2003-2004
UNDERGRADUATE RECORD
College of Arts and Sciences
General Information  |  Academic Information  |  Departments and Programs  |  Faculty
Course Descriptions

Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures

P.O. Box 400781
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4781
Phone: (434) 982-2304
Fax: (434) 924-6977
www.virginia.edu/amelc

Overview Almost two-thirds of the world's population live in Asia and the Middle East, and a greater percentage than that, from the Maghrib in the west to Japan in the east, speak major Asian and Middle Eastern languages. In the twenty-first century knowledge and understanding of that part of the world will become increasingly important for people in any profession or field of endeavor. To address that crucial need the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures (AMELC) offers a comprehensive curriculum in some of the major languages, literatures and cultures of East Asia, the Middle East, and South Asia.

The languages currently taught in AMELC are Arabic (classical and modern), Chinese (classical and modern), Hebrew (modern, with Biblical taught in Religious Studies), Hindi, Japanese (modern and pre-modern), Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil, and Urdu. The Division reserves the right to place any student in the course most appropriate to his or her skill level. Such placement will be the responsibility of the coordinator for each language program, and should be made by the fifth class meeting.

Literature courses in AMELC are offered in all these languages. Most literature courses are offered in the language and many are offered in English, with readings in translation. In addition to courses in language and in literature, courses offered in many other departments and programs - Anthropology, Art History, Government and Foreign Affairs, History, and Religious Studies - are required for AMELC's majors, giving AMELC students a unique multidisciplinary perspective.

The AMELC curriculum is designed to give students a high level of language competency and a deep understanding of East Asia, the Middle East, or South Asia. The department offers a Studies Major, a Studies Minor, a Languages Major, and a Distinguished Major for exceptional students in either the Studies or the Languages Major. Some graduates find employment in their geographical region of study, while others go on to graduate or professional schools for further study. Whichever the case, study in AMELC is an intense, intimate and rewarding experience, and AMELC students are well prepared for the future.

The Major in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies The Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Major replaces the Asian Studies Major in the Program in Asian Studies and the Middle East Studies Major in the Middle East Studies Program. The Asian and Middle Eastern Studies major is an interdisciplinary major featuring a core of language work and additional coursework in one of three regional concentrations: East Asia, the Middle East, or South Asia. Not all concentration courses must be from within AMELC. For instance, a course on Islam in Religious Studies would count towards a concentration in the Middle East or South Asia regions. Current lists of approved concentration courses are posted in the Department and on the AMELC website. Students are also encouraged to take AMELC and related courses outside their geographical region of concentration.

Requirements for the Major in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Prerequisite:†a C or better in AMEL 101.

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency at the 202/206 level or above in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil, or Urdu.
  2. 30 credits in AMELC and related courses, including courses in selected regional concentration, with the following distribution:
    • 9 credits at 300 level or higher of AMELC and related courses:
    students whose regional concentration is East Asia must take EAST 492

    students whose regional concentration is the Middle East must take MEST 496

    students whose regional concentration is South Asia must take AMEL 493 or 494
    • 21 credits in one of three regional concentrations: East Asia, Middle East, or South Asia; see the AMELC website for current listings;
    9 of those 21 credits must be in regional concentration courses from 3 of the following 6 departments: AMELC (at the 300 level or higher), Anthropology, Art History, Government and Foreign Affairs, History, Religious Studies. (It is strongly recommended that History be one of the three.)
  3. double majoring is encouraged, but students are reminded that 18 credits in each major must come from courses unique to that major;
  4. students are reminded that USEM credits do not count toward major requirements;
  5. a maximum of 12 study abroad and domestic transfer credits are allowed, at the discretion of the Undergraduate Committee.

Students in this major must maintain a satisfactory grade point in major and related courses each semester. Satisfactory is defined as an average of C (i.e., 2.0). Students not maintaining this grade point are subject to discontinuation from the major.

Advisors for this major are Gilbert Roy (East Asia), Farzaneh Milani (Middle East), and Robert A. Hueckstedt (South Asia).

Requirements for the Minor in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

  1. 102/106-level in an AMELC language. A grade of C or higher must be earned each semester in 101-102, or the grade in 106 must be C or higher.
  2. at least 18 credits in one of the three regional concentrations (East Asia, Middle East, or South Asia). Language courses beyond the 102/106-level may be counted for this. Of those 18 credits:
    • a minimum of 9 credits must be from concentration courses in AMELC or any other department;
    • at least 3 credits must come from a non-language course in AMELC; and
    no more than 9 credits may be from any one department outside AMELC.
  3. double majoring is encouraged, but students are reminded that 18 credits in each major must come from courses unique to that major;
  4. students are reminded that USEM credits do not count toward major requirements;
  5. a maximum of 12 study abroad and domestic transfer credits are allowed, at the discretion of the Undergraduate Committee.

The advisor for this Minor is Stefania Burk. Students wishing to declare this for their minor course of study must see her.

The Major in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures The Department offers a major in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures for students wanting to achieve proficiency in an AMELC language and a deeper understanding of its literature and culture. The core of this major is a high level of competency in the language and a more focused set of concentration courses.

Requirements for the Major in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures
Prerequisites:

  • 202/206 level of an AMELC language. A grade of C or higher must be earned in each semester of 201-202 or 106-206.
  • 2 three-credit non-language courses in AMELC or one such course in AMELC and one course in History or in Religious Studies. One of the AMELC courses must be AMEL 101. The course in History must have the mnemonic HIEA, HIME, or HISA, and the course in Religious Studies must be RELG 104, or it must have the mnemonic RELB, RELH, or RELI. Each of these two courses must be passed with a grade of C or better.
Requirements
  1. 30 credits in AMELC and related courses, of which
    • 8 credits must be in one AMELC language, or, at the discretion of the student's advisor, 12 in one and at least 6 in a second  language in the same region;
    Tibetan may be used as a second language in the East Asian or South Asian region.  Biblical Hebrew may be used as a second language in the Middle East region. The 12 credits for the first language must be beyond the 202/206 level. The 6 credits for the second language may come from 100-level courses.
    • 12 credits of the 30 must be in AMELC and related courses, of which
    6 credits must be in regional concentration courses from 2 of the following 6 areas: AMELC (at the 300 level or higher), Anthropology, Art History, Government and Foreign Affairs, History, and Religious Studies (see the AMELC website for current listings); and

    6 credits are to be determined in consultation with the student's advisor. These courses may be further AMELC language study or non-language, regional concentration courses in AMELC.

    •a maximum of 15 study abroad credits and domestic transfer credits are allowed at the discretion of the Undergraduate Committee.

