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Curry School of Graduate Education
General Information
The Curry School of Education, founded with two professorships in 1905 as one of the academic schools of the University, was endowed by gifts of $100,000 from John D. Rockefeller and $50,000 from the State General Education Fund. The school was named for Dr. J.L.M. Curry, a native Georgian whose accomplishments made him a man of great renown throughout the antebellum and reconstruction South. In addition to being an ordained minister, a Harvard law graduate, a member of Congress, and a U.S. Ambassador, Dr. Curry was a historian, an author, a college professor, and a strong advocate of universal education.
In 1919, the school was given a professional basis similar to that of the Schools of Law, Medicine, and Engineering; and, in 1950, a graduate division was established, offering the degrees of Master of Education and Doctor of Education. An Education Specialist degree was approved and initiated in 1974.
In 1968, the Curry School of Education entered a period of rapid and significant growth. By the mid 1970s, the faculty had increased to approximately 120 members, and there are now more than 20 specialized programs. The school has assumed a strong leadership role in the state through training educational personnel, providing valuable professional experiences, and applying research findings in service to various school divisions, colleges, and other educational agencies.
The Curry School of Education has two major missions. The first is to prepare personnel to work in America's educational system, pre-kindergarten through collegiate levels, and to conduct research and scholarship that address problems and issues of importance to our educational system. Through partnerships with other organizations and educational institutions, the Curry School is committed to developing exemplary and innovative approaches to address those issues and problems. The second mission is to enhance human potential by preparing professionals and conducting research in such areas as psychological/emotional development, physical development and fitness, and speech/language/auditory development. These areas contribute to the betterment of the human condition and are directly related to increased learning and successful experiences in our educational system.
The school offers graduate students extensive opportunities for experience in research. The University's reciprocal relationships with school divisions and other educational agencies allow for practicum experience and provide opportunities to study the implementation of change in varied institutional settings. Extensive information about the Curry School of Graduate Education and its programs is available online: curry.edschool.virginia.edu
Address
Curry School of Education
University of Virginia, Ruffner Hall
405 Emmet Street S
P.O. Box 400261
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4261
(434) 924-3334

Degree Programs
The Curry School of Education offers programs leading to the Master of Education, the Master of Teaching, the Education Specialist, the Doctor of Education, and the Doctor of Philosophy in Education degrees. There is also a five-year Teacher Education Program that allows students to earn both a bachelor's and a master's degree simultaneously.
All degree programs offered by the Curry School of Education that are related to teacher education and educational leadership have been accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC).

Areas of Graduate Study
Graduate degrees are available in the following program areas. In some cases, a particular program includes several sub-specialities. For a listing of sub-specialties applicable to the Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees, see the Doctoral Degrees section.

Areas Degrees

Administration and M.Ed., Ed.S.,
Supervision Ed.D., Ph.D.

Clinical Psychology Ph.D.

Communication Disorders M.Ed., Ph.D.

Counselor Education M.Ed., Ed.S.,
Ed.D., Ph.D.

Curriculum and Instruction M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Education Policy and M.Ed., Ed.D., Evaluation Ph.D.

Educational Psychology M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Educational Research M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Elementary Education M.T., M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

English Education M.T., M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Foreign Language M.T., M.Ed. Education

Higher Education Ed.S., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Instructional Technology M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Mathematics Education M.T., M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Kinesiology (Health and M.T., M.Ed., Physical Education)  Ed.D., Ph.D.

Reading Education M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

School Psychology M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Science Education M.T., M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Social Foundations M.Ed., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Social Studies Education M.T., M.Ed.,   Ed.D., Ph.D.

Special Education M.T., M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Ph.D.

Note:  Students who want to enroll in one or more graduate courses but do not intend to work for a degree at the University of Virginia should apply for admission as professional development students.

Facilities and Services
Ruffner Hall  The majority of academic facilities and offices of the Curry School of Education are located in Ruffner Hall. This facility houses laboratory space for studies in science education, instructional technology, counselor education, reading, educational psychology, and educational research. A well-equipped behavioral study area enables students and faculty to carry on advanced-level clinical observation and research, and a number of flexible meeting areas provide a supportive environment for studies in education.
Additionally, Ruffner Hall houses centers that provide services to the community, the state and the nation, while providing students and faculty with instructional and research opportunities.

The Center for Clinical Psychology Services is a non-profit clinic providing psychological and educational services to the public and serving as an in-house training facility for graduate students of the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology  and other areas within the Curry School. The center is organized into specialized clinics and offers three basic categories of services: diagnosis, intervention, and consultation.

The Education Library contains approximately 150,000 volumes of current educational materials, a file of over 400,000 ERIC microfiche titles, and access to VIRGO. The library supports the academic needs of the undergraduate and graduate programs of the Curry School and provides periodicals, microfilms, books, and reserve materials required for class reading. Optical disc (CD-ROM) database systems and Internet connections provide access to materials from throughout the world. Retrospective research materials in education are located in Alderman Library.

The Educational Technology Center provides students and faculty with opportunities for technology-enhanced instruction and research. The center houses the Audio-Visual Production Lab; a video filming studio and production facility; the Special Technology Laboratory; the Apple Lab; the interactive IBM Microcomputer Classroom; and a collaborative classroom with Internet video conferencing.

The McGuffey Reading Center functions as a laboratory for the study of the reading process by furthering clinical and empirical research in developmental reading and preparing graduate students to serve as reading-language specialists. It also provides a remedial center for children with reading disabilities.

The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented  The mission of the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) is to produce and disseminate high-quality, practical research studies relating to the identification and development of the talent of students. The research of the center has ranged from investigating ways to encourage talent in young, at-risk students; to the social and emotional development of gifted students; to investigating the feasibility of high-end learning in middle schools. There are currently five faculty and ten graduate students working on projects of the NRC/GT.

The Center for Personal and Career Development is operated by the Department of Human Services. It trains counselors and provides counseling in career change and decision-making, interpersonal relationships, coping with life transitions, and personal growth.

The Center for the Study of Higher Education fosters informed and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of higher education as a resource for scholars and practitioners. It offers degree programs, seminars, short institutes, and workshops, as well as research reports and occasional papers that provide administrators and other educational leaders with fresh perspectives on developments in the arena of post-secondary education.

The Center for Technology and Teacher Education is a cross-disciplinary institute with collaborating faculty drawn from several disciplines, including educational technology, teacher education, and policy studies. Teachers must be prepared to use the rapidly evolving technologies that are being placed in today's classrooms in order to realize the promise that these technologies hold for the future. If we prepare the next generation of teachers, they will effectively serve as diffusion agents. One goal of the center is to identify and develop educational technologies that should be integrated into teacher education curricula. An equally important goal is to prepare the next generation of educational technology leaders. Graduate fellows affiliated with the center are expected to serve in leadership positions in school districts, state education agencies, and teacher preparation programs.

The UCEA Center for the Study of Leadership and Ethics is sponsered jointly by the Department of Leadership, Foundations and Policy and the Ontario Institute for the Studies of Education at the University of Toronto under the auspices of the University Council for Educational Administration. The mission of the center is to research issues of moral and ethical significance to educational leaders, to hold conferences and workshops for practitioners and professors, and to create and maintain a supportive network for practitioners and scholars interested in moral and ethical dimensions of schooling.

The Virginia Center for the Study of Educational Policy The purpose of the Center is to foster connections between activities at the Curry School of Education and the broader world where decisions regarding education and schooling are made. The central goal is to increase the contribution of the University of Virginia to the discourse regarding pre-k, k-12, and higher education policy at local, state, and national levels. The primary intent is to find new ways to integrate and share the full array of research, teaching, and practice related to educational policy at the University of Virginia.


Physical Education Facilities

The following physical education facilities are also a part of the Curry School of Education:

The Athletic Training and Physical Therapy Clinic provides therapy for the University's athletic teams, Student Health patients, faculty and staff, and physician referrals from the community. Offering M.Ed., Ed.D., and Ph.D. programs in athletic training and sports medicine and an undergraduate program in sports medicine, the clinic provides practicums for both graduate and undergraduate students. It is located in the McCue Center, adjacent to University Hall.

The Center for Cardiac Health and Fitness provides professionally supervised programs of physical fitness enhancement and coronary risk factor modification. The programs provide coronary risk factor screening; medically supervised graded exercise testing (stress testing); supervised exercise programs for normal adults; and supervised exercise rehabilitation programs for coronary heart disease patients. The center also serves as a teaching and research facility for experiences in exercise physiology and sports medicine.

The Motor Learning Laboratory is a research facility designed to study factors that influence motor skill acquisition and performance. Research includes investigating perceptual constraints; movement speed; EEG correlates of movement; substructures of balance, strength, and flexibility; and psychological factors related to the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Individuals seeking research experiences related to motor skill acquisition and performance utilize this laboratory.

The Sport and Exercise Psychology Laboratory is designed for experimental and interview studies on such topics as observational learning, peer relationships, perceived competence in sport, coaching feedback, performance enhancement, and character development through sport.

The Sports Medicine/Athletic Training Research Laboratory conducts research in injury prevention and rehabilitation. Specific areas of research include isokinetic assessment of human muscle performance, postural sway (balance), and joint laxity. The laboratory also collaborates on research with several departments in the Health Sciences Center, including the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Department of Radiology.

Communication Disorders Facilities

The Communication Disorders Facilities provide clinical, research, and office space for programs in speech-language pathology. Although the majority of classes are taught in the Curry School of Education's Ruffner Hall facility, the program facilities have electronic conference room capabilities; speech and language science labs; behavioral and electrophysiological audiology and hearing science research labs; individual and group client assessment; treatment and research space; student research space; and a computer lab with Internet connections.

The Speech-Language-Hearing (SLH) Center, housed in the Communication Disorders Facility, is an integral component of the Curry School's Communication Disorders Program and Department of Human Services. The Center is a full-service, ASHA-accredited clinical facility supervised by the faculty and staff of the Communication Disorders Program. It provides students in the speech pathology academic program an opportunity to acquire experience working with individuals of all ages who have a wide range of speech, language, and hearing disorders.

Field Experiences, Associateships, Practica, and Internships
Charlottesville and the surrounding area provide a rich resource for practical experiences for students in the Curry School of Education. The nature of a student's particular field experience is determined by his or her field of specialization. It is impossible to list all of the sites available for students; the following list serves to illustrate the variety:
Cardiac Rehabilitation Program
Kluge Children's Rehabilitation Center (associated with the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center)
Children's Service Center (regional diagnostic agency)
Federal Bureau of Investigation (Quantico)
Federal Executive Institute
Learning Needs and Evaluation Center (counseling and psychological services)
Lynchburg Training Center (for severely retarded children)
Public schools in Charlottesville and surrounding counties
University of Virginia Health Sciences Center
Oakland School
Commonwealth Center for Children and Adolescents

Student Organizations
Education Council  All students in the Curry School of Education become members of the Education Council (EC). In addition to its function as liaison between students and faculty of the School of Education, the EC participates in many service programs affecting the University and the Charlottesville community, such as tutoring underprivileged children and coaching children's sports.

Council for Exceptional Children is a professional group focusing on issues related to individuals with exceptionalities. Membership is open to both faculty and students who have an interest in working with exceptional individuals. It is sponsored by the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education.

Counselor Education Student Organization membership is open to all counselor education students. The organization helps to coordinate student orientation for the fall semester, provides a peer orientation program, and sponsors both social events and professional development programs for faculty and students.

NSSLHA  The National Student Speech Language Hearing Association is open to all communication disorders students. It is both a social and a professional organization that sponsors student activities throughout the year. Membership in the organization also qualifies students for special rates for journals and conventions, as well as for national certification upon completion of their program of study.

Clinical and School Psychology Student Association has four major functions. It holds an orientation for new students in the program each year; sends a representative to faculty meetings to act as a liaison between the faculty and clinical psychology students; sponsors social gatherings; and annually bestows the Lucile E. Michie Award in recognition of a professional in clinical psychology who has been supportive of student development.

Student Virginia Education Association membership is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Members participate in various professional activities, receive various publications, participate in seminars and conferences, and receive liability/tort insurance.

Academic Honors, Scholarships and Honor Societies
Chi Sigma Iota is an international counseling academic and professional honor society. Founded in 1985, the objective of Chi Sigma Iota is to promote scholarship, research, professionalism and excellence in counseling and to recognize high attainment in the pursuit of academic and clinical excellence in the field of counseling. The Rho Beta chapter of Chi Sigma Iota was established through the Counselor Education Program at the University of Virginia in 1989.

Kappa Delta Pi, an honor society in education that was founded in 1911, chartered its Eta Kappa Chapter at the University of Virginia in 1951. The constitution of the society reads as follows: the purpose of Kappa Delta Pi shall be to encourage high professional, intellectual, and personal standards and to recognize outstanding contributions to education. To this end it shall invite to membership such persons as exhibit commendable personal qualities, worthy educational ideals, and sound scholarship. It shall endeavor to maintain a high degree of professional fellowship among its members and to quicken professional growth by honoring achievement in educational work.

Phi Delta Kappa is an international professional fraternity for men and women in education. The membership is composed of recognized leaders in the profession and students whose leadership potential has been identified. Members come from a wide range of educational endeavors. They are classroom teachers, administrators, and college and university professors, who represent research and teaching interests in all areas. Members promote free public education through research, service, and leadership. Alpha Beta Chapter was established at the University of Virginia in 1921.

General Academic Requirements
Admissions  Applications for admission to Professional Development Program and the  Master of Education, Master of Teaching, Education Specialist, Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree programs may be obtained from the Office of Admission and Student Affairs, Curry School of Education, Ruffner Hall, 405 S. Emmet Street, P.O. Box 400261 University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4261; (434) 924-3334. Students who wish to apply for a doctoral degree program should note the differences in the admissions requirements for the Ed.D. and the Ph.D. as outlined in the section titled Doctoral Degrees.
Online applications and extensive information about admissions can be found at www.curry.edschool.virginia.edu.
Admission criteria include strong Graduate Record Examination scores, academic records that reflect advanced capabilities (generally a grade point average above 3.0), strong letters of recommendation, and professional experience related to the field of study. Students must also submit a statement of professional goals that reflects their writing skills and their desire to study at the University of Virginia. This statement should also describe how professional goals will be enhanced by study in the Curry School. Students from under-represented groups and/or with diverse backgrounds are particularly encouraged to apply.
Special instructions apply to the clinical psychology program. Any student who holds a master's degree in psychology, counseling, or another closely related area should complete an application for the Ph.D. program in clinical psychology. Students not holding a master's degree should complete the application for the M.Ed. program. Please note that advanced GRE test results are required for admission into this program. The application deadline is January 15.
Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work, Graduate Record Examination scores, and at least two letters of recommendation must be provided as part of the application process. There is a $40 non-refundable application fee that must accompany the application.

Application Deadlines  Admission applications and all supporting documents, including GRE scores, should be received by deadlines specified by program areas. Applications completed by these dates will be given priority for space and financial aid. Applications for admission and financial aid received after these dates will be considered on a space available basis.
Students are permitted to enter the clinical and school psychology programs in the fall semester only. Applications and required materials for the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology are due by January 15 for admission to the fall semester.
The Communication Disorders and Counselor Education programs have a February 1 deadline. The following programs have  March 1 deadlines and generally accept new applicants for the fall semester: M.T. programs; , curriculum and instruction, sport psychology, and motor learning.
Graduate Record Examinations  The Curry School of Education requires the Graduate Record Examination basic core of verbal, quantitative, and analytic aptitude tests for admission to all graduate programs. In addition, clinical and school psychology requires the psychology GRE advanced tests. All GRE scores must be current (within five years of the date of application).
Examinations should be taken as early as possible so that scores are available prior to the application deadline. Information on the GRE may be obtained directly from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) or from the Office of Admission in Miller Hall. The designation of Code 5820 should be indicated at the time of administration to ensure that scores will be sent to the Curry School of Education.
Completed registration forms and test fees should be mailed to ETS at least five weeks before the test date to request a test center in the United States or Puerto Rico, and seven weeks to request a test center in any other country. For a registration form and detailed information about registration dates, test centers, fees, and score reporting, obtain the Information Bulletin (National Administrations Editions) from Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, NJ 0854; www.gre.org.
It is also possible to take a computerized version of the GRE in many major cities.
TOEFL Scores  All international students for whom English is not the native language must take and submit TOEFL scores.

Other Requirements
Change of Program Area  Students are admitted into a specific program area in the Curry School of Education. To change a program area or registration status, students must be in satisfactory standing in their present program area and be approved for admission to the new program area. Change of status forms to initiate this process are available in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs in 104 Ruffner Hall.

Matriculation  A student who is offered admission must accept that offer (in writing) and take at least one course at the University within one year of the matriculation date stated on his or her application or the school assumes that he or she is not attending the University. After one year, application materials are destroyed, requiring a new application for readmission. Readmission is not automatic in such instances and depends upon a full review of the student's record.

Faculty Advisor  After being admitted, each student is assigned a Curry School faculty advisor. The faculty advisor must be contacted before the first semester of matriculation to plan the degree program. All courses taken for degree credit must be appropriate to the student's degree program and must have the advisor's consent. It is the student's responsibility to determine the specific requirements prescribed by the department and program area.

Transfer of Credit  Students may, with the approval of the associate dean and the department offering the program, transfer some graduate credit earned at other accredited institutions. All graduate credit offered for transfer must be applicable to the degree program the student is pursuing. Specific limitations and policies governing the application of transfer credit toward degrees are listed in the section on degree requirements. Undergraduate courses, or courses previously applied toward an undergraduate degree, are not transferable for credit to graduate programs.
Through the many continuing and professional studies centers located throughout the state, the Curry School of Education offers courses that may be taken for graduate degree credit. Upon request, the Curry School will organize field courses for local school systems or other organizations in which teachers may earn non-degree credit.

Enrollment Requirements  Although it is not necessary to be enrolled continuously from the time of acceptance as a graduate student until completion of the degree, students must apply for readmission to the Curry School if they allow 12 consecutive months to elapse without being enrolled in at least one course for credit toward a degree program. Readmission is not automatic in such instances and will depend on a full review of the student's past record and departmental resources. Students who are readmitted are subject to the current requirements.
Ph.D. students must be continually enrolled in each academic semester. Students who fail to do so must re-apply.
All students, resident or non-resident, must be officially registered during the semester in which a degree may be conferred and at any time in which University resources are used (e.g., examinations, committee meetings, faculty conferences).

Registration  Registration and advising days are announced in the calendar in this Record, the Course Offering Directory, and online at www.virginia.edu/registrar/calendar.html. All registration materials are obtained by students in professional development, M.Ed., M.T., Ed.S., Ed.D., or Ph.D. programs from the Curry School of Education, 104 Ruffner Hall. Students must consult with their advisors prior to registration. Registration includes two components, course enrollment and final registration, both of which must be completed. Special tuition fee students may enroll at the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School on the first day of class. Enrollment in classes is completed using ISIS.

Course Load  Full-time students normally take 12 graduate credits during each regular semester. A student may vary this amount with the approval of his or her advisor and must petition for special permission to take 18 or more credits.
Students who are employed full-time may enroll for a maximum of three credits each semester. Permission to enroll in more than three credits must be secured from the employer, advisor, department chair, and associate dean.

Drop and Add  After the final date for adding or dropping courses, any change in enrollment (or requests to change the grading system by which the student is evaluated) can only be made with the approval of the instructor, advisor, and associate dean, and a petition for a policy exception must be filed.
In general, it is not possible to drop a course after the specified date; but, with the instructor's consent, it may be possible to be assigned a grade of W, WP, or WF.

Grade Changes  It is the student's responsibility to monitor the accuracy of university transcripts. This can be done through ISIS at (434) 296-4747 or www.virginia.edu/ISIS. All corrections or inquiries must be completed within one calendar year of the course.

Incomplete Policy  An IN is recorded when reasons known to the professor are judged adequate to justify an extension of time to complete course requirements. An IN may not be used to allow a student to attempt to raise a grade at the end of the term. The time line to complete an incomplete may be negotiated with an instructor but may not extend beyond one year of the semester in which the course was originally taken. Students are expected to enter into a written contract with the instructor specifying the remaining requirements and agreed-upon time line. It is the student's responsibility to file the incomplete agreement in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs. After one year, if the student has not met the terms of the incomplete agreement, the faculty member may submit a grade of F, U, WF, or W; if no action is taken by the faculty member, the incomplete is administratively changed to a W. Because the structure and content of courses constantly change, in order to change an incomplete grade that is older than three years to a regular course grade, the instructor may require that the student take the course again.

Withdrawal From A Course  A student may withdraw from a course at any point prior to 5:00 P.M. on the last day of classes (in the term of enrollment) if permission has been secured from the student's advisor and instructor and a petition has been approved and filed in the dean's office. This action results in the course remaining on the transcript and the instructor being asked to record a grade of W, WP or WF on the final grade sheet; a W may be assigned only if there is no basis on which to determine a WF or WP. None of these notations affect the grade point average, nor does the course count toward credits earned.

Grading  Grades are awarded only to those students who are registered for and complete a course for credit. The letter grade symbols used for grading graduate students in the Curry School of Education are: A+, A,  A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, W, WP, and WF. The lowest grade that can be applied toward a degree is B-.
Student work may be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis in certain courses within the Curry School. These courses or sections are approved for this grading system by the department offering the course and the associate dean for academic and student affairs. The specific S/U graded courses and the maximum number of credits that may be completed under this system and applied toward a graduate degree must be approved by the student's major program advisor and, if a doctoral student, by the doctoral committee.
A course may not be repeated on an S/U basis in order to change a grade in a course previously completed on a letter-grade basis. If this should happen, the original grade  stands, and the credits earned in the second taking of the course cannot be used for degree credit. The last day for changing to or from an S/U grade in a course is the last day for adding a course.
Students in the Curry School of Graduate Education are not permitted to take courses on a CR/NC basis.

Attendance  Students are expected to attend classes throughout the session, with the exception of University holidays, unless permission to be temporarily absent or to withdraw has been first granted by the student's advisor and the dean. Excuses for absence from class are arranged between the student and the instructor of the course in question. Routine excuses for illness are not furnished by the Department of Student Health either to the student or to the instructor. If final examinations are missed for medical reasons, the Department of Student Health notifies the dean. On request of the dean, the Department of Student Health evaluates the effect of any illness upon a student's attendance and academic performance. Failure to attend classes or other prescribed activities in a course may result in enforced withdrawal from the course or other penalties as determined by the instructor.

Attendance Upon Examinations  Written examinations are an essential part of the work of most courses. A final exam or culminating experience is expected in all classes. The time period assigned for final examinations is considered part of the regular academic semester, and classes must meet during their scheduled examination period. Absence from exams is not excused except for illness on the day of examination as attested by a physician's certificate, or for other causes that the instructor, advisor, and dean, by special action, may approve. An unexcused absence is counted as a failure and, at the discretion of the instructor, may result in failing the course.

Standards for Satisfactory Performance in Graduate Programs  A graduate student's performance is subject to periodic review by his or her advisor and major program area. Course work, clinical performance, and competence in general professional practice, as well as other professionally relevant qualities, are considered. The department may, upon recommendation of the student's major advisor or doctoral committee, require withdrawal from the program whenever the student's performance fails to reflect the potential for high-level professional contributions. Before any decision to require withdrawal is made final, a student must be given notice of inadequacies in his or her performance, advice as to appropriate remedial steps, and a reasonable opportunity to improve. On the other hand, receipt of one or more failing grades (C+ or below) in any semester or summer session may initiate a review by a student's major program area or department. Under such circumstances, the department may, upon recommendation of the student's major advisor or doctoral committee, require the student's immediate withdrawal from the program. (The same policy applies to professional development.)

Voluntary Withdrawal  A student may petition to withdraw from the University any time up to 5:00 P.M. on the last day of classes. An official application to withdraw, accompanied by a statement describing the reasons for withdrawal, must be obtained from the Office of Admission and Student Affairs. The application must be approved, in writing, by the associate dean. If the student withdraws for medical reasons, among the requirements for readmission is clearance from the Department of Student Health. A student under 18 years of age must have parental approval for such withdrawal. An exit interview must be held with the dean of students and all University identification cards must be submitted at that time. In addition, the student must clear any financial debts to the University before the withdrawal is final.
Readmission to the Curry School of Education is not automatic. After an absence of 12 months or longer, a former student must apply for readmission. To apply for readmission, the student must submit an application to the academic dean's office at least 60 days before the next University registration period. Failure to comply with these regulations subjects the student to suspension from the University by the vice president for student affairs.

Enforced Withdrawal  A student may be required to withdraw from the University if the academic advisor, department, and the dean determine that the student is making unsatisfactory progress toward a degree. Such a determination must follow the policies established by the school and those set forth in the chapter titled University Regulations.

Application for Teacher Licensure and Endorsement  Students seeking an initial teaching license in Virginia, or those who wish to add an endorsement to their Virginia license, may receive procedural instructions and forms from the assistant dean of admission and student affairs in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs, Room 104, Ruffner Hall. The assistant dean is also available to help students who wish to apply for out-of-state certification. Under the Interstate Certification Project, the state of Virginia has reciprocity with 28 other states, the District of Columbia, and the Panama Canal Zone.
In the Curry School of Education, degree requirements and license/endorsement requirements are distinct. While many programs of study can meet both degree and licensure/endorsement requirements, and major portions of the two may be synonymous, a student may meet one set of requirements and not the other (i.e., receive a degree without qualifying for recommendation for licensure). Students should see their advisor or the assistant dean, 104 Ruffner Hall, for clarification of degree and license/endorsement requirements.
To be recommended for licensure/ endorsement, a student must satisfactorily complete all requirements of the appropriate Curry School of Education approved program, make appropriate application through the Office of Admission and Student Affairs, and, for initial license, submit Praxis I and II scores (common and area exams) to the State Department of Education.
Any student seeking initial licensure through the Curry School must be in A Curry School 'approved program' and have completed student teaching or an approved equivalent practicum.(see description of master's, M.T., programs and Professional Development non-degree licensure program).

Accelerated Teacher Education Program Option  Students enrolled in a Master of Teaching degree program may complete all requirements and graduate in 1.5 years. Attendance at a 3 week summer session program is required.
Application and Registration for Degrees  Application for a degree must be submitted by the student in accordance with the deadlines listed below. Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admission and Student Affairs and should be submitted to that office through the student's department.

