University of Virginia
The Rotunda at U.Va.
2003-2004
GRADUATE RECORD
Curry School of Graduate Education
General Information  |  Categories of Graduate Status and Program/Degree Requirements  |  Program and Course Descriptions  |  Faculty
Course Descriptions

Department of Human Services

The Department of Human Services provides educational experiences and training for individuals preparing for professional careers in areas related to human development and clinical services in both the physical and psychological domains. Graduate degree programs sponsored by this department are in four program areas: communication disorders, counselor education, health and physical education, and clinical and school psychology. The faculty of the Department of Human Services are involved in training, research, and scholarship, and provide professional leadership to the Commonwealth and the nation on issues related to assisting individuals in the development of their full physical and psychological potential for productive and satisfying learning, leisure, and work.

The specializations within each program area are laboratory and/or clinically oriented. Each of the programs within this department seeks to apply knowledge from its disciplinary base to settings that enhance individual development, both physically and psychologically. For example, programs in counseling, sport and exercise psychology, and clinical psychology all require extensive clinical/psychological experiences. Similarly, communication disorders, clinical psychology, motor learning, athletic training, and exercise physiology each have strong clinical/medical aspects and involve extensive interactions with the School of Medicine and other units of the University of Virginia.

The options and specializations within each program area are described in the following sections.

Clinical and School Psychology
Clinical Psychology
School Psychology

Communication Disorders
Speech/Language Pathology
Counselor Education
Mental Health Counseling
School Counseling
Counseling and Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education

Kinesiology
Adapted Physical Education
Athletic Training
Exercise Physiology
Motor Learning
Pedagogy
Physical Education Teacher Education
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Sports Medicine

To obtain application materials, contact the Office of Admission and Student Affairs of the Curry School of Education. To obtain more specific information about any program in the Department of Human Services, contact the appropriate program area director.

Clinical and School Psychology There are two degree programs offered in clinical and school psychology: the Ed.D. in School Psychology and the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. The Ed.D. Program in School Psychology is for experienced school psychologists who wish to broaden their expertise in this area. The program has a prerequisite of two years of successful experience as a school psychologist and the completion of a minimum of 24 months of study. Included are two summers and one academic year of full-time, on-Grounds study in Charlottesville. A dissertation is completed during the second academic year. Students select two supporting areas (minors) to enhance their preparation in school psychology.

The Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology within the Curry School of Education is designed to train clinical psychologists with potential to make outstanding contributions to the profession in a variety of roles. The majority of graduates seek careers in settings such as hospitals, mental health centers, and schools. A smaller percentage choose purely academic and research careers. The program offers training in individual, group, family, and consultative intervention from several theoretical perspectives.

A thorough grounding in the basic science of psychology is provided for all students. Two research products are required: a pre-dissertation study, leading to a journal-article length thesis, and a doctoral dissertation. Specialized training in clinical work with children, families, and adults is available. Supervised clinical practicum is required, including summers, in all but the first semester of the four years of study. During the first year, students participate in a clinical practicum in a local school system, and in the second year they pursue training in the program's clinic, the Center for Clinical Psychology Services. Of the remaining two years, typically one is spent working as a staff member in the center, while the other is spent working in an area mental health agency, hospital, or school.

Recognizing the major role that schools play in the lives of children and adolescents, experience in schools is encouraged. In addition to preparation for licensure as a clinical psychologist, the program offers the option of becoming licensable as a school psychologist. The program culminates in the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and is fully approved by the APA (American Psychological Association) and by NASP (National Association of School Psychologists).

Students wishing to apply to the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology should contact the Chair of Admissions, Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology, Ruffner Hall, University of Virginia, 405 S Emmet Street, P.O. Box 400270, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4270 for a brochure and instructions. The application deadline is January 15. Admissions decisions are made once per year during the months of February and March.

Professional Development Selected students may be granted professional development status if they currently hold a degree in psychology or are practicing in a position that is predominantly a psychological service. Examples include the holder of a Ph.D. in psychology in a non-clinical research area; a practicing school psychologist; a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist wanting to continue his or her education; or a student in an area closely related to psychology (e.g., social work), who is seeking a special course. Professional development status is not a stepping stone for admission into the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology.

Students seeking admission to professional development status in clinical psychology must submit, along with the application, the following information:

  1. A statement of their reason for applying for professional development status and the goals they are seeking to achieve.
  2. A list of the courses (not to exceed 12 credits) they wish to take.

The following courses are available only to those applicants who are practicing psychologists or who hold at least a master's degree in psychology. Admission to these courses is on a space available basis and requires the instructor's permission: EDHS 763, 764, 768, 863-864, 865, 866-867, 871, 872, 873, 874, and 875.

Communication Disorders The Communication Disorders Program at the University of Virginia offers master's (M.Ed.) and doctoral (Ph.D.) degrees in Speech-Language Pathology. The master's degree curriculum fulfills academic and clinical requirements for obtaining professional credentials in speech-language pathology from the Virginia State Board of Education, the Virginia Licensing Board, and the American Speech-Lanauge-Hearing Association (ASHA). The master's degree in speech-language pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of ASHA. The Speech-Language-Hearing Center is accredited by the Council on Professional Services Accreditation (CPSA) of ASHA for the provision of full clinical services in speech, language, and hearing. Academic and clinical education is comprehensive, and the Program is committed to advancing clinical practice in public school services.

Graduates with a Master's degree in speech-language pathology are prepared to evaluate and treat a broad spectrum of communication disorders as they occur across the life span. Initially, students participate in clinical practica under the supervision of University Clinical Instructors. Advanced clinical training is gained at externship sites throughout the central Virginia region. Each student is required to complete clinical practicum assignments in educational (e.g. public and private schools) and in health-care (e.g., hospitals, rehabilitation units, community clinics; university training centers; research laboratories; federal, state, and local government service programs; private health care agencies; industry; and private practice) service delivery sites. Finally, an internship semester provides the capstone clinical-training experience. The internship site is chosen in accordance with the recommendation of the Director of Clinical Services and the student's geographic and professional preferences.

Students entering the master's program with a bachelor's degree in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) typically complete the graduate program in 5-6 semesters. Students entering with undergraduate degrees in other than CSD typically complete the requirements in 7-8 semesters.

Doctoral studies are supported by the excellent research libraries at the University of Virginia. The Communication Disorders Program faculty specialize in the areas of auditory evoked potentials; central auditory processing; evaluating effective and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas of aphasia, traumatic brain injury, dysfluency, and voice disorders.

Additional information about the Communication Disorders Program Area is available from the Communication Disorders Program Director, 2205 Fontaine Avenue, Suite 202, P. O. Box 800781, Charlottesville, VA 22908-8781 or on the world wide web at: http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/curry/dept/edhs/comdis/

Counselor Education Counseling is a unique helping profession based on the social and behavioral sciences. Counselors draw from a variety of disciplines to help individuals develop toward their full potential and solve problems that are typical for their age and stage of development. The degree programs in counselor education are the master's (M.Ed.), education specialist (Ed.S.), and doctorate (Ed.D. and Ph.D.). Graduate study in counselor education provides opportunities to acquire a depth of knowledge in theories of counseling, group dynamics, interpersonal relations, human behavior dynamics, and research procedures. Most counselor education courses are available only to counselor education majors. Some courses such as EDHS 733, 824, 828, and 834 may be taken by other students with the instructor's permission.

