2003-2004
UNDERGRADUATE RECORD
Admission to the University
General Admission Requirements  |  Admission Timetable  |  Admission of First Year Students
Additional Information  |  Admission of Transfer Students  |  Student Retention Information
Dual Enrollment  |  Special Student Information  |  Summer Session  |  Advanced Placement Programs
 

 

General Admission Requirements

TOP
 

The University of Virginia practices a selective admission policy, seeking outstanding students from throughout the United States and abroad. The Committee on Admission  endeavors to provide the University community with an academically able, diverse, talented, and creative student body.

The committee seeks to balance the strength of a national student body with the importance of a university education for Virginia’s best students. It does not otherwise enforce geographical quotas or observe geographical limitations. The committee does not consider financial need in any way when it evaluates applicants. Upon request, the Office of Admission will provide the annual published profile of the entering class.

Students coming directly from secondary school to the University are admitted in the fall semester to one of four undergraduate schools: the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Architecture, or the School of Nursing. These four schools also admit transfer students. After two academic years of college-level work here or elsewhere, students may apply to the McIntire School of Commerce. Students may apply to the Five Year Teacher Education program sponsored jointly by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Curry School of Education after one or two years of college work. The Curry School also admits students to programs in Communication Disorders and Sports Medicine who have completed two years of college work. The Office of Admission receives and reviews applications for all six undergraduate schools and distributes information on all schools. Each school enforces its own college course requirements for transfer applicants; the Office of Admission will provide current descriptions of requirements upon request.

The School of Continuing and Professional Studies also offers a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) degree for students who have completed two years of college work at a regionally accredited college or university. Applications for the BIS program are received and reviewed by that office; for more information about admission to the BIS program, see chapter 12.

 

 

Admission Timetable

TOP
 
August Office of Admission publishes print and electronic applications for admission for the following year.
November 1 Deadline for Early Decision applications. Deadline for spring transfer applications (College of Arts and Sciences only).
December 1 Notification date for Early Decision applicants. Approximate date of notification of spring transfer applicants.
December-January Last dates to take required standardized tests.
January 2 Deadline for Regular Decision applications and for receipt of $40 non-refundable application fee.
March 1 Deadline for fall transfer applications (all schools). Deadline for return of financial aid forms.
April 1 Notification date for first-year applicants.
April 4th week Approximate date of notification of fall transfer applicants.
May 1 Reply date for candidates accepting offers of admission. Non-refundable $250 deposit also due.
 

 

Admission for First Year Students

TOP
 

Demonstrated academic achievement in a challenging secondary school program is normally the primary criterion for admission to the first-year class. Outstanding grades, high rank in class, good performance in Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and honors courses, and superior standardized test scores all help establish such a record. As the committee prefers applicants who have completed the most rigorous academic courses available in their secondary schools, prospective students should not be satisfied with the minimal graduation requirements. The secondary program should include no fewer than 16 academic courses and must include the following courses:
English 4 units
Mathematics 4 units
Foreign Language 2 units
Science (from among biology, chemistry and physics) 2 units(1)
Social Studies 1 unit
(1) If applying to the School of Engineering and Applied Science, three units, including chemistry and physics, are required. Also, foreign language is recommended, but not required for admission to Engineering.

Because full-time students at the University take five academic courses each term, the committee recommends that students take no fewer than four, and preferably five, academic courses (English, math, history, science, and foreign language) each year in grades nine through twelve.

The Committee on Admission examines the application form for what it reveals about extracurricular successes, special talents and interests, goals, background, and the applicant’s ability to write effective English prose. A letter of recommendation from the secondary school is required.

Regular Decision The admission office publishes applications each fall for admission in the following September. All applications must be returned to the Office of Admission by January 2 with a non-refundable application fee of $40. Candidates who qualify for a waiver of the College Board ATP fee may request a waiver of the application fee as well. For further information and an application for admission, contact the Office of Admission, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400160, Charlottesville, VA 22904; (434) 982-3200; undergradadmission@virginia.edu; http://www.virginia.edu/undergradadmission/.

The committee requires first-year and transfer applicants to submit SAT I scores. Scores from the American College Testing Program (ACT) may be substituted for the SAT I. Also required are three SAT II Subject Tests: Writing, Mathematics (either level), and a third test in science, history, or foreign language. Results of these tests should be reported to the Office of Admission directly from the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, NJ, or from the American College Testing Program in Iowa City, IA. For both first-year and transfer admission, the January test date is the last opportunity to complete the College Board tests, and December is the last date for the ACT. Applicants should consult their high school guidance counselors for the appropriate registration deadlines, which generally precede the test dates by several weeks. Because the SAT I and SAT II cannot be taken at the same sitting, applicants must register for two separate test dates. For more information on special testing centers, call the Educational Testing Service at (609) 921-9000 or the American College Testing Program at (319) 337-1332.

The Committee on Admission evaluates applications during the winter and early spring months and informs all candidates of its decisions on or about April 1. Candidates offered admission must respond by May 1. At that time, the University requires a $250 deposit to guarantee space in the entering class. This deposit is not refundable. Students who choose to rescind their decision to attend the University may receive a refund upon written request until May 1.

Early Decision Secondary school students with outstanding records may want to consider the Early Decision Plan. Under this first-choice plan, applicants agree to attend the University if offered admission and to withdraw all applications from other institutions if accepted. Some 30 percent of the first-year class is admitted under this program each year. The deadline for early decision application is November 1. The Committee on Admission, which responds by December 1, may deny admission, offer admission, or defer admission until the regular decision process, which ends on April 1. Once deferred, candidates are no longer bound by the Early Decision Plan. Deferred students must send the admission office any senior-year College Board or ACT test results as well as their first-semester grades.

 

 

Additional Information

TOP
Jefferson Scholars  |  Echols Scholars  |  Rodman Scholars
 

The Office of Admission does not require personal interviews and does not use them in the evaluation process. The office welcomes visitors to the Grounds. In the spring, summer, and early fall, information sessions are held twice a day during the week; in the summer and early fall, an additional session is held on Saturday mornings. During the winter, sessions are held once a day, Monday through Friday. When classes are in session, the University Guide Service conducts tours of the Grounds (beginning at the East Wing of the Rotunda) following each group discussion. Engineering students also conduct tours of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Reservations are not necessary for either the information sessions or the tours, which are especially directed to prospective students. For specific times and locations of these activities, please contact the Office of Admission, which is open throughout the year from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M., Monday through Friday, or visit the admission Web site at http://www.virginia.edu/undergradadmission/. All admission sessions and tours of the University are accessible to individuals using wheelchairs. Call the Office of Admission or the Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities, (434) 924-7984, to request an interpreter for the hearing impaired.

