2003-2004
UNDERGRADUATE RECORD
College of Arts and Sciences
General Information  |  Academic Information  |  Departments and Programs  |  Faculty
Course Descriptions

Department of Chemistry

P.O. Box 400319
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4319
Phone: (434) 924-3344
Fax: (434) 924-3710
http://www.people.virginia.edu/~jnd/chem-maj.htm

Overview The Department of Chemistry offers outstanding physical facilities and a close-knit community of scholars'an environment which demonstrates that chemistry is far more than the study of matter and its interactions. Chemists contribute to such diverse fields as medicine, agriculture, oceanography, and archaeology. The University offers several chemistry programs, giving students the opportunity to define their individual educational and career goals.

Chemistry is divided into five areas of study: organic, inorganic, biological, physical, and analytical. The first-year courses include elements of all these areas. While organic chemistry is studied most intensely in the second year, inorganic and physical chemistry are the center of concentration in the third and fourth years. Advisors steer students toward specialized courses that correspond with their individual interests and aid them in choosing a specific program.

Faculty The twenty-seven members of the faculty include professors who are nationally and internationally recognized in their fields. The list of recent honors received by faculty members includes the American Chemical Society's Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry; a 1993 and 1998 Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award for excellence in both teaching and research; a 1992 and 1996 Virginia Scientist of the Year award; a 1994 Sloan Foundation Award; a 1997 Cavalier Distinguished Chair; a 1997 and 1999 Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize; an Analytical Chemistry Award in Chemical Instrumentation; a 1999 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers; and a 1999 Coblentz Award; Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award; American Chemical Society Thomson Metal, International Mass Spectrometry Society, Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award, 1999, 2000 Distinguished Service Award, Virginia Section American Chemical Society, 2001 John D. and Catherine T. McArthur Foundation Fellow Award, and a Lilly Analytical Chemistry Academic Contact Grant Award.

Teaching and research have been strengthened in recent years by a number of grants from government and private sources. These funds have permitted the acquisition of excellent instrumental facilities, and the establishment of an outstanding program in molecular research. The department has also made a major commitment to research in biological and biophysical chemistry. These programs, along with ongoing research in analytical methods, spectroscopy, and synthetic inorganic and organic chemistry, provide the student with a choice of strong research areas over a broad range of the chemical sciences. The faculty attracts approximately $8.5 million yearly in outside funding to support these programs, an indicator of the vigor of the research being carried out in the department.

Students Each year approximately 95 students graduate with a degree in chemistry, which makes the program one of the largest in the nation. Students have significant opportunities to conduct research and independent study projects with professors. Advanced students may receive money from research grants or enroll in graduate courses. The class size of chemistry courses varies widely. The introductory chemistry courses are quite large, but upper level courses are usually small, with no more than thirty students per class. All lab sections are small, in order to provide an intimate atmosphere.

Students who have graduated with a B.S. in Chemistry have been admitted to the best graduate schools in the country, while some have accepted positions in industrial or government labs. The number of graduates accepted to top medical schools (especially those who specialize in biological chemistry) has been extremely high, while some graduates' areas of expertise have prepared them for jobs in government agencies, laboratories, and chemical firms.

Special Resources Modern research is dependent on advanced instrumentation, and the department is exceedingly well endowed in this area. Eight mass spectrometers are currently housed in the Department. These include a general purpose gas chromatography/quadrupole instrument equipped for both electron impact and chemical ionization, two ion trap mass spectrometers, a tandem quadrupole Fourier transform instrument equipped for ionization by fast atom bombardment, a time-of-flight instrument for surface analysis, a matrix assisted, laser desorption/ time-of-flight instrument for determining the molecular mass of proteins and oligonucleotides, and two triple quadrupole instruments employed for protein sequence analysis at the low picomole level.

The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) facility includes two 7 T spectrometers, one 8.4 T spectrometer, and two 11.7 T spectrometers, which operate at 300, 360, and 500 MHz for proton resonances, respectively.