It is crucial that language training begin early in the student's career.†Summer study and study abroad are also encouraged. (See the Study Abroad Programs section below.)

Students in this major must maintain a satisfactory grade point in major and related courses each semester. Satisfactory is defined as an average of C (i.e., 2.0). Students not maintaining this grade point are subject to discontinuation from the major.

Students should check with their advisors concerning the current availability of this major in the language or languages of their interest. Those advisors are:

Chinese Anne Kinney
Japanese Michiko Wilson
Arabic Mohammed Sawaie
Hebrew Daniel Lefkowitz
Persian Zjaleh Hajibashi
Hindi Griffith Chaussée
Sanskrit Robert A. Hueckstedt
Tamil Alvappillai Veluppillai
Urdu Griffith Chaussée

The Distinguished Majors Program†AMELC offers a Distinguished Majors Program for qualified majors in order to provide the opportunity to pursue in-depth analysis of issues and topics related to the major.

To qualify, students must meet the general requirements of their AMELC major with the following modifications. They must take 12 hours of concentration courses at the 400 level or above, including AMST 497, a six-hour sequence of tutorial work on a senior thesis to be completed over the fall and spring semesters of the fourth year. Students are responsible for obtaining the agreement of a faculty member to serve as thesis advisor and a second faculty member from a different department to serve as second reader. Students are encouraged to use primary language sources in researching their theses.

Admission into the DMP occurs in the spring semester of the third year. Applicants must be in either the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Major or the Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures Major, with major and general GPAs of at least 3.4. Applications must be submitted by the end of January of the student's third year, and should include the following: 1) a statement of interest explaining the student's desire to enter the program and his or her general area of research interest; 2) a letter of recommendation from a faculty member in the student's concentration, either sent directly to the AMELC Chair or sealed and submitted by the student with other materials; and 3) a copy of the student's most recent transcript. Decisions concerning admission to the DMP are made in February.

Commencement honors of Distinction, High Distinction and Highest Distinction require a minimum GPA of 3.4 as well as timely completion of the senior thesis. Honors are awarded by the Departmental Council on the basis of overall academic performance as well as at the recommendation of the first and second readers of the thesis.

Faculty†The AMELC faculty consists of approximately twenty full and part-time scholars and teachers with national and international reputations ' in cultural studies, linguistics, literary criticism, philology, and translation ' who are fully committed to effective language teaching and to the literatures and cultures of Asia and the Middle East. While other language programs usually use graduate students to teach beginning and intermediate level language classes, AMELC uses for that purpose specially hired and trained lecturers, who are often native speakers or have near-native fluency. Class size is restricted, and faculty make a special effort to be available to students outside of class.

Students†Every semester 600 to 700 students study in AMELC's courses, which usually number between 40 and 50. The majority of AMELC's courses involve language study, so the enrollment is purposely kept low. Other courses taught in English usually satisfy the Non-Western Perspectives Requirement and the Humanities Requirement. Some of those courses also satisfy the Second Writing Requirement and are therefore restricted to thirty students or less. Approximately 1400 students study in Asian and Middle Eastern courses in other departments.

Students of Asia and the Middle East go on to graduate or professional schools, to work in governmental agencies, journalism, art, international banking and business, communications, or the Peace Corps, or they teach in Asia or the Middle East. The possibilities are almost infinite.

Study Abroad Programs

University of Virginia-Yarmouk University Summer Arabic†AMELC administers a summer Arabic program at Yarmouk University in Irbid, Jordan, which provides an opportunity to study Arabic intensively at the intermediate and advanced levels. The program occasionally receives grants from which it can offer fellowships.

University of Virginia-Emory University Semester-in-India†The Center for South Asian Studies, in collaboration with Emory University, sponsors a Semester-in-India Program that is open to third- and fourth-year undergraduates. Through a generous invitation on the part of His Highness the Maharaja of Jodhpur, the program is housed in the magnificent Mehrangarh Fort in Jodhpur, Rajasthan. The program, which runs from late August until mid-December, focuses on the study of language and civilization. Students take Hindi language classes and a course in Indian and Rajasthani culture as well as complete individual research projects.

In addition to study abroad programs administered by UVA, students are encouraged to develop their language skills at the many other study-abroad programs that are available throughout Asia and the Middle East. Faculty are happy to advise students concerning appropriate programs, and program descriptions and advice are also available from the International Studies Office in Minor Hall. Students are particularly encouraged to participate in such programs so that they can experience first hand the languages in their surrounding cultures.

At the discretion of the Departmental Council, a maximum of 12 study abroad and domestic transfer credits is allowed for the Studies Major and a maximum of 15 for the Languages and Literatures Major. No study abroad or domestic transfer credits are allowed for the Studies Minor.

Scholarships

East Asia Center Scholarship†A generous endowment from the Weedon family allows the East Asia Center to award travel grants to undergraduates enrolled in language programs in East Asia as well as research travel grants to graduate students and faculty.

MASTERCARD Asian Studies Scholarship This scholarship is awarded annually to a rising fourth year major in Asian Studies. To be competitive, students applying for this scholarship should be in the Distinguished Majors Program. This scholarship is in the amount of $4000 for tuition.

Centers and Programs

Arts and Sciences Center for Instructional Technology (ASCIT)†A resource containing many audio-visual materials which are used to help bring the culture surrounding our different languages alive for students. It is conveniently located in Cabell Hall along with most AMELC classrooms and offices. The language laboratory is used extensively to help students practice and reinforce their speaking and listening skills.

East Asia Center†For more than twenty years the East Asia Center has promoted activities and events that enhance the study of East Asia and Southeast Asia at the University of Virginia. The Center sponsors ten to fifteen lectures and other events each year. It also manages graduate programs granting an MA in Asian Studies as well as an MA/MBA in Asian Studies in conjunction with the Darden Business School.

Center for South Asian Studies†The Center for South Asian Studies is one of nine federally-funded National Resource Centers for the study of South Asia-Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Tibet. It sponsors a regular weekly seminar program as well as other activities.

Middle East Studies Program†Like the East Asia and South Asia Centers, the Middle East Studies Program is an association of faculty who share a regional interest. The Middle East Program sponsors lectures and other activities, and until recently it administered the undergraduate degree program in Middle East Studies.

Center for Jewish Studies†Jewish Studies is an interdisciplinary program that introduces students to the history, languages, and literature of the Jewish people; to the beliefs and practices of Judaism; and to the contributions of Jewish wisdom to human civilization.

