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General Information

The Curry School of Education offers professional programs designed to prepare individuals for a variety of careers related to the practice of education. The school was named for Dr. Jabez L. M. Curry, an eminent southern educator. It was endowed in 1905 by gifts from John D. Rockefeller and the General Education Fund, and became a professional school in 1919. Graduate programs in education were established in 1950, and the degree programs offered now include the Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.Ed.); a five-year teacher education program leading to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Master of Teaching (M.T.); the Master of Education (M.Ed.), Master of Teaching (M.T.), and Educational Specialist (Ed.S.); and two different doctoral degrees (Ed.D. and Ph.D.).

The Curry School of Education has two major missions. The first is to prepare individuals to work in America's educational system, pre-kindergarten through collegiate levels, and to conduct research and scholarship that address problems and issues of importance to our education system. Through partnerships with other organizations and educational institutions, the Curry School is committed to developing exemplary and innovative approaches to address those issues and problems, and to improving instruction and schooling in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As such, the Teacher Education Program has provided national leadership in the preparation of beginning teachers, as well as advanced training for experienced teachers and personnel related to teaching. The five-year Teacher Education Program is an integrated program sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Curry School of Education. It combines strong subject matter preparation with professional training that leads to teacher licensure and results in the simultaneous receipt of both bachelor's and master's degrees after a total of five years of study at the University.

Programs leading to teacher licensure include specializations in elementary education, health and physical education, foreign languages, early childhood and developmental risk, and special education (including behavioral disorders, learning disabilities, and mental retardation). For secondary teachers, specializations are available in English, mathematics, sciences (biology, chemistry, earth science, physics), and social studies.

The second major mission of the Curry School is to enhance human potential and performance by preparing professionals and conducting research in such areas as psychological/emotional development, physical development and fitness, and speech/language/auditory development. These areas contribute to the betterment of the human condition and are directly related to increased learning and successful experiences in our educational system.

Two additional program areas are designed for students interested in pursuing human service careers related to communication disorders and physical education/sports medicine. These programs require that students transfer into the Curry School, and are designed to terminate after four years (B.S.Ed. degree) so that students may pursue additional graduate study. The Communication Disorders Program provides pre-professional training in speech-language pathology. The Sports Medicine Program is a pre-physical therapy and pre-athletic training program. These programs provide the necessary academic and practical work for the four-year B.S.Ed. degree, and for application to graduate (master's degree) programs in their relative specialities.

Programs within the Curry School are among the best professional education offerings in the country. Faculty hold offices in professional organizations, are scholars of international renown, and are numbered among the University's finest teachers. Students score well above the national norms on the SAT examinations, and are members of such student honorary societies as Chi Sigma Iota, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Delta Kappa, Outstanding Students in America, and the Raven Society.

Extensive information about the Curry School of Education and its programs is available online at the address listed below. Access to information about admissions and academic policies may also be requested by sending an electronic mail message to curry@virginia.edu.

Address
 
Curry School of Education
University of Virginia, Ruffner Hall
405 Emmet Street S
P.O. Box 400261
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4261
(434) 924-3334

The Curry School of Education and its programs to prepare school personnel are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. In addition,  teacher education programs are also accredited by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council and individual program specializations are accredited by such organizations as the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association, the National Athletic Trainers' Association, and the American Psychological Association.

Facilities and Services

Ruffner Hall  
The majority of academic facilities and offices of the Curry School of Education are located in Ruffner Hall. This modern facility houses laboratory space for studies in science education, instructional technology, counselor education, reading, educational psychology, and educational research. A well-equipped behavioral study area enables students and faculty to carry on advanced-level clinical observation and research, and a number of flexible meeting areas provide a supportive environment for studies in education.

Additionally, Ruffner Hall houses centers that provide services to the community, the state, and the nation, while providing students and faculty with instructional and research opportunities.

The Athletic Training and Physical Therapy Clinic provides therapy for the University's athletic teams, Student Health patients, faculty and staff, and physician referrals from the community. Offering M.Ed., Ed.D. and Ph.D. programs in athletic training and sports medicine, and an undergraduate program in sports medicine, the clinic provides practicums for both graduate and undergraduate students. It is located in the McCue Center, adjacent to University Hall.

The Center for Cardiac Health and Fitness provides professionally supervised programs of physical fitness enhancement and coronary risk factor modification. The programs provide coronary risk factor screening, medically supervised graded exercise testing (stress testing), supervised exercise programs for normal adults, and supervised exercise rehabilitation programs for coronary heart disease patients. The center also serves as a teaching and research facility for experiences in exercise physiology and sports medicine.

The Center for Clinical Psychology Services is a non-profit clinic that provides psychological and educational services to the public and serves as an in-house training facility for graduate students of the Institute of Clinical Psychology and other areas within the Curry School. The center is organized into specialized clinics and offers three basic categories of services: diagnosis, intervention, and consultation.

The Communication Disorders Program houses clinical and research facilities. Although the majority of classes are taught in the Curry School of Education's Ruffner Hall, Program facilities include an electronic conference room, speech and language science labs, behavioral and electrophysiological audiology and hearing-science research labs, and individual and group clinical intervention rooms.

The Education Library contains approximately 150,000 volumes of current educational materials, a file of over 400,000 ERIC microfiche titles, and access to VIRGO. The library supports the academic needs of the undergraduate and graduate programs of the Curry School, and provides periodicals, microfilms, books, and reserve materials required for class reading. Optical disc (CD-ROM) data base systems and Internet connections provide access to materials from throughout the world. Retrospective research materials in education are located in Alderman Library.

The Instructional Resource Center provides students and faculty with excellent opportunities for both instruction and research. In addition to audio-visual equipment, the center houses the Audio-Visual Production Lab, both a video filming studio and a video production facility, the Special Technology Laboratory, the Apple Lab, and the interactive IBM Microcomputer Classroom.

The McGuffey Reading Center functions as a laboratory for the study of the reading process by furthering clinical and empirical research in developmental reading and preparing graduate students to serve as reading-language specialists. It also provides a remedial center for children with reading disabilities.

The Motor Development Clinic provides evaluative and prescriptive services for children and youth with motor development problems. Operated by the Department of Human Services, the clinic serves as a teaching laboratory to prepare motor development specialists and provides a source of research opportunities to produce new knowledge and understanding about motor development in children and youth.

The Motor Learning Laboratory is a research facility designed for the study of factors that influence motor skill acquisition and performance. Individuals conduct research to investigate perceptual constraints; movement speed; EEG correlates of movement; substructures of balance, strength, and flexibility; and psychological factors related to the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Those seeking research experiences related to motor skill acquisition and performance utilize this laboratory.

The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) produces and disseminates high-quality, practical studies relating to the identification and development of the talent of students. The research of the center has ranged from investigating ways to encourage talent in young, at-risk students, to the social and emotional development of gifted students, to investigating the feasibility of high-end learning in middle schools. There are currently five faculty and ten graduate students working on projects of the NRC/GT.

The Center for Personal and Career Development is operated by the Department of Human Services. It trains counselors and provides counseling in career decision-making and career change, interpersonal relationships, coping with adult life transitions, and personal growth.

The Speech-Language-Hearing Center (SLHC), is an integral component of the Communication Disorders Program and the Department of Human Services. The UVA SLHC is a full-service, ASHA-accredited clinical facility which operates under the supervision of the faculty and staff of the Communication Disorders Program. It provides students in the speech-language pathology academic programs with opportunities to acquire experience working with individuals of all ages presenting a wide range of speech, language, and/or hearing disorders.

The Sport and Exercise Psychology Laboratory is designed for experimental and interview studies on such topics as observational learning, peer relationships, perceived competence in sport, coaching feedback, performance enhancement, and character development through sport.

The Sports Medicine/Athletic Training Research Laboratory conducts research in injury prevention and rehabilitation. Specific areas of research include isokinetic assessment of human muscle performance, postural sway (balance), and joint laxity. The laboratory also collaborates on research with several departments in the Health Sciences Center, including the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Department of Radiology.

The Center for the Study of Higher Education fosters informed and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of higher education as a resource for scholars and practitioners. It offers degree programs, seminars, short institutes, and workshops, as well as research reports and occasional papers that provide administrators and other educational leaders with fresh perspectives on developments in the arena of post-secondary education.

The Center for Technology and Teacher Education is a cross-disciplinary institute with collaborating faculty drawn from several disciplines, including educational technology, teacher education, and policy studies. Teachers must be prepared to use the rapidly evolving technologies that are being placed in today's classrooms in order to realize the promise that these technologies hold for the future. If we prepare the next generation of teachers, they will effectively serve as diffusion agents. One goal of the center is to identify and develop educational technologies that should be integrated into teacher education curricula. An equally important goal is to prepare the next generation of educational technology leaders. Graduate fellows affiliated with the center are expected to serve in leadership positions in school districts, state education agencies, and teacher preparation programs.

The Virginia Center for the Study of Educational Policy  The purpose of the Center is to foster connections between activities at the Curry School of Education and the broader world where decisions regarding education and schooling are made. The central goal is to increase the contribution of the University of Virginia to the discourse regarding pre-k, k-12, and higher education policy at local, state, and national levels. The primary intent is to find new ways to integrate and share the full array of research, teaching, and practice related to educational policy at the University of Virginia.

Student Organizations

Education Council
  All students in the Curry School of Education are members of the Education Council (EC). In addition to its function as liaison between students and faculty of the Curry School of Education, the EC participates in many service programs affecting the University and the Charlottesville community, such as tutoring underprivileged children and coaching children's sports activities.

Council for Exceptional Children The Council for Exceptional Children is a professional group focusing on issues related to individuals with exceptionalities. Membership is open to both faculty and students who have an interest in working with exceptional individuals. It is sponsored by the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education.

Departmental Student Groups Most departments have a student advisory committee to help plan activities for students and contribute to the quality of the academic and professional experience at the University.