The Molecular Structure Laboratory has a Brucker SMART APEX CCD diffractometer with low temperature capacities currently available for structure determination. The molecular modeling facility of the laboratory hosts three SGI computers: Octane, Origin 2200 and Personal Iris 4D35, used for computational and quantum chemistry calculations for a variety of systems, including proteins and nucleic acids. The modeling software includes the Insight/Discover, Mccromodel, Spartan and Gaussian98 packages. The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Base is also available. Undergraduates are offered training on these facilities. In addition, the laboratory is very actively involved in undergraduate research.

Research in molecular spectroscopy is a major focus of a number of research groups and is supported by a variety instrumentation. Routine apparatus for ultraviolet (UV), visible, and infrared (IR) studies are available, as is CW laser Raman equipment. The departmental has six FTIR spectrometers, several having far IR and high resolution (0.25 cm-1) capabilities and two spectrofluorimeters. Specialized research in the area of molecular spectroscopy has resulted in the acquisition and in-house construction of instrumentation for circular dichroism (CD), magnetically induced CD (MCD), and circularly polarized luminescence spectroscopy. The department has two electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometers with variable temperature capabilities.

The Center for Atomic Molecular and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) Laser Facility within the department houses ultrafast Ti:sapphire, Nd:YAG, excimer, and ion lasers, as well as tunable dye lasers, optical parametric oscillators/amplifiers, and a color center laser. In addition, a unique laser laboratory is accessible at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Va. which is home to the world's most powerful free electron laser (FEL) - a 10 kWIR FEL. Lasers are employed to interrograte and to control matter of all kinds and are often used as initiators and probes of molecular kinetics and dynamics.

Requirements for Major

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry The normal program for a conventional B.A. in Chemistry includes: CHEM 141, 142, 141L, 142L (or CHEM 181, 182, 181L, 182L); CHEM 241, 242, 241L, 242L (or CHEM 281, 282, 281L, 282L); 341, 342; 371, 372, and one other three-credit chemistry elective at the 400-level or higher. A year of physics with laboratory and MATH 122 or 132 are required for the B.A. in Chemistry.

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry The chemistry department offers five programs leading to a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. There is the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, and the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with specialization in Biochemistry (highly recommended for students preparing to study medicine) that areprofessional degrees accredited by the American Chemical Society (ACS) and designed to prepare the student for a career in chemistry. In addition, the department offers the Chemical Physics, Environmental Chemistry, and Materials.

Candidates for degrees must complete, with a grade point average of at least 2.0, a minimum of 120 credits composed of required courses and approved electives.

Recommended ACS Certified B.S. in Chemistry(1)

First Year
CHEM 181 Chemical Structure 3
CHEM 181L Chem. Structure Lab 3
CHEM 182 Chemical Reactions I 3
CHEM 182L Chem. Reactions I Lab 3
ENWR 110 Composition 3
MATH 131 Calculus I 4
MATH 132 Calculus II 4
  Language(2) 8
  Approved electives(3) 0-3
   31-34
  
Second Year
CHEM 281 Chemical Reactions II 3
CHEM 281L Chemical Reactions II Lab 4
CHEM 282 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics 3
CHEM 282L Chem. Thermodynam. Lab 3
PHYS 231 Classical & Modern Phys. I 4
PHYS 232 Classical & Modern Phys. II 4
PHYS 201L Basic Physics Lab I(6)
PHYS 202L Basic Physics Lab II(6)
MATH 221 Calculus III or
MATH 225 or 325 Ordinary  Differential Equations. 4
  Language(2) 3
  Approved electives(3) 3
   34
  
Third Year
CHEM 341 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 342 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 371 Intermediate Chemical Experimentation 3
CHEM 372 Intermediate Chem. Exp. 3
CHEM 432 Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHEM 551 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 3
CHEM 391 Research Seminar 1
CHEM 392 Research Seminar 1
  Approved electives(3) 10-13
   30-33
  
Fourth Year(4)
CHEM ___ Elective (above 400) 3
CHEM 495 Research in Chemistry 3
CHEM 496 Research in Chemistry 3
  Approved electives(3) 21
   30

Specialization in Biochemistry The department offers an opportunity for students to obtain the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with a Specialization in Biochemistry. Candidates for the degree must complete, with a grade point average of at least 2.0, a minimum of 120 credits composed of required courses and approved electives.

