctrines, the "substance over form" and "step transaction" doctrines, the "annual accounting period" concept, "legal transition," and several others. One of the objectives of this course is to arm students with theoretical and practical insights that will measurably enhance their ability to (1) to understand, retain, and apply the tax law; (2) to more effectively identify the tax issues lurking in a given set of facts; and (3) to develop more creative and credible solutions to the problems or opportunities that these tax issues create.
GCOM 743 - (3)
Tax Strategies for Limited Liability Companies and Other Conduit Entities
This case-oriented, transaction-based course addresses the various legal, business, and tax issues arising in connection with the start-up of new business and with the formation, operation, distributions, reorganization, and termination of liability companies, partnerships, S corporations and other conduit entities [e.g., real estate investment trusts and mutual funds]. The course provides in-depth coverage of the technical rules of Subchapters K and S and places special emphasis on the identification and implementation of tax-planning strategies available to conduit entities and their owners. The course contains modules on entrepreneurship and accounting for partnership transactions.
GCOM 744 - (4)
Tax Strategies for Corporations and Shareholders
This case-oriented, transaction-based course addresses the various business, tax, and accounting issues arising in connection with the formation, operation, and termination of domestic corporations and their shareholders. The course provides in-depth coverage of the technical rules of Subchapter C, and places special emphasis on the identification and implementation of tax planning strategies available to corporations and their shareholders. This course also examines the conceptual themes and the technical rules that govern the filing of consolidated tax returns [and compares and contrasts the those rules with the generally accepted accounting principles that govern the preparation of consolidated financial statements].  SFAS 109 (tax provision) is also covered in this course.
GCOM 745 - (5)
Corporate Mergers, Acquisitions, Divisions and Recapitalizations
This eclectic, case-oriented, transaction-based course addresses the various financial, tax, and accounting issues arising in connection with corporate mergers, acquisitions, divisions, and recapitalizations. It presents a detailed introduction to the qualitative and quantitative valuation techniques used in analyzing proposed transactions. Students are exposed to the vast array of legal, tax, and accounting issues that arise in connection with negotiating, structuring, closing, and reporting these transactions and how these various factors impact corporate value. Tax due diligence and financial statement analysis are also covered.
This course also builds on the introduction to consolidated returns covered in GCOM 744. It addresses advanced consolidated return & consolidated financial statement issues [with special emphasis on the consolidated return/statement issues arising in connection with mergers and acquisitions].
GCOM 746 - (3)
Tax Strategies for the Executive and the Entrepreneur
This is an eclectic course that addresses the federal income, estate, and gift tax issues and strategies that arise in connection with executive compensation [stock options, nonqualified deferred compensation strategies, etc.], planning for the death or incapacity of the owners of a closely held business [buy-sell arrangements, succession planning, etc.], gratuitous inter vivos and testamentary transfers of large wealth. The course provides in-depth coverage of federal estate and gift taxes, the generation-skipping transfer tax, and the use of trusts. Related business issues [nontax aspects of executive compensation and business succession planning] and related financial accounting principles are also covered.
GCOM 747 - (4)
International Business and Investment Transactions
This eclectic, case-oriented, transaction-based course addresses the various financial, accounting, and tax issues arising in connection with a wide range of international business and investment transactions. It presents a detailed introduction to international finance [e.g., accessing international financial markets, managing foreign exchange risk, and using various financial instruments], and comprehensive coverage of international taxation and tax planning strategies [including transfer pricing, foreign tax credit planning, Subpart F, etc.]. The course also contains a module on U.S. accounting principles applicable to multinational transactions and operations, and on the managerial accounting aspects of control systems for multinational business operations. Students are exposed to international accounting standards promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Committee. The tax and accounting systems of several countries are compared and contrasted with those of the United States. The course also contains a module on state and local taxation.
GCOM 751 - (3)
Independent Study, Research, and Writing (Elective)
Students taking this course will explore areas and issues of special interest that are not otherwise covered in the graduate curriculum.  Research is conducted under the supervision of a professor chosen by the student. This course is offered at the discretion of the supervising professor. The Director of the Master's Program in Accounting must approve a requesting student's written proposal prior to registration for the course. In addition to other requirements imposed by the instructor, the course requires a final paper of publishable "law review" quality be completed and submitted prior to the end of the semester.
GCOM 752 - (3)
Overseas Study: International Business, Finance, and Taxation (Elective)
This course begins with a directed self-study program on international business and cultural issues that is designed to prepare students to get the most out of their overseas field trips. In mid-May, students leave the United States for 3 weeks of travel overseas.  During this period students travel to several cities and meet with corporate executives, high-ranking government officials, accounting and tax professionals, etc. This worthwhile program has been an unqualified success in each of the 20+ years that it has been offered by the School. Students generally have a choice of itineraries: Western Europe or Far East.
GCOM 895 - (1-6)
Supervised Research
Research into special problems, or for the master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a professor. A written proposal must be approved by the Director of the M.S. Program before registering. The final paper, of publishable quality, must be submitted to the director by the last day of final examinations.
The McIntire School of Commerce is a recognized leader in developing technology-savvy business decision makers. The MS MIS program provides an intensive, collaborative learning experiences that teaches business and technology professionals how to deliver greater business value through the effective management and use of information technologies. The program is based on 30 credit hours with a curriculum that synthesizes  management, finance, accounting, marketing, strategy, and leadership skills with technical knowledge of IT architecture, e-business, enterprise systems, data communication, and datawarehousing. The program is conducted in an executive format, which allows  professionals the option of completing a master's degree while remaining on their job. Students may complete their coursework in 12 months by attending classes every other Friday and Saturday in Charlottesville or in 16 months by attending classes every other Saturday in Reston, Virginia. Both sections join for an initial two-week residency in Charlottesville at the McIntire School of Commerce. The 16 month program meets for an additional one-week residency in Charlottesville toward the end of their first year.  Both sections follow the same curriculum just at a different pace.