Counselor education programs are designed for students preparing to fulfill client services roles in a variety of work settings. The entry-level programs (master's and educational specialists degrees) require a minimum of 36-60 credits (see the brief descriptions below) and are designed to prepare students for client services positions in schools, community, mental health, and human services agencies, and institutions of higher education. The combined M.Ed./Ed.S. degree in mental health counseling requires 60 credits, including 48 credits from the master's program. The doctoral degree in counselor education requires a minimum of 57 credits (including doctoral internship and dissertation credits) above the master's degree.

The Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA), has conferred accreditation to the entry-level degree programs in mental health and school counseling and to the doctoral programs in counselor education at the University of Virginia.

Brief descriptions of the counselor education entry-level program options are below; additional information is available from the Counselor Education Program, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400269, 405 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4269 or the department web site.

Mental Health Counseling The option prepares students to provide mental health counseling in a variety of settings. This program option offers a comprehensive array of studies, which integrates the historical, philosophical, societal, cultural, economic, and political dimensions of mental health counseling with the roles, functions, and professional identity of professional counselors. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders are included in the coursework. Students will be awarded the M.Ed. and the Ed.S. degrees upon completion of the Mental Health Counseling program. The Mental Health Counseling program requires a minimum of 60 (core, specialty, elective) credit hours. Students must be enrolled on a full-time basis (including the following Summer Session between their first and second years) through the Spring Semester of the second year.

School Counseling The program option is designed for the preparation of professional counselors to work in public schools grades pre-K through 12. It is broadly based and interdisciplinary in nature. This program option offers a comprehensive array of studies, which integrates the historical, philosophical, societal, cultural, economic, and political dimensions of school counseling with the roles, functions, and professional identity of professional counselors in school settings. Effectiveness in school settings requires skills in working with individuals and groups, functioning as a school team member, and consulting with teachers and parents. Students complete field experiences at two different school levels.

Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education The program option prepares students for positions as student personnel professionals in post secondary educational institutions. The program is built on the concept that counseling and student services are basic components of the total student development program in post-secondary schools. This option is designed for students who plan to use their training in a variety of student affairs positions (i.e., Admissions, Orientation, Career Planning and Placement, Dean of Students Office, Residence Life, Student Activities, Athletic Advising and Academic Advising). Students take required and elective courses offered by both the Counselor Education Program and the Curry Center for the Study of Higher Education. The doctoral degree programs in counselor education are designed to prepare graduates to be counselor educators and supervisors and to assume positions of leadership in agencies, schools, and institutions that provide counseling services. This option emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary for counselor educators and counseling supervisors. This option is built on the CACREP standards for the Entry-Level programs and it is assumed that students already have a master's degree reflecting the CACREP required courses and successful clinical experience.

Kinesiology Graduate degree programs offered in health and physical education are available at the master's (M.Ed. and M.T.) and doctoral (Ed.D. and Ph.D.) levels.

Detailed descriptions of the Kinesiology Programs and their program specializations are below. For additional information, contact the Kinesiology Program Director, University of Virginia, 202 S Emmet Street, P.O. Box 400407 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4407; (434) 924-6207.

The kinesiology program area offers specializations in adapted physical education, athletic training, exercise physiology, motor learning, sports medicine, sport and exercise psychology, and pedagogy. Requirements within each option are distributed among: (1) a core of related courses usually taken within the department; (2) a supporting area suitable to the student's specialty; (3) research projects, independent study, thesis, and/or practicum experiences as recommended by the advisor; and (4) electives.

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree program is designed to develop an understanding of major factors affecting specific aspects of physical education, sport, and exercise. Graduates are prepared to work in educational settings such as schools, hospitals, athletic organizations, and private industry. The program also provides opportunities for the development of research skills and preparation for advanced graduate study. A minimum of 36 graduate credits must be earned for the M.Ed. degree, including the successful completion of a comprehensive examination or 30 credits and a thesis.

The Master of Teaching (M.T.) degree program culminates in the M.T. degree and teacher certification for health and physical education (grades K-12). Students interested in this program should contact the director of physical education teacher education for details regarding this two-year program.

The doctoral program (Ed.D. or Ph.D.) in kinesiology is organized to provide an in-depth analysis of specializations in physical education through a course of study shaped by a faculty advisor, a doctoral program committee, and the student. Graduates are able to initiate, conduct, and evaluate research related to specific aspects of motor behavior or physical education and to demonstrate teaching behavior appropriate for college or university faculty. Course work is individually prescribed to meet the requirements of the selected specialization and the skills and qualifications of the student. Areas of specialization within kinesiology may be selected from the following options:

Adapted Physical Education specialization provides graduates with the competencies needed to develop functional physical, motor, and leisure skills for individuals with mild, moderate, or severe disabilities. This program is offered in cooperation with special education, the Kluge Children's Rehabilitation Center, and the Charlottesville and Albemarle County school systems. The program is founded on an achievement-based curriculum model. Inherent in the program design are the following principles: the core of the program is an integrated sequence of course work in physical education and special education; hands on applications are emphasized; students complete extensive, well-supervised practicum experiences as one-half time adapted physical education teachers in local schools; students are trained to use a variety of assessment tools and techniques; and students use computer and video technology to analyze and improve teaching effectiveness. The doctoral program in adapted physical education prepares researchers and teacher trainers.

Athletic Training specialization provides M.Ed. graduates with competence and knowledge in the area of athletic medicine, including an understanding of the physiological, biomechanical, and psychological implications of training, as well as the principles, procedures, and techniques of prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Students gain practical experience by working with intercollegiate and interscholastic athletic teams and sports clubs. The athletic training program is one of a select group of NATA accredited graduate programs and has a prerequisite of NATA certification (or certification eligibility) prior to admission.

Exercise Physiology specialization acquaints graduate students with physiological concepts related to the acute and chronic effects of exercise on human subjects. Special areas of emphasis include interactions between exercise and health status, adult fitness, human performance, aging, environmental conditions, and nutrition. Graduates complete practical laboratory training that can lead to certification by the American College of Sports Medicine as either an exercise technologist or an exercise specialist.

Master's students in exercise physiology must complete a two-part comprehensive examination. Part one is taken during the spring semester of the first year and is a basic examination in exercise physiology that must be completed satisfactorily for students to remain in the program. If failed once, a student may petition for a reexamination during the summer. If failed a second time, enrollment is terminated. Part two is either a thesis or an advanced written exam at the end of the second year of study.

Graduates in exercise physiology have a thorough knowledge of exercise and applied physiology with an emphasis on metabolism and cardio-respiratory function; the ability to provide leadership for exercise classes involving healthy and high-risk patients; a thorough knowledge of, and practical experience in, procedures for exercise testing; and a working knowledge of research design, research methods, and basic statistics. This course of study can lead to employment in community, corporate, and university exercise programs or to advanced study and research in the field of applied physiology. The doctoral degree in exercise physiology is designed to prepare students to conduct research in human exercise physiology. Program content includes extensive work in physiology, computer applications, and research procedures, as well as interdisciplinary experiences in the School of Medicine.