Recommended ACS Certified B.S. in Chemistry with Specialization in Biochemistry(1)
First Year
CHEM 181 Chemical Structure 3
CHEM181L Chemical Structure Lab 3
CHEM 182 Chemical Reactions I 3
CHEM 182L Chemical Reactions I Lab 3
ENWR 110 Composition 3
MATH 121, 122 Applied Calculus I&II or
MATH 131, 132 Calculus I&II 8
  Language(5) 8
  Approved electives(3) 0-3
   31-34
  
Second Year
CHEM 281 Chemical Reactions II 3
CHEM 281L Chemical Reactions II Lab 4
CHEM 282 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics 3
CHEM 282L Chem. Thermodynam. Lab 3
  Language(5) 6
BIOL 201 Introduction to Biology 3
BIOL 202 Introduction to Biology 3
  Approved electives(3) 5
   30
  
Third Year
CHEM 441 Biological Chemistry I 3
CHEM 442 Biological Chemistry II 3
PHYS 201, 202 Principles of Phys. I & II or
PHYS 231, 232 Classical & Modern Phys. 8
PHYS 201L, 202L Basic Phys. Lab I & II(6) 3
  Approved electives(3) 13
   30
  
Fourth Year
CHEM 341 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 342 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 432 Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHEM 451 Biological Chemistry Lab I 3
CHEM 452 Biological Chemistry Lab II 3
  Approved electives(3) 15
   30

Specialization in Chemical Physics The department offers an opportunity for a student to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with a Specialization in Chemical Physics. Candidates for the degree must complete, with a grade point average of at least 2.0, a minimum of 120 credits of required courses and approved electives.

B.S. in Chemistry with Specialization in Chemical Physics(7)
First Year
CHEM 181 Chemical Structure 3
CHEM181L Chemical Structure Lab 3
CHEM 182 Chemical Reactions I 3
CHEM 182L Chemical Reactions I Lab 3
ENWR 110 Composition 3
MATH 131 Calculus I 4
MATH 132 Calculus II 4
  Language(5) 8
  Approved electives(3) 0-3
31-34
 
Second Year
CHEM 281 Chemical Reactions II 3
CHEM 281L Chemical Reactions II Lab 3
CHEM 282 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics 3
CHEM 282L Chem. Thermodynamics Lab 3
PHYS 231 Classical & Modern Phys. I 4
PHYS 232 Classical & Modern Phys. II 4
MATH 221 Calculus III or
MATH 225 or 325 Ordinary Differential Equations. 4
  Language(5) 6
30
 
Third Year
CHEM 341 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 342 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 371 Intermediate Techniques in Chemical Experimentation 3
CHEM 372 Intermediate Chem. Exper. 3
PHYS 201L Basic Physics Lab I
PHYS 202L Basic Physics Lab II(6)
PHYS___ Two approved PHYS elect. 6
  Approved electives(3) 9
30
 
Fourth Year
CHEM 521 Advanced Physical Chem. I 3
CHEM 522 Advanced Physical Chem. II 3
  Approved electives(3) 24
30

Specialization in Chemical Education The Specialization in Chemical Education is for students who intend to teach chemistry/science K-12; it is taken in conjunction with the Curry School's five-year Master of Teaching program, to which students must seek admission. This option is available only to students in the five-year Teachers Education Degree Program, and students must complete all requirements and comply with all regulations of the Curry School of Education as applicable to its Teachers Education Degree Program.