Jefferson Scholars

The Jefferson Scholars Foundation of the University of Virginia Alumni Association awards scholarships on the basis of personal merit to approximately 30 outstanding students each year. Selection of Jefferson Scholars begins with nominations from designated schools in geographical areas around the country by November 1. Every secondary school in the Commonwealth of Virginia is eligible to nominate a student to the competition. In 2002-2003, the regions outside the Commonwealth are Birmingham, Alabama; San Francisco, California; Fairfield, Connecticut; Delaware; Atlanta, Georgia; South Georgia/Tallahassee, Florida; Chicago, Illinois; Kentucky; Louisiana; Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; St. Louis, Missouri; Long Island, New York; New York, New York; Westchester, New York; Charlotte, North Carolina; Triad, North Carolina; Cincinnati, Ohio/Northern Kentucky; Maine; Northeast Ohio; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Pittsburgh/Western Pennsylvania; Central and Upstate South Carolina; Lowcountry South Carolina/Georgia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; Nashville, Tennessee; Dallas, Texas; Fort Worth, Texas; Houston, Texas; and Wyoming. In addition, all out-of-state and international applicants to the University from schools outside the designated regions whose completed applications are received by January 1 will automatically be considered. Candidates are screened by the Foundation’s regional selection committees, and finalists from all areas assemble at the University in March for four days of interviews, seminars, exams, and social activities. The criteria for selection are excellence in the Jeffersonian ideals of leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. Scholarship recipients receive an amount designed to cover the entire cost of attending the University for four years. Eligible schools will be notified of details of the 2004 selection process in the fall of 2003. For further information, contact the Executive Director, Jefferson Scholars Foundation, P.O. Box 3446, Charlottesville, VA 22903; jeffsch@virginia.edu; www.jeffersonscholars.org.

Back to Additional Information

Echols Scholars

From each entering class, some 170-200 students who exhibit exceptional academic talent and self-direction are invited to enter the Echols Scholars Program in the College of Arts and Sciences. The program provides a combination of opportunities and freedom for the scholars. First-year Echols scholars live together with the Rodman scholars of the Engineering School. Echols scholars have priority registration for the courses they choose, as well as access to a special interdisciplinary Echols Majors Program. Select faculty from across the disciplines serve as advisors to the scholars, and Echols scholars are exempt from the foreign language, second writing, and area requirements. An e-mail network provides communication to and among the scholars, and an Echols council of students offers a variety of social and intellectual programs. The Echols program has its own academic dean.

All first-year applicants to the College of Arts and Sciences are automatically considered for the Echols program prior to their entrance into the University. Although there are no absolute criteria for selection, Echols scholars generally come from the top five percent of the entering class and are avid, aggressive learners who demonstrate intellectual and personal liveliness as well as strong academic performance. They will have done very well in the strongest programs their schools offer. Students not chosen for the program upon entry into the University may apply to the Echols program in their second semester of residence.

Back to Additional Information

Rodman Scholars

Named for Walter S. Rodman, Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 1933 to 1946, the Rodman Scholars Program in the School of Engineering and Applied Science selects students on the basis of demonstrated and potential leadership qualities as well as scholarship. Participation is by invitation only. The program emphasizes the first two years of study, in which the scholars take special courses in design, communications, and computers. The first-year scholars live in a dormitory set aside for Rodman scholars and Echols scholars of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Back to Additional Information
 

 

Admission of Transfer Students

TOP
College of Arts and Sciences  |  School of Architecture  |  McIntire School of Commerce
Curry School of Education  |  School of Engineering and Applied Science  |  School of Nursing
School of Continuing and Professional Studies-BIS Program  |  International Student Admission
 

The University welcomes applications for admission from students who have attended other accredited institutions of higher education. The application deadline for the fall semester is March 1. A limited number of transfer students are accepted to the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Nursing (RNs only) for the spring semester only. That application deadline is November 1. Transfer applicants must submit high school and college transcripts as well as results of the SAT I or ACT with a $40 non-refundable application fee. Applications and credentials should be sent to the Dean of Admission, P.O. Box 400160, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904.

Transfer admission information for each of the schools is listed in the following sections.

Applicants to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree program should consult the guidelines outlined in chapter 12.

College of Arts and Sciences

Transfer Requirements In every case, an applicant for transfer admission must be in good academic and social standing at any college that he or she is currently attending or has previously attended and must be eligible to return there. To be competitive for admission, we recommend that a transfer student have a cumulative grade point average of B+ or better in all college work attempted and have completed the requirements stated in chapter 6 (see Competency Requirements and Area Requirements).

The College of Arts and Sciences requires a minimum academic residence of two years to receive a degree. Students transferring after one year of college are expected to have completed at least 24 credits; students transferring after two years of college are expected to have completed at least 54 credits. Of the 120 credits offered for the B.A. or B.S. degree in the College, at least 60 must be earned at the University of Virginia. All students are expected to complete the degree in a timely fashion, normally within eight semesters. For transfer students, the eight semesters include all full-time semesters spent at other institutions.

Intra-University Transfers Into The College Transfer into the College is not assured. With space in the College very limited, students seeking to transfer into the College compete for openings by applying during the spring semester for the following academic year. Thus, all students must complete at least two semesters at the University in the school in which they initially enroll. Information and application forms are available on-line at: http://www.virginia.edu/artsandsciences/clas/info/iutinfo.htm.

Transfer Credit Admitted transfer students receive transfer credit for any course that corresponds to one in the College of Arts and Sciences curriculum, and in which students have received a grade of C or better. Courses taken at an institution that uses the pass/fail grading system, and in which a grade of “passing” or better has been received, are transferred with full credit only after verification that the passing grade represents work at the C level or better. We allow no credit for correspondence courses or work passed elsewhere by examination.

The College evaluates courses submitted for transfer credit prior to registration, and notifies transfer students in writing as to transfer credit granted. Once admitted to the College, students need prior permission from the dean’s office in order to apply transfer credits toward a degree.

Back to Admissions for Transfer Students

School of Architecture

Transfer Requirements The School of Architecture welcomes well-qualified transfer students from other colleges and universities. An applicant for transfer admission must be in good academic and social standing at his or her present college and must be eligible to return there.