Additional Information For more information, contact Robert A. Hueckstedt, AMELC Chair, B27 Cabell Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22903; (434) 982-2304; amelc@virginia.edu; http://www.virginia.edu/~amelc/.




Course Descriptions

TOP

AMEL 100 - (3) (Y)
From Genghis Khan to Stalin: Invasions and Empires of Central Asia

Survey of Central Asian civilizations from the first to the twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on nomadism, invasions, conquests, and major religious-cultural developments.

AMEL 101 - (3) (Y)
Literatures of Asia and the Middle East

An introductory course in non-Western literatures that emphasizes genres with no clear Western equivalents. The reading list varies from year to year, but the texts, read in translation, usually come from Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil and Urdu.

AMEL 247 - (3) (Y)
Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities

Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 247.

AMEL 301 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Asian America

Topics in Asian American culture, including historical, socio-economic, racial, gender, and other aspects. Students will employ critical skills in analyzing and questioning ideas about race, class, gender, family.

AMEL 302 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Asian America

An examination of social phenomena that have framed the lives of Asian Americans. Students will employ critical skills in analyzing and questioning ideas about race, class, gender, family, among other issues. Topics will include comparative analyses of Asian American communities, contemporary Asian American experience, and the specific concerns and histories of individual Asian groups in America.

AMEL 347 - (3) (Y)
Language and Culture in the Middle East

Prerequisite: Prior coursework in anthropology, or middle east studies, or linguistics, or permission of the instructor.
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 347.

AMEL 365 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Linguistic Typology

Human languages appear on the surface to be very different from one another. Closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function.

AMEL 493, 494 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Independent study in special field under the direction of a faculty member in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures.

AMEL 497 - (3) (S)
Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Senior Thesis

Prerequisite: restricted to DMP majors and instructor's permission.
Thesis research under the direction of an AMELC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member from a different department serving as second reader.

Note: AMTR courses are taught in English.

AMTR 301 - (3) (SI)
Men and Women of Asia and the Middle East

Focuses on literature of Asia and the Middle East (Chinese, Japanese, Persian) which depicts the world as seen through the eyes of men and women; includes poetry and prose from Ancient to Modern.

AMTR 311/511 - (3) (IR)
Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures

Explores some of the basic issues of women's identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature.

Arabic

ARAB 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Arabic

Prerequisite for ARAB 102: ARAB 101 or equivalent.
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice.

ARAB 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Arabic

Prerequisite for ARAB 201: ARAB 102, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Prerequisite for ARAB 202: ARAB 201, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning.

ARAB 225 - (3) (Y)
Conversational Arabic

Prerequisite: ARAB 202†or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized.

ARAB 226 - (3) (IR)
Conversational Arabic

Prerequisite: ARAB 225†or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Practice of conversation based on everyday situations. Enables communication with native speakers.

ARAB 227 - (3) (Y)
Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East (in English)

Introduces the cultural traits and patterns of contemporary Arab society based on scholarly research, recent field work, and personal experiences and observations in the Arab world. No knowledge of Arabic is required.

ARAB 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Literary Arabic

Prerequisite: ARAB 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Emphasizes reading of modern texts for oral-aural practice, as well as writing.

ARAB 323/523 - (3) (Y)
Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)

Prerequisite: ARAB 302†or instructor permission.
Emphasizes development of writing and speaking skills, with special attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the organization and style of different genres.

ARAB 324/524 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)

Prerequisite: ARAB 323 or equivalent or instructor permission.
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing.

ARAB 333/533 - (3) (Y)
Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I

Prerequisite:†ARAB 202 or higher or permission of instructor.
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith

ARAB 334/534 - (3) (Y)
Arabic of the Quran and Hadith II

Prerequisite:†ARAB 235 or permission of instructor.
Studies the language of the Quran, its exegesis, and the Hadith. ARAB 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y) Independent Study in Arabic

ARAB 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Studiy in Arabic

ARAB 528 - (3) (SI)
The History of the Arabic Language (in English)

Prerequisite:†At least one year of Arabic or Hebrew, and/or historical linguistics.
Traces history of Arabic and its development up to present day. Studies the relation of Arabic to other languages that come in contact with it either through genetic relationship, such as Hebrew and Aramaic; or through conquest, such as Persian, Coptic, Berber, and others. Examines the external and internal factors of linguistic change.

ARAB 583 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Arabic Prose

Prerequisite: ARAB 302/502, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Emphasis on reading modern Arabic prose, and writing descriptive and narrative short essays.

ARAB 584 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Arabic Prose

Prerequisite: ARAB 583, or instructor permission.
Exposure to selected reading material in modern Arabic prose, and writing of short essays, summaries, and descriptive pieces in Arabic.

ARAB 585 - (3) (Y)
Media Arabic

Prerequisite: ARAB 583 and 584 or ARAB 301/501 and 302/502 or instructor permission.
Examination of electronic (television and radio) and print (newspapers, magazines, periodic publications) Arabic.

ARAB 586 - (3) (Y)
Nineteenth Century Arabic Prose

Prerequisite: ARAB 583 and 584†or instructor permission.
Examination of Arabic writing in the 19th century, a period of renaissance in the Arabic language.

Note: ARTR courses are taught in English.

ARTR 329/359 - (3) (Y)
Modern Arabic Literature in Translation

Introduction to the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). Taught in English.

ARTR 339 - (3) (Y)
Love, Alienation, and Politics in Contemporary Arabic Novel

Introduction to the Arabic Novel with emphasis on a medium for expounding political issues of the Arab World.

Chinese

CHIN 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Chinese

Prerequisite for CHIN 102: CHIN 101.
Students are introduced to the basic grammar and vocabulary generally recognized as useful in everyday communication. Using integrated pedagogical and authentic materials, the course adopts a multi-faceted approach to help students gain training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in standard Mandarin Chinese. The goal is the ability to communicate in everyday situations.

CHIN 106 - (4) (Y)
Accelerated Elementary Chinese

This course is accelerated elementary Chinese will focus on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is a one-semester course, but will cover study materials normally covered in two semesters. To pass this course students must meet the following standards: cumulative knowledge of 500 Chinese characters; ability to carry on a 10-minute conversation on various topics; ability to comprehend various complex sentence patterns; ability to write a paragraph (80-100 Chinese characters) with dictionary help.

CHIN 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Chinese

Prerequisite: CHIN 102, or equivalent.
An intermediate Chinese language class which focuses on training in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Aspects of Chinese culture and society are incorporated into the course.