Degree Applications are due October 1 for January graduation, February 1 for May graduation, and June 1 for August graduation. The application specifies all courses offered in fulfillment of degree requirements and must be signed by the official advisor and department chair. In addition, students must provide an official transcript of all applicable course work from the University of Virginia or elsewhere.
Candidates who do not receive degrees in the session for which their applications have been approved must renew their applications at the beginning of the session in which candidacy for the degree is desired.
Non-resident degree applicants must be registered for the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. Registration for an evening or weekend course in residence meets this requirement, but registration through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies does not.
Degree candidates enrolled through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies, as well as those not enrolled at all, must complete registration for the degree and pay registration fees to the University of Virginia during the semester or summer session in which the degree will be conferred. A student who is registered for the degree but who fails to meet the requirements for that degree must register and pay a fee for the preparation of a new diploma in the next term.

Special Tuition and Fee Information
Any person who undertakes any form of academic study within the University, including supervised research, or who uses any University facilities, or who consults regularly with a faculty member concerning graduate work, must register as a student and pay the research fees specified in chapter 2.

Tuition/Related Academic Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree  Students must complete 72 credits of courses while regularly enrolled as graduate students; full tuition must be paid for at least 54 credits other than non-topical research; and only 24 credits of a completed master's degree from another institution may be counted toward either the 54 or 72 credit requirements. Thus, at least 30 credits of regular courses (full tuition) and 48 credits overall must be completed at the University of Virginia (beyond the master's degree).

Reduced University Charges  Students who are candidates for advanced degrees and who carry course loads of fewer than nine credits are permitted to pay reduced University tuition and/or fee charges. (Note: to establish full-time status for doctoral residency, at least twelve credits must be carried.)
A student not in residence at the University who wishes to return to receive a degree or take an examination (e.g., comprehensives, research, qualifying exams) must pay the non-resident fee for the semester or summer session during which the degree is conferred but is exempt from all other fees.
Special Tuition Fees for School Personnel  Full-time school employees have the benefit of paying a reduced rate for any one class taken during an academic session. This special fee applies to individuals employed  in Virginia's  public K-12 schools or private schools that  are members of the Virginia Council of Private Education and are accredited by such. Full-time educators employed by licensed K-12 residential schools are also eligible for special tuition fees.

Summer Session
Students should have been admitted to the professional development category or a graduate degree program before taking courses through summer session. (Admission as a visiting graduate through summer session is not related to admission to any specific degree program or status in the Curry School of Education.)
Inquiries concerning summer offerings should be addressed to the Director of the Summer Session, University of Virginia, Miller Hall, P.O. Box 400161, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4161.
Categories of Graduate Status and Program/Degree Requirements
More detailed information on degree and program requirements can be obtained from the Office of Admission and Student Affairs or from individual departments of the school.


Policy Exceptions  Exceptions to program policies are granted only by the associate dean of the Curry School of Education on the basis of a petition submitted through the appropriate advisor, instructor, and/or department. Those enrolled in a M.T. teacher education program should complete the Teacher Education Policy Exception Form (Room 221) and return the form to the teacher education director.

Professional Development (Non-Degree)

The Professional Development Program is designed for those who hold at least a baccalaureate degree and wish to improve their professional skills by enrolling for course work in the Curry School of Education. This is not a degree program and is not intended to serve students interested in pursuing advanced degrees. Any professional development student who wishes to apply for a degree program must submit a Change of Status Form (available in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs, Room 104, Ruffner Hall), Graduate Record Examination scores, two letters of recommendation, and a complete transcript. It is also helpful to submit a current statement of professional goals.
Professional development students may be assigned an advisor from an appropriate department or program area. In some cases, enrollment in specific courses requires the approval of both the instructor and the advisor.
Professional development students are subject to the Graduate Academic Regulations of the Curry School of Education. Students in the professional development category may earn up to 12 graduate credits (or credits earned in one full-time semester on Grounds) for application toward a degree. Such credit must be approved by the student's advisor. All other University of Virginia course work which is applied to a degree must be earned after admission to that degree program. Students planning to change their status to any degree program are responsible for knowing the various requirements for admission to, and completion of, that degree. These policies also apply to off-grounds degree programs and students taking courses through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

Professional Development (Non-degree Teacher Licensure Programs)
Students accepted into the Elementary and Sepcial Special Education Licensure programs must earn grades of B- or better to remain enrolled. They must also pass PRAXIS I by the third course in their program. They may not enroll in another class until passing all portions of the exam. Curry will process students' licensure applications, if submitted within two years after completion of coursework. Students missing the deadline will assume responsibility for obtaining licensure from the state.

Master's Degrees
Qualified students may pursue a master's degree that focus on two different goals: advanced training in disciplines related to education, which generally lead to a Master of Education degree (M.Ed.), or graduate programs whose primary focus is on initial graduate level licensure for prospective teachers or clinicians. The latter programs generally involve the College of Arts and Sciences and involve in-depth study of the teaching process or areas related to educational issues or health, leading to a Master of Teaching (M.T.) degree.
All master's programs (M.Ed and M.T.) require at least 30 credits of graduate study (or more if specified by the program area). Most programs also require a practicum experience related to the area of specialization and a culminating assessment (comprehensive examination or project).
Master of Education Degree
The Master of Education degree program is designed for experienced professionals who wish to enhance their professional preparation or prepare for other responsibilities in education. The graduate of this program is expected to possess the professional attributes and competencies needed to qualify for a position of responsible leadership.

Admission Requirements  Applications should be submitted to the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education. To be considered, applicants must:

1. hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university;
2. have a B average or better for the last two years of undergraduate study;
3. submit an application for admission and official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work;
4. submit official score reports for the Graduate Record Examination and the Advanced Test for the School Psychology Program (scores must be less than five years old);
5. submit at least two letters of recommendation from professionals who can attest to his or her promise as a graduate student and professional educator;
6. submit a statement of professional goals;
7. meet any additional individual departmental or program area requirements.

Program Requirements  To earn a Master of Education degree, the following minimum requirements must be met:

1. The program requirements established by the faculty of the student's program area must be successfully completed.
2. Satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination in the program area (or in some areas a project).
3. A minimum of 30 credits of graduate work must be successfully completed  (additional credits are required in selected programs).
4. At least 18 credits must be completed after admission to the program.
5. At least 24 credits must be earned from the University of Virginia (including 18 credits on Grounds unless the program is an intact, approved off-Grounds program).
6. Application for the degree must be submitted to the Curry School of Education during the first thirty days of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.
7. Registration must be on Grounds during the final semester.

Comprehensive Examinations  When nearing completion of the program of study, the student must, with the advisor's approval, take a comprehensive examination in his or her area of specialization. (In some programs, a project may substitute for the comprehensive examination.) This examination is developed and administered in accordance with procedures determined by the department and approved by the dean. Satisfactory performance must be demonstrated before the student can be graduated. A student who fails to perform satisfactorily on the comprehensive examination may petition for one re-examination. Such a re-examination, however, cannot be taken sooner than the next semester at the scheduled administration of the comprehensive examinations. Failure to appear to take the test, after having applied for it, constitutes one failure.

Transfer Credit  A student, with permission of the advisor, may transfer a maximum of six graduate credits from another college or university into a Master of Education or Master of Teaching degree program.

Time Limit  No requirements, including transferred credit, completed more than five years before the M.Ed. is to be awarded may be credited toward that degree. Exceptions must be approved by the advisor, department chair, and the associate dean, and are granted only when some emergency, such as illness, interrupts the student's work. In such cases, the student may be required to validate out-of-date work by examination.
Graduate Degree Programs Leading to an Initial Teaching License
Students who possess a baccalaureate degree (or its equivalent in a liberal arts or physical education discipline) may pursue a Master of Teaching (M.T.) degree, which may also qualify them for a teacher license in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

State Assessments of Teacher Education  Under the Commonwealth of Virginia's approved program status for schools of edu- cation, all students enrolled in a teacher education program at the University of Virginia must take the appropriate licensing exams required by the Commonwealth of Virginia for the specific program area endorsement.  The scores on these exams and other evidence presented to the U.S. Secretary of Education, in accordance with Section 207 of the Higher Education Act (HEA) regarding the preparation of graduates who intend to work in the nation's schools, demonstrates the high caliber of the students at the University of Virginia.  During the  2000-2001 academic year, 459 students were enrolled in the Curry School's Teacher Education Program and 114 students participated in the Teaching Associate (student teaching) semester involving 560 hours of student teaching. A total of 31 full or part-time faculty participated in supervision activities resulting in a supervising student/faculty ratio of 2.7.
The following report of Praxis exam pass rates is a mandated condition of the HEA and reflects the scores of those University of Virginia's teacher education program completers who took the exams from September 2000-August 2001 (state-wide pass rates are shown in parentheses). Praxis I pass rate for the PPST Reading was 99% (94%) and CBT Reading was 100% (98%). The PPST Writing pass rate was 96% (91%) and the CBT Writing was 92% (92%). The PPST Mathematics pass rate was 97% (91%) and the CTB Mathematics was 96% (94%). The University's aggregate pass rate for Basic Skills was 99% (94%), while the Summary pass rate 98% (92%).
Master of Teaching Degree
The Master of Teaching (M.T.) degree is for individuals who have completed a bachelor's degree and now wish to qualify for a teaching license. The M.T. programs require one and a half to two years of full-time study, including academic course work in the specialization field and teacher education experiences leading to initial endorsement in one or more specialities. (Opportunities for applicants to correct deficiencies in liberal arts preparation may also be required based on undergraduate course work.) Contact the Office of Teacher Education for additional information.
M.T. degree programs are available in elementary education (PK-6); special education (pk-12)  (behavioral disorders, learning disabilities, and mental retardation); health and physical education (pk-12); foreign languages (French, German, Spanish, Latin) (pk-12), and secondary education, with specialization in English,  mathematics, science (biology, chemistry, earth and space science, general science, physics), or social studies.

Admission Requirements  (See also Master of Education Admission Requirements.) Post-graduate Master of Teaching applicants seeking teacher licensure must have a B.A. or B.S. degree from an accredited institution, with the equivalent of an academic major in the arts and sciences (or an appropriate discipline) and an acceptable general studies component. The general studies component should be a well-planned sequence of courses and experiences that includes theoretical and practical knowledge gained from studies in mathematics, natural science, social science, U.S./American history, English, communication, literature, and other humanities. The following are examples of acceptable courses within the specified areas. Science: natural science, astronomy, biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics. Social science: anthropology, economics, government and foreign affairs, linguistics, psychology, sociology, and Western civilization (a course in some area of non-Western studies is also desirable). Humanities: English, literature, speech communications, public speaking, debate, drama, art, music, philosophy, religious studies, foreign literature in translation, and foreign language.

Program Requirements The following requirements for a Master of Teaching degree must be met:

1. An approved program of study leading to licensure and endorsement. Information on specific program course sequences can be obtained from the Office of Teacher Education.  (http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/TeacherEd)
2. Teaching Associateship  In addition to required courses, individuals must complete a student teaching practicum (teaching associateship) in which they demonstrate an ability to integrate the theoretical concepts of education with academic material in a practical teaching experience. This associateship is equivalent to an entire semester's course work (EDIS 588: 12 credits).
3. Transfer Credit  A maximum of six transfer credits may be counted toward the M.T. degree. All such credit must be approved by the advisor and the director of teacher education.
4. Time Limit  No requirements completed more than five years before the M.T. is to be awarded may be credited toward this degree. In special cases, an extension may be granted for emergency circumstances when approved by the advisor, the director of teacher education, and the dean's office.
5. Field Project/Comprehensive Examination All M.T. candidates must complete a field project or equivalent experience approved by the program area advisor. In special cases, a master's comprehensive examination may be required.
6. Satisfactory Academic Performance in M.T. Programs  All courses required for the B.A. degree or teaching speciality taken at or below the 400 level may be successfully completed with a passing grade of D- or better. Courses in the major must reflect a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better. Courses taken at the 500 level or above require a minimum grade of B- or better. 500-level courses in which a student has performed below the level of B- must be retaken, or a substitute professional course must be taken to replace the deficiency. Course substitution or retaking a course must be approved by the advisor and the Office of Teacher Education. Program deficiencies may require that the student be suspended from the program.
7. Praxis Examinations  All individuals completing M.T. programs for initial licensure in the Commonwealth of Virginia must qualify by passing the Praxis I and II exams. Taking the Praxis exams and appropriate specialty tests are graduation requirements for all M.T. students. Passing scores on the exams are required for licensure.
8. Application For the Degree  Application for the degree must be submitted to the Curry School of Education during the first two weeks of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

Education Specialist Degree

The Education Specialist degree is a planned 30-credit (minimum) post-master's program in which candidates are expected to attain a broad and systematic understanding of professional education; a definitive knowledge of a particular field of specialization; and an ability to integrate and apply theoretical concepts of education in an actual educational context. This program is designed for the accomplished, experienced practitioner with specific professional aspirations. It is not designed for those who wish to pursue a research emphasis as a prelude to doctoral study. The Ed.S. degree may be pursued in the following areas:
Administration and Supervision
Counselor Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Higher Education
Instructional Technology
Special Education
Program Requirements  To earn an Education Specialist degree, the following minimum requirements must be met:

1. Of the 30 credits , 24 must be taken on Grounds and 18 must be taken after admission to the program. At least 60 credits of graduate work must be completed prior to the awarding of the Ed.S. degree. For programs that combine the M.Ed./Ed.S. requirements, and those based on a master's degree of more than 30 credits, exceptions may be filed with the associate dean.
2. All program requirements for the degree, as established by the individual department and program area, must be met.
3. The student must pass a comprehensive written examination of eight to ten hours or in some areas a project or thesis.
4. No requirements, including transferred credit, completed more than eight years before the Ed.S. is to be awarded may be credited toward that degree. Exceptions to this rule must be approved by the advisor, the department chair, and the dean, and is granted only when some emergency, such as illness, interrupts the student's work. In such cases, the student may be required to validate out-of-date work by examination.

Doctoral Degrees
There are two distinct doctoral degrees in education available at the University of Virginia: a Doctor of Education degree and a Doctor of Philosophy degree. For purposes of policy and procedure in the Curry School of Education regarding graduate programs, the terms "program area" and "supporting areas" shall mean a graduate program representing a discrete area of study identified by an IPEDS code number or approved by the student's major department, the Academic Affairs Committee, and the dean. The following list represents those areas approved as of April 22, 1988, as well as the 1997 approval of Educational Policy Analysts.
Curriculum, Instruction, & Special Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Elementary Education
English Education
Mathematics Education
Reading Education
Science Education
Social Studies Education
Special Education (Behavioral Disorders, Learning Disabilities, Mental Retardation, Early Childhood Special Education, and Severe Disabilities)
Human Services
Adapted Physical Education
Athletic Training
Clinical and School Psychology
Counselor Education
Exercise Physiology
Motor Learning
Physical Education-Pedagogy/General
School Psychology
Speech/Language Pathology
Sports Medicine
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Leadership, Foundations, & Policy
Administration and Supervision
Adult Education
Community College Instruction and/or Administration
Education Policy & Evaluation
Educational Psychology
Educational Psychology-Gifted
Educational Research
Elementary Administration
Higher Education
Higher Education-Administration
Instructional Technology
Middle School Administration
Secondary Administration
Social Foundations of Education
Student Personnel Administration
Supervision
Doctor of Education Degree
The primary purpose of the Doctor of Education degree program is to provide experienced educators with a broad and systematic understanding of professional education, a definite knowledge of selected aspects of educational theory and practice, and an ability to both conduct research and evaluation and to apply those research findings in an informed and critical manner. The Ed.D. degree is the highest professional degree in education. Candidates for this degree are recognized for their commitment to the application of knowledge on behalf of improved educational practice. The typical Ed.D. program consists of practicum credit, dissertation credit, and at least 54 credits of course work, including work completed for the master's degree and excluding non-topical research or dissertation credit.

Admission Requirements  In addition to the admission requirements described for the M.Ed., an applicant to the Ed.D. program must: hold a master's degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university; have an outstanding record as a student; and have previous professional experience in an area related to the proposed major. Professional qualifications and experience are weighted heavily.

Residence Requirement Each Ed.D. student must complete a minimum of 24 credits of course work taught by resident faculty, exclusive of internship, practicum, independent study, and dissertation credit. This requirement must be completed after admission to the Ed.D. program. Individual program areas may have additional requirements.

Enrollment Requirements  A student must be continuously enrolled at the University while working toward the degree and must reapply for admission into the Ed.D. program if no credit toward the degree is earned for one year (12 months).

Time Limit  All requirements must be completed within four years after passing the Ed.D. comprehensive examination. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by all members of the doctoral committee, the department chair, and the associate dean, and is granted only when some emergency, such as illness, interrupts the student's work. In such cases, the student may be required to validate out-of-date work by examination. Program committees must determine the appropriateness and currency of all course work, especially if it is eight or more years old.

Program Requirements  To earn a Doctor of Education degree, students must:

1. successfully complete a program of studies established by their doctoral committee, including course requirements in a major program area and in two supporting areas, with a minimum of 12 credits each. One supporting area must be outside the department;
2. successfully complete any preliminary examinations required by the program area or doctoral committee;
3. successfully complete written comprehensive examinations, or, in some areas a project prepared by the doctoral committee. Comprehensives must be completed before the dissertation proposal. Oral comprehensives may also be required by some program areas;
4. pass six credits of research courses at the University of Virginia;
5. pass six credits of supervised practicum or internship work (as judged by the doctoral committee and approved by the associate dean). These experiences must be completed after admission to the Ed.D. program and supervised by University of Virginia faculty or other approved professionals.
6. successfully complete all dissertation requirements, including (a) defending a dissertation proposal as determined by the doctoral committee; (b) planning the dissertation, obtaining appropriate human subjects approval, and carrying out a research study appropriate to the field of specialization; and (c) passing an oral examination on the conduct and conclusions of the dissertation. (All other requirements must be completed before this defense.)
7. the student must complete all additional requirements as specified by the student's department, program area, doctoral committee, and/or advisor.

Doctoral Committees  The Ed.D. program of study is directed by the student's doctoral program committee. After approximately twelve credits of study, a doctoral committee is formed; this committee is responsible for the design of the program of study and supervises the student through all activities until the comprehensive examination is completed. The committee must consist of a minimum of four faculty members of the regular University, appointed to the rank of assistant professor or higher, with at least one faculty representing the major and each of the two supporting areas. One faculty member on the committee must be from outside the student's major program area and two members must be from the Curry School, including the committee chair or co-chair who is from the major area. Where one supporting field is not offered at the University, a fifth committee member from outside the University must be added to represent this field if approved by the student's major department, the four University faculty who have agreed to serve on the committee, the Academic Affairs Committee, and the associate dean.
The representative of a supporting field must be academically qualified in that field and a member of a department offering a program in that field. Supporting field representatives are responsible for program planning, and for writing and evaluating the comprehensive examination in that area.
When all program requirements are met, including the successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive examination, the student must appoint a Doctoral Dissertation Committee. This committee will be responsible for the approval of a dissertation proposal after it has been presented and defended; the supervision of the dissertation; the final approval of the dissertation, based on its written form; and the student's oral defense of the dissertation. The dissertation committee must include at least four University of Virginia faculty members, including at least two from inside the major department (one of whom must agree to serve as the advisor/chair or co-chair) and one from outside the student's major program area. It is the student's responsibility to find appropriate members of the University faculty who will agree to serve on the dissertation committee.
All doctoral committee actions, except doctoral committee membership changes, require concurrence of all committee members. Any committee appointment or change must be approved by the associate dean on the recommendation of the student's advisor and departmental chair. Students who are ready to have a committee appointed must seek faculty who agree to serve on the committee and have them sign an advisory committee card. Cards are available in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs. All parties involved should be notified of any changes in the committee structure. After approval of the dissertation proposal, all committee members must remain on the committee through the final oral defense of the dissertation, unless otherwise approved by the department and associate dean in the case of vacancies.
All actions of doctoral committees must be approved by all members of the committee. There may be more than four members of any committee, but there must be at least four University of Virginia members (including the chair and outside member) present for any presentation or oral defense, and all members must agree to the outcome.

Appointment of the Doctoral Committee  After admission to the doctoral program, and with the recommendation of the temporary advisor, the student requests that the associate dean appoint a doctoral program committee consisting of at least four members, including one outside the student's major program area, and two inside the department (one of whom must agree to be the chair). When students are ready to have a committee appointed, they must contact faculty members to serve on the committee and have an advisory committee card signed by the proposed committee and departmental chair or program area director. These cards are available in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs. After all program requirements are completed, including comprehensive examination, a dissertation committee should be appointed using the same procedures.

Program Area Specializations  The student must select a program area specialization and complete the course requirements specified for the major area. Master's degree work completed by the student may be applied to the program or specialization when approved by the doctoral program committee. All requirements for the doctoral program area must be approved by all doctoral program committee members.

Supporting Fields  Within the student's program of study, a minimum of 12 credits of work must be completed in each of two supporting fields. The supporting fields may be selected from outside the offerings of the Curry School of Education. Typically, each supporting field will include courses beyond the level to which undergraduates are admitted. When approved by the doctoral committee, master's degree work completed by students may be approved for their program. Requirements for both supporting fields must be approved by all doctoral program committee members. At least one supporting area must be outside the major department.

Record of Progress  Students must complete and keep current their official Record of Progress Form. This form may be obtained from the Office of Admission and Student Affairs, and the original copy must be kept on file there. The record of progress should be started upon initial registration and kept up to date throughout the doctoral program.

Preliminary Examinations Preliminary examinations may be required by individual departments, program areas, or doctoral committees. If exams are taken, all committee members must verify that the examinations have been successfully completed.

Comprehensive Examinations When nearing completion of the program of study, and with the approval of the major advisor, the student requests a written examination, or, in some areas, a comprehensive project in all areas appropriate to the student's planned program. The time, place, content, specific format, and evaluation of the examination shall be determined by the doctoral committee. All committee members must judge the student's performance to be satisfactory and must verify successful completion of the exams by signing the student's Record of Progress form. If the student performs unsatisfactorily on the written exam, the committee may be petitioned for one re-examination. Subsequent failure on the written exam precludes further doctoral study in the Curry School of Education.

Practicum Requirements  Each student must complete at least six credits of supervised practicum or internship credit. Practicum requirements must be completed after enrollment in a doctoral program in the Curry School and before the defense of the dissertation proposal. Experiences must be supervised by a Curry School faculty member.

Research Requirements  Each student must pass at least six credits of research courses at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville (additional requirements may be specified by program areas). Research requirements must be completed after admission to the doctoral program and before the defense of the dissertation proposal.

Dissertation Proposal  The student must prepare and orally defend a written dissertation proposal. The student is responsible for scheduling all committee meetings and distributing copies of the proposal and any revisions. At least four University faculty must be present for the defense and all committee members must approve it. The committee chair or co-chair, who must be from the student's major, will conduct all sessions. The acceptance of the dissertation proposal will be verified on the Record of Progress Form by the committee chair after all revisions of the dissertation proposal have been approved. A copy of the signed proposal must be attached to the student's official Doctoral Degree Record of Progress. All committee members must approve the dissertation proposal.
After approval of the dissertation proposal, all committee members must remain on the committee through the final oral defense of the dissertation. Clearance by the IRB for the protection of human subjects must be secured before any data is collected.

Dissertation Requirements  Students are urged to fully consult with all dissertation committee members during the planning, conduct, and writing of their dissertation, although the work will be directly supervised by the committee chair. The general procedures for preparing and submitting the dissertation are available in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs. Students must consult their advisor regarding the specific style to be used in writing the dissertation. The results of the dissertation defense must be verified on the Record of Progress Form by all members of the committee. A minimum of 12 credits of dissertation must be earned, including registration during each semester when working with faculty or using University resources.

Approval and Inspection of Dissertation  A copy of the dissertation must be approved in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs of the Curry School. Consult the calendar of the Curry School to determine the deadline for each semester (generally four weeks before the end of the term).

Oral Defense of Dissertation and Final Examination  All other requirements for the degree must be completed before scheduling the dissertation defense. The dissertation defense is an open, public examination of the doctoral research project. The defense date, time, and place must be announced at least 14 days in advance. A dissertation abstract and announcement must be filed with the doctoral secretary in the Office of the Associate Dean for Graduate Programs, 104 Ruffner, from which it will be directed to each department of the Curry School.
At least four University faculty members from the doctoral dissertation committee, including one from outside the student's major department, must be present for the oral defense. All members must attest to the successful completion of the defense and final examination.

Application and Registration for Degree  Application for the Ed.D. degree must be submitted by the student in accordance with the calendar deadlines. Forms are available from the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education and should be submitted to that office through the student's department. Students must be registered during the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.
Candidates who do not receive degrees in the session for which their applications have been approved must renew their applications in proper form at the beginning of the session in which candidacy for the degree is desired.
Non-resident degree applicants must be registered for the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. More details related to this requirement and to application deadlines are stated in the General Academic Requirements section of this chapter.
The student's completed record of progress along with an official transcript of all applicable course work from the University of Virginia or elsewhere must accompany this application for final review by the dean's office.
Doctor of Philosophy Degree
The Ph.D. degree is the highest academic degree awarded by the University. The primary purpose of the Ph.D. degree is to develop educational scholars who seek to conduct original research and interpret and communicate the results of such research as authors, university professors, and governmental or research agency officials.

Admission Requirements  The student desiring to pursue a Doctor of Philosophy degree must submit an application for admission to the Curry School of Education. The applicant to this degree program must:

1. hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university; (most Ph.D. specialities require a master's degree before admission);
2. have an outstanding record as a student;
3. submit an application for admission and official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work;
4. submit two references strongly endorsing him or her for doctoral work;
5. submit official score reports for the Graduate Record Examinations and Advanced Tests as appropriate;
6. submit a statement of professional goals;
7. meet any additional department or area of specialization requirements.

Residence Requirement  Ph.D. candidates must complete at least three academic years (fall-spring semester) of full-time (12 credits) graduate work. One year of this requirement may be waived for candidates who have already earned a master's degree. Upon approval of a petition to the associate dean for graduate programs of the Curry School of Education, up to one year of the required three years may be undertaken at another graduate school or completed at this University on a part-time basis. In addition, up to one year (or the equivalent) may be spent in dissertation research elsewhere while enrolled as a full-time student (and not simultaneously employed on a full-time basis).

Enrollment Requirements  Students must be continuously enrolled at the University during the fall and spring semesters while working toward the Ph.D. degree. If students are not taking courses, they may maintain enrollment by paying a University non-resident fee through the Office of Admission of the Curry School. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment will require students to reapply.

Time Limitation  All requirements must be completed within four years after passing comprehensive examinations and within seven years of admission to the Ph.D. program. In special cases, upon approval of the doctoral committee, department chair, and associate dean, out-of-date work may be revalidated by examination.