To be competitive for admission, a transfer student should have a cumulative grade point average of B+ or better in all college work attempted and have completed courses in English, mathematics (calculus), natural science (physics is recommended), social science, and humanities. Evidence of interest in the profession is also considered. See Requirements in Chapter 7.

A minimum academic residence of two years is required for a degree from the School of Architecture. In some cases, summer session study at the University is also required of transfer applicants.

Transfer Credit Credit toward a degree is allowed for work comparable to courses offered at the University, if such work has been completed in an accredited college. Credit is not granted for work completed elsewhere with a grade less than C or its equivalent. The Dean of the School of Architecture governs the awarding of transfer credit. In no case are more than 60 transfer credits applied to an undergraduate degree for the School of Architecture.

Back to Admissions for Transfer Students

McIntire School of Commerce

Transfer Requirements A student who wishes to transfer to the School of Commerce from another institution must have completed two years of college work and must have maintained a scholastic average that, in the opinion of the admission committee, predicts successful work at the University. A minimum grade point average of B+ is recommended. Applicants for transfer from other institutions are accepted for September admission only. Students seeking admission to the School of Commerce must have completed a minimum of 54 credits of work prior to enrollment in the fall. The 54 credits should include the following courses:
Introductory Accounting 6 credits (two courses)
Principles of Economics 6 credits (two courses)
English Composition(1) 3 credits (one course)
Mathematics(2) 6 credits (two courses)
Humanities/Fine Arts(4) 3-6 credits  
Foreign Language(4) 0-14 credits  
Social, Natural/Physical Science(4) 0-3 credits  
(1)An additional three credits of English writing (not necessarily an English course) is suggested (not required) before admission. A course in public speaking is strongly recommended (not required) before admission.

(2)Three credits in statistics and three credits in either calculus or probability.

(3)As defined in the Record, College of Arts and Sciences chapter, Area Requirements section. Three humanities credits are required prior to enrollment. Three additional credits of humanities along with three credits of social, or natural/physical sciences are required before graduation and may be taken either before or after admission to the McIntire School. The humanities and foreign language prerequisites may, under unusual circumstances, be completed during the third year.

Transfer Credit Credit toward a degree is allowed for approved work completed in an accredited college or university, or in other schools of this University, upon presentation of a satisfactory transcript of record. However, no credit is given for a required upper-level commerce course unless that course is taken in the School of Commerce. No adjustment of transfer credit is made after the student’s first semester in the School of Commerce.

In general, credit is not granted for:
  1. work completed with a grade of less than C;
  2. business courses beyond the elementary courses in accounting; or
  3. more than one credit of physical or health education courses.
Back to Admissions for Transfer Students

Curry School of Education

Transfer Requirements Students who wish to transfer to the University of Virginia must apply directly through the Office of Admission. Teacher education is a five-year program administered jointly by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Curry School of Education. In either their second or third year, students enroll in the College of Arts and Sciences to pursue a liberal arts major with a secondary emphasis in teacher education. The Master of Teaching degree is completed in the fifth year of the program in the Curry School. Programs in communications disorders and physical education (including teaching or sports medicine) enroll students directly in the Curry School in the third year. To be competitive for admission, a transfer student should have a cumulative grade point average of B+ or better. The applicant should also submit SAT I or ACT scores by March 1 and should have completed course work in the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and physical education. For detailed information about required courses, refer to the Teacher Education Degree Programs, Sports Studies: Sports Medicine, and Communication Disorders sections in Chapter 9.

Transfer Credit Transfer credit is allowed for general education courses that correspond to those offered at the University. A transfer course must be equivalent in credit value and course content (including the level at which it is taught), and the student must have received a grade of at least C. Courses corresponding to our general education courses that have been taken at an institution using the pass/fail grading system, and in which a grade of "passing" or better has been received, are transferred with full credit. Transfer is generally not allowed for work passed elsewhere by re-examination. Once a student is enrolled in the Curry School, all additional transfer credit must be approved prior to its completion elsewhere. Transfer credit is officially evaluated by the dean of the Curry School of Education or the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences for B.A.-M.T. students.

Back to Admissions for Transfer Students

School of Engineering and Applied Science

Transfer Requirements In every case, an applicant for transfer admission must be in good academic and social standing at any college that he or she is currently attending, or has previously attended, and must be eligible to return there. A transfer student should have maintained at least a B+ average, or the equivalent, in previous college work. An applicant for transfer admission should have completed course work in the following areas prior to enrollment at the University:
Calculus 8 credits
Chemistry (including lab) 4 credits
Physics (calculus-based) 4 credits
English Composition 3 credits
Computer Science(1) 3 credits
(1)C++ is preferred.

In evaluating the academic records of transfer applicants, special attention will be given to performance in mathematics and science courses.

Transfer Credit A student is granted transfer credit for any course that corresponds to one in the School of Engineering and Applied Science's curriculum, which is equivalent in content and credit value to the corresponding course, and in which a grade of C or better has been received. No credit is allowed for work passed elsewhere by re-examination. Courses submitted for transfer credit are evaluated prior to fall registration, and transfer students are notified in writing of transfer credit granted upon arrival.

Back to Admissions for Transfer Students

School of Nursing

Transfer students typically enter the traditional nursing program after one year of college-level work; students transferring after two years of college work must still spend three years at the University to earn the Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Thus, students enter in the fall semester as second-year nursing students unless application is made to one of the non-traditional programs listed below.

Selection of applicants to the School of Nursing is competitive, based primarily on scholastic ability demonstrated by academic records of pre-nursing study, secondary school records, and scores on the SAT I or ACT.

An applicant for transfer admission to the School of Nursing must be in good standing at any college that he or she is currently attending or has previously attended and must be eligible to return there.

The applicant must have maintained a scholastic average that, in the opinion of the Committee on Admission, is indicative of successful work at the University (a cumulative grade point average of B or better is recommended).

Students wishing to transfer after one or two years of college work must have completed a minimum of thirty credits of the following general education requirements:

Accelerated Academic Writing - 3 credits: Students who score 750 or higher on the SAT II Subject Test in Writing, or 5 on the English AP Test are exempt. Students exempt from ENWR 110 must take an additional 3-credit elective.

Second Writing Requirement - 3 credits: A second course with extensive writing assignments is required of all students. In most cases, students will take this course at the University of Virginia.