Motor Learning specialization prepares students to design and implement optimal learning environments for both the acquisition and performance of motor skills. The foundation of this specialization is based on the psychology of motor skill learning. The process of motor skill acquisition is explored by analyzing the early perceptual-motor development of children and the problems of motor skill acquisition and retention for individuals of all ages.

Graduates are able to identify factors that affect motor skill acquisition and performance. Specific emphasis is on understanding the theoretical basis of motor learning and investigating practical questions related to stimulus input, integration, and output. Research is conducted to determine optimal learning environments, practice strategies, and elements that affect the performance of skills. Although closely related to sport psychology, this program emphasizes the acquisition of motor skills, while sport psychology focuses on the performance of well-learned skills. At the doctoral level, emphasis is on developing research skills and applying them to current problems in motor skill acquisition and retention. Doctoral students participate in either the ongoing research projects of the laboratory or in their own research inquiry during each semester of study. Current research interests include the effectiveness of mental practice and cognitive/psychological skills training on motor skill acquisition, the impact of knowledge of results and augmented information feedback on motor skill acquisition, parameters affecting the use of models, and visualization.

Pedagogy specialization is for students who already possess bachelor's and master's degrees in teaching physical education. This specialization prepares individuals to assume positions of leadership in teacher education training institutions at university or college levels. Academic experiences include preparation in the pedagogical knowledge base related to effective teaching; the utilization of both classroom and field experiences to train future physical education teachers; and research skills for investigating questions about effective teaching practices. Doctoral students participate in both ongoing research (focused on goal setting and case study teaching methods) and original research, and strive to demonstrate mastery of supervisory techniques in field-based practicum experiences.

Physical Education Teacher Education (M.T.) specialization is for an individual interested in the study of physical education teaching at the elementary and secondary levels. The individual is prepared to assume a position as a physical education teacher (grades K-12, or at a major university that requires the development of a research program in teacher education).

Sport and Exercise Psychology The area of sport and exercise psychology addresses the social influences and individual factors related to participation and performance in a variety of physical activity endeavors. Two major categories of investigation comprise the focus of this field: (1) how participation in sport and exercise contributes to the personal development of participants; and (2) how psychological factors influence participation and performance in sport and exercise. The first category includes such topics as self-esteem, character development, intrinsic motivation, and the ability to cope with anxiety and stress. Some topics under the second category include social support, motivation, self-confidence, goal-setting, arousal control, and mental imagery.

This program emphasizes both the research and application of sport and exercise psychology principles. The research program focuses on developmental sport and exercise psychology, an area that investigates age-related patterns and variations in psychological factors related to sport and exercise participation across the life span. Central topics include determinants of self-esteem through sport and exercise participation; motivational factors related to participation behavior and performance quality (i.e., contextual and individual factors); and social influences on physical activity participation and performance level (i.e., parents, peers, coaches). The applied aspect of the program entails opportunities for translating theory and practice to a variety of practical settings such as athletics, exercise and fitness management, injury management, and youth organizations.

The Sport and Exercise Psychology Program is committed to providing graduate students with the knowledge, skills, and experiences that provide a theoretical and practical background essential to their desired careers in research, teaching, athletics, or health and fitness. Students who pursue terminal master's degrees are prepared for positions as teachers, coaches, or professionals in fitness or athletic clubs. Students are also well-prepared to continue into a Ph.D. program to pursue research and teaching careers in higher education through their study of the breadth and depth of the field and through ample opportunities to engage in research, teaching, mentoring students, collaborative grant writing, and professional service activities.

Sports Medicine The doctoral degree option in sports medicine is designed to prepare candidates to conduct research within athletic medicine and sports science. Program content includes extensive work in physiology, anatomy, athletic training, biomechanics, computer applications, instrumentation, and research procedures.

Research experiences are gained by assisting with ongoing projects in the Sports Medicine/Athletic Training Research Laboratory, by developing independent research projects, and by assisting with master's theses in the athletic training specialization. Examples of current areas of research include isokinetic assessment of human muscle performance, postural sway (balance), and knee laxity. Collaborative research is also available through the School of Medicine and, in particular, with the Departments of Orthopaedics and Radiology.

Teaching assistant opportunities are available in the undergraduate specialization in sports medicine and the NATA approved graduate program in athletic training. Clinical work in athletic training and/or physical therapy is available through the on-Grounds training room, as well as through several local private schools.


Course Descriptions

TOP

Includes courses related to clinical and school psychology, communication disorders, counselor education, and health and physical education.

EDHS 501 - (3) (Y)
Phonetics

Studies the structure and functioning of speech sound production. Teaches the basic skills of phonetic transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet, and introduces basic theoretical issues in the study of phonology.

EDHS 502 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science

Prerequisite: EDHS 501, 505.
Examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual, and acoustic aspects of voice, speech, and hearing.

EDHS 504 - (2) (Y)
The Clinical Process

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides a structured transition from the first observations of speech, language, and hearing disorders to the initial clinical practicum. Uses videotaped and live observations covering evaluation and treatment of the basic disorder areas of language, phonology, articulation, voice, fluency, and hearing across the life span.

EDHS 505 - (3) (Y)
Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms

Examines the mechanisms underlying normal speech production and reception.

EDHS 508 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Audiology

Introduces the profession of audiology, emphasizing diagnostic audiology. Includes anatomy, physiology, and common pathologies of the auditory system; the impact of hearing loss; conventional procedures used to assess hearing; interpretation of audiological test findings; and criteria for making audiological referrals.

EDHS 510 - (1) (Y)
Professional Issues in Communication Disorders

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Lecture and discussion of professional preparation for service to persons with communicatively communication disorders. Introduces students to professional issues including clinical training requirements, academic requirements, certification, licensure, professional ethics, cultural and linguistic diversity, and legislative and judicial mandates.

EDHS 515 - (4) (S)
American Sign Language I

Prerequisite: Speech-language pathology and audiology students.
A beginning course in American Sign Language (ASL), and an overview of using sign language with non-deaf special populations.

EDHS 518 - (4) (SI)
American Sign Language II

Prerequisite: EDHS 515 or instructor permission.
An intermediate course, assuming a beginning skill level in American Sign Language (ASL).

EDHS 524 - (3) (S)
Substance Abuse in Society

Investigates substance abuse and use in contemporary society. Treats topics from a multi-disciplinary perspective, including biological, pharmacologic, cultural, social, psychological, political, economic, and legal aspects of substance abuse. Analyzes patterns of addiction, intervention, and rehabilitation with respect to alcoholism and other drugs. Examines assessments of the costs, options, and alternatives to addiction, along with educational efforts toward prevention. Class discussions are an integral part of this course. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS 224 and 524.

EDHS 533 - (3) (IR)
Communication Skills: Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR)

Continuous and interrelated experiences provide an opportunity to learn more about communicating with other people. Focuses on effective communication skills and personal communication styles. Effective communication responses are practiced in class and through the required laboratory experiences.

EDHS 542 - (3) (Y)
Motor Learning

Prerequisite: Statistics, or Tests and Measurements
Analyzes principles and concepts related to the acquisition of motor skills. Discusses the basic research and principles of motor learning and performance, including the psychological and physiological principles related to movement behavior, with specific relevance to the rehabilitative teaching process. Extensive writing, along with a research project, is required.