CHIN 206 - (4) (Y)
Accelerated Intermediate Chinese

Prerequisite:†Grade of B- or above in CHIN 106, or equivalent.
A one semester course covering study materials normally covered in two semesters with the focus on speaking, reading, and writing. Students must meet the following criteria to pass this course: possess cumulative knowledge of 1000 Chinese characters; ability to give a fluent five-minute oral presentation on a topic in daily life; to read short essays of 600 to 800 characters on non-academic topics; and to write non-academic essays of 300 to 400 characters with only occasional dictionary help.

CHIN 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

Prerequisite: CHIN 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Study of modern Chinese at the advanced level: reading and discussion in Chinese of various aspects of Chinese culture, society, and literature, using radio broadcasts and selections from newspapers, recent essays, short stories, etc.

CHIN 305 - (3) (Y)
Accelerated Readings in Modern Chinese

Prerequisite:†CHIN 206 or permission of instructor.
Part of the series of courses designed for students who already speak Chinese, but cannot read or write the Chinese language, CHIN 305 focuses on reading and writing skills at the advanced level, with substantial cultural content.

CHIN 406 - (3) (Y)
Accelerated Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese

Prerequisite:†CHIN 306 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).
The goal of CHIN 406 is to continue enhancing students' reading comprehension and writing skills by systematically exposing them to formal written Chinese, works of literature, and vigorous writing exercises. By the end of the course the students should be able to read authentic materials with the help of a dictionary and be able to write essays of 500 words in length on assigned topics.

CHIN 401/701, 402/702 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese

Prerequisite: CHIN 302, 502 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).
The goal of these courses is to help students understand journalistic essays and some literature pieces through systematic study of sentence patterns and formal writing styles. In addition students are introduced to the culture of contemporary China in CHIN 401 and the changes in Chinese thought during the past 90 years in CHIN 402702. By the end of the course the students should be able to read authentic materials with the help of a dictionary and be able to write essays of 500 words in length on assigned topics.

CHIN 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Chinese

CHIN 528 - (3) (Y)
History of the Chinese Language (in Chinese)

Prerequisite: CHIN 323/523 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Examination of the evolution of the spoken and written language, diachronically and synchronically, from syntactic, phonological, lexical, and graphic perspectives.

CHIN 581, 582 - (3) (Y)
Media Chinese

Prerequisite: CHIN 302/502†or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Introduces the electronic and print media in Chinese with special emphasis on current events as reported in the Chinese speaking world, to further develop oral and written proficiency.

CHIN 583, 584 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Classical Chinese

Prerequisite for CHIN 584: CHIN 583 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Introduction to the grammar and structure of classical Chinese.

CHIN 585, 586 - (3) (SI)
Classical Chinese Literature

Prerequisite: CHIN 583-584†or equivalent.
Advanced readings in classical Chinese.

Note: CHTR classes are taught in English.

CHTR 280 - (1-3) (SI)
Chinese Calligraphy

Introduction to the history, masters, styles and techniques of Chinese brush calligraphy. Enhances familiarity with use of brush and ink; active and passive differentiation of styles and techniques; and appreciation of Chinese Calligraphy as an art form.

CHTR 301 - (3) (Y)
Legendary Women in Early China

Examines the biographies of female heroines and villains as found in the early Chinese text Tradition of Exemplary Women (ca. 18 B.C.). Students gain a familiarity with 1) the history of women in early China, 2) the evolving codes of behavior that shaped women's' culture for two millennia, and 3) the way in which the Chinese understand gender. Enhances an understanding of the function of role models in both ancient China and their own lives. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement.

CHTR 321, 322 - (3) (Y)
Chinese Literature in Translation

Study of the literary heritage of China. Examines the major genres through selected readings of representative authors. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement.

Hebrew

HEBR 101, 102 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Modern Hebrew

Prerequisite for HEBR 102: HEBR 101.
An introduction to the pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and writing system of modern Israeli Hebrew. By the end of this sequence students have mastered the core grammatical principles of Hebrew, along with a basic vocabulary of 1000 words, and they are able to read and understand simple texts and carry out simple conversation. Includes material on Israeli culture, history, and politics.

HEBR 201, 202 - (4) (S)
Intermediate Modern Hebrew

Prerequisite:†HEBR 102 with grade of C or above or instructor permission.
Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of grammar, with special attention to verb conjugation, noun declension, and syntactic structure, and their occurrence in texts which deal with modern Israeli culture and values. These texts, which include excerpts from newspapers and fiction, introduce 600 new words and expose the learner to political and other issues of modern Israel.

HEBR 301, 302 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Modern Hebrew

Prerequisite:†HEBR 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
This course focuses on the conjugation of weak, or hollow verbs, and the passive of all conjugations. It also continues the study of subordinate clauses with special attention to adverbial clauses and their use. Texts for the course, which form the basis for class discussion in Hebrew and exercises in Hebrew composition, are drawn from various genres.

HEBR 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Hebrew

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Independent study for advanced students of Hebrew.

Hindi

HIND 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Hindi-Urdu

Prerequisite for HIND 102: HIND 101.
Introductory training in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Hindi.

HIND 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Hindi

Prerequisite for HIND 201: HIND 102, or equivalent. Prerequisite for HIND 202: HIND 201, or equivalent.
Introduction to various types of written and spoken Hindi; vocabulary building, idioms and problems of syntax; and conversation in Hindi.

HIND 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Hindi

Prerequisite:†HIND 202, or equivalent or instructor permission.
Readings are drawn from areas of particular interest to the students involved, and include readings from various disciplines.

HIND 323, 324 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Hindi

Prerequisite:†HIND 302/502 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Advanced readings in modern standard Hindi and possibly in medieval Hindi, depending on the interests of the students.

HIND 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Hindi

Japanese

JAPN 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
First-Year Japanese

Prerequisite for JAPN 102: JAPN 101, or equivalent.
Introduces the basic speech patterns and grammatical units, including casual, daily spoken style, and the polite speech used in formal occasions. Emphasizes speaking, listening, and reading. Writing hiragana, katakana, and 200 kanji are also introduced.

JAPN 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Second-Year Japanese

Prerequisite:†JAPN 102 or equivalent.
Continuation of Elementary Japanese introducing more complex sentence patterns, idioms, and vocabulary to prepare students for an intermediate-level communication. Reinforces spoken Japanese skills with writing and reading exercises, and 250 kanji are introduced.

JAPN 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Third-Year Japanese I

Prerequisite: JAPN 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Emphasizes comprehension and active reproduction of modern Japanese beyond the basic patterns of speech and writing. Various topics on current Japanese culture and society are introduced.