The Pre-Physical Therapy Association  The Pre-Physical Therapy Association was founded in 1981 to provide opportunities for undergraduate students to learn more about graduate programs and careers in physical therapy. Officers, elected by interested students, plan specific experiences such as field trips to rehabilitation centers and hospitals, visits from graduate schools, and lectures related to contemporary issues in physical therapy. This organization is part of the sports medicine and physical education programs within the Department of Human Services.

Student Virginia Education Association (SVEA)  Student Virginia Education Association membership is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. SVEA members participate in various professional activities, receive various publications, participate in seminars and conferences, and receive liability/tort insurance.

Academic Honors and Honorary Societies

Dean's List
  To be placed on the Dean's List of Distinguished Students in any given semester, an undergraduate must maintain a minimum 12-credit course load and achieve a current grade point average of 3.4 or higher without failure in any course. Courses taken on a CR/NC basis may not be counted toward the 12-credit minimum. Any student receiving an F, NC, or NG during the semester is not eligible to be on the dean's list.

Graduation Honors  Students with a grade point average of 3.6 or higher will be recognized as graduating "with honors;" students with a grade point average of 3.75 or higher will be recognized as graduating "with high honors;" and students with a grade point average of 3.9 or higher will be recognized as graduating "with highest honors." Computation of grade point averages for the determination of honors is based on all standard letter-grade courses carried since the student has matriculated in the Curry School of Education. Students in the five-year Teacher Education Program may be eligible for dean's list through the College of Arts and Sciences (for B.A. and M.T.) or the Curry School (for B.S.Ed. in Physical Education).

Kappa Delta Pi, an honor society in education that was founded in 1911, chartered its Eta Kappa Chapter of the University of Virginia in 1951. The constitution of the society reads as follows: "The purpose of Kappa Delta Pi shall be to encourage high professional, intellectual, and personal standards to recognize outstanding contributions to education. To this end it shall invite to membership such persons as exhibit commendable personal qualities, worthy educational ideals, and sound scholarship. It shall endeavor to maintain a high degree of professional fellowship among its members and to quicken professional growth by honoring achievement in educational work.

Academic Requirements and Options

All students are subject to the academic policies specified in the chapter titled "University Regulations." In addition, students must follow the policies of the Curry School of Education. Students in the five-year Teacher Education Program should consult the regulations in the College of Arts and Sciences chapter, as well as those of the Curry School of Education.


Application to the Curry School  Students who wish to apply for the teacher education program in the Curry School of Education must submit a full application by March 1 of their first or second year; those who wish to apply for the communication disorders or sports medicine programs must submit a full application by March 1 of their second year. Students wishing to teach in high need areas (math, foreign languages, science, special education) may apply as late as their third year in the college. Students seeking to enroll in teacher education must be in the College (i.e., students in the Schools of Architecture, Engineering, or Nursing must transfer to the College first). Students applying to B.S.Ed. programs in communication disorders or physical education apply to transfer to the Curry School.

To apply, students must complete an application, provide a statement of professional goals, and furnish all transcripts. Applications are evaluated in terms of academic course work (preference given to 3.0 GPA), strong SAT scores (preference given to 1000 or above), and experience related to professional goals. Applications from under-represented groups or those with varied backgrounds are strongly encouraged. Information about specific application procedures is available in Room 104, Ruffner Hall, Office of Admissions.

Residence Requirement  A recipient of a degree in education from the Curry School must have completed four semesters of full-time (12 credits) study at the University of Virginia while enrolled in the Curry School of Education. Exceptions for emergency situations may only be granted with the advisor's and dean's permission. In addition, all students must be full-time (12 hours minimum) during all semesters, including the final one.

Course Load  Special permission of the advisor and dean's office is required to take fewer than 12, or more than 18, credits during a given semester.

Final Examinations are given during a designated period of time at the end of each semester. Examinations may only be given at the time listed in the Course Offering Directory unless authorized by the dean. Students are not authorized to take final exams before the regularly scheduled time. However, under serious conditions, and with their instructor's and advisor's permission, students may be allowed to postpone the examination to a time convenient to the instructor. Students who have three exams in one day or four in a two-day period may petition to have one examination moved.

Attendance  Students are expected to attend classes throughout the session, with the exception of University holidays, unless permission to be absent temporarily or to withdraw has been first granted by the instructor. Routine excuses for illness are not furnished by the Department of Student Health either to the student or to the instructor. If final examinations are missed for serious medical reasons, the Department of Student Health notifies the dean. On request of the dean, the Department of Student Health may evaluate the effect of any illness upon a student's attendance and academic performance. Failure to attend classes or other prescribed activities in a course may result in enforced withdrawal from the course or other penalties as determined by the instructor.

Attendance Upon Examinations  Written exams are an essential part of the work of most courses. A final examination or culminating experience is expected in all classes. The time period assigned for final exams is considered part of the regular academic semester, and classes must meet during their scheduled examination period. Absence from exams is not excused except for illness, attested by a physicians certificate, or for other causes that the instructor, advisor, and dean, by special action, may approve. An unexcused absence is counted as a failure and, at the discretion of the instructor, may result in failing the course.

Course Grades  All specifically required courses must be taken for regular, graded credit (no S/U or CR/NC), including grades of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-. C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F. Internships, practicums, and student teaching are generally graded S/U.

Incomplete Grades for BS Ed Students  An IN is recorded when reasons known to the professor are judged adequate to justify an extension of time to complete course requirements. An IN may not be used to allow a student to attempt to raise a grade at the end of the term. The time line to complete course work may be negotiated with an instructor, but may not extend beyond one year of the semester in which the course was originally taken. Students are expected to enter into a written contract with the instructor specifying the remaining requirements and agreed-upon time line. It is the student's responsibility to file the incomplete agreement in the Curry Office of Admissions. After one year, if the student has not met the terms of the incomplete agreement, the faculty member may submit a grade of F, U, WF, or W; if no action is taken by the faculty member, the incomplete is administratively changed to a W.

B.A.-M.T. students should consult the policies of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Grade Changes  No grade may be changed after it has been submitted to the university registrar without the approval of the dean. The dean is not authorized by the faculty to change a grade submitted to the university registrar except when an instructor certifies that, because of errors in calculation or transcription, an incorrect grade has been submitted.

The Curry School limits the time in which a grade change may be approved to one calendar year.

Credit/No Credit Courses  Students have the option of receiving the grades CR (credit) or NC (no credit) in place of the regular grades, A through F, for a given course prior to admission to a Curry program. This option is taken at the time the students register for the course. Instructors have the right to deny students permission to take courses on a CR/NC basis. If this occurs, students may either change back to the regular grading option or they may drop the course entirely. Courses taken for CR/NC may not be used for any major or basic area requirements.

No more than two courses may be taken on a CR/NC basis in any semester or in summer session. A maximum of 24 credits of CR/NC courses may be used toward the degree. Students may not use a CR/NC course to repeat a class in which a grade has already been given. If such a case should occur, the credits in the CR/NC course would not count toward graduation. The last day to change a CR/NC option is the same as the last day to drop a course. The CR/NC option may not be used to meet the specific requirements under general education; to meet requirements for specialization in a teaching field; or to meet requirements for professional education, with the exception in some teaching areas of field experiences and accompanying seminars that are offered only on a CR/NC basis.

Repeating Courses  A student who has received a grade of D in a required undergraduate course may be required to repeat the course as directed by his or her academic advisor or program faculty. Both grades for the repeated course remain on the transcript and are used in the computation of the grade point average. The course credit will be for only one offering.

Adding a Course or Changing the Grading Option  All additions to course schedules or changes in the grading option for a course must be completed by the last day to add a course. These changes are made via ISIS (434) 296-4747; www.virginia.edu/isis. Changes after the add deadline may only be considered under emergency circumstances and require a petition signed by the instructor, advisor, and dean. Any course required by name must be taken for a grade (not pass/fail). B.A.-M.T. students should consult the policies of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Dropping a Course  With the approval of the student's advisor, a student may drop and void registration in a course until the official drop date. Permission to take fewer than 12 credits must be petitioned to, and approved by, the advisor and the dean and can only be granted for unusual or emergency circumstances.

Withdrawal from a Course  B.S.Ed. students may withdraw from a course at any point prior to 5: 00 P.M. on the last day of classes (in the term of enrollment) if permission has been secured from the student's advisor and instructor and a petition has been filed with the dean. This action results in the course remaining on the transcript and the instructor being asked to record a grade of W, WP, or WF on the final grade sheet and on the petition filed by the student. A W may be assigned only if there is not basis on which to determine a WF or WP. None of these notations effect the grade point average, nor does the course count toward credits earned.

College students should consult the policies of the College and note the earlier date.

Enforced Withdrawal  See chapter 5.

Probation and Suspension  An undergraduate student must maintain good standing each semester by completing at least 12 credits of graded work (or S/C work if engaged in practicums or student teaching), with at least a 1.8 semester average and no more than one grade below C- (or U/NC). A student will be placed on academic probation after any semester in which good standing is not attained.

Suspension involves enforced withdrawal from the Curry School of Education. A student placed on probation in any semester may be suspended if he or she does not regain good standing at the end of the next semester. A student who has been suspended may apply to the Office of Admissions and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education for readmission after one regular semester or one summer session has elapsed since the date of suspension. If readmitted, the student will be on probation and will be suspended again after one semester unless the cumulative grade point average for all courses completed is above 2.0.

Students in the College must comply with all College rules, as well as Curry School policies for teacher education.

Readmission  to the Curry School of Education is not automatic. After an absence of twelve months or longer, a former student must apply for readmission by submitting an application to the academic dean's office at least sixty days before the semester begins. Failure to comply with these regulations subjects the student to suspension from the University by the vice president for student affairs.