B.S. in Chemistry with Specialization in Chemical Education(1)
First Year
CHEM 181 Principles of Chemical Structure 3
CHEM 181L Principles of Chemical Structure Laboratory 3
CHEM 182 Principles of Chemical Reactions I 3
CHEM 182L Principles of Chemical Reactions I Laboratory 3
ENWR 110 Composition 3
MATH 121,122 Applied Calculus I, II or
MATH 131,132 Calculus I, II 8
  Language(5) 8
  Approved elective(3) 0-3
31-34
Second Year
CHEM 281 Principles of Chemical Reactions II 3
CHEM 281L Principles of Chemical Reactions II Laboratory 4
CHEM 282 Principles of Chemical Thermo and Kinetics 3
CHEM 282L Principles of Chemical Thermo and Kinetics Lab 3
Two of the following courses:
BIOL 201,BIOL 202,EVSC 280,EVSC 320,EVSC 340,EVSC 350 6
  Language(5) 6
  Approved electives(3) 5
   30
  
Third Year
Two of the following courses:
CHEM 441, CHEM 442, CHEM 432, CHEM 551 6
CHEM 371, 372 Intermediate Techniques in Chemical Experimentation or
CHEM 451,452 Biological Chemistry Lab. 6
PHYS 201,202 Principles of Physics I&II or
PHYS 231,232 Classical and Modern Physics 8
PHYS 201L, 202L Basic Physics Lab I & II 3
  Approved electives 13
   30
Fourth Year
CHEM 341, 342 Physical Chemistry 6
CHEM 371, 372 Intermediate Techniques Chem. Expt 6
  Science 6
  Approved electives 12
   30

Specialization in Environmental Chemistry The department offers an opportunity for a student to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with a Specialization in Environmental Chemistry. Candidates for the degree must complete, with a grade point average of at least 2.0, a minimum of 120 credits composed of required courses and approved electives.

Recommended B.S. in Chemistry with Specialization in Environmental Chemistry
First Year
CHEM 181 Chemical Structure 3
CHEM 181L Chemical Structure Lab 3
CHEM 182 Chemical Reactions I 3
CHEM 182L Chemical Reactions I Lab 3
ENWR 110 Composition 3
MATH 121 Applied Calculus I or
MATH 131 Calculus I 4
MATH 122 Applied Calculus II or
MATH 132 Calculus II 4
  Language(5) 8
  Approved electives(3) 0-3
   31-34
  
Second Year
CHEM 281 Chemical Reactions II 3
CHEM 281L Chemical Reactions II Lab 4
CHEM 282 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics 3
CHEM 282L Chem. Thermodynam. Lab 3
  Language(5) 6
EVSC _____ Two core courses and labs(8) 8
  Approved electives(3) 5
   32
  
Third Year
CHEM 551 Instrumental Analysis or
EVSC 485L Coastal Processes Lab(9) 3
CHEM 341 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 342 Physical Chemistry 3
PHYS 201, 202 Principles of Phys. I & II or
PHYS 231, 232 Classical & Modern Phys. 8
PHYS 201L Basic Physics Lab I
PHYS 202L Basic Physics Lab II
  Approved electives(3) 12
   32
  
Fourth Year
CHEM 432 Inorganic Chemistry 3
  Two Approved upper-level CHEM or EVSC electives(9) 6
  Approved electives(3) 21
   30

Specialization in Materials  The department offers an opportunity for a student to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with a Specialization in Materials. Candidates for the degree must complete, with a grade point average of at least 2.0, a minimum of 120 credits composed of required courses and approved electives.


Recommended B.S. in Chemistry with Specialization in Materials
First Year
CHEM 181 Chemical Structure 3
CHEM 181L Chemical Structure Lab 3
CHEM 182 Chemical Reactions I 3
CHEM 182L Chemical Reactions I Lab 3
ENWR 110 Composition 3
MATH 131 Calculus I 4
MATH 132 Calculus II 4
MSE 102 Intro to Science Materials 3
  Language(5) 8
   34
  