JAPN 481 - (3) (Y)
Modern Literary Texts

Prerequisite: JAPN 302 or equivalent.
Reading and discussion in Japanese. Develops comprehension and verbal expression skills at the Fourth-Year level. Reading selections include works by modern and contemporary novelists, short story writers and poets.

JAPN 482 - (3) (Y)
Mysteries, Detective Fiction and Business Novels

Prerequisite:†JAPN 302 or equivalent.
Reading and discussion in Japanese. Develops comprehension and verbal expression skills at the Fourth-Year level. Reading selections include some on Japan's bestselling and award-winning writers, Seicho Matsumoto, Miyuki Miyabe, and Ikke Shimizu.

JAPN 483 - (3) (IR)
Media Japanese

Prerequisite:†JAPN 302 or equivalent.
Reading and discussion in Japanese. Develops comprehension and verbal expression skills at the Fourth-Year level. Reading selections include articles from Aera, Japan's counterpart of Newsweek; manga, artistic comic magazines; and film criticism.

JAPN 484 - (3) (Y)
Reading Classical Japanese

Prerequisite:†JAPN 302 or equivalent.
An introduction to classical Japanese; selections from classical narratives and poetry. JAPN 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y) Independent Study in Japanese

JAPN 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Second-Year Japanese

Prerequisite:†JAPN 102 or equivalent.
Continuation of Elementary Japanese introducing more complex sentence patterns, idioms, and vocabulary to prepare students for an intermediate-level communication. Reinforces spoken Japanese skills with writing and reading exercises, and 250 kanji are introduced.

JAPN 493, 4984 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study in Japanese

JAPN 592 - (3) (Y)
Conflicting Postwar Images in Modern Japan

Prerequisite: JAPN 583, 584†or equivalent, or instructor permission.
This course challenges the stereotypic image of Japan and looks at postwar Japan as it is embroiled in conflict, oppression, and doubt. Emphasizes close reading of texts along with gaining an understanding of how the Japanese confront the unsettling issues of dissent and conflict.

JAPN 593, 594 - (3) (Y)
Language Seminar I and II

Prerequisite:†JAPN 583, 584 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
These seminars are the highest level of instruction in modern Japanese language. Literary texts, including poetry and critical essays, are read, interpreted and discussed in Japanese.

Note: JPTR courses are taught in English.

JPTR 321 - (3) (Y)
The Tale of Genji, The World's First Psychological Novel: Court Romance

Introduction to the elegant world of classical Japanese literary tradition represented by one of the world's masterpieces, The Tale of Genji (1010 A.D.) written by Lady Murasaki. Examines the courtship ritual, the marriage institution, the gendering of sexuality and desire, and the aesthetics of mono no aware.

JPTR 322/522 - (3) (Y)
The Modern Japanese Canon

Introduction to the modern Japanese canon (1890's to the present). Writers studied include Natsume SŰseki, the first modern writer to delve into the human psyche; Mori ‘gai, the surgeon-turned writer; RynŰsuke Akutagawa, the consummate writer of short stories; Shiga Naoya, the "god" of "I-Novel" Japanese fiction; Yukio Mishima, whose seppuku suicide caused a sensation world-wide; EndŰ ShŰsaku, the Christian writer; two Nobel laureates, Yasunari Kawabata, the pure aesthetician, and Kenzaburo ‘e, the political gadfly.

JPTR 331 - (3) (Y)
A Cultural Understanding of U.S.-Japan Relations

Prerequisite:†At least one course in Japan-related courses, or instructor permission.
Studies the roles of culture and communication that often contribute to the perpetuation of the myths and misperceptions of Japan and the U.S. about each other; explores what the Japanese have to say about themselves and Americans, and vice versa, and implications of cultural differences in interpersonal relations, basic behavioral patterns, and motivations.

JPTR 335 - (3) (Y)
Classical Japanese Literature
Introduction to the literary arts of Japan from 700-1200. The course considers Japan's earliest myths, the precursors of haiku, the "world's first novel" The Tale of Genji, as well as women's autobiographical memoirs, war tales, folk tales, and other genres. The shifting political, religious, social, and artistic contexts of these centuries will also be considered to enrichen our encounters with and analyses of these works.

JPTR 336 - (3) (Y)
Literature of Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1200-1868

Prerequisite: AMEL 101, any 200-level literature course, or permission of the instructor.
An introduction in English translation to the literary arts of the warriors, aristocrats, monks and nuns, courtesans, and townspeople of Japan from the advent of the age of the shoguns to the rise of the "floating world" pleasure quarters. Readings will include war tales, autobiographical memoirs, noh and kabuki plays, haiku poetry, parody and more.

JPTR 381/581 - (3) (Y)
Classical Japanese Women Writers and Autobiography

An introduction to the celebrated female literary tradition of the Heian court (797-1190) that produced the flowering of vernacular literature, nikki bungaku†(a mixture of prose and poetry called poetic diary).

JPTR 382/582 - (3) (Y)
Modern Japanese Women Writers

Introduction to the resurgence of the female literary tradition from 1904 to the present. Focuses on Japanese women writers as cultural critics, how each individual female artist challenges and is shaped by Japanese culture and society.

Persian

PERS 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Persian

Prerequisite for PERS 102: PERS 101, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Introductory language sequence focusing on reading, writing, comprehending, and speaking modern Persian through audio- lingual methods. Persian grammar is introduced through sentence patterns in the form of dialogues and monologues.

PERS 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Persian

Prerequisite: PERS 102, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Each course focuses on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension using selections from classical and modern Persian prose and poetry, preparing students for advanced studies in Indo-Persian language and literature.

PERS 301/501 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Modern Persian Poetry

Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Study of works by major and some minor poets of the twentieth century. The form and content of 'New Poetry' is discussed as distinguishing features of twentieth-century Persian poetry in contrast with those of classical Persian poetry. Emphasizes the themes of modern poetry as reflections of Iranian society.

PERS 323 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Classical Persian Literature

Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
A comprehensive, historical introduction to Persian poetry and prose from the 10th to the 18th centuries. Emphasizing the history and development of Persian poetry and prose, this advanced-level language course introduces various formal elements of Persian literary tradition. It analyzes literary texts and explores the linguistic structure, fine grammatical points, and syntactic intricacies of classical Persian.

PERS 324 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Modern Persian Literature

Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
This course addresses the development of modern(ist) trends in Persian literature, emphasizing historical and socio-political factors. Exemplar modern poems, stories, and essays are read in the original, then explained and critically evaluated. Defines and discusses significant ideas, ideologies, movements, trends, milieus, social backgrounds, etc., out of which modern Persian literature emerged.