Program Prerequisites  The Master of Science in the Management of Information Systems requires that candidates have successfully completed an bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university prior to admissions and have a minimum of two years of relevant professional work experience including significant managerial or technical involvement with an IT project, program or product. There are no specific requirements as to undergraduate major or prerequisite coursework required.

Admission Requirements  Admission to the Master of Science in the Management of Information Systems is highly competitive.  Prior to the matriculation in the Master's Program, candidates must have earned a bachelor's degree with a successful GPA from an accredited collegiate institution and show high promise for success at the graduate level. A minimum of two years of professional work experience at least some of which must be relevant technical or managerial experience in information technology is required for consideration. Other factors considered for admission include letters of reference, strong performance on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), quality and relevance of work experience,  honors, awards, and extracurricular activities. International students whose first language is not English must also submit a TOEFL scores. Candidates with a minimum of eight years of professional work experience beyond their bachelor's degree and who possess a strong record of academic achievement may request a waiver of the GMAT requirement. A $40 application fee is required which can be paid online with the application. If accepted, a non-refundable deposit of $500 will be required and is credited toward the first tuition payment.
For more information or to access the online admissions services, please visit the website at or contact:

Office of Graduate Admissions
P.O. Box 400173
McIntire School of Commerce - University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4173
(877) 349-2620 [toll-free]
Grading Policy  Grades are assigned using the following criteria:
A = Exceptional Performance
B = Standard/Expected Performance
C = Sub-Standard Performance
(probationary status)
F = Non-Performance (no credit received)

Note: A student who earns six credit hours of sub-standard performance ("C") is placed on probation; a probationary student who earns one additional grade of C is dropped from the program. A student who receives of non-performance ("F") is dropped from the program.
Faculty
Office of the Dean of the McIntire School of Commerce Faculty Menu

Carl P. Zeithaml, B.A., M.B.A., D.B.A., Dean
Michael D. Atchison, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean of the B.S. in Commerce Program
Thomas Fitch, B.A., M.Ed., Director of Career Services
Cynthia N. Huddleston, B.S., M.Ed., Assistant Dean for Graduate Marketing & Admissions
Robert S. Kemp, B.A., M.B.A., D.B.A., C.P.A., Ramon W. Breeden, Sr., Research Professor, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs
Michael L. Koenig, B.A., M.A., Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs
Rebecca L. Leonard, B.S., M.B.A., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
George A. Overstreet, Jr., B.B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean for Research and Center Development, Walker Professor in Growth Enterprises
Gerald D. Starsia, B.A., M.B.A., Associate Dean for Administration
Diana M. Walker, Associate Dean for External Affairs
Ellen M. Whitener, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Senior Associate Dean