Second Year
CHEM 281 Chemical Reactions II 3
CHEM 281L Chemical Reactions II Lab 4
CHEM 282 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics 3
CHEM 282L Chem. Thermodynam. Lab 3
PHYS 231 Classical and Modern Physics I 4
PHYS 232 Classical and Mod. Phys. II 4
PHYS 201L Basic Physics Lab I(6)
PHYS 202L Basic Physics Lab II
MATH 221 Calculus III or
MATH 225 Ordinary Differential Eq. 4
  Language(5) 6
   34
  
Third Year
CHEM 341 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 342 Physical Chemistry 3
CHEM 371 Intermediate Techniques in Chemistry Experiments 3
CHEM 551 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 3
MSE 301, 301L Corrosion and Lab 4
MSE 305 Phase Diagrams and Kinetics of Materials 3
  Approved electives(3) 11
   30
  
Fourth Year
CHEM 432 Inorganic Chemistry 3
MSE ____ or
CHEM ____ Elective(10) 3
  Approved electives(3) 24
   30

(1) This table shows the normal sequence of required courses. Students who have taken CHEM 141, 142, 141L, 142L and wish to obtain the B.S. should complete CHEM 222. CHEM 222 may not be taken for credit by students who complete CHEM 181, 282, 181L, 282L. It is possible to major in chemistry after taking PHYS 201, 202 rather than PHYS 231, 232. Candidates not following the normal course sequence should consult an advisor as early as possible.
(2) Students are required to complete the equivalent of Language 201. German or Russian are recommended but not required. If this requirement is satisfied in less than three semesters, the student may elect other language courses or a different subject.
(3) Approved electives are chosen by the candidate in conference with an advisor; they must include courses that meet other College requirements.
(4) The fourth-year program is adaptable to individual student interests in that there are no specific required courses. Students may choose from any 400 or greater level course in physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, or biological chemistry.
(5) Students are required to complete the equivalent of Language 202. German or Russian are recommended but not required. If this requirement is satisfied in less than four semesters, the student may elect other language courses or a different subject.
(6) PHYS 221, 222 taken after PHYS 231, 232 is an acceptable alternative.
(7) This table shows the normal sequence of required courses. Students who have taken CHEM 141, 142, 141L, 142L and wish to obtain the B.S. should complete CHEM 222. CHEM 222 may not be offered for credit by students who complete CHEM 181, 282, 181L, 282L. Students may also complete the physics requirement by taking the PHYS 151, 152, 251, 252 sequence. Candidates not following the normal sequence should consult an advisor as early as possible.
(8) Student must take at least two EVSC core courses and labs. These include EVSC 280/280L, 320/320L, 340/340L, and 350/350L.
(9) Two additional courses at 400-level CHEM or above, or approved upper-level EVSC courses (300 to 500 level). Examples include EVSC 386, 427, 480, 493, or additional EVSC core courses. By taking EVSC 485 and two upper-level EVSC courses as electives, a student qualifies for a minor in environmental sciences.
(10) Students are required to take one 400-level elective in CHEM or an approved elective in material science (e.g., MSE 301, MSE 304, ENGR 497).

Distinguished Majors Program Students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.4 or higher after five semesters may apply for the Distinguished Majors Program (DMP). Applications and inquiries must be made to the Undergraduate Programs Committee prior to the beginning of the seventh semester. The DMP consists of specified course requirements within the B.A. or B.S. programs and two semesters (six credits) of study or research under the supervision of a faculty member. The results of the research will be submitted in written form and presented to a faculty committee. Additional information can be obtained from the Undergraduate Programs Committee of the Department of Chemistry.

Requirements for Minor A minor in chemistry requires the satisfactory completion of CHEM 141, 142, 141L, 142L, 241, 242, 241L, 242L or CHEM 181, 182, 181L, 182L, 281, 282, 281L, 282L; CHEM 341 and one other chemistry course at the 300-level or higher (except chemistry research courses). CHEM 222 may be presented as the elective course if CHEM 142 is included in the program.

Students who receive advanced standing credit for CHEM 141, 142 and who take CHEM 181, 282 may count both CHEM 141, 142 and CHEM 181, 282 toward the degree.