Program Requirements  To earn a Ph.D. degree the following minimum requirements must be met:

1. The student must successfully complete a program of study determined by their doctoral committee. The student must earn 72 credits, including at least 54 credits for courses other than non-topical research or dissertation credit, and at least 12 dissertation credits. A maximum of 24 credits from the master's program may be counted toward either the 72 or 54 credits. A minimum of 36 credits (not including internships, independent study, practicums and dissertation credit) must be earned on grounds.
2. The student must successfully complete any preliminary examinations required by the program area or the doctoral committee.
3. The student must successfully complete written comprehensive examinations and an oral examination if required, as determined by the student's doctoral committee. Comprehensives must be completed before the dissertation committee is appointed and before the dissertation proposal is defended.
4. The student must demonstrate research proficiency by passing the Curry School Research Examination, which covers quantitative research methods, qualitative inquiry, statistics, tests and measurement, and research design; or by an alternative method developed by the Ph.D. program area in which the student is completing the degree. Alternative methods must comply with the specific departmental program area requirements, and be approved by the Academic Affairs Committee.
5. The student must successfully complete all dissertation requirements, including defending a dissertation proposal as determined by the student's doctoral committee;  gaining approval from the University's Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the protection of human subjects; planning and carrying out a research study (dissertation) appropriate to the field of specialization; and passing an oral final examination on the conduct and conclusions of the dissertation. All other requirements must be completed before this defense.
6. Students must complete all additional requirements as specified by their department and program area in the Curry School of Education, doctoral committee, and advisor.
7. The student must pass the final examination (oral, written, or both).

Record of Progress  The student must complete and keep current an official Record of Progress Form, which should be started upon initial registration and must be kept on file in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education. This form, with instructions, is available from that office.

Doctoral Committee  The Ph.D. program of study is directed by the student's doctoral program committee. After approximately 12 credits of study, a doctoral committee is usually formed. This committee is responsible for the design of the program of study and supervises the student through all activities until the comprehensive examination is completed. The committee must consist of a minimum of four faculty members of the regular University, appointed to the rank of assistant professor or higher, with at least two members from inside the major department (one of whom must agree to be the advisor/chair), and at least one outside of the student's major program area. Ph.D. candidates are not required to designate minors or supporting areas. However, if such a designation is made, there must be at least one representative for each supporting area. An additional committee member from outside the University may be added if approved by the chair of the student's major department; four University faculty who have agreed to serve on the committee; the Academic Affairs Committee; and the associate dean.
When all program requirements are met, including the successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive examination, the student must seek to appoint a doctoral dissertation committee. This committee is responsible for the approval of a dissertation proposal after it has been presented and defended; the supervision of the dissertation; the final approval of the dissertation, based on its written form; and the student's oral defense of the dissertation (the Ph.D. final examination). The dissertation committee must include at least four University faculty members who agree to serve, and who are approved by the dean's office, including at least two from inside the major department (one of whom must agree to serve as the advisor/chair or co-chair) and one from outside the student's major program area.
Any committee appointment or change must be approved by the associate dean on the recommendation of the student's advisor and department chair. Students who are ready to have a committee appointed must seek faculty who agree to serve on the committee and have them sign an advisory committee card, which is available in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs.
All actions of doctoral committees must be approved by all members of the committee. There may be more than four members on any committee, but there must be at least four University of Virginia members (including the chair and outside member) present for any presentation or oral defense, and all members must agree to the outcome.

Major Program Areas  The student must select one major program area of the Curry School of Education and complete the course requirements specified by the doctoral committee for that major area. Master's degree work completed by the student may be applied to the program when approved by the doctoral committee. Requirements for the major program area must be approved by all doctoral program committee members. Exceptions due to emergency must be approved by all committee members and the associate dean.

Preliminary Examinations  Preliminary examinations may be required by individual departments or program areas, or at the discretion of the doctoral committee. All committee members must verify that such examinations have been successfully completed by signing the record of progress.

Comprehensive Examinations  When nearing completion of the program of study, and with the approval of the major advisor, the student requests a written examination, or, in some areas, a comprehensive project in all areas appropriate to the student's planned program. The time, place, content, specific format, and evaluation of the examination shall be determined by the doctoral committee. All committee members must judge the student's performance to be satisfactory and must verify successful completion of the exams by signing the student's Record of Progress form. If the student performs unsatisfactorily on the written exam, the committee may be petitioned for one re-examination. Subsequent failure on the written exam precludes further doctoral study in the Curry School of Education.

Research Skills  Ph.D. students must demonstrate research proficiency. This is done most typically by passing the Curry School Research Examination, which consists of both qualitative and quantitative examinations, including quantitative research methods, statistics, tests and measurement and research design. An alternative method of demonstrating research skills competence may be approved in some program areas. Alternative methods must comply with the specific departmental program area requirements and must be approved by the Academic Affairs Committee. Consult the program area advisor  for a list of approved alternatives to the research examination.

Dissertation Proposal  The student must prepare and orally defend a written dissertation proposal. The oral presentation of the dissertation must be heard by at least four members of the doctoral dissertation committee (including the chair and the outside member), at which time a decision is made regarding continuation of the dissertation plan. Approval requires agreement of all doctoral dissertation committee members, at least one of whom must be from the student's program area and serves as the chair or co-chair. After approval of the dissertation proposal, all dissertation committee members must remain on the committee through the final examination. The proposal may not be defended until successful completion of the comprehensive and research skills examinations.
The student is responsible for scheduling all committee meetings and distributing copies of the proposal and any revisions. The committee chair, however, will conduct all sessions. Advancement to candidacy is to be verified on the Record of Progress Form by the committee chair after all revisions of the dissertation proposal have been approved. A copy of the signed proposal must be filed with the student's official Doctoral Degree Record of Progress.

Dissertation Requirements  The student must successfully complete a dissertation and defend it in a final examination. All students must register for a minimum of 12 credits of dissertation research and be registered for credit during each semester when working with faculty or using University resources. The general procedures for preparing and submitting a dissertation are available in the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education. The advisor must be consulted regarding the specific style to be used in writing the dissertation, and the manuscript must meet specified University standards.

Oral Defense of Dissertation and Final Examination  All other requirements must be satisfied before the dissertation defense. The dissertation defense is an open, public examination of the doctoral research project. The defense date, time, and place must be announced at least 14 days in advance. A dissertation abstract and announcement must be filed with the doctoral secretary in the Office of the Associate Dean for Graduate Programs, 104 Ruffner, from which it will be posted for all members of the Curry School.
At least four University faculty members from the doctoral dissertation committee, including the advisor and the outside member, must be present for the oral defense. All members must attest to the successful completion of the defense and final examination.
Through its chair, the examining committee may invite other members of the department faculty to take part in the examination; indeed, it is recommended that the doctoral examination be given before the entire professional staff of the department concerned. The result of the examination, with the names of the examiners and their departmental affiliation, must be reported by the chair of the dissertation committee to the associate dean. The chair does this by submitting the final copy of the Record of Progress Form signed by all members of the dissertation committee.

Approval and Inspection of Dissertation  Five weeks before graduation, the dissertation title page must be approved by the Curry School's Office of Academic and Student Affairs, and a copy must be attached to the Student's Record of Progress Form. The original and one copy of the dissertation must be inspected and approved by the dean's office two weeks prior to a May or August graduation, and by December 15 for a January graduation.

Application and Registration for Degree  Application for the Ph.D degree must be submitted by the student in accordance with the calendar deadlines listed in this Record. Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education.
Candidates who do not receive degrees in the session for which their applications have been approved must renew their applications at the beginning of the session in which candidacy for the degree is desired.
The student's completed Record of Progress Form, along with an official transcript of all applicable course work from the University of Virginia or elsewhere, must accompany this application for final review by the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education.
Non-resident degree applicants must be registered for dissertation credit in the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology  Requirements and policies for the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology are specified in the Department of Human Services section of this chapter, and in the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology handbook.
Program Descriptions
There are three academic departments within the Curry School of Education: Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education; Leadership, Foundations, and Policy; and Human Services. Each department includes many possible areas of specialization.

Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education
The Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education provides educational programs for individuals concerned with the development and delivery of curriculum and instruction in schools and specialized educational institutions for all learners, including those with special needs. The department provides leadership within the Commonwealth of Virginia and the nation in areas related to curriculum, instruction, and special education. Programs housed in the department include: curriculum and instruction; elementary education; reading education; secondary education (English, foreign languages, math, science, social studies); special education (mental retardation, behavioral disorders, learning disabilities, and severe disabilities and the training program for early childhood special education).
Most program areas in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education offer degrees at three levels: master's (M.Ed. or M.T.), education specialist (Ed.S.), and doctoral (Ed.D. or Ph.D.).
The department offers a concentration area for doctoral students who plan to become pre-service teacher educators at a college or university. This concentration area has two tracks: generalist and specialist. The two tracks share a common core of requirements, but differ according to whether students want an in-depth preparation in a subject-matter area, or a more generalized preparation that would focus on methods of instruction, supervision, technology, and policy. Students interested in the generalist track should apply to the Curriculum and Instruction program area, and students interested in the specialist track should apply to one of the other departmental areas, e.g., mathematics education, science education, or social studies education.

Curriculum and Instruction  Offered for experienced teachers, the Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree program is designed to provide each participant with an individually tailored set of experiences for in-depth professional study consistent with his or her professional goals. Beyond a limited core of required courses, there is ample flexibility for the student and advisor to plan an appropriate course study.
Doctoral-level (Ph.D. and Ed.D.) graduates typically assume positions as faculty in colleges and universities, as leaders of curriculum and instruction improvement in school divisions, or as program specialists in human service agencies. Specialized study in curriculum and instruction, instructional use of computers, and research is required, with additional work selected from program areas across the Curry School. Emphasis is on analysis and evaluation of teaching, design and evaluation of educational programs, processes of change, and practical strategies for inquiry.

Elementary Education  Graduate programs in elementary education (pk-6) are designed to assist individuals seeking to advance their professional knowledge (P.D., M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Ph.D.) or obtain initial licensure (M.T.). The elementary education programs can also assist individuals in meeting re-certification requirements or in adding endorsements to existing certificates.
Students completing graduate programs in elementary education typically find themselves advancing their careers as classroom teachers, elementary supervisors, subject area curriculum coordinators, training materials specialists, or personnel training and staff development professionals in both public and private schools. They may choose education-related professions, such as teacher educators, at either graduate or undergraduate levels as well.
The elementary education graduate degree program includes practicum, and internship experiences. Programs of study at all levels are determined by the student and an assigned advisor or advisory committee working within established program area guidelines. Every effort is made to develop a program of study that is designed to achieve each student's personal and professional goals.

English Education  The post-baccalaureate  Master of Teaching degree program prepares prospective teachers of English. Building on the students  undergraduate English studies, students investigate the social and psychological context for teaching English at the secondary level, explore concepts of curriculum and instructional models, and pursue in-depth study of effective methodologies for teaching language, literature, and writing. The program of study involves practicum experience, emphasizes an integrated conceptualization of secondary English curriculum, and stresses the importance of multicultural awareness in all aspects of planning and instruction. Opportunities exist for individual direction, both within course parameters and in independent study. Study also includes graduate courses in English. The prerequisite for admission is a B.A. in English or the equivalent.
The Master of Education degree program extends the preparation of experienced teachers of English or language arts. With the teacher's experience as the point of departure, the M.Ed. candidate deepens pedagogical inquiry and extends existing background in English studies through graduate-level English and English education courses. The program explores current methodologies and research-based practice and emphasizes the multicultural dimension of literature, composition, and language study. Opportunities exist for researching individual interests both within existing course parameters and in independent study. Prerequisites for admission are two years of teaching experience or satisfactory completion of student teaching (or an equivalent classroom internship), along with an undergraduate major in English or its equivalent.
The Education Specialist degree program trains teachers, teacher educators, and researchers as active creators of language and literature, moving beyond the role of critical consumer and cultural transmitter of language and literature. Course work includes specified courses in English education, English, and in the supporting areas of curriculum, supervision, reading, and evaluation. Study includes a field project combining curriculum planning, instructional implementation, and evaluation in English Education. Prerequisites for admission are a master's degree or its equivalent, preferably in English or English education, and the successful completion of at least two years of full-time teaching, preferably at the secondary school level.
The Doctorate in English Education (Ed.D. and Ph.D.) prepares candidates for a variety of leadership positions in public schools, government agencies, corporations, community colleges, and universities (e.g., university administrators, professors, and researchers; community college instructors and administrators; writers; high school English department chairs; corporate specialists in technical writing and instructional design; language arts supervisors and consultants; and officers in state or national educational agencies). The program design is flexible, including courses in English education combined with courses in English and other supporting areas. Also required are practica in conducting college classes and/or supervising student teachers, a dissertation, and a written comprehensive examination in English education designed in consultation with the degree candidate and faculty advisor. For admission, in addition to the requisite application, recommendations, GRE scores, and transcripts, the candidate must have completed a master's degree or its equivalent, preferably in English or English education, and must have completed at least two years of full-time successful teaching, preferably at the secondary school level.

Foreign Language Education  The Master of Teaching (M.T.) program in foreign language education (pk-12) prepares prospective teachers of foreign languages by building on the students' undergraduate foreign language major. The M.T. program follows the model of the secondary programs and includes preparation in pedagogy, as well as advanced course work in one or more languages and practical teaching experiences in schools under the supervision of University personnel. Students applying to the MT program in foreign languages are required to take speaking and writing proficiency tests in their target language, and final admission to the program is contingent upon the results of these tests.
The Master of Education in Foreign Language (M.Ed.) degree is offered for experienced middle or secondary school teachers to provide in-depth preparation in foreign language instruction. The program of study includes at least 12 hours of professional studies distributed in all three categories: curriculum and instruction, foundations of education, and statistics/technology; 12 hours of graduate- level course work in the appropriate foreign language department; and 2 hours of electives approved by the advisor.

Mathematics Education  The Master of Teaching (M.T.) program in mathematics education prepares prospective teachers of mathematics by building on the students' undergraduate mathematics studies. The M.T. program in mathematics education includes preparation in pedagogy, as well as advanced course work in mathematics and practical teaching experiences in the schools under the supervision of University personnel.
The Master of Education in Mathematics (M.Ed.) degree is offered for in-depth preparation of secondary and/or middle school teachers of mathematics, and a doctoral degree is offered to prepare people to work in mathematics education at the college level and to prepare professionals to work in supervisory positions in mathematics.
Prospective students in the doctoral-level programs must have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in mathematics and at least two years of teaching experience. Doctoral programs are individually tailored and generally require course work in mathematics education, mathematics, research methodology, and other areas of education.

Reading Education  The master's-level Reading Education Program prepares reading specialists to fill the role of reading coordinator in school units of varying size. The program's aim is to produce competent field leaders able to deal with curriculum theory and to implement this theory effectively in field settings through work with administrators, teachers, and pupils.
At the doctoral level, the reading program prepares candidates to fill leadership and scholarship positions in their area of specialization.

Science Education  The Science Education Program offers graduate-level programs in science education including the master's (M.Ed. or M.T.), education specialist (Ed.S.), and doctoral (Ed.D. or Ph.D.) degrees. The program also provides preparation in science and science teaching methods for students in the Master of Teaching Program.

The Master of Teaching Program  The purpose of the master's-level program is to prepare teachers and/or supervisors of science education. The purposes of the doctoral program are threefold: (1) to prepare college and/or university science educators to teach science methods courses, to perform a variety of professional functions related to preservice and inservice education of teachers, and to perform the function of directing graduate study in science education; (2) to prepare supervisors and coordinators to direct the program of science instruction in a school system at the local, county, or state level; and (3) to prepare research specialists for programs of science instruction at all educational levels.
Applicants for admission to the doctoral program in science education must present a strong background in one field of science with sufficient breadth in related fields to ensure that they can pursue graduate study effectively. The candidate must also present evidence of two years of effective work experience related directly to the field of science education.
Applicants for master's-level study must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university, have a B average or better for the last two years of undergraduate study, and meet other requirements for admission to the degree program. In addition to the admission requirements applicable to the master's program, an applicant to the doctoral program must: hold a master's degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university; have an outstanding record as a student; and have previous professional experience in an area related to science education.
Course Requirements  Candidates for the doctoral degree in science education must complete a minimum of 36 credits in science, 12 credits in science education, and 24 credits in two supporting fields, plus elective courses as determined by their advisory committee, for a minimum total of 72 credits beyond the bachelor's degree. The supporting fields are research and statistics (12 credits); curriculum (12 credits); supervision and administration (12 credits); instructional technology (12 credits); and instruction (12 credits). Regardless of the supporting fields, each student must have nine credits of research and statistics, including intermediate statistics and research design. The dissertation relates to learning theories or instructional practices in science education.

Social Studies Education  The purpose of the master's-level Social Studies Education Program is twofold: to prepare social studies teachers (M.T.) in middle school/ secondary education with  and to provide for professional growth of social studies teachers (M.Ed.) in middle school/secondary education with the particular focus on the integration of technology.  The purpose of the doctoral-level program is to prepare social studies educators for teacher education centers; academic fields in secondary and higher education; supervisory positions; and curriculum development positions.

Special Education  The graduate programs in special education include a choice of emphasis in the areas of mental retardation, behavior disorders (emotional disturbance), learning disabilities, severe disabilities and the training program for early childhood and special education.
Students completing specially approved programs may obtain licensure in more than one area of emphasis (e.g., learning disabilities, mental retardation, behavior disorders, and severe disabilities and early childhood education). All programs include a component on the inclusion of learners with special needs in general education programs. Students in the M.T. program must select two endorsements from LD, MR or ED.
Graduate study at the master's level provides a program for those persons whose professional aspirations are oriented toward the instruction of exceptional children. It also provides preparation for students wanting to pursue a post-master's program at the education specialist or doctoral levels. All students in the master's program participate in practicum experiences selected according to their needs and interests.
The purpose of the doctoral program is to provide experiences that require the highest order of scholarship, research ability, creativity, and initiative. It is designed to prepare leadership personnel to function as highly professional special educators in more than one of the following roles: university or college instructors, researchers, administrators, and supervisors of programs for children with disabilities.

Department of Human Services

The Department of Human Services provides educational experiences and training for individuals preparing for professional careers in areas related to human development and clinical services in both the physical and psychological domains. Graduate degree programs sponsored by this department are in four program areas: communication disorders, counselor education, health and physical education, and clinical and school psychology. The faculty of the Department of Human Services are involved in training, research, and scholarship, and provide professional leadership to the Commonwealth and the nation on issues related to assisting individuals in the development of their full physical and psychological potential for productive and satisfying learning, leisure, and work.
The specializations within each program area are laboratory and/or clinically oriented. Each of the programs within this department seeks to apply knowledge from its disciplinary base to settings that enhance individual development, both physically and psychologically. For example, programs in counseling, sport and exercise psychology, and clinical psychology all require extensive clinical/psychological experiences. Similarly, communication disorders, clinical psychology, motor learning, athletic training, and exercise physiology each have strong clinical/medical aspects and involve extensive interactions with the School of Medicine and other units of the University of Virginia.
The options and specializations within each program area are described in the following sections.

Clinical and School Psychology
Clinical Psychology
School Psychology
Communication Disorders
Speech/Language Pathology
Counselor Education
School Counseling
Counseling and Student Affairs Practice
    in Higher Education
Mental Health Counseling
Kinesiology
Adapted Physical Education
Athletic Training
Exercise Physiology
Motor Learning
Pedagogy
Physical Education Teacher Education
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Sports Medicine

To obtain application materials, contact the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education. To obtain more specific information about any program in the Department of Human Services, contact the appropriate program area director.

Clinical and School Psychology  There are two degree programs offered in clinical and school psychology: the Ed.D. in School Psychology and the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. The Ed.D. Program in School Psychology is for experienced school psychologists who wish to broaden their expertise in this area. The program has a prerequisite of two years of successful experience as a school psychologist and the completion of a minimum of 24 months of study. Included are two summers and one academic year of full-time, on-Grounds study in Charlottesville. A dissertation is completed during the second academic year. Students select two supporting areas (minors) to enhance their preparation in school psychology.
The Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology within the Curry School of Education is designed to train clinical psychologists with potential to make outstanding contributions to the profession in a variety of roles. The majority of graduates seek careers in settings such as hospitals, mental health centers, and schools. A smaller percentage choose purely academic and research careers. The program uses an integrated systems orientation with training offered in individual, group, family, and consultative intervention from several theoretical perspectives.
A thorough grounding in the basic science of psychology is provided for all students. Two research products are required: a pre-dissertation study, leading to a journal-article length thesis, and a doctoral dissertation. Specialized training in clinical work with children, families, and adults is available. Supervised clinical practicum is required, including summers, in all but the first semester of the four years of study. During the first year, students participate in a clinical practicum in a local school system, and in the second year they pursue training in the program's clinic, the Center for Clinical Psychology Services. Of the remaining two years, typically one is spent working as a staff member in the center, while the other is spent working in an area mental health agency, hospital, or school.
Recognizing the major role that schools play in the lives of children and adolescents, experience in schools is encouraged. In addition to preparation for licensure as a clinical psychologist, the program offers the option of becoming licensable as a school psychologist. The program culminates in the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and is fully approved by the APA (American Psychological Association) and by NASP (National Association of School Psychologists).
Students wishing to apply to the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology should contact the Chair of Admissions, Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology, Ruffner Hall, University of Virginia, 405 S Emmet Street, P.O. Box 400270, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4270 for a brochure and instructions. The application deadline is January 15. Admissions decisions are made once per year during the months of  February and March.

Professional Development  Selected students may be granted professional development status if they currently hold a degree in psychology or are practicing in a position that is predominantly a psychological service. Examples include the holder of a Ph.D. in psychology in a non-clinical research area; a practicing school psychologist; a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist wanting to continue his or her education; or a student in an area closely related to psychology (e.g., social work), who is seeking a special course. Professional development status is not a stepping stone for admission into the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology.
Students seeking admission to professional development status in clinical psychology must submit, along with the application, the following information:

1. A statement of their reason for applying for professional development status and the goals they are seeking to achieve.
2. A list of the courses (not to exceed 12 credits) they wish to take.

The following courses are available only to those applicants who are practicing psychologists or who hold at least a master's degree in psychology. Admission to these courses is on a space available basis and requires the instructor's permission: EDHS 763, 764, 768, 863-864, 865, 866-867, 871, 872, 873, 874, and 875.

Communication Disorders  The Communication Disorders Program at the University of Virginia offers master's (M.Ed.) and doctoral (Ph.D.) degrees in Speech-Language Pathology. The master's degree curriculum fufills academic and clinical requirements for obtaining professional credentials in speech-language pathology from the Virginia State Board of Education, the Virginia Licensing Board, and the American Speech-Lanauge-Hearing Association (ASHA). The master's degree in speech-language pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of ASHA. The Speech-Language-Hearing Center is accredited by the Council on Professional Services Accreditation (CPSA) of ASHA  for the provision of full clinical services in speech, language, and hearing.
Graduates with a Master's degree in speech-language pathology are prepared to evaluate and treat a broad spectrum of communication disorders as they occur across the life span. Initially, students participate in clinical practica under the supervision of University Clinical Instructors. Advanced clinical training is gained at externships throughout the central Virginia region. Each student is required to complete clinical practicum assignments in educational (public and private schools) and in  health-care (e.g., hospitals, rehabiltation units, community clinics; university training centers; research laboratories; federal, state, and local government service programs; private health care agencies; industry; and private practice) service delivery sites. Finally, an internship semester provides the capstone clinical-training experience. The internship site is chosen in accordance with the recommendation of the Director of Clinical Services and the student's geographic and professional preferences.
Students entering the master's program with a bachelor's degree in communication disorders and sciences typically complete the graduate academic and clinical training in 5-6 semesters. Students entering with no undergraduate training in communication disorders complete the requirements in 7-8 semesters. Students with an interest in, and commitment to, the delivery of speech, language, and hearing services to school children are encouraged to apply.
Doctoral studies are supported by the excellent research libraries at the University of Virginia. The Communication Disorders Program faculty specialize in the areas of auditory evoked potentials;  central auditory processing; speech science and speech perception; evaluating effective and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas of aphasia, traumatic brain injury, child language and child phonology, language-based reading problems (e.g., dyslexia), dysfluency, and voice disorders.
Additional information about the Communication Disorders Program Area is available from the Communication Disorders Program Director, 2205 Fontaine Avenue, Sutie 202, P. O. Box 800781, Charlottesville, VA  22908-8781 or on the world wide web at: http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/curry/dept/edhs/comdis/home.htm

Counselor Education  Counseling is a unique helping profession based on the social and behavioral sciences. Counselors draw from a variety of disciplines to help individuals develop toward their full potential and solve problems that are typical for their age and stage of development. The degree programs in counselor education are the master's (M.Ed.), education specialist (Ed.S.), and doctorate (Ed.D. and Ph.D.). Graduate study in counselor education provides opportunities to acquire a depth of knowledge in theories of counseling, group dynamics, interpersonal relations, human behavior dynamics, and research procedures. During the academic year, most counselor education courses are available only to counselor education majors. During the summer session, others may take EDHS 721, EDHS722 and EDHS 723 with the instructor's permission.
Counselor education programs are designed for students preparing to work in educational institutions or for work in other organizations that have client service roles. Master's degree programs in counselor education require a minimum of 48 credits and train students for entry level positions in schools, institutions of higher education, and community and human service agencies. Post-master's degree programs are adapted to student goals and include opportunities for in-depth study in a specific area. The Ed.S. degree requires a minimum of 66 credits, including 48 credits from the master's program. Admission to doctoral study in counselor education requires a minimum of one year of post-master's degree professional experience.
The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA), has conferred accreditation to the degree programs in counselor education at the University of Virginia.
Brief descriptions of the counselor education entry-level program options are below; additional information is available from the Counselor Education Program, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400269, 405 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4269 or the department web site.

School Counseling  The program option is designed for the professional preparation of school counselors for grades pre-K through 12. It is broadly based and interdisciplinary in nature. Unique to this option is the student's opportunity to gain an understanding of growth and development in childhood and adolescence. Effectiveness in school settings requires skills in working with individuals and groups, functioning as a school team member, and consulting with teachers and parents. Students complete internship experiences at both the elementary and secondary school levels.

Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education  The program option prepares students for positions as counselors or student personnel workers in post secondary educational institutions. The program is built on the concept that counseling and student services are basic components of the total student development program in post-secondary schools. This option is designed for students who plan to use their counseling skills in a variety of entry-level student development positions (i.e., Admissions, Career Planning and Placement, Dean of Students Office, Residence Life, and Student Activities). Students take required and elective courses offered by the Curry Center for the Study of Higher Education as part of their program.