EDHS 543 - (3) (Y)
Social Processes and Individual Differences in Sport and Exercise Psychology

Focuses on the social and psychological factors related to participation in sport and exercise. Includes socialization into and through exercise and sport; observational learning of motor and psychological skills; feedback, reinforcement, and leadership behaviors; competition and competitive stress; and character development and self-perception in sport and exercise.

EDHS 544 - (3) (Y)
Athletic Injuries

Prerequisite: Anatomy, kinesiology, or instructor permission.
An advanced course in principles, procedures, and techniques in the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries for the athletic trainer, physical therapist, and physical education teacher. A one-credit laboratory experience is available in addition to the regular course.

EDHS 545 - (3) (Y)
Adapted Physical Education

Examines the nature and causes of disabling conditions and the motor needs and tolerances associated with these conditions. Enhances experience and skill in planning, assessing, prescribing, teaching, and evaluating instruction for children with disabilities in mainstream physical education settings.

EDHS 546 - (3) (Y)
Assessment in Physical Education

Studies assessment strategies and techniques in physical activity settings (i.e., fitness and motor skills, as well as fitness self-assessments). Emphasizes the general concepts and techniques of assessment in physical activity settings, and addresses strategies for the selection and administration of assessment tests.

EDHS 547 - (3) (Y)
Motivational Processes in Sport and Exercise Psychology

Focuses on factors related to motivation in sport and exercise settings. Antecedents and consequences of motivated behavior are examined from theoretical, research, and application perspectives. Emphasizes participatory motivation in sport; intrinsic/extrinsic motivational orientations (cognitive evaluation and competence motivation); achievement goals; causal attributions and effective responses; and exercise motivation and behavior.

EDHS 548 - (3) (SS)
Qualitative Analysis of Motor Patterns

Experienced teachers analyze and enhance their qualitative assessment skills. The course identifies and works on a number of qualitative skills (approximately 10-15) chosen by the class.

EDHS 549 - (3) (E)
Sport Psychology Interventions

Focuses on psychological skills and methods in sport and exercise settings.

EDHS 550 - (3) (Y)
Contemporary Health Issues

Analyzes current health problems and interests relative to various stages of the life cycle. Discusses human sexuality, modification of disease risks, emergency health care, drug use and abuse, mood alteration, death, and dying. Emphasizes the physiological, psychological, sociological, and ethical factors involved in individual health-related decision making. Same as EDHS450, but with extra requirements.

EDHS 551 - (3) (E)
Teaching School Health Education

Introduces current instructional approaches appropriate to a comprehensive K-12 health education curriculum. Designed for elementary and secondary school health instructors. Stresses specific roles for schools in preventing health problems and promoting high-level wellness among students and community through well-planned health instruction. Emphasizes organization for planning, implementation techniques, SOLS, instructional strategies, and the evaluation of instruction.

EDHS 552 - (4) (S)
Emergency Medical Care

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Examines current approaches to the management of accidental and medical emergencies. Investigates appropriate procedures for reducing the severity of injury, as well as possible preventive actions. Considers cardiopulmonary difficulty, temperature-related injuries, poisoning, hemorrhaging, diabetes, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrest, emergency childbirth, epilepsy, fractures, and major forms of shock. Develops an understanding of community organizations specializing in providing emergency medical treatment. Investigates the components of a comprehensive emergency medical care system. Successful completion appropriate examinations will result in CPR certification. Same as EDHS 451, but with extra requirements.

EDHS 553 - (3) (O)
Nutrition

Studies the basic principles of nutrition, including psychosocial-cultural considerations in dietary intake. Focuses on nutrient sources and actions, digestion, special population needs, weight control, food faddism, international problems, nutrition education, and nutrition-related disorders.

EDHS 554 - (3) (Y)
Modalities in Athletic Training

Prerequisite: EDHS 544 or instructor permission.
Study of the theoretical foundations and principles of the therapeutic modalities used in the physical medicine environment. Includes theory and clinical techniques used to enhance the treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

EDHS 557 - (3) (SS)
The Art and Science of Sports Medicine

A week-long conference that begins with lectures, visitations, and observations of surgery and prosected cadaver joints. Continues with presentations by nationally known physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists, and concludes with a written examination and submission of a literature review paper on a selected topic in sports medicine. Same as EDHS 457, but with extra requirements. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS 457 and 557.

EDHS 558 - (3) (SS)
Sport Psychology Conference

Analysis of psychological variables related to motor skill and athletic performance. Topics include motivation, goal setting, mental rehearsal, coaching styles, personality variables in sport, youth sport, anxiety, and performance enhancement. Specific applications to teaching, counseling, and coaching are emphasized. A conference fee is required. This week-long conference concludes with an examination and an extensive paper due at a later time. Same as EDHS 458, but with extra requirements. Credit may not be earned in both EDHS458 and 558.

EDHS 561 - (3) (Y-SS)
Computer Applications in Physical Education

Provides hands-on experience with specific programs that introduce the student to using the microcomputer as an object of instruction, a medium of instruction, and a management tool. Develops computer skills that can be used immediately by physical education professionals to improve their efficiency.

EDHS 563 - (2) (E)
History, Principles, and Philosophy of Physical Education

Analyzes the heritage of physical education in terms of historical and philosophical foundations, as well as the cultural significance of sport and physical activity. Examines specific issues and principles related to physical education, such as Title IX, advocacy, and block scheduling.

EDHS 589 - (1-6) (S)
Selected Topics

These are designed as pilot courses to meet new program area degree requirements, and changing needs in the field. Used also to offer experimental courses, and courses under development, these are announced and offered on a semester-to-semester basis. May be graded or S/U, depending on the instructor, and may be repeated.

EDHS 706 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Phonology and Articulation

Prerequisite: EDHS 501, 502, 504, 505, instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of development and disorders of phonology and articulation. Etiology, evaluation, and treatment are discussed.

EDHS 708 - (2) (SS)
Disorders of Fluency

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of fluency disorders: development, theory, evaluation, and treatment.

EDHS 709 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Voice

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of voice disorders, organic and functional: pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment. Requires attendance at the University Voice Clinic.

EDHS 710 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Communication: Craniofacial Anomalies

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of communication disorders associated with cleft palate and other orofacial deformities: pathology, evaluation, and treatment. Requires attendance at the University Craniofacial Clinic.

EDHS 718 - (3) (Y)
Habilitative Audiology I

Prerequisite: EDHS 508 or equivalent or instructor permission.
Emphasizes the impact of hearing loss; techniques for improving communication with individuals who have hearing loss; the latest in hearing technology; basic principles of aural (re)habilitation for individuals who are deaf, hard-of-hearing, or experience disorders of auditory processing; and the perspectives of Deaf individuals.

EDHS 719 - (3) (Y)
Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Communication

Prerequisite: Basic anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing mechanism, and instructor permission.
Introduces the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of speech, language, reading, writing, hearing, and vestibular function. Neuropathologies affecting communicative functions are reviewed.

EDHS 721 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to the Profession of Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission; required of all counselor education master's degree students
Introduces the history of professional guidance, counseling, and personnel services; the social, economic, philosophical, theoretical, and political bases of the profession; the major legal and ethical issues facing counselors; and a survey of career opportunities for counselors.