PERS 302/502 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Modern Persian Prose Fiction

Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Selected readings from the works of major writers of the century. Discusses the development of modern Persian fiction as it reflects a changing society. Improves reading ability in Persian and familiarizes students with Iran, its people, and its culture.

PERS 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Persian

PETR 321/521 - (3) (IR)
Persian Literature in Translation

Reading from the works of major figures in classical Persian literature, especially Rudaki, Ferdowsi, Khayyam, Attar, Mowlavi, Sa'adi, and Hafez, as well as the most important minor writers of each period. Emphasizes the role of the Ma'shuq (the beloved), Mamduh (the praised one), and Ma'bud (the worshiped one) in classical verse, as well as the use of allegory and similar devices in both prose and verse. Taught in English.

PETR 322/522 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Persian Literature in Translation

Introduces modern Persian literature in the context of Iranian society and civilization. Lectures and discussions follow the development of modern Persian poetry and prose, and trace the influence of Western and other literature, as well as Iranian literary and cultural heritage, on the works of contemporary Iranian writers. Facilitates understanding of contemporary Iran, especially its people, both individually and collectively, with their particular problems and aspirations in the twentieth-century world. Taught in English.

Sanskrit

SANS 101/501 - (3) (Y)
Elementary Sanskrit I

Prerequisite:†SANS 101 - none, SANS 501 - graduate standing. Studies Sanskrit sounds, the Devanagari script, and basic grammar.

SANS 102/502 - (3) (Y)
Elementary Sanskrit II

Prerequisite: For SANS 102 - SANS101, for SANS502 - SANS 501 and graduate standing.
A continuation of SANS101/501.

Note: The following six courses are all intermediate level Sanskrit courses. They are offered two-by-two in a three year rotation. The courses offered in the academic year 2001-2002 are SANS 201A/503 and SANS 202A/504.

SANS 201A/503 - (3) (IR)
Selections from the Mahabharata

Prerequisite: For SANS 201A -SANS 102; for SANS 503 - SANS 502 and graduate standing.
This second-year course focuses on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students' knowledge of grammar from SANS 102/502, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Mahabharata, one of ancient India's major epics.

SANS 202A/504 - (3) (IR)
The Bhagavadgita

Prerequisite: For SANS 202A - SANS 102; for SANS 504 - SANS 502 and graduate standing.
This second-year course focuses on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students' knowledge of grammar from SANS 102/502, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Bhagavadgita, a major religious text of ancient India.

SANS 201B/505 - (3) (IR)
Selections from the Ramayana†of Valmiki

Prerequisite: For SANS 201B -SANS 102; for SANS 505 - SANS 502 and graduate standing.
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 102/502, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Ramayana of Valmiki, one of two major epics of ancient India, and the 'first poem' in Sanskrit.

SANS 202B/506 - (3) (Y)
Selections from the Upanisads

Prerequisite: For SANS 202B - SANS 102; for SANS 506 - SANS 502 and graduate standing.
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 102/502, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Upanisads, a major spiritual text of ancient India.

SANS 201C/507 - (3) (IR)
Selections from the Kathasaritsagara†of Somadeva

Prerequisite: For SANS 201C - SANS 102; for SANS 507 - SANS 502 and graduate standing.
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 502, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Kathasaritsagara†of Somadeva, the most important collection of story literature in Sanskrit.

SANS 202C/508 - (3) (IR)
Selections from the Puranas

Prerequisite: For SANS 202C - SANS 102; for SANS 508 - SANS 502 and graduate standing. A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 502, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the huge corpus of Puranic texts.

South Asia

SAST 110 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to South Asia

Introduces South Asian economy and environment, caste and society, gender issues, history and political science, secularism-law-religion, philosophy, languages and literatures, theater-music-dance, and visual arts. Emphasizes the colonial and post colonial periods.

SAST 255 - (3) (IR)
The Languages of South Asia

An examination of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of South Asian languages from typological, social, and historical perspectives. This course presupposes no knowledge of a South Asian language or of linguistics and is intended for lower-level undergraduates.

SATR 200 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to South Asian Literature

Surveys classical to contemporary South Asian languages (e.g., Sanskrit, Tamil, Hindi, Urdu) and literature translated into, or written in, English.

SATR 201 - (3) (Y)
Remembering India's Partition through Literature and Poetry

The readings for this course have been put together with the premise that literature, even that which is written at the height of nationalist struggles, does not relate the exact same story that nationalism does. The readings for this course present a view of pre-partition and post-partition India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, especially through the novels of Muslim South Asian writers like Abdullah Hussein and Intezar Hussain.

SATR 300 - (3) (IR)
South Asian Literature Across Borders

Prerequisite: Fulfillment of First Writing Requirement.
An upper-level undergraduate seminar on South Asian literature translated into or written in English that focuses on a particular historical period or thematic concern crucial to understanding South Asian literature as a whole, and specifically the issues associated with writing South Asian literature in English.

SATR 301 - (3) (Y)
Gender Issues in South Asian Literature

Prerequisite: Fulfillment of First Writing Requirement.
An upper-level undergraduate seminar on South Asian literature translated into or written in English that focuses on gender issues crucial for understanding South Asian literature as a whole.

Urdu

URDU 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Urdu

Prerequisite for URDU 201: HIND 102†or equivalent; for URDU 202: URDU 201 or equivalent.
Introduces various types of written and spoken Urdu; vocabulary building, idioms and problems of syntax; and conversation.

URDU 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Urdu

URDU 501, 502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Urdu

Prerequisite URDU 202 or permission of instructor; for 502: URDU 501 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 202 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry.

Language House Conversation

ARAB 301-302H - (1) (Y)
Language House Conversation

Prerequisite: by instructor permission only.
For students residing in the Arabic group in the Monroe Lane Language House.

CHIN 301-302H - (1) (Y)
Language House Conversation

Prerequisite: by instructor permission only.
For students residing in the Chinese group in the Monroe Lane Language House.

HIND 301-302H - (1) (Y)
Language House Conversation

Prerequisite: by instructor permission only.
For students residing in the Hindu group in the Monroe Lane Language House.

PERS 301-302H - (1) (Y)
Language House Conversation

Prerequisite: by instructor permission only.
For students residing in the Persian group in the Monroe Lane Language House.

JAPN 301-302H - (1) (Y)
Language House Conversation

Prerequisite: by instructor permission only.
For students residing in the Japanese group in the Monroe Lane Language House.

East Asia

EAST 131 - (2) (SS)
Conversational Chinese

Prerequisite: admission to China Gateway Program.
Vocabulary and grammar for simple interactions (shopping, travel, restaurants, greeting friends, etc.) for participants in a UVa summer study program in Shanghai.