Natural Science and Math - 12 credits: Anatomy and physiology are required. Other acceptable courses include mathematics, chemistry, physics, genetics, environmental science, geology, and ecology. Students considering graduate education are encouraged to take statistics.

Social Science and History - 9 credits: Acceptable courses include history, government, psychology, sociology, economics, Western civilization, political science, anthropology, linguistics, and women’s studies.

Humanities and Fine Arts - 9 credits: Acceptable courses include philosophy, ethics, public speaking, art, religion, music, drama, foreign languages, classics, comparative literature, and English and foreign literatures.

After satisfying the above requirements, students must complete another fifteen elective credits from the available course offerings for a total of fifty-one general education requirements credits. Of the fifteen elective credits, only seven credits in physical education or skills courses (e.g., studio art, music performance) may be counted toward the general education requirements.

R.N. to B.S.N. Option Registered nurses who have completed general education prerequisite courses may apply for transfer admission to a program in the School of Nursing that leads to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing.

Second Degree in Nursing Option A student holding a baccalaureate degree in another major may also apply to the School of Nursing for an accelerated program leading to the Bachelor of Science. A full year of anatomy and physiology is required for admission to this program. An undergraduate course in statistics, as well as results from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), are recommended for students who plan to apply to the graduate program. Questions regarding specific admission requirements for these programs may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Student Services in the School of Nursing, (434) 924-0141.

Transfer Credit On presentation of an official transcript, students accepted for transfer will be granted transfer credit for academic course work taken at an accredited institution if the grade earned was at least a C or better. Questions regarding acceptability of specific general education courses for transfer should be referred to the Office of Admissions and Student Services in the School of Nursing. Questions about transfer of nursing courses should be directed to the Office of the Associate Dean.

Application Procedures Transfer students applying for admission after one year of college-level work enter the School of Nursing at the beginning of the regular academic session in the fall.

Interview A personal interview with a member of the faculty or staff of the School of Nursing is not required but is recommended for informational purposes. Appointments may be made with the Office of Admissions and Student Services by calling (434) 924-0141.

Back to Admissions for Transfer Students

School of Continuing and Professional Studies

The School of Continuing and Professional Studies offers a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree program for students who have completed two years of college work at regionally accredited colleges or universities. For more information about admission to the BIS degree program, see chapter 12.

Back to Admissions for Transfer Students

International Student Admission

Since 1826 when the first international student was enrolled, the University of Virginia has accepted among its responsibilities a commitment to providing opportunities to citizens from other areas of the world to study, teach, and share the atmosphere of Jeffersonian freedom. The University considers the admission of qualified students from other countries a part of its educational program. International students enhance the life of the University and contribute to the education and personal growth of American students and faculty.

Language Requirement In addition to meeting the admission requirements outlined in previous sections, international students must have an outstanding command of the English language in order to enroll at the University. In general, it does not conduct classes and exams in languages other than English; and it does not accept papers submitted in a non-English language. For this reason, applicants whose native language is not English must demonstrate their English proficiency on the application for admission by submitting an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). This score may not be more than two years old. Most admitted students attain at least 600 on the paper exam or 250 on the computer exam. The TOEFL exam is required of all applicants if the language first learned and spoken in the home is not English. This is true regardless of the number of years of instruction in English or if English is the "official" language of the applicant's home country.

In addition to the TOEFL exam, successful applicants whose first or native language is not English must take the Virginia English Proficiency Exam soon after arriving at the University. The test is administered to new students just before classes begin, and results are used to determine whether supplemental classes in one or more language skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) is advisable. This test is required of all non-native speakers of English, regardless of their TOEFL score or previous experience using English. The University offers an intensive English for Academic Purposes program in the summer for incoming international students, scholars, and research associates. For information contact the Center for American English Language and Culture, (434) 924-6166 or caelc@virginia.edu.

Visa Information The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) has authorized the University of Virginia to issue visa documents appropriate for the F-1 (student) and J-1 (exchange visitor) non-immigrant status. Following academic admission to a University degree program, the International Studies Office reviews the language, financial, and visa qualifications of the applicant. If all documentation is in order, and if the applicant is offered admission, a "Certificate of Eligibility" (I-20 or IAP-66) is issued to the prospective student. In order to request a visa to apply for entry into the United States as a student, this document must be submitted to a U.S. Embassy or Consulate, along with a passport and other indications of purpose while in the United States. The University does not issue a Certificate of Eligibility for part-time study, English language study, or continuing and professional studies courses. Admitted students may email the Office of International Student and Scholar Programs at issp@virginia.edu.

Most students enter the United States using an F-1 visa. The J-1 visa is appropriate for students receiving a significant portion of their financial support from a government agency or international foundation. Students in the United States on F-1 and J-1 status must maintain full-time student status during the fall and spring semesters. They must attend, for at least one semester, the institution that issued the Certificate of Eligibility used to apply for entry into the United States. A prospective international student must have an appropriate, current, valid, and legal non-immigrant status before he or she will be offered final admission to the University of Virginia.

International students should not plan to enter the United States on the tourist visa, B-2 visa, or visa waiver program if they wish to pursue a full course of academic study. Transfer from one visa type to another while in the United States is not always possible. . Students should always consult with a U.S. consular officer in their home country for the most current information on visa regulations.

All non-immigrant visas carry restrictions about employment and length of stay in the United States. Students are advised to carefully read the Certificate of Eligibility before accepting a particular status. Students must be willing and able to abide by the regulations for the visa status they accept. INS visa regulations are subject to frequent change and re-interpretation by Service personnel. It is the foreign national’s duty to keep him or herself informed of all current visa regulations and to maintain valid status according to INS regulations.

Tuition/Fees Non-immigrant students pay the out-of-state full tuition rate (estimated at $22,000 for the 2003-2004 academic year).

Living Expenses The estimated cost for housing, food, books and supplies, and health and personal items is $900 per month for a single student. This does not include travel expenses to and from the United States, tourist excursions, furniture, or luxury items, such as automobiles and computer equipment. Basic expenses for the support of dependents (husband/wife/children) living in Charlottesville are additional.

Financial Certification Eligibility for a student or exchange visitor visa requires that the applicant demonstrate sufficient financial resources for a full course of study. The minimum required by the University of Virginia is $25,500 for 2003-2004. An additional $6,000 for spouse and $3,000 for each child is necessary if students wish to bring dependents to Charlottesville. The International Studies Office requires an acceptable financial guarantee prior to issuing the "Certificate of Eligibility." While the established minimum is considered sufficient for a basic, comfortable existence, it may not be adequate to maintain the lifestyle to which a student is accustomed.