EDHS 722 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Career Interventions

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Surveys social, educational, and occupational information and materials, as well as their use in counseling. Introduces career development theory; written and non-written informational media; personal, educational, and career decision-making; and basic life planning techniques.

EDHS 723 - (3) (Y)
Theories and Techniques of Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Analysis of the theory and practice of counseling with special emphasis on the counseling process. Conditions of counseling, counseling techniques, and the counselor as a professional helper are emphasized.

EDHS 724 - (3) (Y)
Group Counseling Procedures

Prerequisite: EDHS 721, 723, 729, or instructor permission.
Analyzes the theory and practice of group work, the relationship of group activities to counseling, and specific skills in group techniques. Students are required to enroll in a non-credit lab that meets for one hours per week.

EDHS 725 - (1) (Y)
Using Tests in Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors; EDLF 718, EDHS 723, and instructor permission.
Study of the role of standardized test data in counseling.

EDHS 727 - (3) (Y-SS)
Research in Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Examines the role of research in the counseling profession, emphasizing the activities of the counselor as both a consumer and a producer of research.

EDHS 728 - (3) (Y)
Community and Human Service Agency Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Provides an overview of the historical, philosophical, organizational, and sociocultural foundations of human service agencies. Explores various community and human service agency settings and the unique client populations they may serve. Attention is given to the roles, functions, and responsibilities of mental health counselors.

EDHS 729 - (3) (S)
Essential Counseling Skills

Prerequisite/Co-requisite: EDHS 721, 723 or instructor permission.
Exploration and practice of essential counseling skills helpful facilitating client change.

EDHS 730 - (3) (Y-SS)
Multicultural Counseling

Prerequisite: EDHS 721, 723, 729, or instructor permission.
Exploration of cognitive, affective, and behavioral considerations of counseling culturally diverse client groups. Introduces counseling theories and techniques relevant to the mental health of these groups. Cultural attributes, strategies, and coping skills of diverse client groups are examined in terms of how they can be synthesized into the counseling process.

EDHS 731 - (3) (Y)
Mental Health Counseling I

Corequisites: EDHS 721, 723
This is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence addressing the knowledge and skills necessary to become a competent clinical mental health counselor. Historical, philosophical, societal, economic, and political dimensions of mental health counseling are covered. Current trends and professional issues in mental health counseling, personality assessment, diagnosing and treatment of mental and emotional disorders will be discussed.

EDHS 732 - (3) (Y)
Mental Health Counseling II

Prerequisites: EDHS 731 This is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence addressing the knowledge and skills necessary to become a competent mental health counselor with an emphasis on personality assessment, and diagnosis and treatment of mental and emotional disorders. Professional issues in mental health counseling will be discussed.

EDHS 733 - (3) (Y)
Ethical-Legal Aspects of Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Identifies some ethical and legal aspects of the helping professions and considers some of the moral-ethical dilemmas of counselors and other helpers. Focus on actual cases, ethics, legal responsibilities, and decision-making.

EDHS 741 - (3) (Y)
Pathology and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries

Prerequisite: EDHS 544, NATA certification, or instructor permission.
Presents an overview of the etiology for head and neck, upper and lower extremity, and trunk. Also included are the contemporary therapeutic exercise protocols for each of these injuries. Guest lectures are presented on related topics.

EDHS 742 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Exercise Physiology

Prerequisite: Human physiology; introduction to exercise physiology or equivalent.
Emphasizing current research findings, this class focuses on energy metabolism, physiological responses to exercise, and exercise training techniques.

EDHS 743 - (1-3) (Y)
Exercise Physiology Laboratory

Prerequisite: EDHS 742.
A presentation, through lectures and laboratory experiences, of laboratory procedures and biomedical instrumentation pertinent to exercise physiology laboratories and applied physiology research. Students are involved in a review of current research in each area of laboratory experimentation and participate as both subjects and investigators.

EDHS 744 - (3) (SI)
Motor Development

Describes and analyzes normal motor development across the lifespan, from pre-natal development through older adulthood. Emphasizes identifying and classifying motor behaviors across the lifespan, as well as understanding the interaction of environmental and biological factors that affect acquisition of these movement behaviors. Laboratory experiences included. Same as EDHS 445, but with additional scholarly and research requirements.

EDHS 745 - (3) (O)
Advanced Motor Learning

Prerequisite: EDHS542.
Analysis of the interaction of psychological and physiological principles related to the learning and performance of motor skills. Selected topics include feedback models of learning, cybernetics, factors affecting the acquisition of skill, classification of movement behavior and motor memory. Emphasizes in-depth study of the theoretical and practical nature of motor skill acquisition and performance.

EDHS 747 - (3) (O)
Developmental Sport and Exercise Psychology

A lifespan developmental approach is taken with attention to topics that are salient to youth, adolescence, and young, middle, and older adulthood. Topics include self-perceptions, motivation, social influences, moral development, and exercise/sport maintenance and adherence.

EDHS 750 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Practicum

Prerequisite: Advisor permission.
Supervised field experiences under the direction of the professional staff.

Section 1: Adapted Physical Education (S-SS)

Section 2: Adult Fitness (S)

Section 3: Athletic Training (S-SS)

Section 4: Health Promotion (SI)

Section 5: Motor Learning (SI)

Section 6: Sport and Exercise Psychology (S-SS)

Section 7: Strength Training (S-SS)

Section 8: Cardiac Rehabilitation (SI)

Section 9: Instructional Supervision (S-SS)

EDHS 758 - (3) (SS)
Anatomical Bases of Sports Medicine

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course includes dissection of the human cadaver and emphasizes the musculoskeletal, articular, nervous, and vascular systems. Dissection experiences are supplemented with classroom lectures. The role of anatomical structures as they relate to athletic injury mechanism, evaluation, and rehabilitation is emphasized. Each student prepares a presentation designed to relate topics of clinical relevance to dissected regions of the cadavers.

EDHS 759 - (3) (IR)
Principles of Stress and Stress Management

Examines the integration of stress theory, assessment, and management within the counseling and helping professions. Explores the impact of stress on mental and physical health and the acquisition of coping skills.

EDHS 760 - (3) (Y)
Adapted Physical Education: Developmental Disabilities

Studies the physical and motor attributes of children with developmental, learning, and emotional disabilities. Examines abnormal and delayed patterns of motor development through an assessment, diagnosis, and prescriptive format. Emphasizes identifying functional goals for these individuals and programmatic techniques for attaining these goals.

EDHS 762 - (3) (Y)
Personality

Prerequisite: EDLF 715, 716, or 720.
Examines classical and modern theories of the origin and development of personality and human motivation.

EDHS 763 - (3) (Y)
Seminar: Issues in Professional Psychology

Reviews the historical antecedents of contemporary practice. Centers on ethics, regulation of the profession, legislative and legal issues relative to practice, interdisciplinary issues, public policy, and psychopharmacology as it relates to clinical practice.

EDHS 764 - (3) (Y)
Cognitive Assessment

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces the administration, scoring, and interpretation of diverse psychological tests. Includes tests of intelligence, perceptual motor functioning, and various specific abilities.