Grievance Procedure  Due process is guaranteed to all students. See "Grievance Procedures" in the University Regulations chapter or consult the associate dean's office in 104 Ruffner Hall.

Licensure for Teaching  The Curry School of Education affirms the distinction between degree requirements and licensure requirements in its programs. While many programs contain both kinds of requirements, and major portions of the two may be synonymous, one may meet one set of requirements and not the other (i.e., receive a degree without qualifying for recommendation for licensure). Information concerning licensure requirements is provided to students through the Office of Admissions and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education. In order for a student to be recommended by the Curry School of Education for professional licensure, he or she must complete a teacher education program sequence approved by the faculty of the Curry School of Education and meet state cut-off scores on the Praxis I and Praxis II examinations.

State Assessments of Teacher Education  Under the Commonwealth of Virginia's approved program status for schools of education, all students enrolled in a teacher education program at the University of Virginia must take the appropriate licensing exams required by the Commonwealth of Virginia for the specific program area endorsement. The scores on these exams and other evidence presented to the U.S. Secretary of Education, in accordance with Section 207 of the Higher Education Act (HEA) regarding the preparation of graduates who intend to work in the nation's schools, demonstrates the high caliber of the students at the University of Virginia. During the  2000-2001 academic year, 459 students were enrolled in the Curry School's Teacher Education Program and 114 students participated in the Teaching Associate (student teaching) semester involving 560 hours of student teaching. A total of 31 full or part-time faculty participated in supervision activities resulting in a supervising student/faculty ratio of 2.7.

The following report of Praxis exam pass rates is a mandated condition of the HEA and reflects the scores of those University of Virginia's teacher education program completers who took the exams from September 2000-August 2001 (state-wide pass rates are shown in parentheses). Praxis I pass rate for the PPST Reading was 99% (94%) and CBT Reading was 100% (98%). The PPST Writing pass rate was 96% (91%) and the CBT Writing was 92% (92%). The PPST Mathematics pass rate was 97% (91%) and the CTB Mathematics was 96% (94%). The University's aggregate pass rate for Basic Skills was 99% (94%), while the Summary pass rate 98% (92%).

Teacher Education Degree Programs

Students wishing to pursue an academic program leading to teacher licensure are required to complete a five-year curriculum leading to the simultaneous awarding of both a bachelor's and master's degree. This program, sponsored cooperatively by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Curry School of Education, provides an extensive liberal arts foundation, content area preparation, and professional study in education.

The bachelor's degree provides a comprehensive background in the chosen liberal arts discipline, culminating in a B.A. or B.S. degree from the College. (Academic training comparable to the liberal arts degree is provided for physical/health education teachers through the Curry School, culminating in a B.S.Ed. degree.) These bachelor's degree experiences are integrated with professional training in subject matter specialities, pedagogical aspects of education, and clinical/school-based experiences.

The five-year Teacher Education Program offered by the Curry School is recognized nationally for its strong foundation in the liberal arts and its advanced professional training aspects. The program requires that:

  • students complete all requirements for the bachelor's degree (B.A., B.S., or B.S.Ed.) while also completing requirements for licensure and the Master of Teaching degree;
  • students complete a full major in the College and at least 102 credits of College- approved courses for the B.A. or B.S. degree; or 120 credits for the B.S.Ed. degree;
  • students are involved in the practical aspects of teaching during each year of the program, beginning with their second year at the University;
  • students are permitted to experience professional study early and continuously throughout a five-year period.
Enrollment Procedures for the Five-Year Teacher Education Program  Students who are in the College of Arts and Sciences should apply for permission to enroll in the Teacher Education Program during the second semester of their first year of study, (application deadline is March 1). Students, including transfers from other institutions, may also apply to the program during their second year of study (prior to March 1) but must attend summer school in Charlottesville in order to complete the professional course work before the start of their third year. Students in science, math, or world languages may apply by March 1 of their third year.

Permission to enroll requires that the applicant be in good standing, provide adequate SAT scores, and complete a permission to enroll application with statements describing his or her (1) commitment to continued learning and intellectual growth; (2) interest in teaching children and youth; and (3) previous experience working with children and youth. After enrollment, students are expected to demonstrate competence in quantitative skills, verbal skills (oral and written), and computer literacy. Students must remediate any identified deficiencies prior to graduation. All teacher education students must have a primary major in the College of Arts and Sciences (or in the Curry School for health/physical education majors).

Advancement to Graduate Study  By December 1 of the fourth year, students apply to the Master of Teaching degree program in the Curry School of Education. At this time students must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit a letter of recommendation and academic transcripts attesting to outstanding academic performance. Criteria for advancement to graduate study include: (1) demonstrated competence in basic skills (verbal, quantitative, and computer skills); (2) an outstanding grade point average (2.75 overall/3.0 in academic major); (3) one letter of recommendation addressing current or potential teaching skills; (4) satisfactory performance in all field experiences; (5) demonstrated proficiency in public speaking; and (6) satisfactory performance on the GRE and Praxis I.

Satisfactory Academic Performance in Teacher Education  Courses required for the B.A./B.S. degree taken at the 400 level or below may be successfully completed with a passing grade of D- or better. Courses in the major must reflect a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better.

Courses taken at the 500 level or above in the major and in professional studies require a minimum grade of B- or better. 500-level courses taken before the fourth year in which a student has performed below the level of B- may be petitioned, with advisor and dean's office approval, to have the grade standard waived.

Professional studies courses at the 500 level in which a student has received a failing grade (less than a B-) must be retaken, or a substitute professional course must be taken to replace the deficiency. Course substitution or retaking a course must be approved by the advisor and the Office of Teacher Education. Program deficiencies may require that the student be suspended from the program.

Graduation Requirement in Teacher Education  All students in a teacher education program must take the Praxis I and Praxis II examinations as a part of their graduation requirements. Applications for graduation are due by February 1.

Accelerated BAMT Program Option  Students in the teacher education areas may graduate with both the BA and MT degrees in 4.5 years. The student must meet all requirements for both degrees and attend a 3 week summer session.

Licensure Requirements Students are required to submit paperwork and the appropriate Virginia state fee to the Admissions Office (Ruffner 104) no later than February 1 of the fifth year. All course work must be completed and Praxis I and Praxis II exams must be passed in order to be recommended for licensure.

Accelerated BAMT Program Option  Students in the teacher education areas may graduate with both the BA and MT degrees in 4.5 years. The student must meet all requirements for both degrees and attend a 3 week summer session.

Licensure Requirements  Students are required to submit paperwork and the appropriate Virginia state fee to the Admissions Office (Ruffner 104) no later than February 1 of the fifth year. All course work must be completed and Praxis I and Praxis II exams must be passed in order to be recommended for licensure.

Financial Aid for Fifth-Year Students
  During their fifth year, teacher education students are classified as graduate students by the Office of Financial Aid. Thus they qualify for the normal graduate scholarship and loan programs, not undergraduate grants.


General Education

All students in the B.A./B.S.-M.T. program must complete the general education requirements specified by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Curry School of Education or, in the case of B.S.Ed. candidates, those requirements specified exclusively by the Curry School of Education. Candidates for the B.A./B.S. degree must have completed a total of 102 credits from the College of Arts and Sciences.

In order to meet licensure requirements, specific courses within the general education core vary by teacher education program area. Detailed information can be obtained from the Teacher Education Office (221 Ruffner Hall).

Echols Scholars For Echols scholars in the B.A./B.S.-M.T. program, the general studies component should be a well-planned sequence of courses and experiences that must include theoretical and practical knowledge gained from studies in mathematics, natural science, social science, U.S./American history, English communication, literature, and other humanities.


Professional Education Courses

Students in teacher education pursue advanced course work in a specific discipline as well as professional education experiences. Prospective teachers begin professional studies during the second year through an exploration of teaching as a profession in a course called Teaching as a Profession (EDIS 201) and in field-based experiences in schools (EDIS 288). Students declare a specific content major and continue to take courses in the teacher education program. Students are assigned two advisors, one representing the major in the College and one representing professional education (health/physical education majors have only one advisor). Students must meet with each advisor each semester.

Professional courses continue throughout the third, fourth, and fifth year, and include the following courses:

EDLF 301 Learning and Development
3
EDLF 345 Introduction to Educational Technology
2
EDIS 302 The Exceptional Learner
3
EDIS 388 Field Experience
1
EDIS 501 Curriculum and Instruction (Elem. and Special Ed.)
2
EDIS 502.1 Instruction and Assessment (Elem. only) or
EDIS 502.2 Secondary Instruction and Assessment
2
EDIS 488 Field Experience (associated with EDIS 501-502, 503)
2
EDIS 588 Teaching Associateship (student teaching)
12
EDIS 503 Classroom Management and Conflict Resolution (Secondary only)
1
EDLF 710 Contemporary Educ. Issues
3
EDIS 788 Field Project
3

Teaching Fields

The requirements for each teaching specialization are largely determined by the kind of teaching position for which the student is preparing. The teacher education requirements are in addition to the courses required in general education and are in compliance with state licensure guidelines.

All those completing M.T. programs for initial licensure in the Commonwealth of Virginia must qualify by passing the Praxis I and Speciality Area Examinations (Praxis II). Students should contact their advisor in the Curry School of Education or the Office of Admissions for further information. Praxis I exams must be taken the third year and Praxis II is taken in the fifth year. Taking the Praxis exams and appropriate specialty tests are graduation requirements. Course sequences for all teacher education programs may be obtained from the Office of Teacher Education (221 Ruffner Hall), or from the Teacher Education website
(http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/curry/TeacherEd).

Elementary Education Programs  The elementary education program leads to licensure and endorsement for teaching in pre k-6 classrooms. Prospective elementary teachers may complete a major from any discipline in the arts and sciencesIn addition to the general education courses, endorsement requirements include specialized studies.

Secondary Education Programs
 The University of Virginia offers a wide choice of academic majors, with many majors leading directly to an endorsement to teach in the secondary school. The following descriptions are for endorsement programs approved by the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Education.