Financial Assistance Financial awards are not furnished to undergraduates, and international students cannot accept part time employment off campus during the first year of study. If students must have full financial support to study abroad, they should investigate the possibility of awards offered through home governments, international foundations, and other sources. U.S.I.S. libraries and bi-national commissions in various countries can sometimes offer suggestions. Graduate students are eligible for research and teaching assistantships, as well as meritorious fellowships, through their departments. These awards are competitive.

Transfer of Funds The transfer of funds from the student’s home country to the United States may be governed by restrictions. The applicant must be fully informed of the local regulations and process for transfer. Since there may be a considerable delay in the process of transfer, early planning is vital. University expenses must be paid at the beginning of each semester. To avoid unnecessary problems, students are advised to bring sufficient funds with them to pay for tuition, housing, and medical insurance on arrival. This may amount to several thousand dollars and should be in the form of traveler’s or cashier’s checks in U.S. currency. Students must also open an account with a local bank in Charlottesville in order to accept transferred funds from home.

Employment The University of Virginia cannot admit an international student who is unable to show evidence of adequate financial support. The Immigration and Naturalization Service of the U.S. government restricts the employment of non-immigrant students and scholars. Work without prior INS authorization is prohibited and may carry severe penalties. F-2 dependents are neither eligible to request permission to work nor to accept employment of any kind.

Family Considerations Due to the high cost of living in Charlottesville, students wishing to bring their dependent families must give thorough consideration to the added expense. Because dependents are not generally permitted to accept employment, students may find that they cannot support a family while studying at the University. In many cases, students must be prepared to leave their families at home.

Health Care and Insurance Medical care in the United States is very expensive and paid for privately. To protect against a possible medical debt arising from the need for emergency or sustained medical treatment, all students are required to purchase a basic accident and sickness hospitalization insurance plan. The yearly cost for a single student is about $1,000 and does not cover regular eye and dental care or routine physical examinations and office visits. Family coverage is more expensive but is strongly recommended. Insurance may be purchased either in Charlottesville or in the student’s home country.

University students who are enrolled full time may use the out-patient medical facilities of the University’s Student Health department free of charge. Family members are not eligible to participate. The University Hospital is located conveniently on the Grounds, and has extensive emergency facilities as well as private physicians and clinics for specialists and routine family care.

English As A Second Language (ESL)

The Center for American English Language and Culture (CAELC) provides an array of services to help members of the University of Virginia community attain the level of linguistic and cultural proficiency needed for success at a research university in the United States. CAELC offers a number of ESL courses free of charge to students who have matriculated in a degree program at U.Va.. Visiting scholars and research associates may enroll in CAELC classes as space allows. Completion of the Virginia English Language Proficiency Exam must precede placement in any CAELC class. Individuals can take the exam at the beginning of each semester and by appointment throughout the year. CAELC also administers the SPEAK Test in Aug., Dec., and May. The SPEAK Test is used to assess the oral proficiency of prospective graduate teaching assistants whose native language is not English. CAELC offers several courses designed to help prospective teaching assistants develop the communication skills needed for teaching in a US college or university. CAELC offers an intensive English for Academic Purposes (EAP) program through the University's Summer Language Institute, mid-July through mid-August. The EAP program is for entering students and research associates. CAELC endorses the NAFSA Principles of International Educational Exchange and the TESOL Standards for Post Secondary Programs. Information on testing, classes, and other services is available at www.virginia.edu/provost/caelc, caelc@virginia.edu or, (434) 924-6166.

Back to Admissions for Transfer Students
 

 

Dual Enrollment

TOP
 

In many cases, high school students who have not yet attended college full-time may be able to receive credit for dual-enrollment classes (i.e., college courses taken as part of their high school program). Each undergraduate school at the University handles dual-enrollment credit differently; entering students should check with the dean’s office of their school to confirm its guidelines for awarding dual-enrollment credit. Since the majority of students enter the College of Arts and Sciences, its policy on dual-enrollment credit follows.

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences who took dual-enrollment courses in high school should have a transcript sent to the University of Virginia, College of Arts and Sciences, Garrett Hall, P.O. Box 400133, Charlottesville, VA 22904. The dean’s office in the College evaluates each transcript, and the student may check with his or her faculty advisor upon arrival to see what credit has been earned. Dual-enrollment courses may not be used to meet the first writing or foreign language requirements.

If a course for which dual enrollment credits have been awarded is repeated in the College of Arts and Sciences, the dual enrollment credits are disallowed. The repeated course is posted, with its credits counting toward graduation and its grade included in the computation of the grade point average.

 

 

Student Retention Information

TOP
 

The majority of students who enter the University of Virginia—82 percent—graduate after four years of study. Other undergraduate students decide to take a leave of absence for a semester or longer because they wish to travel, work, or take advantage of other opportunities. Many of these students later return to the University and graduate; thus, 92 percent of the students who enter the University as first-year students eventually graduate.

 

 

Special Student Information

TOP
 

Special students may enroll in courses at the University through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. Refer to the Citizen Scholar Program and the Special Student Program in Chapter 12 for guidelines. Admission as a citizen scholar or a special student does not imply or guarantee admission to a degree program in an undergraduate or graduate school of the University. In the College of Arts and Sciences, “special student” has a particular meaning; see “Special Students” in Chapter 6 for more information.

Part-time Degree Programs The College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Architecture (only programs in architectural history and planning), Engineering and Applied Science, and Nursing offer part-time degree programs. Prospective students follow the same application procedures required for the full-time program. Applicants to both the School of Architecture and the School of Engineering and Applied Science are required to have completed two years of college work and must be eligible to enter in the third-year class. The School of Nursing restricts their part-time program to Registered Nurses only. The College of Arts and Sciences normally requires applicants to have completed two years of college work, but will also consider applications from first- and second-year students whose personal circumstances warrant it. Part-time students admitted to the College are not eligible for intermediate honors or the dean's list. If a student’s current grade point average falls below 1.8, or the student earns a grade below C- in a given semester, he or she receives an academic warning. The student may be subject to the College’s standard rules regarding academic suspension. After earning 54 hours, good standing within the major is expected for continuation as a part-time degree student in Arts and Sciences.

The School of Continuing and Professional Studies offers a part-time Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) program. For information about admission to this program see chapter 12.