EDHS 768 - (3) (Y)
Psychopathology

Prerequisite: EDHS 762 and instructor permission.
Analyzes the etiology, development, and manifestations of various forms of emotional and social maladjustment in children, adolescents, and adults. Emphasizes developing the conceptual understanding necessary for differential diagnosis, symptom assessment, and use of the DSM system. Stresses the importance of cultural, social, and developmental factors.

EDHS 770 - (3) (Y)
Health and Physical Education Teaching Seminar

Prerequisite: Advisor permission; corequisite: EDHS 771-772.
Analyzes current issues, such as safety, liability, and child abuse, related to teaching health and physical education (K-12).

EDHS 771 - (6) (Y)
Teaching Associateship: Elementary Physical Education

Prerequisite: Advisor permission
Student teaching experience for pre-service teachers that includes writing lesson plans and reflective teaching logs. Supervised by clinical instructors from elementary schools, in cooperation with University supervisors.

EDHS 772 - (3-6) (Y)
Teaching Associateship: Secondary Health and Physical Education

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Student teaching experience for pre-service teachers that includes writing lesson plans and reflective teaching logs. Supervised by clinical instructors from secondary schools, in cooperation with University supervisors.

EDHS 788 - (1-6) (Y)
Health and Physical Education Field Project

Field based action research project designed to explore a contemporary educational problem.

EDHS 793 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Independent Study

Prerequisite: Approval of advisor and instructor, and an approved plan of study.
Permits students to work on individual study topics, under close faculty guidance, when particular needs cannot be met by registration in regularly scheduled courses. May be repeated for credit; however, only six credits of EDHS 793 may be included in an M.Ed. degree program. The independent study topic must be listed on the student's degree application.

Section 1: Letter Grading

Section 2: S/U Grading

EDHS 802 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Communication: Augmentative and Alternate Systems

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A lecture-demonstration course that introduces the techniques and materials essential to developing augmentative communication programs for children, adolescents, and adults who are non-vocal and severely physically handicapped.

EDHS 803 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Motor Speech Production

Prerequisite/corequisite: EDHS 502, 706, 719 or instructor permission.
Review of contemporary issues in the practice of speech-language pathology for patients with dysarthria or apraxia of speech: includes semiology, etiology, pathophysiology and nosology. Introduces clinical practice, including evaluation, treatment and counseling.

EDHS 809 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Language: Birth to Preschool

Prerequisite: Language development course or instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of language disorders, including morpho-syntax, semantics, and pragmatics in the early developmental population; includes etiology, evaluation, and treatment.

EDHS 810 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Language: School Age

Prerequisite: Language development course or instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of language impairments in school-age children in relation to academic, social, and emotional performance; includes etiology, evaluation, and treatment.

EDHS 811 - (3) (Y)
Disorders of Language: Aphasia

Prerequisite: EDHS 719 or instructor permission.
Reviews contemporary issues in clinical aphasiaology, including epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, semiology, and nosology. Introduces clinical practice, including evaluation, treatment, and counseling.

EDHS 812 - (3) (SS)
Disorders of Communication Based in Cognitive Dysfunction

Prerequisite: EDHS 719 or instructor permission.
Reviews contemporary issues in the practice of speech-language pathology for persons presenting with right cerebral hemisphere pathology, traumatic brain injury, dementia, epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, semiology, or nosology. Introduces clinical practice including evaluation, treatment, and counseling.

EDHS 813 - (3) (Y)
Dysphagia

Prerequisite: EDHS 719 or instructor permission.
A lecture-discussion and clinical study of problems of swallowing. Reviews contemporary issues in the practice of speech-language pathology for patients presenting with dysphagia, including semiology, etiology, pathophysiology, and nosology. An introduction to clinical practice, including evaluation, treatment, and counseling.

EDHS 815 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Clinical Practice in Speech and Language Pathology

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analysis of clinical practice in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of children and adults with communication disorders. Programs are individually structured to provide clinical and field work experience with a variety of ages, patients, and rehabilitation settings, or in a particular aspect of professional specialization. Close individual supervision is maintained by clinical instructors, and each case is discussed in weekly conference.

EDHS 817 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Clinical Externship

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analysis of clinical practice in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of children and adults with communicative disorders. Programs are individually structured to provide experience with a variety of clinical populations, age groups, and specializations. The sites are off-grounds, and usually within a two hour driving distance of the University.

EDHS 822 - (3) (IR)
Consultation

Prerequisite: EDHS 723, 729, or instructor permission.
An examination of the models and process of consultation. Designed to expand the student's interpersonal skill repertoire. Emphasizes the practice of consultation appropriate to various work settings.

EDHS 824 - (3) (Y)
Substance Abuse Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor Education majors or instructor permission.
Introduction to substance abuse counseling. Provides an understanding of the disease concept and other views of addiction, different methods of treating substance abuse, the process of recovery, the Twelve Step model, the role of the family in addiction, and counseling issues such as confronting denial, intervention, family counseling, relapse, and the role of the counselor in treatment. Emphasis is placed on developing skills through role play, case study, and interactions with substance abuse counselors and clients.

EDHS 825 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Career Development and Career Counseling

Prerequisite: EDHS 722 and 723.
Advanced study of career development theories and research, and the application of theoretical propositions to career counseling. Emphasizes the integration of career development concepts into the counseling process.

EDHS 827 - (3) (IR)
Counseling Adults

Prerequisite: EDHS 723.
Explores the concerns and problems that post high-school aged counselees present to counselors. Focuses on developmental theories and examines resources and helping strategies appropriate for those problem areas.

EDHS 828 - (3) (Y)
Marriage and Family Dynamics

Prerequisite: EDHS 723 or instructor permission.
Analyzes the theory and practice of family counseling. An overview course that addresses the major traditional family therapy theories, as well as recent advances.

EDHS 829 - (1-3) (Y)
Counselor Education Master's Internship

Prerequisite: EDHS 721, EDHS 723, EDHS 729, EDHS 731 OR 831, and instructor permission.
Subject to availability of suitable practicum placement. An intent to register must be filed the semester preceding registration. For elementary, secondary, and mental health counselors. A minimum of 100 on-site hours is required. A description of the setting, specifying the school level or mental health agency in which practicum occurred must be included on the student's degree application. Students are required to participate in on-grounds supervision.

Section 1: Mental Health Counseling

Section 2: School Counseling

EDHS 830 - (3) (IR)
Assessment in Counseling

Prerequisite: EDLF 718/EDHS 725.
Studies assessment devices and techniques used by counselors. Also provides practice in the interpretation of test data with emphasis on communication principles.

EDHS 831 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to School Counseling

Prerequisite: Counselor education majors or instructor permission.
Explores the planning and initiation of counseling programs in schools with an emphasis upon counselor's duties, organizational structure, goals, purpose, and evaluation. Programs and techniques appropriate to meet the needs of students are studied. Attention is also given to contemporary issues confronting school counselors.

EDHS 834 - (3) (Y)
Counseling Children and Adolescents

Prerequisite: EDHS 721, 723, EDLF 716, or instructor permission.
Explores concerns and problems that children and adolescents present to counselors. Focuses on developmental theories and examines resources and helping strategies appropriate for those problem areas.