Mental Health Counseling  The option prepares students to provide mental health counseling in a variety of settings. This program option offers a comprehensive array of studies, which integrates the historical, philosophical, societal, cultural, economic, and political dimensions of mental health counseling with the roles, functions, and professional identity of clinical counselors. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders are included in the coursework. Students will be awarded the M.Ed. and the Ed.S. degrees upon completion of the Mental Health Counseling program. The Mental Health Counseling program requires a minimum of 66 (core, specialty, elective) credit hours. Students must begin the program in the Summer Session and be enrolled on a full-time basis (including the following Summer Session) through the Spring Semester of the second year.

Kinesiology  Graduate degree programs offered in health and physical education are available at the master's (M.Ed. and M.T.) and doctoral (Ed.D. and Ph.D.) levels.
Detailed descriptions of the Kinesiology Programs and their program specializations are below. For additional information, contact the Kinesiology Program Director, University of Virginia, 202 S Emmet Street, P.O. Box 400407 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4407; (434) 924-6207.
The kinesiology program area offers specializations in adapted physical education, athletic training, exercise physiology, motor learning, sports medicine, sport and exercise psychology, and pedagogy. Requirements within each option are distributed among: (1) a core of related courses usually taken within the department; (2) a supporting area suitable to the student's specialty; (3) research projects, independent study, thesis, and/or practicum experiences as recommended by the advisor; and (4) electives.
The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree  program is designed to develop an understanding of major factors affecting specific aspects of physical education, sport, and exercise. Graduates are prepared to work in educational settings such as schools, hospitals, athletic organizations, and private industry. The program also provides opportunities for the development of research skills and preparation for advanced graduate study. A minimum of 36 graduate credits must be earned for the M.Ed. degree, including the successful completion of a comprehensive examination or 30 credits and a thesis.
The Master of Teaching (M.T.) degree program culminates in the M.T. degree and teacher certification for health and physical education (grades K-12). Students interested in this program should contact the director of physical education teacher education for details regarding this two-year program.
The doctoral program (Ed.D. or Ph.D.) in kinesiology is organized to provide an in-depth analysis of specializations in physical education through a course of study shaped by a faculty advisor, a doctoral program committee, and the student. Graduates are able to initiate, conduct, and evaluate research related to specific aspects of motor behavior or physical education and to demonstrate teaching behavior appropriate for college or university faculty. Course work is individually prescribed to meet the requirements of the selected specialization and the skills and qualifications of the student. Areas of specialization within kinesiology may be selected from the following options:

Adapted Physical Education specialization provides graduates with the competencies needed to develop functional physical, motor, and leisure skills for individuals with mild, moderate, or severe disabilities. This program is offered in cooperation with special education, the Kluge Children's Rehabilitation Center, and the Charlottesville and Albemarle County school systems. The program is founded on an achievement-based curriculum model. Inherent in the program design are the following principles: the core of the program is an integrated sequence of course work in physical education and special education; hands on applications are emphasized; students complete extensive, well-supervised practicum experiences as one-half time adapted physical education teachers in local schools; students are trained to use a variety of assessment tools and techniques; and students use computer and video technology to analyze and improve teaching effectiveness. The doctoral program in adapted physical education prepares researchers and teacher trainers.

Athletic Training specialization provides M.Ed. graduates with competence and knowledge in the area of athletic medicine, including an understanding of the physiological, biomechanical, and psychological implications of training, as well as the principles, procedures, and techniques of prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Students gain practical experience by working with intercollegiate and interscholastic athletic teams and sports clubs. The athletic training program is one of a select group of NATA accredited graduate programs and has a prerequisite of NATA certification (or certification eligibility) prior to admission.

Exercise Physiology specialization acquaints graduate students with physiological concepts related to the acute and chronic effects of exercise on human subjects. Special areas of emphasis include interactions between exercise and health status, adult fitness, human performance, aging, environmental conditions, and nutrition. Graduates complete  practical laboratory training that can lead to certification by the American College of Sports Medicine as either an exercise technologist or an exercise specialist.
Master's students in exercise physiology must complete a two-part comprehensive examination. Part one is taken during the spring semester of the first year and is a basic examination in exercise physiology that must be completed satisfactorily for students to remain in the program. If failed once, a student may petition for a reexamination during the summer. If failed a second time, enrollment is terminated. Part two is either a thesis or an advanced written exam at the end of the second year of study.
Graduates in exercise physiology have a thorough knowledge of exercise and applied physiology with an emphasis on metabolism and cardio-respiratory function; the ability to provide leadership for exercise classes involving healthy and high-risk patients; a thorough knowledge of, and practical experience in, procedures for exercise testing; and a working knowledge of research design, research methods, and basic statistics. This course of study can lead to employment in community, corporate, and university exercise programs or to advanced study and research in the field of applied physiology. The doctoral degree in exercise physiology is designed to prepare students to conduct research in human exercise physiology. Program content includes extensive work in physiology, computer applications, and research procedures, as well as interdisciplinary experiences in the School of Medicine.
Motor Learning specialization prepares students to design and implement optimal learning environments for both the acquisition and performance of motor skills. The foundation of this specialization is based on the psychology of motor skill learning. The process of motor skill acquisition is explored by analyzing the early perceptual-motor development of children and the problems of motor skill acquisition and retention for individuals of all ages.
Graduates are able to identify factors that affect motor skill acquisition and performance. Specific emphasis is on understanding the theoretical basis of motor learning and investigating practical questions related to stimulus input, integration, and output. Research is conducted to determine optimal learning environments, practice strategies, and elements that affect the performance of skills. Although closely related to sport psychology, this program emphasizes the acquisition of motor skills, while sport psychology focuses on the performance of well-learned skills. At the doctoral level, emphasis is on developing research skills and applying them to current problems in motor skill acquisition and retention. Doctoral students participate in either the ongoing research projects of the laboratory or in their own research inquiry during each semester of study. Current research interests include the effectiveness of mental practice and cognitive/psychological skills training on motor skill acquisition, the impact of knowledge of results and augmented information feedback on motor skill acquisition, parameters affecting the use of models, and visualization.

Pedagogy specialization is for students who  already possess bachelor's and master's degrees in teaching physical education. This specialization prepares individuals to assume positions of leadership in teacher education training institutions at university or college levels. Academic experiences include preparation in the pedagogical knowledge base related to effective teaching; the utilization of both classroom and field experiences to train future physical education teachers; and research skills for investigating questions about effective teaching practices. Doctoral students participate in both ongoing research (focused on goal setting and case study teaching methods) and original research, and strive to demonstrate mastery of supervisory techniques in field-based practicum experiences.

Physical Education Teacher Education (M.T.) specialization is for an individual interested in the study of physical education teaching at the elementary and secondary levels. The individual is prepared to assume a position as a physical education teacher (grades K-12, or at a major university that requires the development of a research program in teacher education).

Sport and Exercise Psychology  The area of sport and exercise psychology addresses the social influences and individual factors related to participation and performance in a variety of physical activity endeavors. Two major categories of investigation comprise the focus of this field: (1) how participation in sport and exercise contributes to the personal development of participants; and (2) how psychological factors influence participation and performance in sport and exercise. The first category includes such topics as self-esteem, character development, intrinsic motivation, and the ability to cope with anxiety and stress. Some topics under the second category include social support, motivation, self-confidence, goal-setting, arousal control, and mental imagery.
This program emphasizes both the research and application of sport and exercise psychology principles. The research program focuses on developmental sport and exercise psychology, an area that investigates age-related patterns and variations in psychological factors related to sport and exercise participation across the life span. Central topics include determinants of self-esteem through sport and exercise participation; motivational factors related to participation behavior and performance quality (i.e., contextual and individual factors); and social influences on physical activity participation and performance level (i.e., parents, peers, coaches). The applied aspect of the program entails opportunities for translating theory and practice to a variety of practical settings such as athletics, exercise and fitness management, injury management, and youth organizations.
The Sport and Exercise Psychology Program is committed to providing graduate students with the knowledge, skills, and experiences that provide a theoretical and practical background essential to their desired careers in research, teaching, athletics, or health and fitness. Students who pursue terminal master's degrees are prepared for positions as teachers, coaches, or professionals in fitness or athletic clubs. Students are also well-prepared to continue into a Ph.D. program to pursue research and teaching careers in higher education through their study of the breadth and depth of the field and through ample opportunities to engage in research, teaching, mentoring students, collaborative grant writing, and professional service activities.
Sports Medicine  The doctoral degree option in sports medicine is designed to prepare candidates to conduct research within athletic medicine and sports science. Program content includes extensive work in physiology, anatomy, athletic training, biomechanics, computer applications, instrumentation, and research procedures.
Research experiences are gained by assisting with ongoing projects in the Sports Medicine/Athletic Training Research Laboratory, by developing independent research projects, and by assisting with master's theses in the athletic training specialization. Examples of current areas of research include isokinetic assessment of human muscle performance, postural sway (balance), and knee laxity. Collaborative research is also available through the School of Medicine and, in particular, with the Departments of Orthopaedics and Radiology.
Teaching assistant opportunities are available in the undergraduate specialization in sports medicine and the NATA approved graduate program in athletic training. Clinical work in athletic training and/or physical therapy is available through the on-Grounds training room, as well as through several local private schools.

Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy
The Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy offers programs in higher education, educational policy studies, school administration, school supervision, educational psychology, education of the gifted, educational research, educational evaluation, instructional technology, and social foundations of education. These degree programs seek to prepare professional educators who rank with the best in the nation.
The school administration, school supervision, educational policy studies, and higher education programs are designed for students who are preparing themselves for leadership roles in the nation's schools, colleges, universities, and governmental or research agencies.
Another set of programs are grouped under the foundations rubric. Included here are programs in educational psychology, psychology and education of the gifted, educational research, educational evaluation, instructional technology, and the social foundations of education. These programs have a dual function: they prepare master's and doctoral candidates in their respective areas of specialization, and they provide courses that serve to enrich the research competencies, technical skills, and knowledge base of students in other programs within the Curry School.
Programs in the Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy may lead to the Master of Education (M.Ed.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. The Education Specialist (Ed.S.) degree is also offered in selected programs.
These programs are designed for students interested in research and instruction relating to educational programs, organizations, and processes. The programs in the department emphasize academic and practical experience, with most students spending extensive time working on research and instructional projects in the field. Since the ratio of full-time graduate students to faculty in the department is about three to one, students have close contact with faculty and ready access to assistance and guidance. Each program has its own emphasis, but all share a common commitment to the analysis of educational theory and practice from a systematic, broad-based perspective.
Many opportunities are available for students to gain experience in a variety of research and instructional activities. Within the University, opportunities are available in the Center for the Study of Higher Education, the Summer Enrichment Program for Gifted Students, the Office of Medical Education, and the Evaluation Research Center. Beyond the University, students work on a wide range of projects in school systems, business and industry, government agencies, and non-profit research and development organizations.

General Information  The Department of  Leadership, Foundations, and Policy contains several centers and agencies that enhance career development opportunities for students. The Center for the Study of Higher Education sponsors conferences, seminars, short institutes, workshops, publications, and internships, in addition to program offerings for graduate students. The Virginia Center for Educational Policy Studies conducts policy studies for, and provides assistance to, agencies and policy makers concerned with education in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the nation. The Thomas Jefferson Center for Educational Design conducts field studies of innovative schools and learning programs, designs institutes for groups interested in creating new schools or reinventing existing ones, and distribute materials dealing with timely design issues. Other departments and agencies can be found in the Facilities and Services portion of this chapter.

Administration and Supervision of NK-12 Schools  At the master's degree level, students may choose programs leading to Virginia endorsement in school administration and supervision, or programs focusing on research in educational leadership and policy studies.
Those seeking full administrative endorsement are expected to complete an internship of a minimum of 90 school days (at least half-time) as well as course work in general leadership studies, communication skills, school management, and an area of specialization (for example, instructional leadership). If a student does not complete an internship of a minimum of 90 school days, he or she may receive the M.Ed. with partial endorsement and arrange to meet the internship requirement during his or her first year of employment as an administrator. Full Virginia endorsement can be obtained upon successful completion of an internship during the first year of employment. A seminar meeting on Grounds may be required to supplement the internship. Students seeking endorsement in supervision have no internship requirement, but are expected to meet experiential needs through practica. The minimum number of credits for a master's degree leading to full administrative endorsement is 36. Students not interested in earning endorsement must complete a minimum of 10 courses or 30 credits of graduate study. In addition to courses in administration and supervision, students are encouraged to select courses from social foundations of education, psychological foundations of education, curriculum and instruction, and research.
Applicants for advanced graduate study (post-master's) in administration and supervision programs should complete two years of administrative and/or supervisory experience before the degree is awarded. Because many states require teaching experience as part of the endorsement requirement, the student is urged to check state requirements before seeking certification. Students with at least two years of teaching experience will be given strong preference over those without teaching experience for admission to the principal preparation and supervision programs.
Education specialist degree programs are designed to provide a post-master's degree level of preparation for school leadership. Emphasis is placed on developing specialized skills and in-depth familiarity with a particular professional role in educational leadership. Generally, the pattern of course work for each student is planned to supplement and complement work already completed at the master's degree level. Internships and practica, depending upon the need of the individual student, may be included in the program. The Ed.S. is a planned 30-credit (minimum) post-master's program, 24 credits of which must be taken on Grounds, and 18 credits of which must be taken after admission to the program. The program can be completed in one year of full-time study. Virginia endorsement, either full or partial, in school administration and/or supervision may be earned as part of an education specialist program.
Programs leading to the degrees of Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy are designed to provide the highest level of preparation for professional and scholarly leadership. The typical Ed.D. and Ph.D. programs consist of a minimum 78 credits of course work, including work completed for the master's degree. A minimum residence of 24 credits taught by Curry resident faculty is required for the Ed.D. degree, and a minimum of two years of full-time study is expected for the Ph.D., although full-time enrollment until completion of all requirements is encouraged. (See Residence Requirements in the Doctoral Degrees section of this chapter.)

Areas of Specialization in Administration and Supervision 
Elementary Administration (School Principalship)
Middle School Administration (School Principalship)
Secondary Administration (School Principalship)
Central Office Administration and the Superintendency
Supervision (General, Elementary, and/or Secondary level).

In addition to these specializations, supporting areas in education finance and educational policy studies are available for interested students.

Education Policy and Evaluation  The objectives of the Education Policy & Evaluation program are to provide graduate students with an opportunity to acquire quantitative and qualitative skills required to interpret research and evaluation studies related to educational policy; to design and conduct research and evaluation policy studies; to acquire the expertise necessary to teach or conduct policy research in state, national, international, and comparative education; and communicate the findings of policy research to multiple constituencies. There is an increasing need for professionals trained to bridge education, the social sciences, and social policy-making; who teach and carry out research in academic and nonacademic settings; and who occupy strategic positions in public and private sector agencies engaged in shaping and influencing policies directed toward improving education on state, national, and international levels.
The interdisciplinary nature of the program provides opportunities for students to engage in course work and seminars throughout the University of Virginia in disciplines such as government, sociology, law, economics, and urban planning. Areas of concentration within the Education Policy & Evaluation program area include: economics and finance in education; educational policy and politics; educational evaluation; government; history, philosophy, and sociology of education; and social welfare policy.
The Education Policy & Evaluation Program includes classroom, research, and field-based components and the proximity of the University of Virginia to both Richmond, Virginia, and Washington, D.C., provides unique opportunities and rich learning environments for both students and faculty to engage in various aspects of the policy process. The Virginia Center for the Study of Educational Policy is housed within the Education Policy & Evaluation program area. The Center provides research opportunities for students to plan and implement policy studies.

The Educational Policy Pavilion (curry.edschool.virginia.edu/curry/centers/edpolicy) serves as an information and communication nexus for those involved or interested in the policy process. The Web site goes beyond providing mere baseline demographic data, documents, graphics and other useful information. It also supports interactive discussion and electronic conferencing, in which discussion strands are archived by topic. A primary goal of the site is the creation of a forum for public debate. Although focusing on issues concerning the Commonwealth, the site also provides links to other Web sites containing information about pre- and post-secondary, national, and international policy issues and developments.
 
Educational Psychology (including Gifted Education)  The purpose of the Educational Psychology Program is to prepare students to apply psychological and educational principles, empirical methods, and research findings to practical problems in a variety of professional settings. Majors may concentrate in a content area within educational psychology that is flexibly tailored to their unique professional objectives, or follow a prescribed curriculum in gifted education. Those who choose individualized programs begin with an academic core that includes human development, learning, and psychometric assessment before narrowing their focus. Those who select the gifted specialty focus on the characteristics and needs of gifted children, methods of teaching the gifted, the development and evaluation of gifted programs, and/or research conducted in gifted education.
Graduates with individualized programs are typically employed as educational research, evaluation, or teaching specialists in universities, medical colleges, federal agencies, school systems, state departments of education, or private corporations. Those with Masters degrees are qualified to design developmentally appropriate curricula, validate tests, assess educational programs, evaluate educational products, and participate in educational or psychological research investigations. Doctoral graduates are qualified to become university professors and assume leadership roles as educational psychologists in federal or state agencies, medical schools, or private corporations.
Graduates who specialize in education of the gifted are employable as gifted education specialists in public or private schools, private foundations, state or federal agencies, and colleges or universities. Degrees in educational psychology with a speciality in education of the gifted are offered at both the master's and doctoral levels. The Master of Education degree (M.Ed.) provides a core of courses that gives students general competence in the areas of assessment, development, and learning, and special expertise in the development of curriculum and instructional strategies for working with gifted students. The Ph.D. and Ed.D. are designed to provide in-depth study of gifted children and programs for gifted children. The doctoral degrees prepare graduates for positions in universities or public education.

Educational Research  The purpose of the program in educational research is to prepare students to apply the quantitative rational approach in seeking solutions to educational problems by equipping them to state important educational questions in terms of testable hypotheses; bring existing knowledge to bear on such questions; create efficient designs for collecting data that are relevant to such questions; use appropriate analytical procedures for extracting relevant information from the data; and communicate the findings effectively.
The Educational Research Program consists of a sequence of courses in quantitative methods ranging from elementary statistical concepts to advanced multivariate techniques. In addition, advanced seminars allow intense exploration of other topics. Students are also involved in ongoing research projects directed by program faculty. Graduates at the master's level are employed by school systems, state education departments, schools of education, nursing, medicine, etc., and other public and private organizations engaged in educational research or evaluation. Doctoral level graduates are qualified for a wide variety of positions of leadership. Some have become professors in schools; others have found positions of leadership in state or national educational agencies and organizations, in profit and non-profit private educational firms, or in industry.

Higher Education  The Center for the Study of Higher Education is an instructional, research, and service unit within the Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy. The instructional program provides college, university, and adult educational leaders opportunities to explore established and emerging practices in postsecondary education, to analyze current issues and problems, and to think in a critical fashion about institutional priorities and commitments.
Instructional programs offered by the center lead to the degrees of Education Specialist, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. Postdoctoral study and research opportunities are provided through the center's professional development program. Students seeking a graduate degree in higher education must hold a master's degree in a related field, and full time experience is highly desirable.
The Education Specialist degree provides a post-master's level of preparation for higher education administrators. The Ed.S. Program involves 30 credits of course work that can be completed in either one year of full-time study, or part-time with a minimum of one semester or two summer sessions devoted to residence study. Emphasis in the program is placed on developing specialized skills and understandings with a particular role in higher education administration and management.
Candidates for the Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees are encouraged to complete all of their doctoral study in full-time residence. The minimum residency requirement is 24 credits taken from University resident faculty, excluding credits for practica, internship, independent study, and dissertation. Minimum residency for the Ph.D. is two academic years of full-time study. Doctoral programs in higher education normally consist of a minimum of at least 78 credits, including work completed for the master's degree.
Internships, as part of the doctoral programs, provide the prospective faculty member, administrator, or agency staff member with an opportunity to experience theory in practice in the actual institutional context.

Areas of Specialization in Higher Education
Adult Education
Community College Instruction and/or Administration
Higher Education
General Administration
Policy Studies
Student Affairs Administration

Instructional Technology  The graduate Instructional Technology (IT) Program directly addresses the rapidly accelerating changes in the field by providing exposure to a wide range of emerging technologies, while ensuring the basic competencies required of all practitioners. Core course requirements for graduate students in IT provide a broad but firm background in the areas of instructional design, computer-based learning, media production, learning theory, educational evaluation, and tests and measurement. Preparation is offered in the master's (M.Ed.), education specialist (Ed.S.), and doctoral (Ed.D. and Ph.D.) levels. Applications may be received at any time, but those received by March 1 are given preference for financial aid.
Depending on their career goals, students may elect to specialize in either instructional media production or interactive technologies, and may participate in an internship in instructional technology. The specialization in instructional media production offers professional preparation for directing instructional resource center operations, designing and producing instructional media (such as graphic arts, photography, and video), and for being faculty members in higher education in these specializations.
The specialization in interactive technologies offers experience in the design and production of interactive instructional materials; instructional components are selected from digital images, sound, text, and video. Advanced course work offers an opportunity for the development of interactive products of increasing complexity, and for the conduct of usability tests on user interface design. Doctoral students in this area pursue research projects involving the effective design of interactive media.
Internship opportunities in schools, corporations, and government agencies throughout the mid-Atlantic region give the IT student valuable skills and experience in a variety of work settings. Graduates of the IT Program go on to pursue careers as instructional technologists in education, business and industry, the government, and non-profit organizations.
Individuals desiring entry into the Ed.D. or Ph.D. programs in instructional technology must submit a scholarly writing sample of at least 12, and no more than 20, pages. For details, contact the Chair of Admissions, Instructional Technology Program, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, 405 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2945.

Computers in Education  In the Curry School, computer applications to instructional, clinical, and management problems are considered an important part of many programs. Thus, a wide variety of courses and facilities is available to students interested in this area.
Although the Curry School offers no major in computer applications, special course sequences designed to meet individual needs have been provided to students in virtually all of the major areas that the school does offer. Courses in the area of computer applications are offered mainly by the Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy, or under various departmental titles when the content is specific to a professional discipline.