Note:  The credits required for a major at the University of Virginia generally exceed the credits required for an endorsement in a particular field. Introductory courses that may not be counted for a major in the College may be counted for endorsement purposes.

Students majoring in fields for endorsement at the secondary level must complete the regular professional education sequence plus at least three specific courses related to the academic discipline and EDIS 587 (Seminar in Subject Area Teaching).

When completing a second endorsement, the specific pedagogy courses for each of the requested endorsement areas is required.

English  The curriculum for prospective teachers of English fulfills the guidelines of the National Council of Teachers of English plus all requirements of the Commonwealth of Virginia for teaching grades 6-12. Minimum requirements include:

1. 3 credits in English composition (ENWR 110) or equivalent
2. 32 credits in upper-division English courses, including:
  • 6 credits in history of English literature
  • 6 credits in literature before 1800
  • 1 course in Shakespeare
  • 1 course in American literature (pre-1900)
  • 1 course in American literature (post 1900)
  • 1 course in the novel
  • 1 course in poetry
  • 1 course in creative or non-fiction writing
  • 1 course in teaching composition
  • 1 course in language, literacy, and culture
  • 1 course in literature for adolescents
  • 2 courses in American/English literature at the graduate level

Course work should include the history of the English language. Courses dealing with women and minority American writers and providing a working knowledge of theatrical and cinematic aesthetics are recommended.

Foreign Language Education  Endorsement programs for prek-12 are available in French, German, Latin, and Spanish. Students must complete a 30-hour major at the 300-level and above, plus two graduate-level courses in the appropriate foreign language and literature department. Course work must be related to advanced grammar and composition, advanced conversation, culture and civilization, literature, and applied linguistics, with a minimum of the following credits in the specific language.

French: 36 credits at the 300-level and above
German: 30 credits at the 300-level and above
Spanish: 36 credits at the 300-level and above

Students majoring in a foreign language are required to take a speaking and writing proficiency test in their target language. Final admission to the Teacher Education Program will be contingent upon the results of these tests. An exit proficiency test in both skills will be required for licensure as a teacher of foreign languages.

Latin
  Students seeking endorsement as a Latin teacher must complete 18 credits (above LATI 103) and 12 credits in related subjects. Course experiences should include reading and comprehension of Latin; Latin phonology, morphology, and syntax; the culture and civilization of the Roman people; and literary masterpieces. Teachers who have completed requirements for endorsement in other modern languages may be additionally endorsed by completing 12 credits above LATI 103 and CLAS 202.

Students who have completed a major (including all endorsement requirements) in one modern foreign language or Latin may be additionally endorsed in a second language by completing 18 credits above the 300 level. Course experiences must include advanced grammar and composition, conversation, culture and civilization, literature, and applied linguistics.

An endorsement in English as a Second Language is available to students with majors in a modern foreign language or English. Requirements include 9 credits in linguistics, including general linguistics; English phonology, morphology and syntax; applied linguistics; and a course in teaching a second language.

Mathematics requires a major in mathematics or its equivalent, including at least 9 courses in mathematics above the calculus sequence. The math major must include calculus; 6 credits of mathematical analysis with differential equations; 6 credits of linear and modern algebra; 6 credits of probability and statistics; and 3 credits of geometry. At least 6 of these credits must be taken at the 500 level or above. In addition, at least 3 credits of computer science and 3 credits of educational computing must be presented. Required professional courses include EDIS 545 (Teaching Secondary Mathematics) and EDIS 587 (Seminar in Mathematics).

Algebra Add-on Endorsement  A student who has completed requirements for an endorsement in another area may be additionally endorsed to teach general mathematics and algebra by completing a concentration of 20 credits of computer science and math, including two courses in differential and integral calculus; one course in linear or modern algebra; two courses selected from mathematical analysis; discrete mathematics; geometry; probability; statistics; and at least one course in computer science.

Science  Teacher education students interested in science participate in programs designed to meet or exceed the standards of National Science Teachers Association. Science education majors must complete 52 credits in science, mathematics (at least to introductory calculus), statistics, and computer applications in order to demonstrate depth and breadth of scientific background. Additionally science teacher education students are required to take at least 1 course in the history of science.

Biology: 32 credits in biology, with at least one course from each of the following areas: botany, cell biology/biochemistry, ecology, genetics, physiology, zoology; plus 20 credits in a related field, including chemistry, earth/space science, mathematics (above introductory calculus) and physics. *At least 6 of the science credits must be taken at the 500 level or above.

Chemistry: 32 credits in chemistry, with at least one course from each of the following areas: analytical chemistry, biochemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry; plus 20 credits in a related field, including biology, earth/space science, mathematics (at or above calculus), and physics. *At least 6 of the science credits must be taken at the 500 level or above.

Earth and Space Science: 32 credits in earth and space science, with at least one course from each of the following areas: astronomy, geology, meteorology, oceanography; plus 20 credits of supporting courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics. *At least 6 of the science credits must be taken at the 500 level or above.

Physics: 32 credits in physics including the following areas: classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, optics, waves; plus 20 credits of supporting courses in biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and mathematics through introduction to differential equations. *At least 6 of the science credits must be taken at the 500 level or above.

Social Studies  The Social Studies program is designed for teachers in grades 6-12 who wish to be prepared to teach United States History, World History, Government, Economics, Political Science, or Geography. Students are required to successfully complete the following courses from the College.

HIUS 201 American History to 1865
HIUS 202 American History since 1865
HIEU 201 Western Civilization I
HIEU 202 Western Civilization II
ECON 201 Microeconomics
PLAP 101 Introduction to American Politics
EVSC 101 Introduction to Environmental Sciences, or
EDIS 564 Physical Geography, or
EDIS 565 Cultural Geography

*Note: at least two of these courses must be 500 level or above.

Early Childhood and Developmental Risk combining licensure requirements for early childhood special education (birth-age 5) and primary education (prek-grade 3) this program focuses on the needs of children at-risk for failure. The program specifies courses from both special education (severe disabilities) and elementary education.

Special Education Programs meet the guidelines of the Council for Exceptional Children and prepare teachers to work in at least two handicapping areas: behaviorally disordered, learning disabilities, and/or mental retardation. Professional preparation for special education must include credits in the characteristics of two specific disabilities (behavioral disabilities, mental retardation, or learning disabilities); credits in reading and reading diagnostics; principles of curriculum and instruction for exceptional individuals, methodology for exceptional individuals, classroom management and psychoeducational assessment of exceptional individuals, math and technology, and field experiences in teaching exceptional individuals.

Kinesiology (Health and Physical Education Program)  The five-year program leading to endorsement in health and physical education (with a possible add-on in athletic training) requires that all students transfer into the Curry School of Education for a combined B.S.Ed.-M.T. degree. This health and physical education program follows the same format as the B.A.-M.T. option, but it is located entirely in the Curry School due to the specific disciplinary course offerings related to human movement sciences (e.g., anatomy, kinesiology, motor learning, and sport psychology).

Health and physical education majors must take BIOL 201-202 and a lab as part of the natural science requirements. Students must take a variety of performance courses and are therefore not required to complete the foreign language courses within the humanities area (although 12 credits of humanities are required, and those may include foreign languages).

The content major for health and physical education focuses on human movement sciences such as anatomy, health topics, kinesiology, exercise physiology, motor learning, etc. This program qualifies individuals to meet endorsement requirements to teach physical education and health K-12. The program is designed to meet all AAHPERD (NASPE) certification requirements.

Individuals complete 45 credits in the College of Arts and Sciences plus 25 credits in human physical development and movement sciences including motor development, anatomy, kinesiology, exercise physiology, and motor learning; 10 credits in physical performance areas (sports, dance, rhythms); 10 credits in adapted physical education, including developmental disorders and orthopedic/sensory impairments; and 18 credits in health education.

Professional preparation in health and  physical education includes the following courses:

EDHS 358 Teaching Secondary Physical Education
1
EDHS 357 Teaching Elementary Physical Education
1
EDHS 356 Elementary Physical Education Pedagogy
2
EDHS 359 Secondary Physical Education Pedagogy
2
EDHS 546 Assessment in Physical Ed.
3
EDHS 551 Teaching School Health Education
3
EDHS 770 Physical Education Seminar
3

All students are required to attend at least one state or national convention within the profession of physical education and to fulfill an experience in outdoor education.

Practicum experiences in health and physical education include the regular sequence of field experiences in the five-year teacher education program (EDIS 288, 488); instructional technology (EDLF 345); special teaching experiences in physical education (EDHS 357, 358, 377); and the K-12 teaching associateship (Student Teaching: EDHS 771, 772).

An area of concentration is available in athletic training upon completion of 13 credits in selected courses. In addition, 1,500 clock hours of practicum work in athletic training are needed to take the NATA certification examination.

The Sports Medicine Program is a four-year, pre-professional curriculum leading to a B.S.Ed. in Physical Education. Most students electing this option will pursue a graduate degree following the receipt of the B.S.Ed. degree.

Eligibility for admission to the program is based on the admission requirements of the University of Virginia, the Curry School of Education, and the Health and Physical Education Program Area. Generally, applicants require at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and 1000 combined score on the SAT. Since the program is geared toward graduate study, a strong background in the general sciences is recommended. Students should be career oriented in sports medicine or allied health areas. Enrollment is limited to 15 students per year.

General education requirements are 12 credits in humanities, including English composition and English literature; 12 credits in social sciences, including one course each in introductory psychology and introductory sociology; and 12 credits in math and science. For specific course requirements by program area, go to this website (
http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/tedhandbooks/).

Sports Medicine is a specialization that leads to career opportunities in allied health professions. Students must complete 120 credits of course work emphasizing the human movement sciences and basic natural sciences (chemistry, physics, physiology) and sports medicine. Additional requirements include attendance at a professional conference and, to qualify for the NATA certification exam, 1500 Practicum Hours of Athletic Training.