 

 

Summer Session

TOP
 

The summer session is an integral part of the University year; courses offered in the summer are similar in character to courses given in the regular session and have the same credit value. Candidates should be graduates of accredited high schools or have had an equivalent preparation. However, rising juniors and seniors in high school with distinguished academic records are allowed to attend the summer session. Admission to the summer session does not constitute admission to the regular session in September. Inquiries concerning summer admission should be addressed to the Director of the Summer Session, P.O. Box 400161, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4161; e-mail: dkm2c@virginia.edu; website: www.virginia.edu/summer.

The Summer Language Institute offers nine-week courses in French, German, Italian, Latin, Russian, Spanish, and Tibetan. Students attend classes five days a week, six hours a day. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are developed in a student-centered environment. Participation in evening cultural activities is required five days a week. Students are advised to live in their program's language residence to enhance their learning and to increase proficiency in the target language. Individuals who successfully complete the Institute earn 12 credits, which satisfies the foreign language requirement at the University of Virginia. The seven individual SLI language programs are listed in the course offering section of the catalog. The Summer Language Institute also offers English for Academic Purposes . Participants in this 4.5 - week program enjoy the intensive learning experience found in other SLI programs. English for Academic Purposes is listed in the course offering section of the catalog.

OFFICIAL APPLICATION REQUIRED. For further information, contact the Director of the Summer Language Institute, Summer Session, University of Virginia, P. O. Box 400161, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4161; e-mail: U.Va.sli@virginia.edu; website: http://www.virginia.edu/summer/SLI/.

English for Academic Purposes (ESL) The Center for American English Language and Culture (CAELC) offers an intensive language and culture program through the Summer Language Institute. The program is designed for non-native speakers of English who have been admitted to an undergraduate or graduate degree program in the United States. Incoming U.Va. research associates and visiting scholars are also welcome to apply for admission to the program. Participants fine-tune the language skills required for success in US higher education through classes in academic writing, academic reading and vocabulary development, listening comprehension and note-taking, classroom discussion strategies, and presentation skills. A pronunciation assessment is conducted with follow-up work assigned as needed. The program includes a series of workshops that provides a general introduction to US higher education. Workshop topics include library and research skills, university computing resources and facilities, academic culture, student-faculty relationships, cross-cultural awareness, and student services. Cultural proficiency is developed through a combination of workshops and activities. Activities include social gatherings, sporting events, field trips, and frequent meetings with conversation partners.

A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required.

 

 

Advanced Placement Programs

TOP
Advanced Placement Programs Chart  |  SAT II Subject Test Placement  |  International Baccalaureate
 

The University of Virginia participates in the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program by awarding advanced standing (course exemption and academic credits) or advanced placement (course exemption without credits) to entering students who have made specified scores on Advanced Placement (AP) tests taken prior to matriculation at the University of Virginia or any other college. Students may receive credit in any academic discipline in which an AP test is offered. (See the Advanced Placement Programs Chart.)

The faculties of the appropriate academic departments of the University establish policies for advanced placement and advanced standing in each discipline. Faculty members examine AP tests closely, and students will find that course exemptions and placement awarded on the basis of AP test scores correspond well with their level of progress in AP subject areas. Accepted students should have AP score reports sent directly to the Office of Admission at the University (College Code 5820) in the summer following their senior year of high school.

Course exemptions can also be gained with certain scores on the SAT II in writing and foreign language. The University does not award credit or placement based on College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) tests.

Questions regarding advanced placement policies and procedures should be directed to the Office of Admission, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400160, Charlottesville, VA 22904.

Advanced Placement Test Score Policies Unless otherwise noted, exemption and credit awards apply equally to the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Architecture, and the School of Nursing. Students who take a course at the University for which they have already received credit via an advanced placement examination will have the advanced placement credit deleted from their academic record.

Policies for Other Advanced Examinations The University’s undergraduate schools usually award advanced standing (course exemption and academic credits) to entering students for qualifying scores on a variety of advanced examinations if such examinations are taken before matriculation at the University or another college. For example, the College of Arts and Sciences awards advanced standing credit for scores of 5, 6, and 7 on most International Baccalaureate Higher Level Examinations. Advanced standing credit is also considered for qualifying scores on the General Certificate of Equivalency (GCE) A-level, the French Baccalaureate, and the German Abitur.

College of Arts and Sciences students should consult the chart included in the College of Arts and Sciences Handbook for credit awarded to students for International Baccalaureate, A-Level, Abitur, and French Baccalaureate examinations. Students in the School of Architecture, School of Engineering and Applied Science, and School of Nursing should consult their undergraduate dean’s office to find out what credit is given for these exams.

Accepted students should have score reports sent directly to the Office of Admission at the University in the summer following the final year of secondary school study.

Advanced Placement Programs Chart
Examination Score Course Exemption Credits
Art General (Studio Art) 4 or 5 ARTS 100 3
Art History 4 or 5 ARTH 101, 102 8
Biology 4 or 5BIOL 201, 202 6(1)
Chemistry 4 or 5 CHEM 141, 142 or 6(1)
  4 or 5 CHEM 151, 152 (SEAS) and 6
    CHEM 151L, 152L (SEAS) 2
Computer Science (A) 5 CS101 (College) (SEAS) 3
Computer Sci. (AB) 4 or 5 CS 101 (SEAS) 3
Computer Sci. (AB) 4 or 5 CS 101 & 201 (College) 6
Economics (Micro) 5 ECON 201 3
Economics (Macro) 5 ECON 202 3
English (Language) 5 ENWR 110 (College) or TCC 101 (SEAS) 3
English (Literature) 4 or 5 ENLT 249 (College) (SEAS) 3
Environmental Science 4 or 5 EVSC 101 3
French Language 3 FREN 201, 202 Exemption
  4 or 5 FREN 331 Exemption, 3
French Literature 3 FREN 201, 202 Exemption
  4 or 5 FREN 332 Exemption, 3
German Language 4 GERM 201 3(2)
  5 GERM 201, 202 6
Government (U.S.) 4 or 5 PLAP 101 3
Government(Comparative) 4 or 5 PLCP 101 3
History (U.S.) 4 or 5 HIUS 201, 202 8
History (World) 4 or 5 HIST 101T 3
History (European) 4 or 5 HIEU 207, 208  6
Latin (Literature) 4 or 5 LATI 201, 202 Exemption,3(3)
Latin (Vergil) 4 or 5 LATI 201, 202 Exemption,3(3)
Math (AB) 4 or 5 MATH 131 4
Math (BC) 5 APMA 111 (SEAS) 4
Math (BC) 4 or 5 MATH 131, 132 8
Math (AB) subscore MATH 131 4
Music (Listening and Literature) 4 or 5 MUSI 101 3
Music (Music Theory) 4 or 5 MUSI 231 3
Physics B 4 or 5 PHYS 201, 202 (Architecture) 8
  4 or 5 PHYS 201, 202 (College) 8
Physics C 4 or 5 PHYS 151 4
Physics C (Mechanics) 4 or 5 PHYS 151 (College majors) 4
  4 or 5 PHYS 231 (College non-majors) 4
  4 or 5 PHYS 142E (SEAS) 4
Physics C (Electricity and Magnetism) 4 or 5 PHYS 231, 232 (College non-majors and Architecture) 8
  4 or 5 PHYS 241E (SEAS) 3
Psychology 4 or 5 PSYC 101 3
Spanish (Language orLiterature) 4 SPAN 201 3(4)
  5 SPAN 201, 202 6
Statistics 4 or 5 STAT 112 (College) 3
(1) No laboratory credit is given.