Social Foundations  The program in social foundations of education employs a broad range of academic disciplines to understand educational realities. Its multidisciplinary approach affords insight into questions about  the aims, functions, and consequences of educational activities, and of education as a whole. In this context, schools are viewed as social organizations whose policies interact with American and international economic, political, and intellectual currents. Education, in turn, is conceived as including both school and non-school learning enterprises. Advanced study in social foundations involves four related areas:
Anthropological Foundations  focuses on the interrelationship of education and culture. It examines education as a cultural process, exploring how educational practices and ideas are shaped by culture as well as how education participates in the creation of culture in a variety of contexts around the world.
Historical Foundations  provides awareness of the historical sources of the choices that we have made that affect the present state of education in the United States and other Western Societies.
Philosophical Foundations  considers the intellectual origins of educational theories and ideas, the assumptions underlying various educational theories and practices, and the likely consequences of acting on the basis of these assumptions.
Sociological Foundations  systematically considers contemporary education in terms of its broader social meaning and social effects, drawing upon relevant sociological theory and research.
Comparative and International Foundations  analyzes the relationship between education and society through contrastive study of the cultural, social, and political influences on education in selected foreign countries and the United States.
An analytic approach equips graduates in social foundations to perform valuable services in education and government. Graduates hold positions in universities and colleges, in policy-related functions in school systems, with educational research agencies, and in other areas of professional education. Others work in various governmental agencies, both domestic and international. An interdisciplinary area of emphasis is offered at the doctoral level in educational policy studies.
The program requirements, course work, exams, and research opportunities are described in the EDLF student handbook.
Additional information about programs in the Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy or courses in EDLF may be obtained by contacting the Department Chair, 179 Ruffner Hall, University of Virginia, 405 Emmet Street, P.O. Box 400265 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4265; (434) 924-3880; curry@virginia.edu.
Course Descriptions
Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education
EDIS 500 - (3) (Y-SS)
The Exceptional Learner
An intensive introduction to the study of exceptional children and adults. Focuses on extending principles of learning and intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development to persons with disabilities, as well as the gifted. Credit is not given for both EDIS302 and 500.
EDIS 501 - (2) (Y)
Curriculum and Instruction for Elementary and Special Education
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 488.
Study of curriculum and instructional design, and instructional strategies consistent with those designs.
EDIS 502 - (2) (Y)
Instruction and Assessment
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 488.
Section 1:  Elementary and Special Education: Extension of EDIS 501 with a focus on instructional strategies and ways of assessing learning outcomes.
Section 2:  Secondary Education: Focuses on instructional design and strategies for teaching in secondary classrooms and assessment of student growth toward prescribed learning outcomes.
EDIS 503 - (3) (Y)
Classroom Management and Conflict Resolution
Many beginning teachers report difficulties with classroom management issues. This class provides the opportunity to reflect on the importance of instructional, classroom management, and conflict resolution practices. Examines the critical issues associated with discipline and management, and develops communication and social skills that are critical for implementing a management system in the classroom.
EDIS 504 - (3) (S)
Assessment Techniques for Exceptional Individuals
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 510, 511, or 512.  
Prepares teachers of exceptional children to administer, score, and interpret several standard educational instruments; to use informal procedures in educational assessment; and to interpret the combined results of psychological, sociological, medical, and educational assessments as they apply to the development and evaluation of individualized educational plans.
EDIS 508 - (2) (Y)
Teaching Exceptional Children
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500 (510, 511, 512).
Presents strategies for teaching children with special needs, focusing on cognitive and behavioral instructional approaches. Emphasizes collaboration and consultation for inclusive classrooms. Includes application of instructional modification procedures and development of individualized plans. Coordinated with EDIS 514.
EDIS 510 - (2) (S-SS)
Characteristics of People with Emotional Disturbances and Behavioral Problems
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.
Studies the characteristics of socially and emotionally disturbed children. Develops an understanding of the definitions, descriptive data, and various theoretical models of disturbance currently used in the literature and practice of appropriate professional disciplines.
EDIS 511 - (2) (S-SS)
Characteristics of People with Learning Disabilities
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.
Studies the meaning and concepts associated with the field of learning disabilities and the diverse characteristics of individuals with these disabilities. Includes the nature, causes, assessment, and treatment of learning disabilities.
EDIS 512 - (2) (Y)
Characteristics of People with Mental Retardation
Prerequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.
Explores basic concepts and issues pertaining to persons with intellectual disabilities. Physiological, psychological, sociological, and educational implications are considered, as well as a historical perspective relating to the many issues in the field of mental retardation.
EDIS 513 - (2) (Y)
Characteristics of People with Severe Disabilities
Prerequisite: EDIS 500.
Introduces the characteristics of persons with severe and profound disabilities. Emphasizes the study of the physical, ecological, psychological, and educational implications of severe/profound disabilities and current issues.
EDIS 514 - (3) (Y)
Curriculum for Exceptional Children
Prerequisite: EDIS 302 (510, 511, or 512).
An extension of EDIS 508, this class focuses on strategies for secondary-aged students with special needs. Emphasizes curriculum and instructional approaches related to cognitive and behavioral theories and addresses applications of transition procedures.
EDIS 517 - (3) (SI)
Adapted Physical Education in Alternative Settings
Two-semester sequence, using a workshop format that focuses on Outward Bound type activities: modified individual and group confidence-building physical activities, sports, crafts, and recreation. Experiences in the field accompany the study of research and practices applicable to adolescents in alternative settings.
EDIS 518 - (3) (IR)
Counseling Handicapped Youth
A two-semester sequence, focusing on recognition and management of stress in professionals and their clients, and working with substance-abusing youth. Techniques with short-term goals are studied.
EDIS 521 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Language Development
An overview of the language acquisition and development process. Surveys current and historical perspectives on language acquisition and treats those factors influencing language development.
EDIS 522 - (3) (Y-SS)
Reading Development
Reading Development is designed for pre-service elementary education techers and is the requisite course for EDIS 530 A and B, the Language Skills Block. The aim of this course is to make language structures accessible for teachers of reading and writing so that they may use instructional programs with confidence and flexibility. Within this course, the theoretical foundations of understanding how children learn to read and write will be explored.  Effective reading instruction hinges on an awareness of the language development of each individual student as well as the language content of the text. This course deals with how students learn to read (reading psychology) and the content of reading (the form of written language). EDIS 530 A and B, the Language Skills Block, deals with the pedagogy (how it is to be taught).
EDIS 530 - (6) (Y)
Language Skills Block
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Prepares preservice teachers for teaching reading and language arts in the elementary classroom. Attention shifts from "learning to read" to "reading to learn," and from working with small groups to the effective differentiation needed to work with entire classes of children.
EDIS 532 - (3) (SS-E)
Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program
Designed to prepare preservice teachers in understanding PreK-6 elementary topics in mathematics, teaching these topics, and how children learn mathematics developmentally. Examines ways to reason mathematically, make connections, and communicate mathematics through the use of literature, manipulatives, technology, and classroom discourse.
EDIS 540 - (3) (Y-SS)
Teaching English
Prerequisite: EDIS 541, 542, 543, and instructor permission.
Translates theory and research into practice by designing, enacting, and evaluating instructional units with a variety of teaching methodologies. Students individualize instruction; construct appropriate learning objectives; develop evaluation tools; and use cooperative learning groups, micro-teaching, and reflective processes.
EDIS 541 - (3) (Y)
Literature for Adolescents
Students read the latest and greatest in adolescents literature, learn to motivate reluctant readers, and develop individualized multi-genre and multicultural reading programs.
EDIS 542 - (3) (SS)
Language, Literacy, and Culture
Considers the relationships among language, literacy, culture, and schooling. Students learn to investigate language as teachers of language, to research current issues, and to design effective strategies for teaching various aspects of the English language.
EDIS 543 - (3) (Y-SS)
Teaching Composition K-12
Students study, practice, and evaluate theories and methods of writing and teaching writing. They prepare a personal writing project, criticize a writing program, or create a writing program for students.
EDIS 545 - (3) (Y-SS)
Teaching Secondary School Mathematics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers objectives, subject matter, teaching materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluation procedures in mathematics classes. Emphasizes organization of courses and programs in mathematics education.
EDIS 548 - (3) (Y)
Teaching Secondary School Foreign Languages other than Latin
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers theory and research in second language acquisition; classroom instructional procedures that follow the National Standards, which incorporate interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes and foster successful communication in foreign languages and selection of appropriate materials, realia, visuals, and media for instructional purposes.
EDIS 549 - (2) (Y)
Planning Foreign Language Instruction
Prerequisite: EDIS 548.
Considers specific objectives; setting long and short-term goals, planning and outcomes, assessment and testing, grading, record keeping, and communication with parents.
EDIS 550 - (4) (Y-SS)
Teaching Secondary School Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers objectives, subject matter, materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluative procedures for science classes. Emphasizes organization of courses and programs in science education.
EDIS 560 - (3) (Y)
Teaching Secondary School Social Studies
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers objectives, subject matter, materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluative procedures for social studies classes. Discusses organization of courses and programs in social studies education.
EDIS 563 - (3) (IR)
Economics for Teachers
Examines essential concepts of micro- and macro-economics, emphasizing the incorporation of these concepts in elementary and secondary schools.
EDIS 564 - (3) (IR)
Physical Geography
Emphasizes the use of maps, map interpretation, and the study of climactic systems and physical forces on human activity.
EDIS 565 - (3) (IR)
Cultural Geography
Emphasizes concepts of cultural patterns and their influence on political and regional patterns of the world.
EDIS 573 - (3) (Y-SS)
Diagnostics in Reading
An introductory course focusing on classroom-based reading assessments.  Students  learn to match assessment to instruction and to use assessment information to organize flexible reading groups for school-age children.  Participants develop expertise in the use of formal and informal assessments that measure a variety of literacy skill from emerging concepts of print and alphabet knowledge to word recognition, decoding, oral reading fluency, and comprehension.
EDIS 574 - (3) (Y-SS)
Remedial Techniques in Reading
This course focuses on intervention techniques for accelerating the reading ability of struggling readers. Instructional methods are presented in four categories of literacy development: oral reading fluency, comprehension, word knowledge (phonics, spelling, decoding, and vocabulary), and writing. Assignments are practicum based. Students learn how to match instructional techniques to assessed areas of literacy needs and how to differentiate instruction for varying levels of reading achievement.
EDIS 586 - (1) (Y)
Seminar: Multicultural and Health Issues
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Using a workshop format, this course focuses on the implications of cultural differences among students for teacher behavior and instruction. Investigates physical and mental health topics, and the implications thereof, for the professional educator.
EDIS 587 - (3) (Y)
Seminar: Teaching Methods
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Designed to accompany the teaching associateship experience (i.e., student teaching). Focuses on special issues and concerns that grow out of that experience, including such topics as classroom management, parent-teacher conferences, and school-communication relations.
EDIS 588 - (6-12) (Y)
Teaching Associateship
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; permission of advisor and the Director of Teacher Education.
A required student teaching internship for potential teachers. Supervised by clinical instructors from public schools, in cooperation with University supervisors.
EDIS 589 - (1-6) (S)
Selected Topics
These are designed as pilot courses to meet new program area degree requirements, and changing needs in the field. Used also to offer experimental courses, and courses under development, these are announced and offered on a semester-to-semester basis. May be graded or S/U, depending on the instructor, and may be repeated.
EDIS 590 - (1-3) (Y)
Workshop
Special topics, offered as needed.
EDIS 591 - (1-6) (Y)
Internship
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A special assignment, agreed to by the student and his or her assigned advisor, providing a unique experience in an educational setting that is consistent with the student's professional objectives and program focus. Conducted under the guidance of an experienced teacher or University faculty.
Section 1: Elementary Education
Section 2: Early Childhood Education
EDIS 702 - (3) (Y)
Models of Instruction
Focuses on variety in instructional design and delivery. A range of instructional models are introduced, most emphasizing cognition and the processing of information. Students practice planning and implementing instruction using several selected models.
EDIS 705 - (3) (Y)
Behavior Management
Intensive analysis of cases in which classroom behavior management is a key issue. Using the case method, students apply knowledge of behavior management experience, and the experiences of their peers, to the solution of problems encountered by practicing teachers.
EDIS 708 - (3) (Y-SS)
Advanced Techniques of Teaching the Exceptional Individual
Prerequisite: EDIS 408 or instructor permission.
Analyzes instructional approaches, strategies, and materials for advanced-level consultant and resource teachers in special education. Emphasizes the development of interactive skills among professionals in order to facilitate collaboration with general education.
EDIS 711 - (3) (E)
Vocal and Non-Vocal Communication
Prerequisite: EDIS 500, 705, and concurrent enrollment in practicum.
Designed for teachers, therapists, and other professionals who implement communication programs for persons with moderate to severe disabilities or for preschoolers with disabilities. Current research and teaching practices are addressed, focusing on appropriate assessment strategies and tools; nonsymbolic communication; augmentative and alternative communication systems; functional assessment; naturalistic teaching approaches; and collaborative teaming between teachers, parents, and speech, occupational, and physical therapists. Students design, implement, and evaluate an individual teaching program.
EDIS 712 - (3) (E)
Positioning, Handling, and Self-Care Skills
Prerequisite: EDIS 500 and 705 and concurrent enrollment in practicum.
Explores assessment and teaching of students with moderate to severe disabilities, emphasizing normal muscle tone, high and low tone, and related disabilities; gross and fine motor skills, including mobility, walking, transfers, positioning, handling, and carrying; use and basic maintenance of adaptive equipment; basic self care (toileting, dressing, eating) and grooming; and collaborative teaming. In addition to special education, instructors include occupational, physical, and speech therapists, and a registered nurse, who model and provide supervised practice opportunities. Students design, implement, and evaluate an individual teaching program.
EDIS 713 - (3) (Y)
Secondary, Vocational and Transition Skills
Prerequisite: EDIS 500, 705.
Emphasizes the following areas of assessment and instruction related specifically to students with disabilities: functional academics; vocational skills, models of employment, and employment; independent living and use of the community; and post-secondary training in education.
EDIS 715 - (3) (O)
Advanced Behavior Support
Prerequisite: EDIS 500, 705.
Emphasizes understanding and applying principles of positive behavior support to preschoolers, children, and youth with disabilities who exhibit behavior problems. Topics include defining and measuring behavior through interview and direct observation; identifying preferences; functional assessment and analysis; identification and teaching of alternative behaviors and replacement skills; social skill instruction; improvement of classroom, living, or work settings; nonaversive behavior support strategies; communication-based interventions; self-management; and peer support.
EDIS 721 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Language Development
Prerequisite: EDIS 521 or equivalent.
Focuses on language acquisition and development. Emphasizes the development of syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and phonology. Factors influencing language acquisition and development, such as the role of primary caretaker, the active participation of the child, social-economic conditions, and sensitivity to non-verbal cues are explored. Reading and research in language development highlight current issues in language requisition.
EDIS 730 - (3) (IR)
Language Arts: Elementary School
Designed for the graduate student whose primary interest is in methods and materials in the teaching of language arts in the elementary classroom. Emphasizes instructional strategies, activities, materials, and techniques to stimulate the acquisitions of oral, aural, and written language skills.
EDIS 731 - (3) (Y)
Children's Literature
Studies children's literature and its importance as an integral part of the school curriculum. Emphasizes the treatment in books of contemporary social problems and conditions.
EDIS 732 - (3) (Y)
Integrated Science in the Elementary School
Emphasizes understanding basic principles, processes, and conceptual schemes of the integrated life and physical sciences from the perspective of curricular requirements and societal expectations for elementary science teaching. In reviewing the history of science education, curriculum improvement studies, and current trends in science teaching, students examine instructional options for K-8 science teaching. Provides experience translating science content into activity/inquiry based, hands-on science lessons compatible with applicable curriculum standards and instructional objectives. Methods of interdisciplinary instruction involve mathematics, art, music, writing, reading, social studies, environmental education, and health and physical education. Credit may not be earned for both EDIS 432 and 732.
EDIS 733 - (3) (SI)
Social Studies in Elementary Schools
Studies curriculum materials, teaching methods, and problems in social studies education for elementary school children.
EDIS 739 - (3) (Y)
Academic Uses of the World Wide Web
Investigates, evaluates, and develops online resources that can be used in teaching or other educational endeavors. Emphasizes meaningful content, sound principles of web design, and use of appropriate current and developing technologies.
EDIS 740 - (3) (SI)
Problems and Issues in English Education
Critique of major issues in current instructional practice and curricula for secondary English. Students conduct inquiry directed toward posting solutions to identified problems.
EDIS 745 - (3) (SI)
Problems and Issues in Mathematics Education
Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Studies major curriculum and instructional problems and issues in mathematics education from historical and present-day perspectives.
EDIS 750 - (3) (SI)
Problems and Issues in Science Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Studies major curriculum and instructional problems and issues in science education from both historical and present day perspectives.
EDIS 753 - (3-6) (SI)
Science Supervision Internship
Supervisory experience under the direction of the University, in cooperation with local school divisions.
EDIS 760 - (3) (SI)
Problems and Issues in Social Studies Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Discussion of the major curriculum and instructional problems and issues in social studies education.
EDIS 770 - (3) (Y)
Foundations of Reading Instruction
The foundations of reading and reading development are the focus of this survey course. Topics covered include: children's basic language development as a precursor to reading and as a medium for instruction, methods for assessing and instructing the emergent reader, the beginning reader, and the instructional reader, and reading disability.
EDIS 771 - (3) (Y)
Reading and Writing in the Content Areas
This course focuses on the uses of writing and reading as ways to learn across the curriculum. Educators interested in elementary through high school instruction, in all subject areas, will learn about comprehension strategies they may teach their students to use.  In so doing, students' will become more effective learners and develop better communication skills. Teachers learn how to use quality literature, to provide vocabulary instruction, to provide various sources of information rather than to teach from one source, and honor the various achievement levels of their students.
EDIS 772 - (3) (Y)
Word Study: Language Structures and Phonics
Prerequisite: EDIS 770.
Explores a combination of theoretical and practical issues surrounding the most fundamental skill in reading—access to word in print. Assumes a basic knowledge of the reading process, such as familiarity with the alphabetic principle and prerequisites for learning to read. Provides hands-on opportunities to make conceptually-based word study tasks for developmental needs in phonics, spelling, and vocabulary acquisition.
EDIS 773 - (3) (SS)
Practicum in Reading Diagnosis
Prerequisite: EDIS 573.
Introduction to basic and advanced testing procedures used to diagnose reading difficulties of elementary and secondary students and adults. Examines clinical and classroom diagnostic methods, explores theoretical foundations for these practices, and discusses practical applications to the classroom.
EDIS 774 - (3) (SS)
Practicum in Remedial Reading
Prerequisite: EDIS 574.
Acquaints students with a variety of techniques to support and instruct remedial readers. These techniques address reading, writing, comprehension, and word study across the developmental stages. As a practicum, this class entails teaching either in the McGuffey Reading Clinic or in one of the local schools under close supervision. Emphasizes learning and developing appropriate and practical techniques that will meet the needs of specific individuals with specific reading problems.
EDIS 775 - (3) (Y)
Effective Reading Programs
Prerequisite: EDIS 770.
Examines the organization and supervision of effective reading programs in the nested contexts of the classroom, the school, the school district, and beyond. The issue of organizational plans are discussed in relation to students' needs in literacy acquisition. Participants critically examine "in place" reading programs and design their own plan for a reading program.
EDIS 779 - (3) (Y)
Using Cooperative Learning Strategies in the Classroom
Focuses on using cooperative strategies with all types of students to improve learning and retention. Strategies include Jigsaw, Think/Pair/Share, Virginia Pairs, Four Corners, Send a Problem, Telephone, and Round Table.
EDIS 780 - (3) (Y-SS)
Curriculum: Fundamentals
Introduces basic concepts and issues related to curriculum design, development, change, and evaluation.
EDIS 781 - (3) (S)
Curriculum: Middle and Secondary School
Studies the curriculum of both middle and high schools, including significant curriculum issues and movements of the past and present.  Specific attention is given to objectives, sequence, standards, and developments in each subject area, as well as exploring interdisciplinary curricula.
EDIS 782 - (3) (Y)
Curriculum: Elementary School
Introduces issues, concepts, trends, and major orientations to early childhood and elementary curricula.  Examples of currently used curriculum materials are also presented.
EDIS 785 - (3) (SI)
Seminar
Section 1:  Special Education: Advanced study of various problems in special education. Areas of emphasis are: behavior disordered (emotionally disturbed); learning disabled; mentally retarded; general special education; severely handicapped; preschool handicapped. Prerequisite: master's level students with 12 graduate credits.
Section 2:  Elementary Childhood: Study of the major problems in elementary education today as they influence curriculum development.
Section 3:  Early Childhood: Study of the major problems in early childhood education today as they influence curriculum development.
Section 4:  English Education: Study of selected topics in theory and development of curriculum and instructional methods in English education.
Section 5:  Science Teaching: Study of the major problems in science teaching today,  emphasizing historical and philosophical contributions to the formulation of objectives and methods in modern science .
Section 6:  Science Education: Study of recent curriculum developments in science and in-depth consideration of selected topics, themes, and areas of content for the major of curriculum studies in elementary and secondary schools.
Section 7:  Social Studies Education: Study of selected topics in theory and development of curriculum and instructional methods in social studies education.
Section 8:  Curriculum: Consideration of selected problems, issues, programs, reports of research, and elements of theory pertaining to evaluation of elementary and secondary school curricula.
Section 9:  Seminar: Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education (3) (Y)
Section 10:  Instructional Research and Evaluation: Focus on development of research projects directed toward the resolution of problems in teaching and teacher education.
Section 11:  Literacy Acquisition: Designed to stimulate critical evaluation and thinking about current theories of literacy acquisition. The central question is: How do we ensure that all children are reading at grade level at the end of third grade? Topics include research on the process of learning to read and how that knowledge informs the national agenda; the additional research that needs to be done to fully understand and promote literacy; the tasks and processes involved in reading acquisition and the factors that affect it.
Section 12:  Reading Research: Basic seminar in models and processes of reading. The widest possible range of reading models are considered, from those that emphasize processes of word recognition to those that encompass reader-response theory and postmodern perspectives. Each model is evaluated in turn, with the goal of synthesizing multiple perspectives in a final paper that reconciles conflicting views and focuses on instructional implications.
Section 13:  Comprehension of Text: Explores what it means to comprehend a text and how that ability develops in children and adolescents. Examines comprehension theories from the perspectives of psychology, education, linguistics, and literary theory. Participants also study the research on teaching reading comprehension to determine if schools can improve how students think and learn with texts.
Section 14:  Reading Disabilities: Explores the research on reading disabilities from various perspectives. Phonological awareness, attention, language processing abilities, neuropsychological deficits, heritable syndromes, and motivational-emotional issues are examined from existing research and case studies. Dyslexia, hyperlexia, and other labels applied to reading disabilities are examined in light of this research. Seminar discussions focus on behavioral manifestations, etiology, and instruction.
EDIS 788 - (3) (Y)
Field Project
A field-based, action research project, designed to explore a contemporary educational problem.
EDIS 789 - (3-6) (SI)
Practicum: Special Education
Supervised experiences under the direction of the professional staff in cooperation with local and state educational personnel. Experiences are designed to prepare the students to manage and instruct individual children and groups of children representative of their respective area of emphasis. The experiences are addressed as follows:
Section 1:  Early Childhood Special Education
Section 2:  Severe Disabilities
Section 3:  In-Service Training
Section 4:  Vocational
Section 5:  Behavioral Disorders
Section 6:  Learning Disabilities
Section 7:  Mental Retardation
Section 8:  Curriculum: A laboratory course for students beginning to work on the development of curriculum and instructional programs. Prerequisite: EDIS 780.
EDIS 790 - (3) (Y)
Teaching and Learning with Web-Based Cases
Students concentrate on interdisciplinary teaching and learning in elementary, middle, and secondary schools across the U.S. Course content is delivered in a case-based format via the Internet. Purposes of the course are to develop and refine the ability to recognize, analyze, and address professional problems through the use of case studies; promote collaboration and group problem-solving among professional educators; model the use of instructional technology to support student-centered learning; and provide opportunities to develop technical skills.
EDIS 793 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Independent Study
Course permits students to work, under close faculty guidance, on an individual research project. Research done in this course may not be considered a part of thesis or dissertation work. Enrollment in this course should be limited to two three-credit registrations (six credits) at the doctorate level. Exceptions to this regulation should have the approval of the advisory committee and the dean of the School of Education.
EDIS 801 - (3) (IR)
Administration and Supervision of Special Education Programs
Prerequisite: EDLF 776 and 15 graduate credits in special education.
Analyzes the administration, organization, and supervision of special education programs. Staffing, physical facilities, budgeting, equipment, community agencies, legal basis, and methods of school survey and program evaluation are considered.
EDIS 802 - (3) (S)
Readings and Research in Education of Exceptional Children
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Individual reading or research program for students majoring in the education of exceptional children. Areas of emphasis: behavior disordered (emotionally disturbed); learning disabled; mentally retarded; general special education; and special education administration and supervision.
EDIS 804 - (3) (S)
Problems in Special Education
Analyzes contemporary research on exceptional children. Areas of emphasis: behavior disordered (emotionally disturbed); learning disabled; mentally retarded; general special education; and special education administration and supervision. No more than three credits may be taken in each subsection.
EDIS 809 - (1-12) (S)
Special Education Doctoral Internship
Practical experience for doctoral students in methods, theories, and practices of various governmental and private agencies. The following appropriate and selected experiences will be provided in special education: higher education teaching; administration, supervision, and/or research in public schools; state departments of education; the United States Office of Education; state institutions; and private residential facilities for exceptional children.
EDIS 840 - (3) (Y)
Studies and Research in English Education
Students learn to analyze significant studies and research in English education; and to present and criticize selected studies from the students' review of research for their dissertations.
EDIS 851 - (1-3) (Y)
Curry Forum on Educational Issues
School-wide interdisciplinary course on key issues in education. Curry School faculty and nationally recognized scholars introduce selected issues and topics. Small discussion groups explore these subjects in greater detail. Sponsored by all four departments and open to all master's and doctoral students.
EDIS 880 - (3) (E)
Curriculum: Design and Evaluation
Prerequisite: EDIS 780.
Laboratory course for students beginning to work on the development of curriculum and instructional programs. Application of curriculum design and evaluation principles to the development of a particular curriculum identified by the student.
EDIS 882 - (3) (Y)
Curriculum: Advanced Theory
Study of the most significant recent developments in curricular concepts and patterns directed toward a deeper understanding of the theoretic base underlying them.
EDIS 885 - (3) (Y)
Current Research on Teaching and Teacher Education
Examines the emerging knowledge base on effective teaching and effective teachers. This literature includes studies of teachers, teaching and learning, and the contexts in which teaching occurs. Considers procedures and results of both quantitative and qualitative research and looks at contributions of major researchers in the field.
EDIS 891 - (3-6) (SI)
Field Project
Field based and/or action research project designed to explore an issue or line of inquiry chosen by the student and his or her assigned advisor.
EDIS 897 - (1-6) (SI)
Master's Thesis
A thesis project conducted under the guidance of the master's advisor or others approved by the departmental chair. A formal plan should be filed in the Office of Student Affairs, and the final project must be approved by at least two Curry faculty members.
EDIS 920 - (3) (Y)
Readings and Research in Early Childhood Education
Survey of current issues and trends in early childhood research. Focuses on readings in current literature and explores topics and issues determined by class participants and the instructor.
EDIS 925 - (3) (Y)
Readings and Research in Elementary Education (K-8)
Applies empirical, theoretical, and practical knowledge to classroom teaching problems.
EDIS 940 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in English Education
Students develop a comprehensive and annotated bibliography of research, along with a rationale and procedures for carrying out a study that will contribute to research, theory, and practice in English education.
EDIS 945 - (3) (IR)
Research in Mathematics Education
Analysis of significant studies and research in mathematics education. Consideration is also given to implications for needed research.
EDIS 955 - (3) (IR)
Readings and Research in Science Education
Analysis of significant studies and research in science education. Consideration is also given to implications for needed research.
EDIS 965 - (3) (IR)
Readings and Research in Social Studies Education
EDIS 970 - (3) (IR)
Reading Research Seminar
EDIS 974 - (1-6) (IR)
Internship in College Teaching or Supervision
Opportunities for experienced doctoral students to teach courses or partial courses at the University, or to supervise student teachers under the guidance of a faculty member. Opportunities arranged by the students with assistance of the sponsoring faculty member.
EDIS 993 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Under close guidance of a faculty member, students work on an area of particular interest that cannot be met by a regularly scheduled course. A plan of study should be signed by the faculty sponsor and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDIS 995 - (1-6) (SI)
Supervised Research
Prerequisite: Advisor permission.
Permits students to work jointly with faculty or other students in cooperatively designing and executing research projects. The nature and scope of such projects are advanced beyond the master's level, and a plan of research should be signed and filed in the student's permanent file.
EDIS 996 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Research
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.Independent work supervised by a Curry faculty member. A research plan should be signed by the faculty member and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDIS 997 - (1-6) (SI)
Internship - Ed.D. or Ph.D.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Section 1: Designed for doctoral students to gain experience in the profession of education, this supervised internship must be completed after admission to the doctoral program and under the direct supervision of a Curry faculty member.
Section 2: Enables doctoral students to gain experience in methods, theories, and practices of governmental and private agencies with functions related to science education. Possibilities include teaching science in higher education institutions; administration, supervision, and research in state departments of education, the U.S. Office of Education, the National Science Foundation, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and businesses and industries in science-related fields.
EDIS 999 - (3-12) (S-SS)
Doctoral Dissertation