The Communication Disorders Program  The B.S. Ed. degree, awarded upon completion of the four-year, 120-credit program, is not adequate preparation for provision of clinical services to children and adults with communicative disorders, nor for professional certification from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). The undergraduate curriculum prepares students who wish to choose from one of three career paths in communication disorders: audiology, speech-language pathology, and speech and hearing science. Completion of an accredited graduate program in speech-language pathology or audiology is required for ASHA certification and state licensure. Academic programs should not be perceived as a rigid set of requirements but, rather, as a guide for academic planning. The advisor's permission is required for any official academic registrations, including add/drops.

General education requirements for applicants are 12 credits in humanities, including English composition and English literature (required) with the balance from any of the following fields: foreign language, public speaking, fine arts, music, or philosophy; 12 credits in social sciences, including one class in American history (HIUS required), two classes in psychology and/or sociology, with the balance from psychology, sociology, history, anthropology, economics, political science, or geography; 15 credits in natural sciences and mathematics, including a course in college level mathematics (MATH 111 or above), statistics, PHYS 105 or 106, and 2 other science courses; EDHS 450, one credit in physical activity (PHYE), and six credits in professional education (EDLF 315 or PSYC 250 and EDLF 316). The program includes a minimum of 35 credits of approved course work in the nature, prevention, evaluation, and treatment of speech, language, hearing, and related disorders (EDIS 521, EDIS 302, EDIS 504, EDIS 512, EDIS 510 or 511, EDHS 545, and a psycholinguistics course). This pre-professional course work addresses issues pertaining to normal and abnormal human development and behavior across the life span as well as issues related to culturally diverse populations.

Sample Programs

The following sample programs are provided to facilitate academic planning. These are suggested sequences that reflect a solid arrangement of courses leading to the fulfillment of all degree requirements. The sample programs should not be perceived as a rigid set of requirements but, rather, as a guide for academic planning. The advisor's permission is required for any official academic registrations, including add/drops.

Sample Program for Teacher Education

Teacher Education programs have been revised to meet new state licensure regulations. Consult the Teacher Education Web site at
http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/curry/TeacherEd or the Office of Teacher Education.

Sample B.S.Ed. Program For Communication Disorders (120 Credits)

Year One
Fall Semester
ENWR 110 or equivalent
3
BIOL 201 Introduction to Biology
3
MATH 111 (or above)
3
American History
3
PSYC 101 General Psychology
3
Physical Education activity
1
16
Spring Semester
English Literature
3
Social Science elective
3
Humanities elective
3
BIOL 202 Introduction to Biology
3
Statistics
3
15
Year Two
Fall Semester
Humanities elective
3
Social Science electives
6
EDLF 315
Child Development or 
PSYC 250 Child Psychology
3
Elective(2)
3
15
Spring Semester
PHYS 106 How Things Work
3
EDLF 316 Intro. to Ed. Psych.
3
EDHS 450 Contemporary Health Issues
3
Electives(2)
6
15
Entry into Communication Disorders Professional Program.(1)
Year Three
Fall Semester
EDHS 501 Clinical Phonetics
3
EDHS 505 Anatomy and Phys. of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms
3
PSYC 411 Psycholinguistics or
ANTH 341 Sociolinguistics or
ANTH 240 Language and Culture
3
Electives(2)
6
15
Spring Semester
EDIS 302 Exceptional Learner
3
EDHS 502 Speech and Hearing Science
3
EDIS 504 Assessment Techniques
3
EDIS 512 Mental Retardation or
EDIS 513 Severe Disabilities
3
Elective(2)
3
15
Year Four
Fall Semester
EDHS 504 Clinical Process
2
EDHS 508 Intro. to Audiology
3
EDIS 510 Emotional Disturbances or
EDIS 511 Learning Disabilities
3
EDLF 545 Instructional Computing
3
Elective(2)
3
14
Spring Semester
EDHS 515 Intro. to American Sign Language I
3
EDIS 521 Intro. to Language Devel.
3
Electives(2)
10
16

(1) 40 credits in the CDIS professional training area are required. 120 credits are required for graduation with B.S.Ed. degree.

(2)
Suggested elective courses for interdisciplinary education:

EDHS 518 American Sign Language II
EDHS 533 Communication Skills: IPR
EDHS 542 Motor Learning
LING 325 Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis
PHYS 121 Science of Sound
PHYS 201 Principles of Physics
PSYC 215 Introduction to Cognition
PSYC 250 Intro. to Child Psychology
PSYC 311 Psychology of Language
PSYC 346 Psychology Study of Children, Families, and the Law
PSYC 352 Adolescence: Theory and Development
PSYC 353 Development in Infancy

Sample B.S.Ed. Program in Sports Medicine (120 Credits)
(Pre-Physical Therapy or Athletic Training)

Year One
Fall Semester
ENWR 110 Composition
3
PSYC 101 General Psychology
3
MATH 111 (or above)
3
CHEM 141 Intro. College Chem. or
CHEM 121 Concepts of Chemistry
3
CHEM 141L Intro. College Chem. Lab
2
PHYE or
EDHS Physical Education activity
1
15
Spring Semester
ENLT 248 Contemporary Literature
3
Social Science or Humanities
3
SOC 101 Intro. to Sociology
3
PHYE 106 Weight Training
1
CHEM 142 Intro. College Chem. or
CHEM 122 Contemporary Chemistry
3
CHEM 142L Intro. College Chem. Lab
2
15
Year Two
Fall Semester
EDHS 450 Contemp. Health Issues
3
Social Science elective
3
PHYE or
EDHS Physical Education activity
1
BIOL 201 Introduction to Biology
3
BIOL 203 Intro. to Biology Lab
2
Humanities or Social Science elective
3
15
Spring Semester
Humanities elective
3
Social Science elective
3
BIOL 202 Introduction to Biology
3
BIOL 204 Intro. to Biology Lab
2
EDHS 355 Intro. to Sport and Exercise Psychology
4
15
Year Three
Fall Semester
EDHS 353 Human Anatomy
3
EDHS 546 Assessment in Phys. Ed.
3
PHYS 201 Principles of Physics I
4
PHYS 201L Basic Physics Lab I
PHYE or
EDHS Physical Education activity
1
Elective
3
15½
Spring Semester
EDHS 354 Neuromuscular Bases
3
EDHS 545 Adapted Physical Education
3
EDHS 451 Emergency Medical Care
4
EDHS 553 Nutrition
3
PHYS 202 Principles of Physics II or
PHYS 102 Concept of Physics
3-4
PHYS 202L Basic Physics Lab II
17½-18½
Summer
EDHS 457 The Art and Science of Sports Medicine
3
Year Four
Fall Semester
EDHS 544 Athletic Injuries and Lab
4
EDHS 441 Exercise Physiology
3
EDHS 446 Practicum in AT
3
EDHS ___ EDHS elective
3
Elective
3
16
Spring Semester
EDHS 524 Substance Abuse in Society
3
EDHS 542 Motor Learning
3
EDHS 445 Motor Development
3
Statistics (recommended) or elective
3
BIOL 207 Physiology & Anatomy II
3
15


General Electives Sample Programs

In addition to the requirements in the teaching specialization, general education, and professional education programs, the remaining credits needed to complete the graduation requirements may be elected,
subject to the approval of the student's advisor, from any courses offered in the University. (All actions regarding registration for courses require the permission of the assigned Curry School advisor. B.A. students also need permission from their College advisor.)
Course Descriptions

Courses offered for undergraduate credit in the Curry School of Education are described below. Additional graduate courses are required for the completion of the M.T. degree. For descriptions of courses that may be used to satisfy the general education requirements for the B.A. or B.S. in Education, see chapter 6 of this
Record. Course prerequisites consist of the stated courses or their equivalent, as determined by program area faculty. Courses offered in the Curry School of Education are listed by departments within the school.

The Curry School of Education is organized into three academic departments. For further information, contact the Office of Admissions and Student Affairs (434-924-3334) of the Curry School of Education.


Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education Course Descriptions Menu

EDIS 201 - (3) (Y-SS)
Teaching as a Profession 
Prerequisite: Approval of Permission to Enroll Application; corequisite: EDIS 288.
Teaching as a Profession is designed as the introductory course for the Five Year Teacher Education Program. In this survey of American education, students examine education history, philosophy in action in schools, student diversity, curriculum, effective teaching, school organization and governance, education finance, education law, sociopolitical dimensions of education, and the role of teacher as professional.

EDIS 288 - (1) (Y-SS)
Field Experience
Prerequisite: Approval of Permission to Enroll Application; corequisite: EDIS 201.
Experiences are provided for students to observe and interview teacher in the field. A computer component focuses on word processing, telecommunications, and networking skills that are valuable tools for educators.

EDIS 289 - (3) (S)
Strategies for Academic Achievement
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Instruction in multiple strategies for analyzing, planning, and completing academic tasks. Guidance in appropriate application and adaptation of general procedures of study to requirements and materials of specific courses. Focus on continual implementation, refinement, and evaluation of strategies to ensure that study habits are effective and efficient.

EDIS 302 - (3) (Y)
The Exceptional Learner
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Focuses on extending principles of learning and intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development to persons with disabilities, as well as the gifted. Credit may not be earned for both EDIS 302 and 500.

EDIS 388 - (1-2) (Y)
Laboratory/Field Experience
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.
Field-based practice experiences tutoring children.

EDIS 389 - (1) (Y)
Selected Topics
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.
This is a field-based course for all students enrolled in the elementary education program. This course provides opportunities to apply technology skills learned in EDLF 345.

EDIS 488 - (1-2) (S)
Field Experience
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 501 or 502.
Extensive experiences in practice teaching using various models of instruction.