(2)Students who receive a 4 on this exam must enroll in GERM 202 to complete the foreign language requirement.

(3)Students receive credit for a 310-level Latin course determined by the department.

(4)Students who receive a 4 on this exam must enroll in SPAN 202 to complete the foreign language requirement.


Back to Advanced Placement Programs

SAT II Subject Test Placement

Writing

Students who took the SAT II Writing Test before May 1998 and scored 720 or higher are exempt from the introduction to academic writing (ENWR 110) required by the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Architecture. No credits are awarded. A score of 470-710 on the SAT II in Writing places the student in ENWR 110, and a score of 460 or below requires the student to take ENWR 105 in the fall and ENWR 106 in the spring.

Students who took the SAT II Writing Test after May 1, 1998 and scored 750 or higher are exempt from ENWR 110. A score of 490-740 requires a student to take ENWR 110; a score of 480 or lower requires a student to take the ENWR 105/106 sequence. Students who took SAT II tests prior to April 1995 should consult the appropriate academic department for placement.

Foreign Language

The College of Arts and Sciences requires foreign language proficiency equivalent to four semesters of college language study. Most language courses follow the sequence 101, 102, 201, 202 through the first four semesters. Language placement is determined by the following SAT II subject test scores:
French

SAT II Scores Placement
440 or below French 101
450-530 French 102
540-600 French 201
610-650 French 202
660 and above language requirement is fulfilled


German

SAT II Scores Placement
400 or below German 101
410 - 500 German 102
510 - 620 German 201
630 - 640 German 202
650 and above language requirement is fulfilled


Italian

SAT II Scores Placement
410 or below Italian 101
420-510 Italian 102
520-590 Italian 201
600-640 Italian 202
650 and above language requirement is fulfilled


Latin

SAT II Scores Placement
480 or below Latin 101
490 - 570 Latin 103
580 - 640 Latin 201
650 and above language requirement is fulfilled
Spanish

SAT II Scores Placement
410 or below Spanish 101
420-510 Spanish 102
520-590 Spanish 201
600-640 Spanish 202
650 and above language requirement is fulfilled


Other Languages(1)



Chinese with Listening
SAT II Scores Placement
700 and above language requirement is fulfilled


Japanese with Listening
SAT II Scores Placement
700 and above language requirement is fulfilled


Modern Hebrew
SAT II Scores Placement
560 and above language requirement is fulfilled


(1)Students who have taken an SAT II test in one of these three languages and received a score below the cutoff should consult the departmental language coordinator for placement. Students whose SAT II scores in Modern Hebrew exempt them from the language requirement may not take any of the College’s courses in Biblical Hebrew for credit.

Back to Advanced Placement Programs

International Baccalaureate

The College of Arts and Sciences offers advanced standing credit and/or advanced placement for many international college-level examinations. What follows describes the College’s policy regarding these examinations. We encourage you to contact us and the appropriate Departmental Undergraduate Director if you have questions about receiving advanced standing credit or advanced placement for any of these examinations. A list of the names of the Directors of Undergraduate Progams is located on the College of Arts and Sciences web site. You may also locate departmental phone numbers by calling University directory assistance at 434-924-0311.

The College of Arts and Sciences grants advanced standing credit and advanced placement for qualifying examination scores in the Higher-Level International Baccalaureate, the French Baccalaureate, the British A-Level, the German Abitur, and select other examinations. We award advanced standing credit or placement based upon qualifying examination scores (and, where applicable, subject coefficients) and the recommendation of the appropriate Arts and Sciences department(s).

Credit and advanced placement are generally determined on a case-by-case basis, on the student’s initiative, by the Dean’s Office in the College of Arts and Sciences and by the Director of Undergraduate Programs in the appropriate department(s). We do not award credit based upon the length of study of a particular program. Since approved credit is advanced standing credit, not transfer credit, we base the award of credit solely upon examination results and not upon completed courses.

Advanced standing credit is included among “non-U.Va. credits” on your transcript and, along with your transfer credit, is limited to a total of 60 semester hours. The College of Arts and Sciences and individual departments may limit the number of advanced standing credits awarded to an individual. You may receive at least one, and not more than two, semesters of introductory-level credit per qualifying examination score. Departments have their own policies on the use of advanced standing credit for their major or minor requirements.

We do not award credit for foreign language subject examinations of English language or literature.

The College does not automatically award credit for international college-level examinations. To receive credit, you must provide an official copy of your examination certificate, including an official English translation if requested. The certificate should be sent directly to the College of Arts and Sciences, P.O. Box 400133, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4133, or should be delivered in person in a sealed envelope. You must be prepared to provide to the departmental undergraduate directors official course descriptions, syllabi, and copies of your examinations. No special form is required from the department to verify the award of credit. Recommendations, however, should be made on departmental letterhead stationery. You should request that the undergraduate directors call Dean Frank Papovich at 924-3350 if they have questions.

We are pleased to assist students with the review of international college-level examinations. Questions may be directed to Dean Frank Papovich at 924-3350.

The International Baccalaureate

The College of Arts and Sciences offers possible credit for scores of 5, 6, or 7 on most higher-level IB examinations. We award no credit for standard-level examinations. Upon departmental recommendation, we will consider an award for one, and no more than two, semesters of College introductory-level credit. Scores below a 5 on the higher-level exam may be sufficient for higher-level placement (no credit will be awarded). Such advanced placement decisions must be made by the appropriate department. The College of Arts and Sciences accepts only IB scores sent directly from IB North America. Their address is 200 Madison Avenue, Suite 2301, New York, NY 10016-3903; their phone number is 212-696-4464.