Students are responsible for breakage charges.

Additional Information For more information, contact the head of Undergraduate Advising, Department of Chemistry, Chemistry Building, Charlottesville, VA 22903; (434) 924-3344; www.virginia.edu/chem/ (Undergraduate Information).




Course Descriptions

TOP

CHEM 121 - (3) (Y)
Concepts of Chemistry

Studies the unifying ideas of the structure of matter and energy, including topics such as the ozone layer and radioactivity, and the nature of scientific investigation. Primarily for non-science majors. Three class hours; no laboratory.

CHEM 122 - (3) (Y)
Contemporary Chemistry

By examining what science teaches us about relevant topics such as energy, synthetics, and food, the student develops a sense of the tone, vocabulary, and demarcation of scientific discourse. Independent of, and complementary to, CHEM 121. Primarily for non-science majors. Three class hours; no laboratory.

CHEM 141, 142 - (3) (Y)
Introductory College Chemistry

Corequisite: CHEM 141L, 142L or CHEM 181L, 182L.
Introduces the principles and applications of chemistry. Topics include stoichiometry, chemical equations and reactions, chemical bonding, states of matter, thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. For students planning to elect further courses in chemistry, physics, and biology. Three class hours.

CHEM 141L, 142L - (2) (Y)
Introductory College Chemistry

Laboratory Corequisite: CHEM 141, 142, or CHEM 181, 182.
Surveys the practice of chemistry as an experimental science, the development of skills in laboratory manipulation, and laboratory safety. Topics include observation, measurement and data analysis, separation and purification techniques, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three and one-half laboratory hours, and an optional one-hour laboratory lecture.

CHEM 151, 152 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

Corequisite: CHEM 141L, 142L, CHEM 151L, 152L, or CHEM 181L, 182L.
The principles and applications of chemistry are tailored to engineering students. Topics include stoichiometry, chemical equations and reactions, chemical bonding, states of matter, thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. For engineering students, but may be used as a prerequisite for further courses in chemistry. Three class hours.

CHEM 151L, 152L - (1) (Y)
Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

Laboratory Corequisite: CHEM 151, 152.
Surveys the practice of chemistry as an experimental science, the development of skills in laboratory manipulation, and laboratory safety. Topics include observation, measurement and data analysis, separation and purification techniques, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three and one-half laboratory hours. Meets every other week.

CHEM 170, 171 - (1-3) (Y)
Liberal Arts Seminar

Seminar assigned primarily for first and second-year students taught on a voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary.

CHEM 181 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Structure

Prerequisite: A strong background in high school chemistry.
First of a four-semester sequence covering the basic concepts of general and organic chemistry (the 180/280 sequence is comparable to the 140/240 sequence but is more rigorous). Establishes a foundation of fundamental particles and the nature of the atom, develops a rationale for molecular structure, and explores the basis of chemical reactivity. Topics include introductory quantum mechanics, atomic structure, chemical bonding, spectroscopy, and elementary molecular reactivity.

CHEM 181L - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Structure

Laboratory Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 181.
Accompanies CHEM 181. Four laboratory hours plus weekly lecture.

CHEM 182 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Reactions I

Prerequisite: CHEM 181.
Seeks to understand elementary reaction types as a function of chemical structure by emphasizing organic compounds. Topics include acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, oxidation-reduction, electrophilic addition, elimination, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, aromaticity, and molecular spectroscopy.

CHEM 182L - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Reactions I

Laboratory Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 182. Accompanies CHEM 182. Four laboratory hours plus weekly lecture.

CHEM 191 - (3) (IR)
Archaeological Chemistry

Prerequisite: High school chemistry or physics.
Studies the methods for the discovery, scientific characterization, and preservation of archaeological artifacts; intended for students of archaeology, anthropology, art history, and other disciplines dealing with ancient civilizations.

CHEM 210 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Survey of Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 121, 122 or CHEM 141, 142, or CHEM 181, 182.
Surveys organic chemistry and acquaints the student with the scope of carbon chemistry, its basic principles, and some of its applications. Not intended for chemistry majors; not a suitable organic chemistry course for pre-medical students. (Three hours lecture, no laboratory).