EDIS 493 - (1-6) (S)
Directed Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

EDIS 500 - (3) (Y)
The Exceptional Learner
An intensive introduction to the study of exceptional children and adults. Focuses on extending principles of learning and intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development to persons with disabilities, as well as the gifted. Credit may not be earned for both EDIS 302 and 500.

EDIS 501 - (2) (Y)
Curriculum and Instruction for Elementary and Special Education
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 488.
Study of curriculum and instructional design, and instructional strategies consistent with those designs.

EDIS 502 - (2) (Y)
Instruction and Assessment
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 488.
Section 1: Elementary Education: Extension of EDIS 501 with a focus on instructional strategies and ways of assessing learning outcomes.
Section 2: Secondary Education: Focuses on instructional design and strategies for teaching in secondary classrooms and assessment of student growth toward prescribed learning outcomes.

EDIS 503 - (2) (Y)
Curriculum and Management
Provides instructional, classroom management, and conflict resolution skills and the opportunity to reflect upon their importance in the classroom. Opportunities to develop communication and social skills are also provided.

EDIS 504 - (3) (S)
Assessment Techniques for Exceptional Individuals
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 510, 511, or 512.
Prepares teachers of exceptional children to administer, score, and interpret several standard educational instruments; to use informal procedures in educational assessment; and to interpret the combined results of psychological, sociological, medical, and educational assessments as they apply to the development and evaluation of individualized educational plans.

EDIS 508 - (3) (Y)
Teaching Exceptional Children
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500 (510, 511, 512).
Presents strategies for teaching children with special needs and focuses on cognitive and behavioral instructional approaches. Collaboration and consultation for inclusive classrooms are essential class features. Includes application of instructional modification procedures and development of individualized plans. This class is coordinated with EDIS 514.

EDIS 510 - (2) (Y)
Characteristics of People with Emotional Disturbances and Behavioral Problems
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.
Studies the characteristics of socially and emotionally disturbed children. Develops an understanding of the field that relates definitions, descriptive data, and various theoretical models of disturbance currently used in the literature and practice of appropriate professional disciplines.

EDIS 511 - (2) (S-SS)
Characteristics of People with Learning Disabilities
Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.
Studies the meaning and concepts associated with the field of learning disabilities and the divergent characteristics of individuals with these disabilities. Topics include the nature, causes, assessment, and treatment of learning disabilities.

EDIS 512 - (2) (Y)
Characteristics of People with Mental Retardation
Prerequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.
Explores the basic concepts and issues pertaining to persons with intellectual disabilities. Physiological, psychological, sociological, and educational implications are considered, as well as a historical perspective relating to the many issues in the field of mental retardation.

EDIS 513 - (2) (Y)
Characteristics of People with Severe Disabilities
Prerequisite: EDIS 500.
Introduction to the characteristics of persons with severe and profound disabilities. Emphasizes the study of physical, ecological, psychological, and educational implications of severe/ profound disabilities and current issues.

EDIS 514 - (3) (Y)
Curriculum for Exceptional Children
Prerequisite: EDIS 302 (510, 511, or 512).
Focuses on strategies for secondary aged students with special needs, and is designed to extend the information given in EDIS 508. Emphasizes curriculum and instructional approaches related to cognitive and behavioral theories and addresses applications of transition procedures.

EDIS 517 - (3) (SI)
Adapted Physical Education in Alternative Settings
Two-semester sequence, using a workshop format that focuses on Outward Bound type activities: modified individual and group confidence-building physical activities, sports, crafts, and recreation. Experiences in the field accompany the study of research and practices applicable to adolescents in alternative settings.

EDIS 518 - (3) (IR)
Counseling Handicapped Youth
A two-semester sequence focusing on recognition and management of stress in professionals and their clients, and working with substance abusing youth. Techniques with short-term goals are studied.

EDIS 521 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Language Development
An overview of the language acquisition and development process. Surveys current and historical perspectives on language acquisition and treats those factors influencing language development.

EDIS 522 - (3) (Y-SS)
Reading Development
Reading Development is designed for pre-service elementary education teachers and is the requisite course for EDIS 530 A and B, the Language Skills Block. The aim of this course is to make language structures accessible for teachers of reading and writing so that they may use instructional programs with confidence and flexibility. Within this course, the theoretical foundations of understanding how children learn to read and write will be explored. Effective reading instruction hinges on an awareness of the language development of each individual student as well as the language content of the text. This course deals with how students learn to read (reading psychology) and the content of reading (the form of written language). EDIS 530 A and B, the Language Skills Block, deals with the pedagogy (how it is to be taught).

EDIS 530 - (6) (Y)
Language Skills Block
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Prepares students to teach reading and language arts in the elementary classroom. Attention shifts from "learning to read" to "reading to learn," and from working with small groups to effective differentiation needed to work with entire classrooms of children.

EDIS 532 - (3) (SS-E)
Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program.
Designed to prepare preservice teachers in understanding PreK-6 elementary topics in mathematics, teaching these topics, and how children learn mathematics developmentally. Examines ways to reason mathematically, make connections, and communicate mathematics through the use of literature, manipulatives, technology, and classroom discourse.

EDIS 540 - (3) (Y-SS)
Teaching English
Prerequisite: EDIS 541, 542, 543, and instructor permission.
Translates theory and research into practice by designing, enacting, and evaluating instructional units with a variety of teaching methodologies. Students individualize instruction; construct appropriate learning objectives; develop evaluation tools; and use cooperative learning groups, micro-teaching, and reflective processes.

EDIS 541 - (3) (Y)
Literature for Adolescents
Students read the latest and greatest in adolescent literature, learn to motivate reluctant readers, and develop individualized multi-genre and multicultural reading programs.

EDIS 542 - (3) (Y)
Language, Literacy, and Culture
Considers the relationships among language, literacy, culture, and schooling. Students learn to investigate language as teachers of language, research current issues, and design effective strategies for teaching various aspects of the English language.

EDIS 543 - (3) (Y-SS)
Teaching Composition K-12
Students study, practice, and evaluate theories and methods of writing and teaching writing. They prepare a personal writing project, criticize a writing program, or create a writing program for students.

EDIS 545 - (3) (Y-SS)
Teaching Secondary School Mathematics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers objectives, subject matter, teaching materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluative procedures for mathematics classes. Emphasizes organization of courses and programs in mathematics education.

EDIS 548 - (3) (Y)
Teaching Secondary School Foreign Languages other than Latin
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers theory and research in second language acquisition; classroom instructional procedures that follow the National Standards, which incorporate interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes and foster successful communication in foreign languages; and selection of appropriate materials, realia, visuals, and media for instructional purposes.

EDIS 549 - (2) (Y)
Planning Foreign Language Instruction
Prerequisite: EDIS 548 or instructor permission.
Considers specific objectives; setting long and short-term goals, planning and outcomes, assessment and testing, grading, record keeping, and communication with parents.

EDIS 550 - (3) (Y)
Teaching Secondary School Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers objectives, subject matter, teaching materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluative procedures for science classes. Emphasizes organization of courses and programs in science education.

EDIS 560 - (3) (Y)
Teaching Secondary School Social Studies
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Considers objectives, subject matter, teaching materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluative procedures for social studies classes. Emphasizes organization of courses and programs in social studies education.

EDIS 563 - (3) (IR)
Economics for Teachers
Examines essential concepts of micro- and macro-economics, emphasizing the incorporation of these concepts in elementary and secondary schools.

EDIS 564 - (3) (IR)
Physical Geography
Emphasizes the use of maps, map interpretation, and the study of climactic systems and physical forces on human activity.

EDIS 565 - (3) (IR)
Cultural Geography
Emphasizes concepts of cultural patterns and their influence on political and regional patterns of the world.

EDIS 573 - (3) (Y)
Diagnostics in Reading
An introductory course that focuses on classroom-based reading assessments. Students learn to match assessment to instruction and to use assessment information to organize flexible reading groups for school-age children. Participants develop expertise in the use of formal and informal assessments that measure a variety of literacy skills from emerging concepts of print and alphabet knowledge to word recognition, decoding, oral reading fluency, and comprehension.

EDIS 574 - (3) (Y)
Remedial Techniques in Reading
 This course focuses on intervention techniques for accelerating the reading ability of struggling readers. Instructional methods are presented in four categories of literacy development: oral reading fluency, comprehension, word knowledge (phonics, spelling, decoding, and vocabulary), and writing. Assignments are practicum based. Students learn how to match appropriate instructional techniques to assessed literacy needs and how to differentiate instruction for varying levels of reading achievement.

EDIS 586 - (1) (Y)
Seminar: Multicultural and Health Issues
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
This course focuses on the implications of cultural differences among students for teacher behavior and instruction.

EDIS 587 - (3) (Y)
Seminar: Teaching Methods
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Designed to accompany the teaching associateship experience (i.e., student teaching). Focuses on special issues and concerns that grow out of that experience, including such topics as classroom management, parent-teacher conferences, and school-community relations.

EDIS 588 - (6-12) (Y)
Teaching Associateship
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; and permission of both the advisor and the Director of Teacher Education.
A required student teaching internship for all potential teachers. Supervised by clinical instructors from the public schools, in cooperation with University supervisors.

Section 1: Elementary (PreK-6)
Section 2: Special Ed. - Behavior Disorders (PreK-12)
Section 3: Special Ed. - Learning Disability (PreK-12)
Section 4: Special Ed. - Mental Retardation (PreK-12)
Section 5: English (6-12)
Section 6: Foreign Language (PreK-12)
Section 7: Mathematics (6-12)
Section 8: Science (6-12)
Section 9: Social Studies (6-12)
Section 10: Early Childhood and Developmental Risk

EDIS 589 - (1-6) (S)
Selected Topics
These are designed as pilot courses to meet new program area degree requirements, and changing needs in the field. Used also to offer experimental courses, and courses under development, these are announced and offered on a semester-to-semester basis. May be graded or S/U, depending on the instructor, and may be repeated.