Faculty Faculty Menu
Professors
Gib Akin, B.A., Ph.D.
Michael D. Atchison, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A.
Elias M. Awad, B.S., M.B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Virginia Bankers Association Professor of Bank Management
Thomas S. Bateman, B.A., M.B.A., D.B.A., Bank of America Eminent Professor
O. Whitfield Broome, Jr., A.B., M.S., Ph.D., C.P.A, Frank S. Kaulback, Jr. Professor of Commerce
David B. Croll, B.B.A., M.B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Richard F. DeMong, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., C.F.A., C.C.A., Virginia Bankers Professor of Bank Management
Mary Jo Hatch, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Sally M. Jones, B.B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D., KPMG Peat Marwick Professor of Professional Accounting
William J. Kehoe, A.B., M.B.A., M.A., D.B.A., William F. O Dell Professor of Commerce
Robert S. Kemp, B.A., M.B.A., D.B.A., C.P.A., Ramon W. Breeden, Sr., Research ProfessorJohn H. Lindgren, Jr., B.A., M.B.A., D.B.A., Consumer Bankers Association Professor of Retail Banking
David M. Maloney, B.S., B.A, M.A.S., Ph.D., C.P.A.
David G. Mick, B.A., M.A., M.H.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Robert Hill Carter Professor of Commerce
R. Ryan Nelson, B.S., M.P.A., Ph.D.
George A. Overstreet, Jr., B.B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Laurence C. Pettit, Jr., B.S., M.S., D.B.A.
Bruce L. Reynolds, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Richard A. Scott, B.B.A., M.B.A., M.S., Ph.D., C.P.A., Arthur Andersen and Company Alumni Professor of Commerce
William G. Shenkir, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., William Stamps Farish Professor of Free Enterprise
David G. Smith, B.S., D.B.A.
Neil H. Snyder, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Ralph A. Beeton Professor of Free Enterprise
Peter A. Todd, D.E.C., B.Comm., Ph.D.
Robert I. Webb, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Paul Tudor Jones II Research Professor
Ellen M. Whitener, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
William J. Wilhelm, Jr., B.B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Carl P. Zeithaml, B.A., M.B.A., D.B.A., F.S. Cornell Professor of Free Enterprise
Associate Professors
Robert B. Brown, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.
William K. Carter, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., C.P.A.
Gayle R. Erwin, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
David W. LaRue, B.B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Malcolm H. Lathan, Jr., B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A.
John P. Leschke, B.M.E., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Felicia C. Marston, B.S., Ph.D.
Susan E. Perry, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A., C.M.A.
Paul L. Walker, B.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A.
Mark A. White, B.A., M.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Professors
James E. Burroughs, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Robert L. Cross, B.S., M.B.A., D.B.A.
Patrick J. Dennis, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Stefano Grazioli, M.I.S., Ph.D.
Adelaide W. King, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
James G. Maxham III, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Michael G. Morris, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Chris P. Pullig, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Elizabeth K. Thurston, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
John O. Wheeler, B.A., J.D.
Barbara Wixom, B.A., Ph.D.
Lecturers
Lucien L. Bass III, B.S., M.B.A.
Michael D. Bills, B.A., M.B.A.
Karin B. Bonding, C.F.A.
John A. Griffin, B.S., M.B.A.
Lynn A. Hamilton, B.A., M.B.A., M.F.A.
Eric Keshin, B.S.
Lawrence E. Kochard, B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Rebecca L. Leonard, B.S., M.B.A.
Eric E. Meier, B.S., M.S.

Retired Faculty Faculty Menu
Joseph E. Gibson, B.A., J.D., C.P.A., Peat, Marwick, Mitchell Professor Emeritus of Professional Accounting
Robert L. Grinaker, M.B.A., C.P.A., Professor Emeritus of Commerce
John M. Gwin, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus
Raymond M. Haas, B.S., M.B.A., D.B.A., Professor Emeritus of Commerce
Ray C. Hunt, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., C.P.A.,F.S. Cornell Professor Emeritus of Free Enterprise
George W. McKinney, Jr., A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Bank Management
Stewart C. Malone, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus
Bernard A. Morin, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.,Professor Emeritus of Commerce
Henry R. Odell, A.B., M.B.A., D.B.A., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Commerce
William F. O Dell, B.S., Lecturer in Commerce
Andrew C. Ruppel, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Sandra Schmidt, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Commerce
Charlotte H. Scott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., Professor Emeritus
David W. Thompson, B.S., M.S., C.P.A., Professor Emeritus of Commerce
Robert H. Trent, B.S., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Commerce
William R. Wilkerson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Thomas H. Williams, B.B.A., M.S., Ph.D., C.P.A., Carman A. Blough Professor of Accounting

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