EAST 132 - (4) (SS)
Chinese Culture and Society

Prerequisite: admission to China Gateway Program.
Introduction to the culture, history and social structure of China, as part of an eight-week summer study program in Shanghai and Tibet.

Supporting Courses

List of possible courses to be taken for credit in the Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures degree programs. See Course Offering Directory for current course offerings.

Note: Prior approval from an advisor should be received before a course may count towards a degree program.

ANTH 225 - (3) (Y)
Nationalism, Racism, Culture, Multiculturalism

ANTH 232 - (3) (Y)
Symbol and Ritual

ANTH 234 - (3) (IR)
Anthropology of Birth and Death

ANTH 266 - (3) (Y)
Peoples of Polynesia

ANTH 325 - (3) (Y)
Anthropological Perspectives on the Third World

ANTH 332 - (3) (Y)
Shamanism, Healing, and Ritual

ANTH 363 - (3) (E)
Social Structure of China

ANTH 364 - (3) (E)
Ethnology of Southeast Asia

ANTH 365 - (3) (IR)
Asian American Ethnicity

ANTH 366 - (3) (Y)
China: Empire and Nationalities

ANTH 523 - (3) (IR)
Political Systems

ANTH 524 - (3) (IR)
Religious Organizations

ANTH 557 - (3) (IR)
Topics In Ethnology of East Asia

ANTH 558 - (3) (IR)
Topics in Ethnology of Southeast Asia

ARTH 103 - (3) (IR)
History of Art III

ARTH 261 - (3) (IR)
Buddhist Art From India to Japan

ARTH 262 - (3) (IR)
East Asian Art

ARTH 362 - (3) (IR)
Japanese Art

ARTH 567 - (3) (IR)
Text and Image in Chinese Buddhist Art

ECON 355 - (3) (Y)
Economics of China

ENTC 355 - (3) (Y)
Asian American Fiction

HIEA 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in East Asian History

HIEA 201 - (3) (IR)
Chinese Culture and Institutions

HIEA 203 - (3) (Y)
Modern China: The Road to Revolution

HIEA 205 - (3) (IR)
Korean Culture and Institutions

HIEA 206 - (3) (IR)
Korean Culture and Institutions: 14th-20th Centuries

HIEA 207 - (3) (IR)
Japan, From Susanno to Sony

HIEA 311 - (3) (Y)
The Traditional Chinese Order, Antiquity-Sixth Century A.D.

HIEA 312 - (3) (IR)
The Traditional Chinese Order, Seventh Century-Seventeenth Century

HIEA 314 - (3) (IR)
Political and Social Thought in Modern China

HIEA 315 - (3) (Y)
East Asian-American Relations in the 20th Century

HIEA 321 - (3) (IR)
Japan's Economic Miracle

HIEA 322 - (3) (IR)
Japan's Political History

HIEA 331 - (3) (Y)
Peasants, Students, and Women: Social Movements in Twentieth-Century China

HIEA 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in East Asian History

HIEA 402 - (4) (IR)
Colloquium in East Asia

HIEA 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics In East Asian History

HIEA 404 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in East Asia

HIEA 515 - (3) (IR)
Mao and the Chinese Revolution

MUSI 307 - (3) (Y)
Worlds of Music

PLCP 351 - (3) (Y)
Chinese Politics

PLCP 551 - (3) (Y) Politics of China

PLCP 553 - (3) (Y)
Politics of Japan

PLCP 563 - (3) (E)
Politics of Vietnam

PLIR 360 - (3) (Y)
Political Economy of Asia

PLIR 571 - (3) (Y)
China in World Affairs

PLIR 572 - (3) (Y)
Japan in World Affairs

RELG 104 - (3) (S)
Introductions to Eastern Religious Traditions

RELG 375 - (3) (Y)
Taoism and Confucianism

RELG 503 - (3) (SI)
Readings in Chinese Religion

RELB 210 - (3) (Y)
Buddhism

RELB 212 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Literature

RELB 213 - (3) (O)
Taoism and Confucianism

RELB 245 - (3) (Y)
Zen

RELB 254 - (3) (IR)
Tibetan Buddhist Culture

RELB 300 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Mysticism and Modernity

RELB 315 (3) (Y)
Seminar in Buddhist Studies

RELB 316 - (3) (Y)
The Religions of Japan

RELB 317 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Meditation

RELB 319 (3) (Y)
Buddhist Nirvana

RELB 500,501 - (4) (E)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan I, II

RELB 502 - (3) (O)
Tibetan Perspectives on Tantra

RELB 525 - (3) (E)
Seminar in Japanese Buddhism

RELB 527 - (3) (O)
Seminar in Chinese Buddhism

RELB 526 - (3) (O)
Seminar in Tibetan Buddhism II

RELB 535,536 - (4) (E)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan III, IV

RELB 539 - (3) (IR)
Tibetan Buddhist Tantra-Dzokchen

RELB 547,548 - (4) (O)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan V, VI

RELB 549 - (3) (Y)
Religious History of Tibet

RELB 555 - (3) (E)
Buddhist Philosophy

RELB 591 - (3) (E)
Seminar in Chinese Buddhism Middle East

ANTH 225 - (3) (Y)
Nationalism, Racism, Culture, Multiculturalism

ANTH 232 - (3) (Y)
Symbol and Ritual

ANTH 234 - (3) (IR)
Anthropology of Birth and Death

ANTH 247 - (3) (Y)
Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and Communities

ANTH 325 - (3) (Y)
Anthropological Perspectives on the Third World

ANTH 332 - (3) (Y)
Shamanism, Healing, and Ritual

ANTH 347 - (3) (Y)
Language and Culture in the Middle East

ANTH 583 - (3) (SI)
Archaeology of the Ancient Near East

ANTH 555 - (3) (IR)
Topics in Ethnology of the Middle East

ARTH 211 - (3) (IR)
Art of the Ancient Near East and Prehistoric Europe

ARTH 221 - (3) (IR)
Early Christian and Byzantine Art

ARTH 263 - (3) (IR)
Arts of the Islamic World

ARTH 522 - (3) (IR)
Byzantine Art

ECON 451 - (3) (Y)
Economic Development

HIEU 317 - (3) (IR)
Eastern Christianity

HIME 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in Middle East History

HIME 201 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 570-ca. 1500

HIME 202 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 1500-Present

HIME 319 - (3) (IR)
Christianity and Islam

HIME 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in Middle East and North Africa History

HIME 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in Middle East History

HIME 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in Middle Eastern History