Department of Human Services

Includes courses related to clinical and school psychology, communication disorders, counselor education, and health and physical education.
EDHS 501 - (3) (Y)
Phonetics
Studies the structure and functioning of speech sound production. Teaches the basic skills of phonetic transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet, and introduces basic theoretical issues in the study of phonology.
EDHS 502 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science
Prerequisite: EDHS 501, 505.
Examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual, and acoustic aspects of voice and speech.
EDHS 504 - (2) (Y)
The Clinical Process
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides a structured transition from the first observations of speech, language, and hearing disorders to the initial clinical practicum. Uses videotaped and live observations covering evaluation and treatment of the basic disorder areas of language, phonology, articulation, voice, fluency, and hearing across the life span.
EDHS 505 - (3) (Y)
Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms
Examines the mechanisms underlying normal speech production and reception.
EDHS 508 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Audiology
Introduces the profession of audiology,  emphasizing diagnostic audiology. Includes anatomy, physiology, and common pathologies of the auditory system; the impact of hearing loss; conventional procedures used to assess hearing; interpretation of audiological test findings; and criteria for making audiological referrals.
EDHS 510 - (1) (Y)
Professional Issues in Communication Disorders
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Lecture and discussion of professional preparation for service to the communicatively impaired population. Introduces students to professional issues including clinical training requirements, academic requirements, certification, licensure, professional ethics, cultural and linguistic diversity, and legislative and judicial mandates.
EDHS 515 - (4) (S)
American Sign Language I
Prerequisite: Speech-language pathology and audiology students.
A beginning course in American Sign Language (ASL), and an overview of using sign language with non-deaf special populations.
EDHS 518 - (4) (SI)
American Sign Language II
Prerequisite: EDHS 515 or instructor permission.
An intermediate course, assuming a beginning skill level in American Sign Language (ASL).
EDHS 524 - (3) (S)
Substance Abuse in Society
Investigates substance abuse and use in contemporary society. Treats topics from a multi-disciplinary perspective, including biological, pharmacologic, cultural, social, psychological, political, economic, and legal aspects of substance abuse. Analyzes patterns of addiction, intervention, and rehabilitation with respect to alcoholism and other drugs. Examines assessments of the costs, options, and alternatives to addiction, along with educational efforts toward prevention. Class discussions are an integral part of this course. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS 224 and 524.
EDHS 533 - (3) (IR)
Communication Skills: Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR)
Continuous and interrelated experiences provide an opportunity to learn more about communicating with other people. Focuses on effective communication skills and personal communication styles. Effective communication responses are practiced in class and through the required laboratory experiences.
EDHS 542 - (3) (Y)
Motor Learning
Prerequisite: Statistics, or Tests and Measurements
Analyzes principles and concepts related to the acquisition of motor skills. Discusses the basic research and principles of motor learning and performance, including the psychological and physiological principles related to movement behavior, with specific relevance to the rehabilitative teaching process. Extensive writing, along with a research project, is required.
EDHS 543 - (3) (Y)
Social Processes and Individual Differences in Sport and Exercise Psychology
Focuses on the social and psychological factors related to participation in sport and exercise. Includes socialization into and through exercise and sport; observational learning of motor and psychological skills; feedback, reinforcement, and leadership behaviors; competition and competitive stress; and character development and self-perception in sport and exercise.
EDHS 544 - (3) (Y)
Athletic Injuries
Prerequisite: Anatomy, kinesiology, or instructor permission.
An advanced course in principles, procedures, and techniques in the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries for the athletic trainer, physical therapist, and physical education teacher. A one-credit laboratory experience is available in addition to the regular course.
EDHS 545 - (3) (Y)
Adapted Physical Education
Examines the nature and causes of disabling conditions and the motor needs and tolerances associated with these conditions. Enhances experience and skill in planning, assessing, prescribing, teaching, and evaluating instruction for children with disabilities in mainstream physical education settings.
EDHS 546 - (3) (Y)
Assessment in Physical Education
Studies assessment strategies and techniques  in physical activity settings (i.e., fitness and motor skills, as well as fitness self-assessments). Emphasizes the general concepts and techniques of assessment in physical activity settings, and  addresses strategies for the selection and administration of assessment tests.
EDHS 547 - (3) (Y)
Motivational Processes in Sport and Exercise Psychology
Focuses on factors related to motivation in sport and exercise settings. Antecedents and consequences of motivated behavior are examined from theoretical, research, and application perspectives. Emphasizes participatory motivation in sport; intrinsic/extrinsic motivational orientations (cognitive evaluation and competence motivation); achievement goals; causal attributions and effective responses; and exercise motivation and behavior.
EDHS 548 - (3) (SS)
Qualitative Analysis of Motor Patterns
Experienced teachers analyze and enhance their qualitative assessment skills. The course identifies and works on a number of qualitative skills (approximately 10-15) chosen by the class.
EDHS 549 - (3) (E)
Sport Psychology Interventions
Focuses on psychological skills and methods in sport and exercise settings.
EDHS 550 - (3) (Y)
Contemporary Health Issues
Analyzes current health problems and interests relative to various stages of the life cycle. Discusses human sexuality, modification of disease risks, emergency health care, drug use and abuse, mood alteration, death, and dying. Emphasizes the physiological, psychological, sociological, and ethical factors involved in individual health-related decision making. Same as EDHS450, but with extra requirements.
EDHS 551 - (3) (E)
Teaching School Health Education
Introduces current instructional approaches appropriate to a comprehensive K-12 health education curriculum. Designed for elementary and secondary school health instructors. Stresses specific roles for schools in preventing health problems and promoting high- level wellness among students and community through well-planned health instruction. Emphasizes organization for planning, implementation techniques, SOLS, instructional strategies, and the evaluation of instruction.
EDHS 552 - (4) (S)
Emergency Medical Care
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Examines current approaches to the management of accidental and medical emergencies. Investigates appropriate procedures for reducing the severity of injury, as well as possible preventive actions. Considers cardiopulmonary difficulty, temperature-related injuries, poisoning, hemorrhaging, diabetes, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrest, emergency childbirth, epilepsy, fractures, and major forms of shock. Develops an understanding of community organizations specializing in providing emergency medical treatment. Investigates the components of a comprehensive emergency medical care system. Successful completion appropriate examinations will result in CPR certification. Same as EDHS 451, but with extra requirements.
EDHS 553 - (3) (O)
Nutrition
Studies the basic principles of nutrition, including psychosocial-cultural considerations in dietary intake. Focuses on nutrient sources and actions, digestion, special population needs, weight control, food faddism, international problems, nutrition education, and nutrition-related disorders.
EDHS 554 - (3) (Y)
Modalities in Athletic Training
Prerequisite: EDHS 544 or instructor permission.
Study of the theoretical foundations and principles of the therapeutic modalities used in the physical medicine environment. Includes theory and clinical techniques used to enhance the treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.
EDHS 557 - (3) (SS)
The Art and Science of Sports Medicine
A week-long conference that begins with lectures, visitations, and observations of surgery and prosected cadaver joints. Continues with presentations by nationally known physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists, and concludes with a written examination and submission of a literature review paper on a selected topic in sports medicine. Same as EDHS 457, but with extra requirements. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS 457 and 557.
EDHS 558 - (3) (SS)
Sport Psychology Conference
Analysis of psychological variables related to motor skill and athletic performance. Topics include motivation, goal setting, mental rehearsal, coaching styles, personality variables in sport, youth sport, anxiety, and performance enhancement. Specific applications to teaching, counseling, and coaching are emphasized. A conference fee is required. This week-long conference concludes with an examination and an extensive paper due at a later time. Same as EDHS 458, but with extra requirements. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS458 and 558.

EDHS 561 - (3) (Y-SS)
Computer Applications in Physical Education
Provides hands-on experience with specific programs that introduce the student to using the microcomputer as an object of instruction, a medium of instruction, and a management tool. Develops computer skills that can be used immediately by physical education professionals to improve their efficiency.
EDHS 563 - (2) (E)
History, Principles, and Philosophy of Physical Education
Analyzes the heritage of physical education in terms of historical and philosophical foundations, as well as the cultural significance of sport and physical activity. Examines specific issues and principles related to physical education, such as Title IX, advocacy, and block scheduling.
EDHS 589 - (1-6) (S)
Selected Topics
These are designed as pilot courses to meet new program area degree requirements, and changing needs in the field. Used also to offer experimental courses, and courses under development, these are announced and offered on a semester-to-semester basis. May be graded or S/U, depending on the instructor, and may be repeated.
EDHS 706 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Phonology and Articulation
Prerequisite: EDHS 501, 502, 504, 505, instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of development and disorders of phonology and articulation. Etiology, evaluation, and treatment are discussed.
EDHS 708 - (2) (SS)
Disorders of Fluency
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of fluency disorders: development, theory, evaluation, and treatment.
EDHS 709 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Voice
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of voice disorders, organic and functional: pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment. Requires attendance at the University Voice Clinic.
EDHS 710 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Communication: Craniofacial Anomalies
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of communication disorders associated with cleft palate and other orofacial deformities: pathology, evaluation, and treatment. Requires attendance at the University Craniofacial Clinic.
EDHS 718 - (3) (Y)
Habilitative Audiology I
Prerequisite: EDHS 508 or equivalent or instructor permission.
Overview of a family-centered team approach to the development or rehabilitation of communication skills in hearing impaired individuals across the life span, with sensitivity to cultural differences. The student is acquainted with a wide variety of hearing technology.
EDHS 719 - (3) (Y)
Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Communication
Prerequisite: Basic anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing mechanism, and instructor permission.
Introduces the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of speech, language, reading, writing, hearing, and vestibular function. Neuropathologies affecting communicative functions are reviewed.
EDHS 721 - (3) (Y-SS)
Introduction to the Profession of Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission; required of all counselor education master's degree students
Introduces the history of professional guidance, counseling, and personnel services; the social, economic, philosophical, theoretical, and political bases of the profession; the major legal and ethical issues facing counselors; and a survey of career opportunities for counselors.
EDHS 722 - (3) (Y-SS)
Introduction to Career Interventions
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Surveys social, educational, and occupational information and materials, as well as their use in counseling. Introduces career development theory; written and non-written informational media; personal, educational, and career decision-making; and basic life planning techniques.
EDHS 723 - (3) (Y-SS)
Theories and Techniques of Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Analysis of the theory and practice of counseling with special emphasis on the counseling process. Conditions of counseling, counseling techniques, and the counselor as a professional helper are emphasized.
EDHS 724 - (3) (Y-SS)
Group Counseling Procedures
Prerequisite: EDHS 721, 723, 729, or instructor permission.
Analyzes the theory and practice of group work, the relationship of group activities to counseling, and specific skills in group techniques.
EDHS 725 - (1) (S)
Using Tests in Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors; EDLF 718, EDHS 723, and instructor permission.
Study of the role of standardized test data in counseling.
EDHS 727 - (3) (Y-SS)
Research in Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Examines the role of research in the counseling profession, emphasizing the activities of the counselor as both a consumer and a producer of research.
EDHS 728 - (3) (Y)
Community and Human Service Agency Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Provides an overview of the historical, philosophical, organizational, and sociocultural foundations of human service agencies. Explores various community and human service agency settings and the unique client populations they may serve. Attention is given to the roles, functions, and responsibilities of mental health counselors.
EDHS 729 - (3) (S)
Essential Counseling Skills
Prerequisite/ Co-requisite: EDHS 721,  723 or instructor permission.
Exploration and practice of essential counseling skills helpful facilitating client change.
EDHS 730 - (3) (Y-SS)
Multicultural Counseling
Prerequisite: EDHS 721, 723, 729, or instructor permission.
Exploration of cognitive, affective, and behavioral considerations of counseling culturally diverse client groups. Introduces counseling theories and techniques relevant to the mental health of these groups. Cultural attributes, strategies, and coping skills of diverse client groups are examined in terms of how they can be synthesized into the counseling process.
EDHS 733 - (3) (Y)
Ethical-Legal Aspects of Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Identifies some ethical and legal aspects of the helping professions and considers some of the moral-ethical dilemmas of counselors and other helpers. Focus on actual cases, ethics, legal responsibilities,  and decision-making.
EDHS 741 - (3) (Y)
Pathology and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries
Prerequisite: EDHS 544, NATA certification, or instructor permission.
Presents an overview of the etiology for head and neck, upper and lower extremity, and trunk. Also included are the contemporary therapeutic exercise protocols for each of these injuries. Guest lectures are presented on related topics.
EDHS 742 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Exercise Physiology
Prerequisite: Human physiology; introduction to exercise physiology or equivalent.
Emphasizing current research findings, this class focuses on energy metabolism, physiological responses to exercise, and exercise training techniques.
EDHS 743 - (1-3) (Y)
Exercise Physiology Laboratory
Prerequisite: EDHS 742.
A presentation, through lectures and laboratory experiences, of laboratory procedures and biomedical instrumentation pertinent to exercise physiology laboratories and applied physiology research. Students are involved in a review of current research in each area of laboratory experimentation and participate as both subjects and investigators.
EDHS 744 - (3) (SI)
Motor Development
Describes and analyzes normal motor development across the lifespan, from pre-natal development through older adulthood. Emphasizes identifying and classifying motor behaviors across the lifespan, as well as understanding the interaction of environmental and biological factors that affect acquisition of these movement behaviors. Laboratory experiences included. Same as EDHS 445, but with additional scholarly and research requirements.
EDHS 745 - (3) (O)
Advanced Motor Learning
Prerequisite: EDHS542.
Analysis of the interaction of psychological and physiological principles related to the learning and performance of motor skills. Selected topics include feedback models of learning, cybernetics, factors affecting the acquisition of skill, classification of movement behavior and motor memory. Emphasizes in-depth study of the theoretical and practical nature of motor skill acquisition and performance.
EDHS 747 - (3) (O)
Developmental Sport and Exercise Psychology
A lifespan developmental approach is taken with attention to topics that are salient to youth, adolescence, and young, middle, and older adulthood. Topics include self-perceptions, motivation, social influences, moral development, and exercise/sport maintenance and adherence.
EDHS 750 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Practicum
Prerequisite: Advisor permission.
Supervised field experiences under the direction of the professional staff.
Section 1: Adapted Physical Education (S-SS)
Section 2: Adult Fitness (S)
Section 3: Athletic Training (S-SS)
Section 4: Health Promotion (SI)
Section 5: Motor Learning (SI)
Section 6: Sport and Exercise Psychology (S-SS)
Section 7: Strength Training (S-SS)
Section 8: Cardiac Rehabilitation (SI)
Section 9: Instructional Supervision (S-SS)
EDHS 758 - (3) (SS)
Anatomical Bases of Sports Medicine
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course includes dissection of the human cadaver and emphasizes the musculoskeletal, articular, nervous, and vascular systems. Dissection experiences are supplemented with classroom lectures. The role of anatomical structures as they relate to athletic injury mechanism, evaluation, and rehabilitation is emphasized. Each student prepares a presentation designed to relate topics of clinical relevance to dissected regions of the cadavers.
EDHS 759 - (3) (IR)
Principles of Stress and Stress Management
Examines the integration of stress theory, assessment, and management within the counseling and helping professions. Explores the impact of stress on mental and physical health and the acquisition of coping skills.
EDHS 760 - (3) (Y)
Adapted Physical Education: Developmental Disabilities
Studies the physical and motor attributes of children with developmental, learning, and emotional disabilities. Examines abnormal and delayed patterns of motor development through an assessment, diagnosis, and prescriptive format. Emphasizes identifying functional goals for these individuals and programmatic techniques for attaining these goals.
EDHS 762 - (3) (Y)
Personality
Prerequisite: EDLF 715, 716, or 720.
Examines classical and modern theories of the origin and development of personality and human motivation.
EDHS 763 - (3) (Y)
Seminar: Issues in Professional Psychology
Reviews the historical antecedents of contemporary practice. Centers on ethics, regulation of the profession, legislative and legal issues relative to practice, interdisciplinary issues, public policy, and psychopharmacology as it relates to clinical practice.
EDHS 764 - (3) (Y)
Cognitive Assessment
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces the administration, scoring, and interpretation of diverse psychological tests. Includes tests of intelligence, perceptual motor functioning, and various specific abilities.
EDHS 768 - (3) (Y)
Psychopathology
Prerequisite: EDHS 762 and instructor permission.
Analyzes the etiology, development, and manifestations of various forms of emotional and social maladjustment in children, adolescents, and adults. Emphasizes developing the conceptual understanding necessary for differential diagnosis, symptom assessment, and use of the DSM system. Stresses the importance of cultural, social, and developmental factors.
EDHS 770 - (3) (Y)
Health and Physical Education Teaching Seminar
Prerequisite: Advisor permission; corequisite: EDHS 771-772.
Analyzes current issues, such as safety, liability, and child abuse, related to teaching health and physical education (K-12).
EDHS 771 - (6) (Y)
Teaching Associateship: Elementary Physical Education
Prerequisite: Advisor permission
Student teaching experience for pre-service teachers that includes writing lesson plans and reflective teaching logs. Supervised by clinical instructors from elementary schools, in cooperation with University supervisors.
EDHS 772 - (3-6) (Y)
Teaching Associateship: Secondary Health and Physical Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Student teaching experience for pre-service teachers that includes writing lesson plans and reflective teaching logs. Supervised by clinical instructors from secondary schools, in cooperation with University supervisors.
EDHS 788 - (1-6) (Y)
Health and Physical Education Field Project
Field based action research project designed to explore a contemporary educational problem.
EDHS 793 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Approval of advisor and instructor, and an approved plan of study.
Permits students to work on individual study topics, under close faculty guidance, when particular needs cannot be met by registration in regularly scheduled courses. May be repeated for credit; however, only six credits of EDHS 793 may be included in an M.Ed. degree program. The independent study topic must be listed on the student's degree application.
Section 1: Letter Grading
Section 2: S/U Grading
EDHS 802 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Communication: Augmentative and Alternate Systems
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-demonstration course that introduces the techniques and materials essential to developing augmentative communication programs for children, adolescents, and adults who are non-vocal and severely physically handicapped.
EDHS 803 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Motor Speech Production
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDHS 502, 706, 719 or instructor permission.
Review of contemporary issues in the practice of speech-language pathology for patients  with dysarthria or apraxia of speech: includes semiology, etiology, pathophysiology and nosology. Introduces clinical practice, including evaluation, treatment and counseling.
EDHS 809 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Language: Birth to Preschool
Prerequisite: Language development course or instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of language systems disorders, including morpho-syntax, semantics, and pragmatics in the early developmental population; includes etiology, evaluation, and treatment.
EDHS 810 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Language: School Age
Prerequisite: Language development course or instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of language impairments in school-age children in relation to academic, social, and emotional performance; includes etiology, evaluation, and treatment.
EDHS 811 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Language: Aphasia
Prerequisite: EDHS 719 or instructor permission.
Reviews contemporary issues in clinical aphasiaology, including epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, semiology, and nosology. Introduces clinical practice, including evaluation, treatment, and counseling.
EDHS 812 - (3) (SS)
Disorders of Communication Based in Cognitive Dysfunction
Prerequisite: EDHS 719 or instructor permission.
Reviews contemporary issues in the practice of speech-language pathology for persons presenting with right cerebral hemisphere pathology, traumatic brain injury, dementia, epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, semiology, or nosology. Introduces clinical practice including evaluation, treatment, and counseling.
EDHS 813 - (3) (Y)
Dysphagia
Prerequisite: EDHS 719 or instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of problems of swallowing. Reviews contemporary issues in the practice of speech-language pathology for patients presenting with dysphagia, including semiology, etiology, pathophysiology, and nosology. An introduction to clinical practice, including evaluation, treatment, and counseling.
EDHS 815 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Clinical Practice in Speech and Language Pathology
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analysis of clinical practice in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of speech- and language-handicapped children and adults. Programs are individually structured to provide clinical and field work experience with a variety of ages, patients, and rehabilitation settings, or in a particular aspect of professional specialization. Close individual supervision is maintained by clinical instructors, and each case is discussed in weekly conference.
EDHS 817 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Clinical Externship
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analysis of clinical practice in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of children and adults with communicative disorders. Programs are individually structured to provide experience with a variety of clinical populations, age groups, and specializations. The sites are off-grounds, and usually within a two hour driving distance of the University.
EDHS 822 - (3) (IR)
Consultation
Prerequisite: EDHS 723, 729, or instructor permission.
An examination of the models and process of consultation. Designed to expand the student's interpersonal skill repertoire. Emphasizes the practice of consultation appropriate to various work settings.
EDHS 824 - (3) (Y)
Substance Abuse Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor Education majors or instructor permission.
Introduction to substance abuse counseling. Provides an understanding of the disease concept and other views of addiction, different methods of treating substance abuse, the process of recovery, the Twelve Step model, the role of the family in addiction, and counseling issues such as confronting denial, intervention, family counseling, relapse, and the role of the counselor in treatment. Emphasis is placed on developing skills through role play, case study, and interactions with substance abuse counselors and clients.
EDHS 825 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Career Development and Career Counseling
Prerequisite: EDHS 722 and 723.
Advanced study of career development theories and research, and the application of theoretical propositions to career counseling. Emphasizes the integration of career development concepts into the counseling process.
EDHS 827 - (3) (IR)
Counseling Adults
Prerequisite: EDHS 723.
Explores the concerns and problems that post high-school aged counselees present to counselors. Focuses on developmental theories and examines resources and helping strategies appropriate for those problem areas.
EDHS 828 - (3) (Y)
Marriage and Family Dynamics
Prerequisite: EDHS 723 or instructor permission.
Analyzes the theory and practice of family counseling. An overview course that addresses the major traditional family therapy theories, as well as recent advances.
EDHS 829 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Counselor Education Master's Internship
Prerequisite: Instructor permission, EDHS 729, subject to availability of suitable internship placement. An intent to register must be filed the semester preceding registration.
For elementary, secondary, and college personnel, and community agency counselors. A minimum of 100 on-site hours is required for each 1 credit of EDHS 829. A minimum total of 600 on-site hours and six credits of EDHS 829 may be included in M.Ed. programs. When approved by the program advisor, nine credits of EDHS 829 may be included in an M.Ed. program. A description of the setting, specifying the school level, the student personnel service, or the type of community or human service agency in which the internship occurred must be included on the student's degree application. Students are required to participate in on-Grounds supervision. May be repeated for credit.
Section 1:  Elementary School (S)
Section 2:  Middle/Secondary School (S)
Section 3:  Higher Education (S-SS)
Section 4:  Mental Health (S-SS)
EDHS 830 - (3) (IR)
Assessment in Counseling
Prerequisite: EDLF 718/EDHS 725.
Studies assessment devices and techniques used by counselors. Also provides practice in the interpretation of test data with emphasis on communication principles.
EDHS 831 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to  School Counseling
Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or  instructor permission.
Explores the planning and initiation of counseling programs in schools with an emphasis upon counselor's duties, organizational structure, goals, purpose, and evaluation. Programs and techniques appropriate to meet the needs of students are studied. Attention is also given to contemporary issues confronting school counselors.
EDHS 834 - (3) (Y)
Counseling Children and Adolescents
Prerequisite: EDHS 721, 723, or instructor permission.
Explores concerns and problems that children and adolescents present to counselors. Focuses on developmental theories and examines resources and helping strategies appropriate for those problem areas.
EDHS 838 - (1-3) (SI)
Topical Issues in Counselor Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Deals with a variety of professional issues in counseling, guidance, and personnel services. Topics are announced prior to registration and can be developed around the interests of prospective students. Must be prearranged.
EDHS 839 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Advanced Counseling Practicum
Prerequisite: EDHS 729, advanced standing, and instructor permission.
An intent to register must be filed the semester preceding registration. For advanced students who desire field or counseling experiences. (Subject to availability of suitable practicum placement.) May be repeated.
Section 1: Individual Counseling
Section 2: Group Counseling
EDHS 841 - (3) (Y)
Orthopedic Basis of Sports Medicine
Prerequisite: EDHS 741, instructor permission.
Analyzes topics pertinent to evaluation and treatment of athletic injuries, including Cyriax approach to soft tissue evaluation, instrumented assessment of knee joint laxity, joint mobilization, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, and isokinetic evaluation and rehabilitation. Laboratory experiences follow didactic presentations when appropriate.
EDHS 842 - (3) (Y)
Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise
Prerequisite: EDHS 742 or instructor permission.
Analyzes metabolic adaptations to acute bouts of exercise and chronic exercise training. Includes energy sources for human movement; substrate utilization, muscle plasticity, functional significance of the metabolic adaptations to chronic exercise training; muscle fatigue and damage.
EDHS 843 - (3) (Y)
Exercise Intervention in Disease
Prerequisite: EDHS742 or instructor permission.
Examines the impact of exercise on the disease process, focusing primarily on cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Examines hypotheses concerning causes of diseases, risk factors, and modification of risk factors through exercise and diet intervention.
EDHS 845 - (3) (Y)
Disease Processes and Prevention
Investigates those disease processes most common and of most significance in their effects upon individual, community, nation, and world health status. Emphasizes definitions, manifestations, etiology, pathology, epidemiology, general medicine procedures, disease prognosis, and potential preventive actions. Develops an understanding of the specific mechanisms through which preventive actions work as a goal of effective health education.
EDHS 846 - (3) (Y)
Adapted Physical Education: Physically and Sensory Impaired
Studies the physical and motor attributes of individuals with physical, sensory, and health disabilities. Addresses programming and instructional implications in physical education for these populations in regard to their ecological, psychological, social, and learning characteristics. Emphasizes developing and achieving functional physical education goals through planning, assessing, prescribing, teaching, and evaluating instruction.
EDHS 848 - (3) (Y)
Review and Critique of Sport and Exercise Psychology Research
Develops critical thinking and analysis in order to read and interpret recent studies on a variety of topics. Discusses the process of article review and publication, including the publication process; characteristics of good research articles; using those characteristics to review and critique published and submitted work; and how to organize and write a good manuscript review. Enables independent, informed decisions on the quality of others  research and offers insight on how to write papers that maximize the probability of a favorable response by reviewers and readers.
EDHS 850 - (3)
Seminar
Prerequisite: Instructor and advisor permission.
Additional sections on special topics may be offered subject to sufficient student interest.
Section 1: Adapted Physical Education (S-SS)
Section 2: Athletic Training (Y)
Section 3: Biomechanics (S-SS)
Section 4: Exercise Physiology (S-SS)
Section 5: Health Promotion (S-SS)
Section 6: Motor Development (S-SS)
Section 7: Motor Learning (S-SS)
Section 8: Sport/Exercise Psychology (S-SS)
Section 9: Sports Medicine (Y)
Section 10: Strength Training (S-SS)
Section 11: Pedagogy (S-SS)
EDHS 851 - (1-3) (IR)
Curry Forum on Educational Issues
School-wide interdisciplinary course on key issues in education. Selected topics are introduced by Curry School faculty and nationally recognized scholars and then explored in greater detail by small discussion groups. Sponsored by all four departments and open to all master's and doctoral students.
EDHS 853 - (1-9)
Supervised Research
Prerequisite: advisor and instructor permission
Participation in a research project. Designed especially for master's degree program students. Total credits may not exceed nine.
Section 1: Adapted Physical Education (S-SS)
Section 2: Athletic Training (S-SS)
Section 3: Biomechanics (S-SS)
Section 4: Exercise Physiology (S-SS)
Section 5: Health Promotion (S-SS)
Section 6: Motor Development (S-SS)
Section 7: Motor Learning (S-SS)
Section 8: Sport/Exercise Psychology (S-SS)
Section 9: Sports Medicine (S-SS)
Section 10: Strength Training (S-SS)
Section 11: Pedagogy (S)
EDHS 861 - (3) (Y)
Marital and Couple's Therapy
Analyzes basic principles and techniques of marital and couple's therapy. Emphasizes the practical, covering theory as it relates to the interactional dynamics and behavior of the therapy. Experiential techniques (i.e., role playing, video tape, and live supervision) are an integral part of the course. Some therapy experience is desirable, although not required.
EDHS 863 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Psychotherapy I
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduction to the assumption and process of psychotherapy. Explores basic principles of change as reflected in the dynamics of the psychotherapeutic relationship between the therapist and the client. Examines the pitfalls of being a beginning therapist and the problems faced in initiating the therapy process. Participants are provided with an experiential setting to heighten awareness of transference, resistance, and termination.
EDHS 864 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Psychotherapy II
Prerequisite: EDHS 863 or instructor permission.
In-depth examination of cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic individual psychotherapy. The theoretical base and accompanying empirical literature of varying approaches are discussed with special emphasis on application of principles. Experimental techniques (e.g., role playing and observation of video tapes) are included. Continuation of EDHS 863.
EDHS 865 - (3) (Y-SS)
Individual Psychotherapy
Designed to teach the principles and techniques of individual psychotherapy. May be repeated for credit; each year the psychotherapeutic approaches to be taught are specified. The specialized course offering for a given year (e.g., brief strategic psychotherapy, child psychotherapy, or rational emotive therapy) is printed on the student's transcript.
EDHS 866 - (3) (Y)
Personality Assessment I
Prerequisite: EDHS 764 and instructor permission.
First of a two-semester sequence in personality assessment. Trains the clinical/ school psychology graduate student in basic methods of clinical assessment using a battery of psychological tests, including both projective and non-projective instruments. There are two components to the first semester course: critical examination of theory and research on psychological testing; and a supervised practicum in clinical assessment. Clinical assessments of children and adults are covered.
EDHS 867 - (3) (Y)
Personality Assessment II
Prerequisite: EDHS 866 and instructor permission.Second of a two-semester sequence in personality assessment.
During this semester, students examine theory, practice, and research on the application of a variety of personality assessment techniques and instruments to specific diagnostic questions (e.g., assessment of psychotic, affective, neurotic, and borderline disorders); and continue learning to conduct personality assessments through a supervised practicum. Clinical assessments of children and adults are covered.
EDHS 869 - (1-6) (S-SS)
School/Clinical Psychology Practicum
Prerequisite: EDHS 764.
Supervised field experience in activities central to the role of the school/child psychologist.
EDHS 870 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Clinical Psychology Practicum
Supervised placement in a setting designed to provide students with clinical experiences dealing with children, adults, and families.
EDHS 871 - (3) (Y)
Psychosocial Consultation
Prerequisite: EDHS 768 and instructor permission.
Seminar and practicum experience designed specifically for advanced doctoral students. Focuses on the theoretical and research issues that relate to the practice of consultation and supervision. In addition to the readings and class discussions, students engage in both consultation and supervisory activities. Students are challenged to draw upon their prior knowledge of psychological assessment, problem solving, methods of intervention, and psychological theory. Facilitates the integration of prior learning into practice.
EDHS 872 - (3-6) (IR)
Group Therapy Interventions
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Designed to broaden and strengthen the group therapeutic skills and experience of doctoral students. Entails the observation of various group procedures and participation in an ongoing group experience.
EDHS 873 - (3) (Y)
Family Therapy: Theory and Techniques
Prerequisite: EDHS 864, 865 or equivalent, and instructor permission.
Examines major schools in the field of family therapy with a focus on learning how to conceptualize a case from these different perspectives. Special emphasis is on the application of various intervention models to family problems commonly presented in therapy and to a review of both process and outcome research in family therapy. Observation of actual cases is a required part of the course.
EDHS 874 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Family Therapy
Prerequisite: EDHS 864, 865 and instructor permission.
Advanced seminar in family therapy designed to give students an in-depth exposure to methods of family intervention. Includes ongoing supervision using both didactic and case format. May be repeated for credit.
EDHS 875 - (3) (E)
Psychological Interventions in Schools
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Advanced study of the role and function of the psychologist in school settings. Topics include psychoeducational assessment and remediation procedures; varieties and techniques of appropriate psychological interventions in schools; models of, and national trends in, school psychology service delivery.
EDHS 893 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Approval of advisor and instructor and an approved plan of study
Permits advanced graduate students to work on individual study topics, under close faculty guidance, when particular needs cannot be met by registration in regularly scheduled courses. The topics of the independent study must be listed on the student's degree application. May be repeated for credit.
Section 1: Letter Grading
Section 2: S/U Grading
EDHS 897 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Directed Research and Master's Thesis
Prerequisite: permission of advisor and faculty sponsor
Section 1: Independent research by advanced level graduate students preparing for doctoral dissertation research. May be repeated.
Section 2: A master's thesis project conducted under the guidance of the master's advisor or others approved by the departmental chair. A formal plan should be filed in the Office of Student Affairs, and the final project must be approved by at least two Curry faculty members.
EDHS 909 - (3) (SI)
Doctoral Seminar: Communication Disorders
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.May be repeated for credit.
EDHS 921 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Group Counseling Techniques
Prerequisite: EDHS 724, 729, and instructor permission.
Advanced graduate seminar in group counseling theories and techniques. Different theoretical approaches to philosophies of group counseling are studied in depth. The accompanying techniques of each theory are considered and practiced.
EDHS 922 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Individual Counseling Strategies
Prerequisite: EDHS 729 and instructor permission.
An advanced graduate seminar designed to offer a thorough examination of the theoretical basis and research evidence for several specific behavior change techniques applicable in counseling individuals. Particular attention is assigned to the application of learning models in the development and use of various individual counseling procedures.
EDHS 929 - (3) (Y)
Counselor Supervision
Prerequisite: Counselor education doctoral student or instructor permission.
Study of counselor supervision combined with a required experience as a supervisor-trainee in a laboratory practicum course.
EDHS 931 - (3) (Y)
Doctoral Seminar: Counselor Education
Prerequisite: advanced standing and instructor permission.
Specialized study of the profession's present status, emphasizing research in the field and possible future directions.
EDHS 932 - (3) (Y)
Doctoral Seminar: Counselor Education
Prerequisite: advanced standing and instructor permission.Specialized study of the profession's present status, emphasizing professional problems and issues.
EDHS 939 - (3-6) (S-SS)
Counselor Education Doctoral Internship
Prerequisite: instructor permission; subject to availability of suitable internship placement.
Section 1: School
Section 2: Higher Education
Section 3: Mental Health
Section 4: Counselor Education
EDHS 950 - (1-6) (Y)
Advanced Doctoral Seminar
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Special topics and research analysis for doctoral students.
EDHS 974 - (1-6)
Internship in College Teaching or Supervision
Opportunities for experienced doctoral students to teach courses or partial courses at the University, or to supervise student teachers under the guidance of a faculty member. Opportunities are arranged by the students with the assistance of the sponsoring faculty member.
EDHS 975 - (1-3) (S-SS)
Seminar: Topics in Clinical Psychology
Doctoral seminar covering selected topics in adult and family clinical psychology. May be repeated for credit.
EDHS 976 - (1-3) (S-SS)
Seminar: Topical Issues in School Clinical Psychology
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Deals with a variety of professional issues in school and child clinical psychology. Topics can be developed around the interests of prospective students. Must be prearranged. Course topics will be announced prior to registration and have included social and affective process in development and neuropsychology. May be repeated for credit.
EDHS 993 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Advisor permission.
Under close guidance of a faculty member, student work on an area of particular interest that cannot be met by a regularly scheduled course. A plan of study should be signed by the faculty sponsor and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDHS 995 - (1-6) (SI)
Supervised Research
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Permits students to work jointly with faculty or other students in cooperatively designing and executing research projects. The nature and scope of such projects are advanced beyond the master's level, and a plan of research should be signed and filed in the student's permanent file.
EDHS 996 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Research
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Permits students to work independently under the supervision of a Curry faculty member. A plan of research should be signed by the faculty member and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDHS 997 - (1-12) (S-SS)
Internship - Ed.D. or Ph.D.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Full-time professional internship with supervision shared by the host institution or agency and the University.
Section 1: Professional Psychology: A supervised experience in which students apply their clinical skills in a mental health, school, or hospital setting. All settings meet either the criteria for internships set by the Virginia Board of Psychology or those set by the American Psychological Association, in addition to those established by the faculty of the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology.
Section 2: Speech-Language Pathology: Clinical internship in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals with communicative handicaps in an educational, rehabilitation, or medical setting. The internship provides students with an opportunity to gain experience in working with other professional team members serving  communicatively handicapped individuals; be exposed to, and participate in, the operations of the practicum site; increase their abilities to assume the responsibilities associated with independent case management; and, when possible, specialize in working with a particular age group or disorder.
Section 3: A supervised internship designed for doctoral students to gain experience in the profession of education. This internship must be completed after admission to the doctoral program and under the direct supervision of a Curry faculty member.
Section 4: Counselor Education: A supervised doctoral-level internship experience in Counselor Education.
EDHS 999 - (1-12) (S-SS)
Doctoral Dissertation
Continuous enrollment is required from the start of the dissertation through the proposal and final examination.

Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy
EDLF 501 - (3) (Y)
Learning and Development
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS388.
Surveys the principles of human growth, development, and learning that are central to the practice of teaching. Provides opportunities for professional application. Credit may not be earned in both EDLF 301 and 501.
EDLF 545 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Classroom Computing
Prerequisite: EDLF 345.
This course addresses the use and integration of educational technologies in K-12 educational settings, and particularly leading edge tools and emerging technologies. The focus of the course is on practical use of such technologies in K-12 classrooms. Laboratory exercises and assignments enable students to practice skills, learn management techniques, review courseware, evaluate software, and develop instructional activities while completing professionally related projects.
EDLF 546 - (3) (Y)
Software Applications in Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides experience in using major generic utility software: data base management, data graphing tools, and graphic production. Students apply a wide variety of software to instructional and administrative problems.
EDLF 555 - (3) (Y)
Multicultural Education
Prepares students to deal with the increasingly multicultural educational milieu. Emphasizes the process of understanding one's own bias and prejudices and how they effect the school and classroom learning environment. Included are readings, class discussions, field projects, journal writing, and other methods of directed self explorations.
EDLF 561 - (3) (Y)
Production of Instructional Materials
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides teachers and instructors with the skills and competencies needed to design and produce appropriate instructional media. Topics include media production planning; selecting appropriate media formats; illustrating concepts, processes, and techniques; lettering for captions and text; mounting and preserving materials; audio design; supporting print materials; and media format translation.
EDLF 562 - (3) (Y)
Educational Video Production
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introductory experience in producing educational video programs. Emphasizes design and production of video materials in education and industry. Participants operate as production crews in studio simulations and as producers-directors of field projects. Competencies of program design, production, and utilization are emphasized.
EDLF 563 - (3-6) (SI)
Advanced Video Technology
Prerequisite: EDLF 562 or equivalent, video design/production experience, instructor permission.
Provides field experience in the design, production, and post-production phases of video programs. The participants function as production team members. Emphasizes producing programs that meet the research, instructional, and information dissemination needs of the Curry School of Education.
EDLF 564 - (3) (Y)
Instructional Photography
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Explores photography as a research technique and classroom activity. Emphasizes the basic competencies required to visualize images and execute the steps of exposing, processing, and printing them. Topics include basic darkroom equipment, chemistry, and processes; camera operation; film exposure and filtration; image control with the view camera; studio lighting; copy techniques; audio narration; and synchronization. Students need access to an adjustable camera and must provide their own film, paper, and other supplies.
EDLF 565 - (3-6) (Y)
Advanced Photography
Prerequisite: EDLF 564 or equivalent experience; instructor permission.
Initial lectures and demonstrations cover a selected range of skills that are requisite to the serious use of the medium. This is followed by presentations and discussions on the application of photography to specific areas, such as instruction (visual media design and production), research (principles of visual anthropology and other field work applications), and aesthetics (photography as human expression).
EDLF 586 - (3) (Y)
Museums and Education
Introduction to the history and development of museums and their educational work in America. Themes include an overview of museum history; exemplary museum interpretation and educational programs; instructional designs for teaching with objects and collections; and strategies for working with school groups and other audiences.
EDLF 589 - (1-6) (S)
Selected Topics
These are designed as pilot courses to meet new program area degree requirements, and changing needs in the field. Used also to offer experimental courses, and courses under development, these are announced and offered on a semester-to-semester basis. May be graded or S/U, depending on the instructor, and may be repeated.
EDLF 590 - (1-3) (IR)
Workshop
Special topics offered as needed. Generally an experimental or shortened course format.
EDLF 591 - (1-6) (IR)
Internship/Practicum
A special assignment, agreed to by an advisor, that provides a unique experience in an educational setting consistent with the student's professional objectives and program focus. A written description of the experience must be agreed upon by the advisor and supervisor and filed in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDLF 593 - (1-6) (IR)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
EDLF 700 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Instructional Design
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Integrates systematic approach to instructional design (ID) with current trends in learning theory, drawing from a number of ID theories and models. This knowledge is applied in team-based ID projects, through performing needs assessments; specifying instructional goals, objectives, and criterion-referenced testing; designing instructional activities; developing instructional materials; and executing formative evaluation of the instructional product. Skills learned are applicable in a variety of environments.
EDLF 700L - (1) (Y)
Prerequisite: Instructor permission and concurrent registration in EDLF 700.
Lab accompanies Introduction to Instructional Design Course.
EDLF 701 - (3) (Y)
Computer Courseware Tools
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analysis of software tools that can be used in support of instruction, including graphics tools, digitized audio, synthesized speech, and digitized video images. Hypermedia authoring systems are reviewed. Course projects include development of stand alone or web-based presentations that incorporate digitized video, audio, and original graphics created by the developer.
EDLF 702 - (3) (Y)
Computer Courseware Design
Prerequisite: EDLF 701, and instructor permission.
Continues the review of hypermedia authoring techniques. Courseware development tools presented in EDLF 701 are used to design and implement a complete unit of interactive instruction. Methods underlying design and evaluation of effective interactive software are addressed.
EDLF 703 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Interactive Technologies I
Prerequisite: EDLF 562, 700, 702 and instructor permission.
Building on instructional design, video production, and computer-based development skills, this course explores emerging interactive technologies through periodic competencies and a major development or usability testing project. Existing interactive products are examined and design techniques discussed.
EDLF 704 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Instructional Technology
There are four background segments of this course: history, current issues, specializations and competencies, and international perspectives. These four units have been designed to provide all IT majors with the requisite professional understanding of their discipline's heritage. Also included are units that guide the participants through the application of specific media to the instruction process. These include research on media, selection, utilization and evaluation, and the relevant characteristics of the media.
EDLF 705 - (3) (Y)
Institutional Frameworks of Education Policy
We all have those epiphanies when we look at the people making public policy and say, "Why don't they do this?" Well, this course is about why that brilliant idea so often doesn't get on the agenda, doesn't get done, gets done but doesn't work, or gets done but doesn't work as intended. This course examines the institutional constraints and incentives that shape public policy, with particular attention to the forces that shape education policy.
EDLF 706 - (3) (Y)
Theoretical Perspectives on Education Policy
This course will examine the underpinnings of educational policy from theoretical perspectives rooted in the social science disciplines. This is an intensive graduate-level seminar that is intended both for disciplinary students and for students pursuing specialized work in education. Our goal in the course is to examine, from a variety of normative and disciplinary perspectives, the core issues that underlie contemporary debates over public policy - and especially those underlying debate over education policy.
EDLF 710 - (3) (S)
Contemporary Educational Issues
Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Teaching Program.
Identifies the defining issues in the profession of teaching. Lectures, panel discussions, and videos are used to present a variety of contemporary issues. Small group instruction is used to maximize the participation of students.
EDLF 715 - (3) (S)
Educational Psychology
Overview of the contributions of psychology to the teaching-learning process. Topics include learning theory, individual differences, motivation, human development and personality, teaching methodology, and measurement and evaluation.
EDLF 716 - (3) (Y)
Human Development
Analysis of the principles of development covering the entire life span. Examines the development of the child through education, the unfolding of human abilities in terms of both personal adjustment and achievement beyond the period of youth, and the work life of the individual. The development of principal psychological qualities such as motivation, emotion, and personality, are, in like manner, considered with respect to the life span. Designed broadly to accommodate various professional specialists within education and other areas of human welfare.
EDLF 717 - (3) (Y)
Concepts of Learning
Addresses both theoretical and practical issues relating to human adaptation. Emphasizes underlying motivational forces as translated in behavioristic and humanistic terms. Content coverage reflects an integrative rather than a descriptive approach.
EDLF 718 - (2) (S)
Tests and Measurements
Introductory course concentrating on the development of the ability to evaluate and interpret assessment tools. Topics include reliability and validity; social and ethical considerations of testing; summarizing and interpreting measurements; and the use of standardized tests, rating scales, and observational scales. Following completion, students must enroll in at least one course that focuses on a specific area of tests and measurements. This may include using tests in counseling, classroom assessment, tests and measurements in physical education, techniques of instrument development, or psychoeducational assessment of exceptional children. To receive credit for EDLF 718, a specific area course must be satisfactorily completed. EDLF 718 or equivalent competency demonstrated by examination is prerequisite to the specific area courses.
EDLF 719 - (1) (S)
Classroom Assessment
Prerequisite: EDLF 718 or the equivalent.
Focuses on the development of skills in constructing, evaluating, and interpreting the results of teacher-made educational assessment. Includes the principles of constructing and evaluating paper-and-pencil tests (objective and essay), rating scales, observational scales, and other non-paper-and-pencil techniques.
EDLF 720 - (3) (Y)
Child Development
A master's-level course in which several prominent theories of child development are examined and applied to parenting and teaching. A variety of viewpoints are explored, but emphasis is placed on the constructionist position. Although there are no prerequisites, an undergraduate background in child or human development is useful.
EDLF 721 - (3) (SS)
Adolescent Development
Intermediate-level course designed to explore modern concepts of adolescence. Examines the interrelationships of physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development, as well as the treatments of specific adolescent problems.
EDLF 722 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to the Gifted
Examines characteristics and needs of the gifted; identification; programming options; special populations; practices in curriculum differentiation; creativity; and special issues in working with the gifted.
EDLF 723 - (3) (Y)
Curriculum for the Gifted and Talented
Reviews current theory and practice in planning and executing curriculum and instruction for the gifted and talented. Stresses design of instruction as a response to the specific cognitive and affective needs of gifted learners and in-depth investigation of curricular differentiation by content, process, product, effect, and learning environment. Provides opportunity for both assessment and development of curriculum for the gifted.
EDLF 724 - (3) (Y)
Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Students
Designed for teachers, administrators, parents, and others who work with high ability learners. Investigates similarities and differences between the development of gifted learners and other students, exploring the implications of these comparisons and focusing on strategies to assist gifted learners in school and home environments.
EDLF 725 - (3) (Y)
Models and Strategies for Teaching the Gifted
Examines programming and curricular models for teaching gifted and talented learners, as well as a variety of instructional strategies commonly used with gifted and talented learners. Develops modes of assessing the effectiveness of models and strategies for use with gifted and talented learners.
EDLF 726 - (3) (Y)
Social Development in Context
A graduate seminar addressing children's development in relation to their social environments, with concentration on the ways that environments pose or ameliorate psychological, emotional, and societal risk. Contemporary research on children's relationships and experiences in educational and societal contexts and consideration of the ways environments influence the lives of children identified as at risk will be explored though the topics of individual differences, peer affiliations, relationships with caregivers and teachers, interactions between families and schools, school transitions, and experiences with neighborhood and community. Students will understand, critique, and question empirical research; become adept at analyzing the relations among research, practice, and policy; and become capable of translating research into guidelines useful to teachers, administrators, and other practitioners.
EDLF 727 - (3) (S)
Adult Development
Introductory-level course focusing on key issues in successful adult adaptation. Explores cognition, personality, interpersonal relationships, work adjustment, physical and psychological health, and biological and psychological aging.
EDLF 728 - (3) (Y)
Creativity and Problem Solving
Explores theories of creativity through study of creative people, the creative process, and creative products. Focuses on assessment of creativity, research on creativity and its applications to education, environments conducive to the development of creativity, and heuristics designed to encourage creativity.
EDLF 729 - (1-3) (S)
Seminar in Educational Psychology
Advanced study of topics in educational psychology.
EDLF 730 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Educational Research
An orientation to methods and procedures utilized in educational research, emphasizing basic principles for conducting, interpreting, and criticizing published articles representative of educational problems and issues.
EDLF 731 - (3) (S)
Educational Statistics: Stat I
Analysis of descriptive to inferential techniques. Specific procedures include the logic of hypotheses testing, t tests, chi square, correlation, and simple linear regression.
EDLF 732 - (1-3) (S)
Educational Statistics Laboratory
Designed to familiarize students with computer use in educational studies by using such ready-made programs as SPSS. Students learn to conduct computer-based data analysis, run weekly programs, and interpret the output in written reports. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and factor analysis.
EDLF 733 - (3) (S)
Single-Subject Research
Detailed examination of the design and interpretation of single-subject research. Foci for the course include rationale for single-subject research; methods for planning, implementing, and evaluating studies; and issues in the use of this methodology.
EDLF 734 - (3) (Y)
Information Management
Analysis of the use of integrated software: word processing, spreadsheet, database management, graphics and telecommunications. Educational applications focus on program planning, monitoring student progress, fiscal analysis, budgeting, and inventory control. Emphasizes standard and customized reporting.
EDLF 735 - (1-3) (S)
Seminar in Educational Research
Advanced study of topics in educational research.
EDLF 740 - (3) (IR)
Seminar: Educational Studies
Topical seminar. Focus changes from offering to offering.
EDLF 750 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Program Evaluation
An overview of current program evaluation approaches, emphasizing the terminology of educational evaluation and the wide variety of theoretical approaches to program evaluation. Consideration is also given to the application of evaluation approaches to non-educational settings.
EDLF 752 - (3) (Y)
Techniques of Instrument Constructions
Prerequisite: A course in tests and measurements or a basic understanding of the concepts of reliability and validity.
In educational evaluation there is a continual need for measurement instruments specific to unique settings and problems. These are developed by the evaluators who must often strike compromises with sound test and measurement theory and with time constraints in order to collect data under field conditions. This course provides students with the ability to make such compromises intelligently, and with practical experience in the design of evaluation instruments serving a wide variety of purposes, audiences, and roles. Topics include construction of observation forms, interview schedules, and questionnaires. Specific methods include rating scales, checklists, ranking methods, paired comparison, semantic differential, Q sorts, content analysis, and goal attainment scaling. Each method is dealt with in terms of item writing, data analysis, reliability, and validity.
EDLF 753 - (3) (S)
Qualitative Analysis
Introduction to the central concepts of qualitative methods in research and evaluation. Focuses on the appropriateness of qualitative information and its analysis in various inquiry research and evaluation contexts. Although primary emphasis is on the development of skills required to conduct qualitative inquiry, the philosophy and background of the methodology are discussed.
EDLF 754 - (3) (IR)
Seminar in Program Evaluation
A topical seminar. Topics change from offering to offering.
EDLF 760 - (3) (S)
Social Foundations of Education
Introduction to the scope and nature of education in American society as reflected in the historical, sociological, and philosophical forces affecting the school and other social institutions. Primary emphasis is on contemporary educational problems.
EDLF 761 - (3) (Y)
History of American Education
The development of education in the United States since colonial times, emphasizing the social-historical forces and ideological concepts that determined the direction and nature of education in the United States to the present.
EDLF 762 - (3) (Y)
Philosophy of Education
Inquiry into the applicability to present problems of selected philosophical themes and approaches. Issues include conceptions of pupils, theories of learning and teaching, educational equity and justice, indoctrination, and the adequacy of educational research itself.
EDLF 763 - (3) (Y)
Sociology of Education
Studies the sociological theory and research that applies to a systematic analysis of education as its functions in modern society. Selected social and educational problems are discussed to interpret the sociological nature of the educational process and the role of the school as a complex social organization. Research of educational outcomes and consequences is considered. The effects of school on social stratification are also considered.
EDLF 764 - (3) (Y)
Anthropology of Education
Analysis of education and development in primitive and modern societies interpreted from an anthropological perspective. Examines international studies from the Eastern and Western worlds to assess the nature and process of education and cultural change.
EDLF 765 - (3-6) (Y)
Comparative Education
Analysis of the relationship between education and society through a study of social, political, and economic determinants of education in selected foreign countries and the United States. The role of education in political socialization, national development, and foreign policy formation is examined.
EDLF 766 - (3-6) (IR)
Asian Education
Studies the nature and scope of educational planning in selected Asian countries. Explores the planning process in terms of education and nation-building, economic investment in education, educational policy formation, extension and diversification of educational opportunities, and the education of the modern elite.
EDLF 767 - (3) (IR)
Aesthetics and Education
An interdisciplinary endeavor that considers aesthetics as more than a specialized philosophical study of fine arts, and education as wider than the school or college. Study includes historical and theoretical understandings, cultural and public dimensions of aesthetics and education, psychological considerations, and the discipline of various art forms.
EDLF 768 - (3) (IR)
Futurism and Education
An interdisciplinary approach focusing on the  theoretical contests of the future; the science and practice of futurism; the human condition; trends and projections of the future; ethical considerations; teaching strategies; and educational policy for the future.
EDLF 769 - (3) (Y)
Seminar
Section 1: Problems in Educational Studies: An introductory course for those in education and the behavioral sciences. Topics include problem-solving and planning, knowledge representation, natural language and understanding, intelligent tutoring systems, and expert systems. Balances theoretical concepts with their practical implementation. The Prolog computer language is used for building working models.
Section 2: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
EDLF 770 - (1-3) (Y)
Seminar: Social Foundations of Education
EDLF 772 - (3) (IR)
Women and Education
Examines the role of women in education from historical, sociological, philosophical, and psychological perspectives. Focuses on issues related to girls and women in current educational settings.
EDLF 775 - (1-3) (SI)
Problems in Administering School Systems
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A study of special problems involving school administration, school district management, and central office management.
EDLF 776 - (3) (Y)
Public School Administration
Introduction to school administration, including the organization and structure of the school system; legal basis for school administration; authority, responsibility, and control of different levels of government for education; the administration and supervision of the instructional program; and the application of theories of leadership and organization to enduring problems of schooling.
EDLF 777 - (1-3) (Y)
Human Resource Management in Schools
Analysis of the theory and practice of resolving the administrative problems of teaching staff and school employees, including selection, salaries, tenure, retirement classification and promotion, and training-in-service. Emphasizes the participation of educational workers in administrative activities.
EDLF 778 - (3) (Y)
School and Community Relations
Studies of the philosophy, principles, techniques, agencies, and practices involved in a desirable school and community relations program. Special attention is given to the role of the school administrators in coordinating system-wide and building-level communication networks.
EDLF 779 - (3) (SS)
Elementary School Principalship
Emphasizes educational leadership, working with individual school and community power structures, and the principal's responsibility for curriculum development, public relations, personnel development, restructuring, scheduling, and managing programs with an emphasis on at-risk students.
EDLF 780 - (3) (SS)
Secondary School Principalship
Introduction to the structure and culture of secondary schools, the current and projected responsibilities of secondary administrators, and the literature on secondary school reform. Special emphasis is given to teacher evaluation, student discipline, and policy development at the secondary level.
EDLF 781 - (3) (SS)
Middle School Principalship
Introduction to the structure and culture of middle schools, the current and projected responsibilities of middle school administrators, and the literature of middle school reform. Special emphasis is given to teacher evaluation, student discipline, and policy development at the middle school level.
EDLF 782 - (3) (SS)
Evaluation and Development of Educational Staff
Evaluation and development of educational personnel is a major responsibility of school administration. Provides students with a conceptual framework for staff development and evaluation, and facilitates and enhances skill in data collection, analysis of teacher performance, and plans of assistance development. Includes legal and policy issues related to recruitment, selection, and staff development.
EDLF 783 - (3) (Y)
School Finance
Analysis of the problems and principles involved in finance in an individual school with special emphasis on budgeting procedures and accounting systems.
EDLF 784 - (3) (Y)
Organizational Communications
Designed for individuals interested in the theory and practice of communications in educational organizations, this course involves a variety of practicums. Students study rhetoric, in preparation for delivering a persuasive speech, and research on conflict resolution and effective interpersonal communications. Communications related to instructional diagnosis and leadership are investigated.
EDLF 786 - (3) (Y)
Instructional Decision-Making in Schools
Deals with selected issues related to school-level instructional decision-making. Includes information and strategies related to monitoring and assessing instruction, formulating policies on grading practices, utilizing test data for purposes of instructional decision-making, and implementing special education law and programs.
EDLF 789 - (1-3) (Y)
Topical Seminar
Seminar on current topics or issues
EDLF 793 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Independent Study: Leadership and Policy Studies
Under close guidance of an individual faculty member, students work on areas of particular interest that cannot be met in regularly scheduled courses. Enrollment in this course is limited to three credits in a master's degree program.
EDLF 800 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Instructional Computing
Advanced study of special topics and issues in the use of computers in education with an emphasis on recent developments in the field.
EDLF 801 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Instructional Design
Prerequisite: EDLF 700
Assists students in becoming instructional design (ID) professionals by refining designer skills, building knowledge about the practice of ID, and encouraging the development of platform presentation skills. Self-directed teams analyze an instructional need for an outside client, design and develop instruction to meet that need, and then evaluate and revise the instruction. Students also research and deliver presentations on current topics within instructional technology.
EDLF 801L - (1) (Y)
Prerequisite: EDLF 700 and concurrent registration in EDLF 801.
Lab accompanies advanced Instructional design course.
EDLF 802 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Interactive Technologies II
Prerequisite: EDLF 703 or instructor permission.
Students expand their interactive design and development skills by working together in project teams to develop interactive products of increased sophistication. Projects may be for an outside client or may serve as a base for research on interactive technologies.
EDLF 803 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Seminar in Instructional Technology
Prerequisite: EDLF 730, 753, 830, and instructor permission.
As a prelude to dissertation research, each student conducts a pilot quantitative research study on instructional technology. Prior to enrollment, students must submit a research proposal to the instructor for approval. Students assemble research materials, arrange study participants, conduct the study, analyze the data, and write the research report. Students also critique, and assist in, the research of their colleagues.
EDLF 815 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Tests and Measurements
Prerequisite: EDLF 718 and 719.
A comprehensive analysis of traditional, latent-trait, criterion-referenced, and psychophysiological tests. This course builds upon EDLF 718 and 719, and is assigned for students who need to further their study of measurement theory and practice.
EDLF 816 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Child Development
Focuses on the developing child as a growing, active, and changing organism. In lieu of static stages or normative milestones, the process and mechanisms of growth are investigated.  Although applications for child rearing, clinical practice, and classroom teaching are considered, emphasis is on the articulate understanding of the developmental process. To this end, a sample of both theoretical and empirical studies is examined in depth.
EDLF 817 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Seminar in Creativity
Encourages advanced individual and group study in the theory of creativity and its applications to classroom practice. Includes the history and philosophy of creativity; brain research; environmental effects; intelligence; motivation; the assessment of, and empirical research on, creativity; and applications of creativity research to education and other settings.
EDLF 818 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Seminar in Curriculum for the Gifted
Designed for those participants with a strong background in the study of curriculum development for gifted learners. Provides an opportunity for advanced study research and application of principles and issues central to appropriate instruction of gifted learners. Students examine current thinking about teaching and learning, current contexts of education, and applications and impacts of those elements on instructing gifted learners.
EDLF 819 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Seminar Research on the Gifted
Explores specific research issues (definition of population, instrument ceilings, control group issues) using current empirical studies. Students are required to develop a proposal for a research study or to work on an on-going research project in the field of gifted education. Considers both quantitative and qualitative approaches.
EDLF 820 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Seminar Issues in Gifted Education
Focuses on fundamental beliefs about gifted students, programs for gifted students, and general education and its relationship to the gifted. Examines philosophical and theoretical arguments and empirical studies relating to unresolved issues in gifted education.
EDLF 821 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Seminar on Underserved Gifted Students
Focuses on groups of gifted students who have been underserved or who have unique characteristics and needs. Addresses identification, programming and curriculum development, and instruction. Groups studied include cultural and ethnic minorities, economically disadvantaged, handicapped, underachievers, and women.
EDLF 822 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Seminar in Educational Psychology
EDLF 830 - (3) (S)
Experimental Design: Stat II
Prerequisite: EDLF 731
The major goal of this course is to extend analytic abilities to the design and analysis of more complex experiments. Students accomplish this objective through construction of a research proposal.
EDLF 831 - (3) (S)
Correlation and Regression Analysis: Stat III
Prerequisite: EDLF 731 and 830, or instructor permission.
Considers basic correlation and regression analysis, including regression theory, dummy coding, and basic multivariate techniques.
EDLF 832 - (3) (IR)
Non-Parametric Statistics
Prerequisite: EDLF 731.
Considers a wide-range of non-parametric statistical techniques and covers typical procedures, such as one sample, two sample, k-sample, and correlation.
EDLF 833 - (3) (IR)
Bayesian Statistics
Prerequisite: EDLF 731 and 830, or instructor permission.
Analysis of basic theory, rationale, and application of Bayesian statistics and techniques. Topics include Bayes  theorem, conditional probabilities, posterior densities, and Bayesian inference for the binomial and normal models. Emphasizes case studies and computer-assisted data analysis.
EDLF 834 - (3) (IR)
Measurement Theory I
Prerequisite: EDLF 731, 830, 831, or instructor permission.
Focuses on theory and techniques of measurement models. Models based on one-parameter (Rasch model), two-parameter, and three parameter item characteristic curves are analyzed, and current research is evaluated.
EDLF 835 - (3) (IR)
Multivariate Statistics
Prerequisite: EDLF 830 and 831, or instructor permission.
Presents the theory and rationale of selected multivariate statistical techniques. Topics include multivariate analysis of variance canonical correlation and discriminant analysis. Emphasizes computer-assisted analysis and the application of appropriate statistical methods to research data.
EDLF 836 - (3) (IR)
Seminar in Advanced Statistics
Prerequisite: Advanced research majors; mathematics background recommended.
Brings about a synthesis and mastery of research and analytic techniques previously introduced in the research course sequence and utilizes current literature in psychometrical, biometrical, and statistical journals.
EDLF 837 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Seminar in Educational Research and Measurement
Prerequisite: Completion of measurement theory courses.
Addresses current measurement issues as presented in measurement journals, national or regional conferences, or legislative policy. Objectives are to bring about a synthesis and mastery of measurement theory previously presented and to understand and critique the most recent measurement developments.
EDLF 840 - (3) (Y)
Program Evaluation Design
Explores problems of designing, conducting, and reporting evaluation research studies. Time is spent examining philosophies of science that underlie evaluation studies; conceptualizing a total evaluation study; planning for the use of time and resources in conducting an evaluation study; assembling the evidence for or against a particular proposition; analyzing costs; and learning how to avoid common pitfalls in working with clients and program participants to design and conduct an evaluation study.
EDLF 841 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Seminar In Program Evaluation
A topical seminar that focuses on advanced topics in program evaluation. Topics change from offering to offering.
EDLF 843 - (3) (Y)
Evaluation of Teaching
Evaluating teaching in worthwhile ways involves understanding the needs and abilities of teachers, tasks teachers must accomplish, the environmental effects on teachers, and behaviors demonstrated in teaching. This course examines the independent and interactive effects of these four factors. Emphasizes formative evaluation (i.e., helping teachers improve via in-class observation and feedback) and the translation of research results into practice. Requirements include various combinations of project work, writing, and tests.
EDLF 844 - (3) (S)
Advanced Qualitative Analysis
Advanced course in methods and practices of qualitative research. Students determine their own philosophy of inquiry and become increasingly proficient in the application of qualitative methods. Assumes an introductory course in qualitative methods. Focuses on research design and proposal development, data collection and analysis techniques, and presentation of findings. The course is field-based and guides students through the complete qualitative research cycle.
EDLF 845 - (3) (S)
Qualitative Data Analysis with Computers
An advanced course in qualitative research methods that emphasizes applied and computing aspects of qualitative data analysis. Focuses primarily on various types of qualitative analysis software and presumes that the student has at least a general knowledge about qualitative research methods and techniques (especially research design and data collection). Prior knowledge about microcomputers is helpful. Class activities include lectures, demonstrations, exercises, and discussion of readings. Students are required to complete a pilot research project demonstrating their ability to apply computer assisted qualitative research methods.
EDLF 846 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Aesthetics and Education
Advanced seminar on aesthetics and education, focusing on the evolution of aesthetic ideas, their relationship to education, aesthetic experiences and the human mind, the use of aesthetics in the public domain, and aesthetics and educational strategies for improving the quality of experiences in American education.
EDLF 847 - (3) (IR)
Folklore and Education
Introduction to the field of folklore and folklife studies. This field provides a powerful framework for understanding educational patterns, problems, and issues in traditional and modern societies. The course blends the substance and methodology of the discipline with the pragmatic needs of the educator in the school.
EDLF 848 - (3-6) (IR)
Advanced Seminar in Foundations of Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
EDLF 849 - (1-6) (Y)
Advanced Seminar in Educational Studies
EDLF 850 - (3) (Y)
History of Higher Education
Study of the growth of colleges and universities and the major philosophical and sociological forces that have shaped their development. Emphasizes the historical development of American higher education.
EDLF 851 - (1-3) (IR)
Curry Forum on Educational Issues
School-wide interdisciplinary course on the key issues in education. Faculty from the Curry School and nationally recognized scholars introduce selected issues and topics. Small discussion groups explore these subjects in greater detail. Sponsored by all four departments and open to all master's and doctoral students.
EDLF 852 - (3) (Y)
College Student Development
Promotes an understanding of contemporary, traditional-aged college students from sociological, psychological, and historical perspectives. Topics include the social and cultural context of entering college students, student development theory, student outcomes assessment, student attrition, and dynamics of student change.
EDLF 853 - (3) (Y)
Curriculum in Higher Education
Study of curricular patterns and processes in post-secondary educational institutions. Includes social, historical, and philosophical perspectives on current curricular trends and processes of change among various institutional types.
EDLF 854 - (3) (Y)
Governance and Management of Colleges and Universities
Study of the organizational structure, governance, and administrative patterns in institutions of higher education in America. Focuses on managerial behavior and decision-making in academia.
EDLF 855 - (3) (Y)
Student Affairs in Colleges and Universities
Survey of current theory and practice in student affairs programming, organizations, and administration in institutions of higher education. Emphasizes philosophy, services provided, and trends and issues within the profession, including research and literature analysis.
EDLF 856 - (3) (Y)
Ethical Considerations for Student Affairs Administrators
Prerequisite: EDLF 855 or instructor permission.
Analyzes the principles of the organization and administration of student affairs programs in institutions of higher education. Attention is given to relating theory to practice and the evaluation of programs. Includes case studies of contemporary issues.
EDLF 857 - (3) (Y)
Economics and Finance of Higher Education
Study of contemporary policies and practices in the finance of American higher education. The interpretation and uses of financial data in the administration of institutions; sources and methods of securing funds; budget processes; and policies and issues regarding the finance of higher education are some of the topics considered.
EDLF 858 - (3) (Y)
Management Planning in Higher Education
Study of information gathering and analysis in institutions of higher education for decision-making activities concerning short-term and long-range planning.
EDLF 859 - (3) (Y)
Legal Aspects of College Administration
Confronts the legal implications of problems and issues with personnel in higher education. This topical seminar is designed to provide the educator with an understanding of the legal aspects of policy development in higher education.
EDLF 860 - (3) (O)
The Adult Learner
Study of adults as learners, the implications of their characteristics for adult learning, and the practice of adult education. Attention is given to current issues facing adult education.
EDLF 861 - (3) (E)
The Community College
Studies the institutional character of the community college, including a review of history, purposes, clientele, organization, finance, programs, societal functions, and current issues.
EDLF 863 - (3) (IR)
Contemporary Issues in American Higher Education
Surveys selected major problems or issues facing contemporary American higher education.
EDLF 864 - (3) (Y)
The American Professoriate
Provides an understanding of the role and circumstances of American faculty members and the issues and policy forces that impact the professoriate. Explores various aspects of the professoriate, and institutional policies and external factors that shape the viability and vitality of the profession.
EDLF 865 - (3) (Y)
Educational Policy Formulation
and Implementation I
Analyzes current theories of political allocation and processes of public policy formulation in relation to selected current issues in education. Students acquire knowledge and skills required to interpret and conduct research studies related to educational policy.
EDLF 866 - (3) (SS)
Policy in Curriculum and Instruction
Analyzes policies developed and implemented at the local school division level.
EDLF 867 - (3) (Y)
Politics of Education
Serves as a foundation course in the politics of education, tracing the means by which American schools can be viewed as political. Considers local, state, and federal conversion processes; investigates the origins, foundations, and demand inputs of, as well as the access channels to, school decision- and policy-making. Controversial political theories, cross-cultural research and analysis, and dominant conceptual frameworks will inform and guide discussions.
EDLF 868 - (3) (Y)
Economics and Education Policy
Designed for those without training in economics who want a better understanding of how economic concepts and methods are used in analyzing education policy issues. Examines market concepts and forms of government involvement in the market and uses economic research in education. Students develop the skills of economic analysis by applying them to current issues in public education.
EDLF 869 - (3) (Y)
Educational Policy Formulation
and Implementation II
Provides in-depth analysis of processes of policy development at federal, state, and local levels; processes of policy implementation; and critical issues in the analysis of implementation strategies and policy effects.
EDLF 870 - (3) (Y)
Seminar: Contemporary Educational Policy Studies
Topical seminar in educational policy studies.
EDLF 871 - (3) (Y)
Moral and Ethical Dimensions of Leadership
Explores the moral and ethical dimensions of leadership within the context of education. Assumes that educational administration is fundamentally an ethical undertaking, or, as Christopher Hodgkinson claims, "philosophy in action." Readings, activities, and discussions are all designed to assist practicing and aspiring administrators, as well as other educators, in the explication and resolution of ethical dilemmas. Considers different moral positions and encourages students to examine both personal values and professional ethics.
EDLF 872 - (3) (IR)
School Design
Focuses on factors that influence the design and operation of educational facilities. Topics include learning environments, facility planning, change and versatility, technology, energy issues, and finance.
EDLF 873 - (3) (Y-SS)
Education Finance, Policy and Practice
Introduces the problems and principles involved in financing public schools, including the economics of education; the characteristics of selected taxes for school purposes; the role of federal, state, and local governments in financing education; finance litigation; and the concepts of equality of educational opportunity, liberty, and efficiency as a basis for resource allocation policies in education.
EDLF 874 - (3) (Y)
Public School Superintendency
For students who have superintendency as a career goal. Focuses on the complexity of the superintendent's role in leading and managing a school division.
EDLF 875 - (3) (Y)
School Law
Analyzes school laws and regulations, regulations of state boards of education, and court decisions; legal status of the teacher and the pupil; legal and illegal use of school funds and property; legal responsibility of school officials with respect to contracts and purchases; and the liability of school officials. Considers all topics with reference to the state of Virginia.
EDLF 876 - (3) (Y)
Problems in School Business Administration
Prerequisite: Admission to the Curry School and instructor permission.
Focuses on selected problems in school business administration and the administrative uses of computers, including accounting and finance;  data processing; school indebtedness;  insurance management; maintenance and operations; personnel administration; purchasing and supply management; food service management; schoolhouse planning and construction; school store management; management techniques and development; systems analysis; written and oral communication; and transportation. May be repeated for credit.
EDLF 877 - (3) (Y)
Applications of Organizational and
Administrative Theory in Education
Prerequisite: Educational leadership and policy major or instructor permission.
Examines organizational and administrative theory and its uses in the management and functioning of school systems. Attention is given to the requisites for adequate theory and to methodological considerations in the study of organizations and administrative processes.
EDLF 878 - (3) (Y)
Implementing Instructional and
Organizational Change
Examines the relationships between instructional change and the intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, political, and professional contexts of teaching. Topics include the nature of instructional change, case studies of successful and unsuccessful change, planning for instructional improvement, and implementing and evaluating instructional change.
EDLF 879 - (3) (O)
Grant and Proposal Development
Focuses on the principal investigator role and the process of obtaining financial support from external sources to support desired projects and activities. Emphasizes phases of developing ideas; identifying sources of funds; researching funding sources; writing, submitting, and reviewing proposals; administering grants.
EDLF 880 - (3) (E)
Leadership Assessment and Development
Analysis of the research related to leadership effectiveness with an emphasis on the individual as a leader and the role of educational leaders in the management of human resources. Participants use leadership assessment procedures and programmed simulation to provide indicators of individual leadership style and effectiveness.
EDLF 881 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Supervision of Instruction
Analyzes basic concepts involved in modern educational supervision. Serves the requirements of administrative positions or curriculum specialists.
EDLF 882 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Theory and Practice of Educational Supervision
Prerequisite: EDLF 881.
Provides an understanding of, and some practice in, selected aspects of educational supervision, such as group process, leadership theory and techniques, human relations, evaluation of teaching and supervision, and in-service teacher education.
EDLF 883 - (1-3) (IR)
Elementary Administration Seminar
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Advanced study of current major problems. May be repeated for credit.
EDLF 884 - (1-3) (IR)
Secondary School Administration Seminar
Advanced study of current major problems.
EDLF 885 - (1-3) (IR)
Special Seminar: Elementary Administration
A multidisciplinary approach to the advanced study of current major problems.
EDLF 887 - (1-3) (IR)
Seminar-Secondary Administration
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A multidisciplinary approach to the advanced study of current major problems.
EDLF 888 - (1-3) (IR)
Middle School Administration Seminar
Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Advanced study of current major problems.
EDLF 889 - (1-6) (IR)
Topical Seminar: Leadership
May be repeated for credit.
EDLF 890 - (1-6) (IR)
Supervised Research
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
EDLF 893 - (1-12) (S)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Under close faculty guidance, students work on an area of interest not covered by the curriculum. A plan of study must be signed by the faculty sponsor and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDLF 894 - (1-12) (S)
Internship
EDLF 895 - (1-12) (S)
Practicum
EDLF 896 - (3-6) (Y)
Practicum in Educational Administration
A semester- or year-long project supervised by a resident faculty member.
EDLF 897 - (1-6) (SI)
Master's Thesis
A thesis project conducted under the guidance of the master's advisor or others approved by the departmental chair. A formal plan must be filed in the Office of Student Affairs and the final project approved by at least two Curry faculty members.
EDLF 900 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Seminar: Administration and Supervision
Required for all doctoral degree candidates; deals with dissertation proposal development for students in educational administration.
EDLF 966 - (3-6) (Y)
Policy Studies Seminar
May be repeated for credit.
EDLF 980 - (3) (IR)
Higher Education Seminar: Current Literature
May be repeated for credit.
EDLF 981 - (3) (Y)
Research Seminar in Higher Education
Seminar for advanced doctoral students. Discusses current research topics and strategies, and develops dissertation topics.
EDLF 993 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Under close faculty guidance, students work on an area of interest not covered by the curriculum. A plan of study must be signed by the faculty sponsor and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDLF 995 - (1-6) (SI)
Supervised Research
Prerequisite: Advisor permission.
Students work with faculty or other students in designing and executing research projects. The nature and scope of the projects are advanced beyond the master's level, and a plan of research must be signed and filed in the student's permanent file.
EDLF 996 - (1-12) (SI)
Independent Research
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Students work independently under the supervision of a Curry faculty member. A plan of research must be signed by the faculty member and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.
EDLF 997 - (3-6) (Y)
Internship: Ed.D. or Ph.D.
Section 1: A supervised internship designed for doctoral students to gain professional experience. Must be completed after admission to the doctoral program, and under the direct supervision of a Curry faculty member.
Section 2: Practicum in Educational Administration: A semester- or year-long project in educational administration supervised by a resident faculty member. A formal contract must be created, signed by the student and faculty advisor, and filed in the Office of Academic and Student Affairs.
Section 3: A supervised experience in higher education.
EDLF 999 - (1-12) (S)
Doctoral Dissertation
Faculty
Office of the Dean of the Curry School of Education
David W. Breneman, B.A., Ph.D., Dean
Rebecca D. Kneedler, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Robert H. Pate, Jr., A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Dean for Administrative Services
Joanne M. Herbert, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs

Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education
Professors
James M. Cooper, A.B., A.M., A.M., Ph.D.
Daniel P. Hallahan, Chair, B.A., Ph.D.
Jane Hansen, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Marcia A. Invernizzi, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
James M. Kauffman, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Rebecca D. Kneedler, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
John W. Lloyd, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Martha E. Snell, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Associate Professors
Mary P. Abouzeid, A.B., A.M., Ph.D.
Frederick J. Brigham, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Sandra B. Cohen, B.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.
Margo A. Figgins, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Joe Garofalo, B.A., M.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Joanne Herbert, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Stephen P. Plaskon, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Laura B. Smolkin, A.B., M.A., Ed.D.
Joseph E. Strzepek, A.B., M.A.T., Ph.D.
Stanley C. Trent, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Assistant Professors
Randy Bell, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Ishmail Conway, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Laura Justice, B.A., B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Susan Mintz, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Paige C. Pullen, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Kristen L. Sayeski, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Robert H. Tai, B.A., B.S., M.S., Ed.M., Ed.D.
Maria A. Timmerman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Stephanie van  Hover, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Eleanor V. Wilson, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.

Department of Human Services
Professors
Richard R. Abidin, Jr., B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Linda K. Bunker, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Dewey G. Cornell, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Glenn A. Gaesser, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.
Joe Gieck, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Luke E. Kelly, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Robert H. Pate, Jr., A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Robert C. Pianta, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Ronald E. Reeve, Chair, B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
Roger Ruth, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Peter L. Sheras, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Maureen R. Weiss, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Arthur Weltman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Associate Professors
Martin E. Block, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
B. Ann Boyce, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Harriet L. Glosoff, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Christopher D. Ingersoll, B.S., MA., Ph.D.
N. Kenneth LaFleur, A.B,. M.A., Ph.D.
Edith C. Lawrence, B.A., Ph.D.
Ann B. Loper, B.S., Ph.D.
Kathleen M. May, B.A., M.Ed., M.S., Ph.D.
Randall R. Robey, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Professors
John Culbreth, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Susan Dalebout, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Aliaa A. Khidr, B.M.S., M.D., M.S.C., Ph.D.
Helen H. Kim, B.A., Ed.M., Ph.D.
Sandra I. Lopez-Baez, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Ethan N. Saliba, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Antoinette R. Thomas, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Diane E. Whaley, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.

Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy
Professors
Eric R. Bredo, B.A., M.S., M.A., Ph.D.
David W. Breneman, B.A., Ph.D.
Glen L. Bull, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Harold J. Burbach, Chair, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Carolyn M. Callahan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Daniel L. Duke, B.A., Ed.D.
Bruce M. Gansneder, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Annette Gibbs, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Robert F. McNergney, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Herbert C. Richards, B.A., M.A.T., Ph.D.
Jerry G. Short, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.
Harold R. Strang, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Alton L. Taylor, A.B., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Deborah Verstegen, B.A., Ed.M., M.S., Ph.D.
Jennings L. Wagoner, Jr., B.A., M.A.T., Ph.D.
Carol Camp Yeakey, B.S.B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Associate Professors
Donald W. Ball, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
John B. Bunch, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Alfred R. Butler, IV, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Michael S. Caldwell, B.S.B.A., M.S.E., Ph.D.
Robert W. Covert, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
James P. Esposito, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Xitao Fan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Margaret M. Grogan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Diane M. Hoffman, B.A., M.A.T., Ph.D.
Mable B. Kinzie, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Timothy R. Konold, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
John Milam, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
John A. Sanderson, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Zahrl G. Schoeny, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Carol A. Tomlinson, B.A., M.R.E., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Assistant Professors
Walter F. Heinecke, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Cheryl Henig, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Frederick M. Hess, B.A., M.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.
Tonya Moon, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Brian Pusser, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Sara Rimm-Kauffman, B.S., Ph.D.
Pamela D. Tucker, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Sarah E. Turner, B.A., Ph.D.

Retired Faculty
Howard W. Allen, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
Frank E. Barham, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
James H. Bash, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Charles W. Beegle, B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D.
Ralph C. Bralley, B.F.A., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Richard M. Brandt, B.M.E., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Jeanette Brown, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
R. Lynn Canady, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.
William R. Carriker, A.B., M.A., Ed.D.
Jay L. Chronister, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Vincent C. Cibbarelli, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.
Patricia R. Crook, B.S., M.S., Ed.D.
Jean Ervin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Thomas H. Estes, A.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Joan C. Franks, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Mary Alice Gunter, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
Charles M. Heuchert, B.S., M.A., Ed.S., Ph.D.
E.D. Hirsch, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
George Washington Holmes, III, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
John S. Horner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.
Samuel Kellams, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Donald M. Medley, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
John F. Mesinger, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.
Jerry Moore, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Greta Morine-Dershimer, B.S.Ed., M.A., Ed.D.
Charlotte H. Scott, A.B., M.B.A., L.L.D.
Ralph J. Stoudt, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Ertle Thompson, A.B., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Chester R. Titus, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Donald L. Walker, B.Sc., M.A., Ed.D.
Virgil S. Ward, A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D.

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