EDHS 838 - (1-3) (SI)
Topical Issues in Counselor Education

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Deals with a variety of professional issues in counseling, guidance, and personnel services. Topics are announced prior to registration and can be developed around the interests of prospective students. Must be prearranged.

EDHS 839 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Counselor Education Master's Internship

Prerequisite: EDHS 829 and instructor permission, advanced standing, and instructor permission. Subject to availability of suitable internship placement An intent to register must be filed the semester preceding registration. For elementary, secondary, and mental health counselors and student affairs professionals. A minimum of 100 on-site hours is required for each one (1) credit of EDHS 839. A minimum of 600 on-site hours and six credits of EDHS 839 may be included in the M.Ed. programs and 900 on-site hours and nine credits of EDHS 839 may be included in the M.Ed. /Ed.S. mental health counseling program. A description of the setting, specifying the school level, the student personnel service, or the type of mental health service agency in which internship occurred must be included on the student's degree application. Students are required to participate in on-grounds supervision. May be repeated for credit.

Section 1: Mental Health Counseling *S-SS

Section 2: School Counseling *S

Section 3: Student Affairs in Higher Education *S

EDHS 841 - (3) (Y)
Orthopedic Basis of Sports Medicine

Prerequisite: EDHS 741, instructor permission.
Analyzes topics pertinent to evaluation and treatment of athletic injuries, including Cyriax approach to soft tissue evaluation, instrumented assessment of knee joint laxity, joint mobilization, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, and isokinetic evaluation and rehabilitation. Laboratory experiences follow didactic presentations when appropriate.

EDHS 842 - (3) (Y)
Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise

Prerequisite: EDHS 742 or instructor permission.
Analyzes metabolic adaptations to acute bouts of exercise and chronic exercise training. Includes energy sources for human movement; substrate utilization, muscle plasticity, functional significance of the metabolic adaptations to chronic exercise training; muscle fatigue and damage.

EDHS 843 - (3) (Y)
Exercise Intervention in Disease

Prerequisite: EDHS742 or instructor permission.
Examines the impact of exercise on the disease process, focusing primarily on cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Examines hypotheses concerning causes of diseases, risk factors, and modification of risk factors through exercise and diet intervention.

EDHS 845 - (3) (Y)
Disease Processes and Prevention

Investigates those disease processes most common and of most significance in their effects upon individual, community, nation, and world health status. Emphasizes definitions, manifestations, etiology, pathology, epidemiology, general medicine procedures, disease prognosis, and potential preventive actions. Develops an understanding of the specific mechanisms through which preventive actions work as a goal of effective health education.

EDHS 846 - (3) (Y)
Adapted Physical Education: Physically and Sensory Impaired

Studies the physical and motor attributes of individuals with physical, sensory, and health disabilities. Addresses programming and instructional implications in physical education for these populations in regard to their ecological, psychological, social, and learning characteristics. Emphasizes developing and achieving functional physical education goals through planning, assessing, prescribing, teaching, and evaluating instruction.

EDHS 848 - (3) (Y)
Review and Critique of Sport and Exercise Psychology Research

Develops critical thinking and analysis in order to read and interpret recent studies on a variety of topics. Discusses the process of article review and publication, including the publication process; characteristics of good research articles; using those characteristics to review and critique published and submitted work; and how to organize and write a good manuscript review. Enables independent, informed decisions on the quality of others research and offers insight on how to write papers that maximize the probability of a favorable response by reviewers and readers.

EDHS 850 - (3)
Seminar

Prerequisite: Instructor and advisor permission.
Additional sections on special topics may be offered subject to sufficient student interest.

Section 1: Adapted Physical Education (S-SS)

Section 2: Athletic Training (Y)

Section 3: Biomechanics (S-SS)

Section 4: Exercise Physiology (S-SS)

Section 5: Health Promotion (S-SS)

Section 6: Motor Development (S-SS)

Section 7: Motor Learning (S-SS)

Section 8: Sport/Exercise Psychology (S-SS)

Section 9: Sports Medicine (Y)

Section 10: Strength Training (S-SS)

Section 11: Pedagogy (S-SS)

EDHS 851 - (1-3) (IR)
Curry Forum on Educational Issues

School-wide interdisciplinary course on key issues in education. Selected topics are introduced by Curry School faculty and nationally recognized scholars and then explored in greater detail by small discussion groups. Sponsored by all four departments and open to all master's and doctoral students.

EDHS 853 - (1-9)
Supervised Research

Prerequisite: advisor and instructor permission
Participation in a research project. Designed especially for master's degree program students. Total credits may not exceed nine.

Section 1: Adapted Physical Education (S-SS)

Section 2: Athletic Training (S-SS)

Section 3: Biomechanics (S-SS)

Section 4: Exercise Physiology (S-SS)

Section 5: Health Promotion (S-SS)

Section 6: Motor Development (S-SS)

Section 7: Motor Learning (S-SS)

Section 8: Sport/Exercise Psychology (S-SS)

Section 9: Sports Medicine (S-SS)

Section 10: Strength Training (S-SS)

Section 11: Pedagogy (S)

EDHS 861 - (3) (Y)
Marital and Couple's Therapy

Analyzes basic principles and techniques of marital and couple's therapy. Emphasizes the practical, covering theory as it relates to the interactional dynamics and behavior of the therapy. Experiential techniques (i.e., role playing, video tape, and live supervision) are an integral part of the course. Some therapy experience is desirable, although not required.

EDHS 863 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Psychotherapy Basics

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduction to the assumption and process of psychotherapy. Explores basic principles of change as reflected in the dynamics of the psychotherapeutic relationship between the therapist and the client. Examines the pitfalls of being a beginning therapist and the problems faced in initiating the therapy process. Participants are provided with an experiential setting to heighten awareness of transference, resistance, and termination.

EDHS 864 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Psychotherapy Advanced

Prerequisite: EDHS 863 or instructor permission.
In-depth examination of cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic individual psychotherapy. The theoretical base and accompanying empirical literature of varying approaches are discussed with special emphasis on application of principles. Experimental techniques (e.g., role playing and observation of video tapes) are included. Continuation of EDHS 863.

EDHS 865 - (3) (Y-SS)
Individual Psychotherapy

Designed to teach the principles and techniques of individual psychotherapy. May be repeated for credit; each year the psychotherapeutic approaches to be taught are specified. The specialized course offering for a given year (e.g., brief strategic psychotherapy, child psychotherapy, or rational emotive therapy) is printed on the student's transcript.

EDHS 866 - (3) (Y)
Personality Assessment I

Prerequisite: EDHS 764 and instructor permission.
First of a two-semester sequence in personality assessment. Trains the clinical/ school psychology graduate student in basic methods of clinical assessment using a battery of psychological tests, including both projective and non-projective instruments. There are two components to the first semester course: critical examination of theory and research on psychological testing; and a supervised practicum in clinical assessment. Clinical assessments of children and adults are covered.

EDHS 867 - (3) (Y)
Personality Assessment II

Prerequisite: EDHS 866 and instructor permission. Second of a two-semester sequence in personality assessment.
During this semester, students examine theory, practice, and research on the application of a variety of personality assessment techniques and instruments to specific diagnostic questions (e.g., assessment of psychotic, affective, neurotic, and borderline disorders); and continue learning to conduct personality assessments through a supervised practicum. Clinical assessments of children and adults are covered.