HIME 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Middle Eastern History

HIME 502 - (3) (IR)
Revolution, Islam, and Gender in the Middle East

HIME 503 - (3) (Y)
Multiculturalism in the Ottoman Empire

PLCP 341 (3) (Y)
Politics of the Middle East and North Africa

PLCP 541 - (3) (Y)
Islam and Democracy in the Middle East

PLIR 365 - (3) (Y)
International Relations in the Middle East

RELA 390 - (3) (O)
Islam in Africa

RELG 104 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions

RELG 517 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in History of Religions

RELI 207 - (3) (Y)
Classical Islam

RELI 208 - (3) (Y)
Islam in the Modern Age

RELI 311 - (3) (E)
Muhammad and the Qur'an

RELI 312 - (3) (O)
Sufism

RELI 367 - (3) (E)
Religion and Politics in Islam

RELI 390 - (3) (O) I
slam in Africa

RELI 540 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Islamic Theology

RELI 541 - (3) (IR)
Islamic Theology: The Shi'ite Creed

RELI 542 - (3) (IR)
War and Peace in Islam: A Comparative Ethics Approach

RELJ 203 - (3) (Y)
The Judaic Tradition

RELJ 309 - (3) (E)
Israelite Prophecy

RELJ 322 - (3) (Y)
Judaism and Zionism

RELJ 330 - (3) (Y)
The Jewish Mystical Tradition

RELJ 331 - (3) (Y)
Jewish Law

RELJ 335 - (3) (Y)
Jewish Social Ethics

RELJ 336 - (3) (Y)
Judaism and Christianity

RELJ 337 - (3) (Y)
Modern Movements in Judaism

RELJ 523 - (3) (O)
Modern Jewish Thought: From Phenomenology to Scripture

SWAG 312 - (3) (Y)
Women and Islam South Asia

ANTH 109 - (3) (Y)
Colloquia for First-Year Students

ANTH 234 - (3) (IR)
Anthropology of Birth and Death

ANTH 243 - (3) (IR)
Languages of the World

ANTH 260 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Civilization of India

ANTH 325 - (3) (E)
Anthropological Perspectives on the Third World

ANTH 329 - (3) (Y)
Marriage, Fertility, and Mortality

ANTH 362 - (3) (IR)
Cinema in India

ANTH 364 - (3) (E)
Ethnology of Southeast Asia

ANTH 522 - (3) (E)
Economic Anthropology

ANTH 529 - (3) (Y)
Selected Topics in Social Anthropology

ANTH 539 - (3) (SI)
Selected Topics in Symbolic Anthropology

ANTH 556 - (3) (IR)
Topics in Ethnology of South Asia

ANTH 558 - (3) (IR)
Topics in Ethnology of Southeast Asia

ANTH 575 - (3) (Y)
Buddhism, Politics and Power Architectural History

ARH 381-581 - (3) (Y)
East-West Architecture

ARH 585 - (3) (O)
World Buddhist Architecture

ARTH 261 - (3) (IR)
Buddhist Art From India to Japan

ARTH 264 - (3) (O)
The Arts of India

ARTH 491 - (3) (S)
Seminar in Asian Art

HISA 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in South Asia

HISA 201 - (3) (IR)
History and Civilization of Classical India

HISA 202 - (3) (IR)
History and Civilization of Medieval India

HISA 203 - (3) (IR)
History of Modern

India HISA 301 - (3) (IR)
History of Muslim India

HISA 302 - (3) (IR)
India From Akbar to Victoria

HISA 303 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth Century India

HISA 311 - (3) (IR)
Social and Political Movements in Twentieth Century India

HISA 312 - (3) (IR)
History of Women in South Asia

HISA 401 - (4) (IR)
Seminar in South Asia

HISA 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in South Asia

HISA 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in South Asian History

HISA 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in South Asia

HISA 502 - (3) (IR)
Historiography of Early Modern South Asia

HISA 510 - (3) (E)
Economic History of India

HIST 100 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Seminar in History Music

MUSI 226 - (3) (IR)
Music as Culture: India

MUSI 307 - (3) (IR)
Worlds of Music

PLCP 101 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Comparative Politics

PLCP 212 - (3) (Y)
The Politics of Developing Areas

PLCP 313 - (3) (Y)
Political Economy of Development

PLCP 363 - (3) (Y)
Politics in India and Pakistan

PLCP 401 - (3) (IR)
Theories of Comparative Politics

PLCP 424 - (3) (S)
Seminar: Topics in Comparative Politics

PLCP 525 - (3) (Y)
Politics of Economic Reform

PLCP 567 - (3) (IR)
Comparative Science and Technology Policy

PLIR 360 - (3) (Y)
Political Economy of Asia

PLIR 375 - (3) (IR)
South Asia in World Affairs

PLIR 595 - (3) (S)
Selected Problems in International Relations

RELB 210 - (3) (Y)
Buddhism

RELB 212 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Literature

RELB 245 - (3) (Y)
Zen

RELB 315 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Buddhist Studies

RELB 317 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Meditation

RELB 500, 501 - (4) (E)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan I & II

RELB 502 - (3) (O)
Tibetan Perspectives on Tantra

RELB 526 - (3) (E)
Seminar in Tibetan Buddhism II

RELB 535, 536 - (4) (E)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan III & IV

RELB 543, 544 - (3) (SI)
Sanskrit Religious Texts

RELB 546 - (3) (O)
Seminar in Mahayana Buddhism

RELB 547, 548 - (4) (O)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan V & VI

RELB 555 - (3) (E)
Buddhist Philosophy

RELB 560 - (3) (SI)
Elementary Pali

RELB 561 - (1-3) (IR)
Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit

RELB 566 - (3) (SI)
Approaches to Buddhist Studies

RELB 599 - (3) (SS)
South Asian and Inner Asian Buddhist Bibliography

RELG 104 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions

RELG 575 - (3) (SI)
Myth and Ritual

RELH 209 - (3) (Y)
Hinduism

RELH 211 - (3) (E)
Popular Hinduism

RELH 314 - (3) (O)
The Jain Tradition

RELH 371 - (3) (O)
Hindu Traditions of Devotion

RELH 374 - (3) (E)
Hinduism Through Its Narrative Literatures

RELH 553 - (3) (E)
Hindu Philosophical Systems

RELH 554 - (3) (O)
Hindu Ethics

RELH 589 - (3) (IR)
Vedic Hinduism

RELI 207 - (3) (Y)
Classical Islam

RELI 208 - (3) (Y)
Islam in the Modern Age

RELI 312 - (3) (O)
Sufism

SOC 338 - (3) (O)
India and South Asia


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