Below are the pre-approved departmental equivalencies for qualifying higher-level IB examination scores:
Subject Score U.Va. Equivalents
Arabic B 5, 6 or 7 No credit; exemption

300-level course to be determined by the dept.
Art/Design 5 or 6 No Credit
Art/Design 7 ARTS 100 (3 credits)
Biology 5, 6, or 7 BIOL 201 (3 credits) and BIOL 202 (3 credits)
Chemistry 5, 6, or 7 CHEM 141 (3 credits) and CHEM 142 (3 credits)
Computer Science   Placement test given during Fall Orientation; confer with the Office of the Dean, SEAS, (924-3164)
Economics 5, 6, or 7 ECON 201 (3 credits), ECON 202 (3 credits)
English A1 5, 6, or 7 ENLT 249 (3 credits)
English A2 --- No Credit
English B --- No Credit
French A1 or A2 5, 6, or 7 FREN 331 (3 credits)
French B

5 or 6 No credit; exemption
French B 7 FREN 331 (3 credits)
German A1 or A2 5, 6, or 7 GERM 201 (3 credits), GERM 202 (3 credits)
German B 5 or 6 GERM 201 (3 credits)
German B

7 GERM 201 (3 credits), GERM 202 (3 credits)
Geography 5, 6, or 7 EVSC 101 (3 credits)
Greek 5, 6, or 7 GREE 202 (3 credits)
History 6 HIST 000T (3 credits)
History 7 HIST 000T (6 credits)
Italian A1   Confer with the Italian Lang. Placement Coord. for recommendation (924-7159)
Japanese A1, A2 and B   Confer with the Asian Lang. Placement Coord. for recommendation (982-3275)
Japanese B   Confer with the Asian Lang. Placement Coord. for recommendation (982-3275)
Latin 5, 6, or 7 LATI 202 (3 credits)
Mathematics 5, 6, or 7 MATH 131 (4 credits) and MATH 200T (3 credits)
Music   Confer with the Undergraduate Director for recommendation (924-6497)
Philosophy   Confer with the Undergraduate Director for recommendation (924-7701)
Physics 5, 6, or 7 PHYS 201 (4 credits) and PHYS 202 (4 credits)
Pilipino A1 5, 6, or 7 AMEL 200T (6 credits)
Portuguese A1 or A2 5, 6, or 7 PORT 111 (4 credits) and PORT 212 (4 credits)
Portuguese B 5 or 6 PORT 111 (4 credits)
Portuguese B 7 PORT 111 (4 credits) and PORT 212 (4 credits)
Psychology 5, 6, or 7 PSYC 101 (3 credits)
Social Anthropology 5, 6, or 7 ANTH 101 (3 credits)
Spanish A1 or A2 5, 6, or 7 SPAN 201 (3 credits), SPAN 202 (3 credits)
Spanish B 5 or 6 SPAN 201 (3 credits)
Spanish B 7 SPAN 201 (3 credits), SPAN 202 (3 credits)
Theater Arts   Confer with the Undergraduate Director for recommendation (924-8962)
Turkish A1 5, 6, or 7 TURK 201 (3 credits) and TURK 202 (3 credits)



For higher-level examinations not listed, confer first with Dean Frank Papovich and then with the Departmental Undergraduate Director; they will review your syllabus/exam and confer regarding possible credit.

British System Advanced-Levels, including AICE

(A- and AS-Levels)

The College of Arts and Sciences offers possible advanced standing credit for scores of A, B, or C. Upon departmental recommendation, you may receive one, and no more than two, semesters of introductory-level credit for each A-Level examination. No credit is available for O- or OA-Level examinations. One semester’s credit may be awarded for AS-Level examinations. A-Level and AS-Level scores not eligible for advanced-standing credit may be considered for advanced placement (no credit will be awarded); such placement decisions must be made by the appropriate Departmental Under-graduate Director. The pre-approved departmental equivalencies for qualifying A-level examination scores are listed below:

A-Level Examination Scores
Subject U.Va. Equivalents
Biology BIOL 201 (3 credits) and BIOL 202 (3 credits); No pre-approved lab credit
Chemistry CHEM 141 (3 credits) and CHEM 142 (3 credits); No pre-approved lab credit
Commerce COMM 200T (6 credits)1
Economics ECON 201 (3 credits) and ECON 202 (3 credits)
English ENLT 200T (6 credits)
Geography EVSC 101 (3 credits)
Mathematics2  
   • Pure Math 1, 2 and 3 MATH 131 (4 credits)
   • Statistics MATH 112 (3 credits)

   • Mechanics

MATH 200T (3 credits)
Physics PHYS 201 (4 credits), PHYS 201L (1.5 credits)

PHYS 202 (4 credits), PHYS 202L (1.5 credits)

Notes:
  1. Students who plan to transfer to the School of Commerce should contact Rebecca Leonard for placement in COMM 201 and 202.
  2. No more than 7 credits of math may be awarded; a transcript is required.

For all other examinations, you must obtain syllabi for the course(s) for which you wish to obtain credit, and confer with Dean Frank Papovich and the appropriate Departmental Undergraduate Director.

The French Baccalaureate

The College of Arts and Sciences offers possible advanced standing credit for scores of 12/20 or higher on examinations in subjects studied at a coefficient of 4 or 5. Upon departmental recommendation, you may receive one, and no more than two, semesters of introductory-level credit for each qualifying examination. Scores not eligible for advanced-standing credit may be considered for advanced placement (no credit will be awarded); such placement decisions must be made by the appropriate Departmental Undergraduate Director. The French Bac “total score” is not used to determine credit eligibility; credit in the College is based on examination subject scores alone.

The German Abitur

The College of Arts and Sciences offers possible advanced-standing credit for examination scores of 10 or higher (15-point scale). Upon departmental recommendation, students may receive one, and no more than two, semesters of introductory-level credit for each qualifying examination. Abitur scores not eligible for advanced-standing credit may be considered for advanced placement (no credit awarded); such placement decisions must be made by the appropriate Departmental Undergraduate Director. The Abitur “total score” is not used to determine credit eligibility; credit in the College is based on examination subject scores alone.

Back to Advanced Placement Programs
 

Undergraduate Record Home