EDIS 590 - (2-3) (SI)
Workshop
Special topics, offered as needed.

EDIS 591 - (1-6) (Y)
Internship
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A special assignment, agreed to by the student and his or her assigned advisor, providing a unique experience in an educational setting that is consistent with the students' professional objectives and program focus. Conducted under the guidance of an experienced teacher and/or University faculty.

Section 1: Elementary Education
Section 2: Early Childhood Education


Department of Human Services Course Descriptions Menu

Courses listed in this section are from the programs of clinical psychology, counselor education, communication disorders (speech pathology and audiology), and health and physical education.

EDHS 224/524 - (3) (S)
Substance Abuse
Examines substance abuse and use in contemporary society. Treats topics from a multi-disciplinary perspective and includes biological, pharmacologic, cultural, social, psychological, political, economic, and legal aspects of substance abuse. Analyzes patterns of addiction, intervention, and rehabilitation with respect to alcoholism and other drugs. Examines assessments of costs, options, and alternatives to addiction, along with educational efforts toward prevention. Class discussions are an integral part of this course. EDHS 524 includes additional graduate-level requirements.

EDHS 225 - (2) (Y)
Sexuality for Today
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Academic content and leadership training primarily for individuals serving as peer counselors.

EDHS 289 - (1-3) (SI)
Selected Topics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course is used to offer selected topics or as a course number for courses under development. Grading is determined on the basis of the individual offering and may be S/U. May be repeated if different titles/content.

EDHS 324 - (3) (Y)
Peer Health Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Academic content and training on various health topics for college students.

EDHS 341 - (1-4) (S- SS)
Basic Skills
Prerequisite: Physical education major or graduate student in any school.
Measurement of body condition, training for skills required in various sports, and related knowledge necessary for teaching or supervising sports. (See PHYE listings for specifics.)

EDHS 344 - (2) (Y)
Gymnastics, Rhythms, and Dance
Participation in, and understanding of, performance and teaching techniques for gymnastics, rhythms, outdoor education, games, cooperative activities, and dance.

EDHS 350 - (2-4) (O)
Team Sport Skills
Prerequisite: Physical education major.
Analysis of team sport skills and teaching techniques related to group sport activities. Covers specific sport experiences, such as basketball, field hockey, football, lacrosse, soccer, softball, and volleyball. Analyzes basic principles of biomechanics, motor learning, injury prevention and diagnosis, exercise physiology, and pedagogical issues.

EDHS 351 - (2-4) (E)
Individual Sport Skills
Prerequisite: Physical education major.
Analyzes basic sport skills, developmental progressions, and teaching strategies for individual sports, such as badminton, golf, racquetball, tennis, multi-disciplinary activities, fitness self assessment, track and field, and outdoor education. Covers the basic principles of biomechanics, motor learning, injury prevention and diagnosis, exercise physiology, and pedagogical issues.

Section 1: Individual Sport Skills I (2 credits)
Section 2: Individual Sport Skills II (2 credits)

EDHS 353 - (3) (Y)
Human Anatomy
A systematic approach to human anatomy with emphasis on the interdependence of structure and function in the skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular and digestive systems. A laboratory experience is included.

EDHS 354 - (3) (Y)
Neuromuscular Bases of Human Behavior 1
Prerequisite: EDHS 353.
Studies the science of human movement in the context of muscle actions and the application of forces through levers of the musculoskeletal system. Analyzes fundamental human movement patterns, such as gait.

EDHS 355 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
Study of various aspects of sport and exercise psychology, including stress, anxiety, motivation, personality, and self-perceptions and influences as they relate to physical activity  and participation.

EDHS 356 - (2) (Y)
Elementary Physical Education Pedagogy
Study of elementary curriculum and instructional design in physical education. Examines the principles of planning (i.e., SOLs), implementing, and evaluating sound elementary physical education programs.

EDHS 357 - (1) (Y)
Teaching Elementary Physical Education
Provides pedagogical skills for teaching elementary physical education. Instructional strategies consistent with the instructional designs emphasized in EDHS 356 are examined and practiced.

EDHS 358 - (1) (Y)
Teaching Secondary Physical Education
Provides pedagogical skills for teaching secondary physical education. Examines and practices instructional strategies consistent with the designs emphasized in EDHS 359.

EDHS 359 - (2) (Y)
Secondary Physical Education Pedagogy
Study of secondary curriculum and instruction in physical education. Examines the principles of planning (i.e., SOLs, safety, legal issues, substance abuse, and child abuse), implementing, and evaluating a sound secondary physical education curriculum.

EDHS 377 - (1) (Y)
Teaching Assistant Program in Adapted Physical Education
Corequisite: EDHS 545.
Should be taken in conjunction with EDHS 545-Adapted Physical Education. Prospective teachers work with a variety of students with disabilities in a physical education setting. Students are assigned to, and supervised by, an adapted physical educator in one of the local schools.

EDHS 441 - (3) (Y)
Exercise Physiology
Prerequisite: BIOL 101-102 or 201-202, or 206 or equivalent.
A study of the physiological adaptations to exercise. Emphasis is placed on energy metabolism, physiological responses to exercise and exercise training techniques.

EDHS 445 - (3) (SI)
Motor Development
Describes and analyzes normal motor development across the lifespan, from pre-natal development through older adulthood. Emphasizes identifying and classifying motor behaviors across the lifespan, as well as understanding the interaction of environmental and biological factors that affect acquisition of these movement behaviors. Laboratory experiences are included.

EDHS 446 - (1-6) (S)
Practicum in Health or Physical Education
Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and completed "contract".

Section 1: Health Education
Section 2: Physical Education
Section 3: Sports Medicine

EDHS 450 - (3) (S)
Contemporary Health Issues
Analyzes current health problems and interests relative to various stages of the life cycle. Major discussions deal with human sexuality, modification of disease risks, emergency health care, drug use/abuse, mood alteration, death, and dying. Emphasizes the physiological, psychological, sociological, and ethical factors involved in individual health-related decision making.

EDHS 451 - (4) (S)
Emergency Medical Care
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Examines current approaches to the management of accidental and medical emergencies. Investigates appropriate procedures for reducing the severity of injury  as well as possible preventive actions. Considers cardiopulmonary difficulty, temperature-related injuries, poisoning, hemorrhaging, diabetes, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrest, emergency childbirth, epilepsy, fractures, and major forms of shock. Develops an understanding  of community organizations specializing in providing emergency medical treatment. Investigates the components of a comprehensive emergency medical care system. Successful completion of appropriate examinations will result in CPR certification.

EDHS 453/553 - (3) (Y)
Nutrition
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Studies the basic principles of nutrition, including psychosocial-cultural considerations in dietary intake. Focuses on nutrient sources and actions, digestion, special population needs, weight control, food faddism, international problems, nutrition education, and nutrition-related disorders. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS 453 and 553.

EDHS 457 - (3) (SS)
The Art and Science of Sports Medicine
A week-long conference that begins with lectures, visitations, and observations of surgery and prosected cadaver joints. Continues with presentations by nationally known physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists, and concludes with a written examination and submission of a literature review paper on a selected topic in sports medicine. Undergraduates register for EDHS 457, not 557.

EDHS 458 - (3) (SS)
Sport Psychology Conference
Undergraduates use this number, not EDHS 558.
Analysis of psychological variables related to motor skill and athletic performance. Includes motivation, goal setting, mental rehearsal, coaching styles, personality variables in sport, youth sport, anxiety, and performance enhancement. Specific applications to teaching, counseling, and coaching are emphasized. A conference fee is required. Credit may not be earned for both EDHS 458 and558.

EDHS 481 - (3) (S)
Problems of Personal Adjustment
Examines social and emotional adjustment within the context of normal development. Encompasses problems associated with the developmental process.

EDHS 493 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

EDHS 497 - (1-6) (SI)
Directed Research
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

EDHS 501 - (3) (Y)
Phonetics
Studies the structure and functioning of speech sound production. Teaches the basic skills of phonetic transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet, and introduces basic theoretical issues in the study of phonology.

EDHS 502 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science
Prerequisite: EDHS 501 and 505.
Examines principal concepts and procedures appropriate to the study of physiological, perceptual, and acoustic aspects of voice and speech.

EDHS 504 - (2) (Y)
The Clinical Process
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides a structured transition from the first observations of speech, language, and hearing disorders to the initial clinical practicum. Uses video-taped observations covering evaluation and treatment of the basic disorder areas of language, phonology, articulation, voice, fluency, and hearing across the life span.

EDHS 505 - (3) (Y)
Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms
A preliminary examination of the mechanisms underlying normal speech production and reception.

EDHS 508 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Audiology
Introduces the profession of audiology, with an emphasis on diagnostic audiology. Topics include anatomy, physiology, and common pathologies of the auditory system; the impact of hearing loss; conventional procedures used to assess hearing; interpretation of audiological test findings; and criteria for making audiological referrals.

EDHS 510 - (1) (Y)
Professional Issues in Communication Disorders
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Lecture and discussion of professional preparation for service to the communicatively impaired population. Introduces students to professional issues including clinical training requirements, academic requirements, certification, licensure, cultural and linguistic diversity, and legislative and judicial mandates.

EDHS 515 - (4) (Y)
American Sign Language I
Prerequisite: Speech pathology and audiology students.
A beginning course in American Sign Language (ASL), and an overview of using sign language with non-deaf special populations.

EDHS 518 - (1-4) (SI)
American Sign Language II
Prerequisite: EDHS 515 or instructor permission.
An intermediate course, assuming a beginning skill level in American Sign Language (ASL).