EDHS 869 - (1-6) (S-SS)
School/Clinical Psychology Practicum

Prerequisite: EDHS 764.
Supervised field experience in activities central to the role of the school/child psychologist.

EDHS 870 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Clinical Psychology Practicum

Supervised placement in a setting designed to provide students with clinical experiences dealing with children, adults, and families.

EDHS 871 - (3) (Y)
Psychosocial Consultation

Prerequisite: EDHS 768 and instructor permission.
Seminar and practicum experience designed specifically for advanced doctoral students. Focuses on the theoretical and research issues that relate to the practice of consultation and supervision. In addition to the readings and class discussions, students engage in both consultation and supervisory activities. Students are challenged to draw upon their prior knowledge of psychological assessment, problem solving, methods of intervention, and psychological theory. Facilitates the integration of prior learning into practice.

EDHS 872 - (3-6) (IR)
Group Therapy Interventions

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Designed to broaden and strengthen the group therapeutic skills and experience of doctoral students. Entails the observation of various group procedures and participation in an ongoing group experience.

EDHS 873 - (3) (Y)
Family Therapy: Theory and Techniques

Prerequisite: EDHS 864, 865 or equivalent, and instructor permission.
Examines major schools in the field of family therapy with a focus on learning how to conceptualize a case from these different perspectives. Special emphasis is on the application and evaluation of various intervention models to family problems commonly presented in therapy. Observation of actual cases is a required part of the course.

EDHS 874 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Family Therapy

Prerequisite: EDHS 864, 865 and instructor permission.
Advanced seminar in family therapy is designed to give students an in-depth exposure to methods of family intervention. Includes both didactic and case format.

EDHS 875 - (3) (E)
Psychological Interventions in Schools

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Advanced study of the role and function of the psychologist in school settings. Topics include psychoeducational assessment and remediation procedures; varieties and techniques of appropriate psychological interventions in schools; models of, and national trends in, school psychology service delivery.

EDHS 893 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Independent Study

Prerequisite: Approval of advisor and instructor and an approved plan of study
Permits advanced graduate students to work on individual study topics, under close faculty guidance, when particular needs cannot be met by registration in regularly scheduled courses. The topics of the independent study must be listed on the student's degree application. May be repeated for credit. Section 1: Letter Grading Section 2: S/U Grading

EDHS 897 - (1-6) (S-SS)
Directed Research and Master's Thesis

Prerequisite: permission of advisor and faculty sponsor
Section 1: Independent research by advanced level graduate students preparing for doctoral dissertation research. May be repeated. Section 2: A master's thesis project conducted under the guidance of the master's advisor or others approved by the departmental chair. A formal plan should be filed in the Office of Student Affairs, and the final project must be approved by at least two Curry faculty members.

EDHS 909 - (3) (SI)
Doctoral Seminar: Communication Disorders

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.May be repeated for credit.

EDHS 921 - (1-3) (IR)
Advanced Group Counseling Theories and Practicum

Prerequisite: EDHS 724, 729, and instructor permission.
Advanced graduate seminar and practicum in group counseling theories and technique. Different theoretical approaches to group counseling along with accompanying techniques are studies in section 1. Section 2 is a practicum in advanced group counseling and is subject to availability of suitable practicum placement. Section 2 may be repeated for credit

Section 1: Group Theories (1 credit)

Section 2: Practicum (1-3 credits)

EDHS 922 - (1-3) (Y)
Advanced Individual Counseling Strategum

Prerequisite: EDHS 729 and instructor permission.
A group seminar designed to enhance students' individual intake, assessment, counseling and treatment planning skills. Subject to availability of suitable practicum placement. May be repeated for credit.

EDHS 929 - (3) (Y)
Counselor Supervision

Prerequisite: Counselor education doctoral student or instructor permission.
Study of counselor supervision combined with a required experience as a supervisor-trainee in a laboratory practicum course.

EDHS 931 - (3) (Y)
Doctoral Seminar: Counselor Education

Prerequisite: advanced standing and instructor permission.
Specialized study of the profession's present status, emphasizing research in the field and possible future directions.

EDHS 932 - (3) (Y)
Doctoral Seminar: Counselor Education

Prerequisite: advanced standing and instructor permission. Specialized study of the profession's present status, emphasizing professional problems and issues.

EDHS 939 - (3-6) (S-SS)
Counselor Education Doctoral Internship

Prerequisite: instructor permission; subject to availability of suitable internship placement.

EDHS 950 - (1-6) (Y)
Advanced Doctoral Seminar

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Special topics and research analysis for doctoral students.

EDHS 974 - (1-6)
Internship in College Teaching or Supervision

Opportunities for experienced doctoral students to teach courses or partial courses at the University, or to supervise student teachers under the guidance of a faculty member. Opportunities are arranged by the students with the assistance of the sponsoring faculty member.

EDHS 975 - (1-3) (S-SS)
Seminar: Topics in Clinical Psychology

Doctoral seminar covering selected topics in clinical psychology. May be repeated for credit.

EDHS 976 - (1-3) (S-SS)
Seminar: Topical Issues in School Clinical Psychology

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Deals with a variety of professional issues in school and child clinical psychology. Topics can be developed around the interests of prospective students. Must be prearranged. Course topics will be announced prior to registration and have included social and affective process in development and neuropsychology. May be repeated for credit.

EDHS 993 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Study

Prerequisite: Advisor permission.
Under close guidance of a faculty member, student work on an area of particular interest that cannot be met by a regularly scheduled course. A plan of study should be signed by the faculty sponsor and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.

EDHS 995 - (1-6) (SI)
Supervised Research

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Permits students to work jointly with faculty or other students in cooperatively designing and executing research projects. The nature and scope of such projects are advanced beyond the master's level, and a plan of research should be signed and filed in the student's permanent file.

EDHS 996 - (1-6) (SI)
Independent Research

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Permits students to work independently under the supervision of a Curry faculty member. A plan of research should be signed by the faculty member and filed in the student's permanent file in the Office of Student Affairs.

EDHS 997 - (1-12) (S-SS)
Internship - Ed.D. or Ph.D.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Full-time professional internship with supervision shared by the host institution or agency and the University.

Section 1: Professional Psychology: A supervised experience in which students apply their clinical skills in a mental health, school, or hospital setting. All settings meet either the criteria for internships set by the Virginia Board of Psychology or those set by the American Psychological Association, in addition to those established by the faculty of the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology.

Section 2: Speech-Language Pathology: Clinical internship in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals with communicative disabilities in an educational, rehabilitation, or medical setting. The internship provides students with an opportunity to gain experience in working with other professional team members serving communicatively disordered individuals; be exposed to, and participate in, the operations of the practicum site; increase their abilities to assume the responsibilities associated with independent case management; and, when possible, specialize in working with a particular age group or disorder.

Section 3: A supervised internship designed for doctoral students to gain experience in the profession of education. This internship must be completed after admission to the doctoral program and under the direct supervision of a Curry faculty member.

Section 4: Counselor Education: A supervised doctoral-level internship experience in Counselor Education.

EDHS 999 - (1-12) (S-SS)
Doctoral Dissertation

Continuous enrollment is required from the start of the dissertation through the proposal and final examination.


 
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