EDHS 524 - (3) (Y)
Substance Abuse in Society
Examines substance abuse and use in contemporary society. Topics are treated from a multi-disciplinary perspective and include biological, pharmacologic, cultural, social, psychological, political, economic, and legal aspects of substance abuse. Analyzes patterns of addiction, intervention, and rehabilitation with respect to alcoholism and other drugs. Examines assessments of the costs, options, and alternatives to addiction, along with educational efforts toward prevention. Class discussions are an integral part of this course.

EDHS 533 - (3) (Y)
Communication Skills: Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR)
Continuous and interrelated experiences provide an opportunity to learn more about communicating with other people. Focuses on effective communication skills and personal communication styles. Effective communication responses are practiced in class and through required laboratory experiences.

EDHS 542 - (3) (Y)
Motor Learning
Prerequisite: Statistics or Tests and Measurements.
Analyzes basic principles and concepts relating to the acquisition of motor skills. Discusses basic research on motor learning and performance, including the psychological and physiological principles related to movement behavior, with specific relevance to the rehabilitative and teaching process. Requires extensive writing and a research project.

EDHS 543 - (3) (S)
Social Processes and Individual Differences in Sport and Exercise Psychology
Focuses on the social and psychological factors related to participation in sport and exercise. Includes socialization into and through exercise and sport; observational learning of motor and psychological skills; feedback, reinforcement, and leadership behaviors; competition and competitive stress; and character development and self-perception in sport and exercise.

EDHS 544 - (3) (Y)
Athletic Injuries
Prerequisite: Anatomy, kinesiology, or instructor permission.
An advanced course in principles, procedures, and techniques in the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries for the athletic trainer, physical therapist, and physical education teacher. A one-credit laboratory experience is available in addition to the regular course.

EDHS 545 - (3) (Y)
Adapted Physical Education
Examines the nature and causes of disabling conditions and the motor needs and tolerances associated with these conditions. Enhances experience and skill in planning, assessing, prescribing, teaching, and evaluating instruction for children with disabilities in mainstream physical education settings.

EDHS 546 - (3) (Y)
Assessment in Physical Education
Introduces assessment strategies and techniques in physical activity settings (i.e., motor skills and fitness self-assessments). Although the focus is on general concepts and techniques of assessment in physical activity settings, the course also addresses strategies for the selection and administration of assessment tests.

EDHS 547 - (3) (Y)
Motivational Processes in Sport and Exercise Psychology
Focuses on factors related to motivation in sport and exercise settings. Antecedents and consequences of motivated behavior are examined from theoretical, research, and application perspectives. Emphasizes participatory motivation in sport; intrinsic/extrinsic motivational orientations (cognitive evaluation and competence motivation); achievement goals; causal attributions and effective responses; and exercise motivation and behavior.

EDHS 548 - (3) (SS)
Qualitative Analysis of Motor Patterns
Experienced teachers analyze and enhance their qualitative assessment skills. The course identifies and works on approximately 10-15 qualitative skills chosen by the class.

EDHS 550 - (3) (Y)
Contemporary Health Issues
Same as EDHS 450, but with additional graduate-level requirements. Credit may not be earned for both EDHS450 and 550.

EDHS 551 - (3) (E)
Teaching School Health Education
Introduction to current instructional approaches appropriate to a comprehensive K-12 health education curriculum. Designed for elementary and secondary school health instructors; the course stresses specific roles for schools in preventing health problems and promoting high-level wellness among students and the community through well-planned health instruction. Emphasizes organization for planning, implementation techniques, SOLs, instructional strategies, and the evaluation of instruction.

EDHS 552 - (4) (S)
Emergency Medical Care
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Same as EDHS 451, but with additional graduate requirements.

EDHS 553 - (3) (O)
Nutrition
Same as EDHS 453, but with additional graduate requirements. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS453 and 553.

EDHS 554 - (3) (SS)
Modalities in Athletic Training
Prerequisite: EDHS 544 or instructor permission.
Study of the theoretical foundations and principles of the therapeutic modalities used in the physical medicine environment. Includes theory and clinical techniques used to enhance the treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

EDHS 557 - (3) (SS)
Sports Medicine Conference
Same as EDHS 457, but with additional graduate requirements.

EDHS 558 - (3) (SS)
Sports Psychology Conference
Same as EDHS 458, but with additional graduate requirements. Credit may not be earned for both EDHS458 and558.

EDHS 561 - (3) (Y)
Computer Applications in Physical Education
Provides hands-on experience with specific programs designed to introduce students to using the microcomputer as an object of instruction, a medium of instruction, and a management tool. Develops computer skills that can be used immediately by physical education professionals to improve their efficiency.

EDHS 563 - (2) (E)
History, Principles, and Philosophy of Physical Education
Analyzes the heritage of physical education in terms of historical and philosophical foundations, as well as the cultural significance of sport and physical activity. Examines specific issues and principles related to physical education, such as Title IX, advocacy, and block scheduling.

EDHS 589 - (1-6) (S)
Selected Topics
These are designed as pilot courses to meet new program requirements, and changing needs in the field. Used also to offer experimental courses, and courses under development, these are announced and offered on a semester-to-semester basis. May be graded or S/U, depending on the instructor, and may be repeated.


Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy Course Descriptions Menu

EDLF 301 - (3) (Y)
Learning and Development
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program.
A survey course featuring topics that are central to the practice of teaching. A team of experts share their knowledge of physical growth, cognitive development, sociocultural influences, social learning, adolescent psychology, moral autonomy, youth violence, behavior management, teacher effectiveness and cultural diversity.

EDLF 315 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Child Growth and Development
A course with an applied focus featuring the affective, cognitive, and social development of children. The course integrates several major theoretical perspectives, and draws heavily upon empirical studies of children and adolescents.

EDLF 316 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Educational Psychology
Organized around two major concepts of learning: motivation and instruction. Teaches students to alter conditions of motivation and instruction in order to maximize the effectiveness of educational programs. Topics include motivation theory, learning theory, evaluation, self-management, and instructional strategies.

EDLF 345 - (2) (S)
Introduction to Educational Technology
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program.
This class focuses on current technologies relevant to preservice teachers' areas of study in the Curry School.

EDLF 489 - (1-4) (IR)
Workshop in Instructional Technology
Topical workshops designed for K-12 teachers to gain experience in instructional technology applications for use in classrooms and schools.

EDLF 501 - (3) (Y)
Learning and Development
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 388.
A survey course featuring the major principles of human growth, development, and learning that are central to the practice of teaching. Students are provided with opportunities to apply what they have learned in a professional context. Credit may not be earned for both EDLF 301 and 501.

EDLF 545 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Classroom Computing
Prerequisite: EDLF 345.
This course addresses the use and integration of educational technologies in K-12 educational settings, and particularly leading edge tools and emerging technologies. The focus of the course is on practical use of such technologies in K-12 classrooms. Laboratory exercises and assignments enable students to practice skills, learn management techniques, review courseware, evaluate software, and develop instructional activities while completing professionally related projects.

EDLF 546 - (3) (Y)
Software Applications in Education
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides experience in major generic utility software: database management, data graphing tools, and graphic production. Students apply a wide variety of software to instructional and administrative problems.

EDLF 555 - (3) (Y)
Multicultural Education
Prepares students to deal with the increasingly multicultural educational milieu. Emphasizes the process of understanding one's own bias and prejudices and how they effect the school and classroom learning environment. Included are readings, class discussions, field projects, journal writing, and other methods of directed self explorations.

EDLF 561 - (3) (Y)
Production of Instructional Materials
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides teachers with the skills and competencies needed to design and produce appropriate instructional media. Key topics include media production planning; selecting appropriate media formats; illustrating concepts, processes, and techniques; lettering for captions and text; mounting and preserving materials; audio design; supporting print materials; and media format translation.

EDLF 562 - (3) (Y)
Educational Video Production
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides introductory experience in producing educational video programs. Emphasizes the design and production of video materials in education and industry. Participants operate as production crews in studio simulations and as producers-directors of field projects. The competencies of program design, production, and utilization are emphasized.

EDLF 563 - (3-6) (SI)
Advanced Video Technology
Prerequisite: EDLF 562 or equivalent; video design/production experience; instructor permission.
Field experience in the design, production, and post-production phases of video programs. Participants function as production team members. Emphasizes producing programs that meet the research, instructional, and information dissemination needs of the Curry School of Education.

EDLF 564 - (3) (Y)
Instructional Photography
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Explores the use of photography as a research technique and classroom activity. Emphasizes the basic competencies required to visualize images and execute the steps of exposing, processing, and printing them. Topics include basic darkroom equipment; chemistry and processes; camera operation; film exposure and filtration; image control with the view camera; studio lighting; copy techniques; audio narration; and synchronization. Students need access to an adjustable camera and must provide their own film, paper, and other supplies.

EDLF 565 - (3-6) (Y)
Advanced Photography
Prerequisite: EDLF 564 or equivalent experience; instructor permission.
Initial lectures and demonstrations cover a selected range of necessary skills. This is followed by presentations and discussions on the application of photography to specific areas, such as instruction, research, and aesthetics.

EDLF 586 - (3) (Y)
Museums and Education
Introduces the history and development of museums and their educational work in America. Themes include an overview of museum history; exemplary museum interpretation and educational programs; instructional designs for teaching with objects and collections; and strategies for working with school groups and other audiences.

EDLF 589 - (1-6) (S)
Selected Topics
These are designed as pilot courses to meet new program requirements, and changing needs in the field. Used also to offer experimental courses, and courses under development, these are announced and offered on a semester-to-semester basis. May be graded or S/U, depending on the instructor, and may be repeated.

EDLF 590 - (1-3) (IR)
Workshop
Special topics offered as needed; generally an experimental or shortened course format.

EDLF 591 - (1-6) (IR)
Internship/Practicum
A special assignment, agreed to by the advisor, that provides a unique experience in an educational setting consistent with the students' professional objectives and program focus. A written description of the experience must be agreed upon by the advisor and supervisor and filed in the Office of Student Affairs.

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