CHEM 212 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: One semester of general chemistry; corequisite: CHEM 212L.
Introduces the nomenclature, structure, reactivity, and applications of organic compounds, including those which are of importance in the chemical industry. Three lecture hours.

CHEM 212L - (1) (Y)
Introduction to Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Corequisite: CHEM 212.
Six-to-seven four-hour laboratory sessions and an equal number of one-hour laboratory lectures to accompany CHEM 212.

CHEM 222 - (4) (Y)
Solution Chemistry

Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 141, 142 or 181, 182 and 141L with an A grade in 141.
Application of the principles of chemical equilibrium to solutions. The laboratory applies classical and instrumental methods to systems involving solubility, ionization, complexion formation, and oxidation-reduction equilibria. Two class hours, four laboratory hours. No credit may be received for CHEM 222 if CHEM 181L and 282Lhave been taken.

CHEM 241, 242 - (3) (Y)
Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 141, 142 or equivalent. CHEM 281 or 241 is a prerequisite for CHEM 242; corequisites: CHEM 241L, 242L, or 281L, 282L.
Surveys the compounds of carbon in relation to their structure, identification, synthesis, natural occurrence, and mechanisms of reactions. Three class hours; optional discussions.

CHEM 241L, 242L - (3) (Y)
Organic Chemistry

Laboratory Corequisite: CHEM 281, 282 or CHEM 241, 242.
Focuses on the development of skills in methods of preparation, purification and identification of organic compounds. One discussion hour; four laboratory hours.

CHEM 281 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Reactions II

Prerequisite: CHEM 182.
Continued exploration of organic reactions and structures initiated in CHEM 182. Includes electrophilic aromatic substitution, nucleophilic aromatic substitution, nucleophilic addition, nucleophilic acyl substitution, organometallic compounds, carbohydrates, lipids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids.

CHEM 281L - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Reactions II

Laboratory Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 281. Accompanies CHEM 281.
Six laboratory hours plus weekly lecture.

CHEM 282 - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Prerequisite: CHEM 281 and MATH 122 or 132; corequisite: PHYS 202 or 232.
Focuses on the macroscopic properties of chemical systems. Topics include states of matter, physical equilibria, chemical equilibria, thermodynamic relationships, kinetic theory, and electrochemistry.

CHEM 282L - (3) (Y)
Principles of Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Laboratory Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 282. Accompanies CHEM 282.
Four laboratory hours plus weekly lecture.

CHEM 341, 342 - (3) (Y)
Physical Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 141, 142 or CHEM 181, 182, MATH 122 or 132, and PHYS 201, 202 or PHYS231, 232.
Introduces physical chemistry with numerous biological applications. CHEM 341: properties of gases, liquids, and solids; thermodynamics; chemical and biochemical equilibrium; solutions; electrochemistry; and structure and stability of biological macromolecules. CHEM 342: chemical kinetics; introductory quantum theory; chemical bonding; spectroscopy and molecular structure; biochemical transport; and statistical mechanics.

CHEM 351, 352 - (1) (Y)
Research Seminar in Biological Chemistry

Students and faculty discuss current topics of interest in biological chemistry. Intended for students who are participants in the undergraduate research program. Credit/no credit basis.

CHEM 351 - (3) (Y)
Physical Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 151, 152, PHYS 241E, and APMA 205, 206.
Introduces physical chemistry designated specifically for undergraduate chemical engineers. Survey of the basic principles of equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, quantum mechanics of atoms and molecules, molecular spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and reaction dynamics. Emphasizes the fundamental theories, models, and laws used in describing, representing, and explaining physical processes and properties characteristic of chemical systems.

CHEM 362 - (3) (Y)
Physical Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 341 or CHEM 361. The second semester of physical chemistry for B.S. majors. Topics include quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, molecular spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and kinetics.

CHEM 371, 372 - (3) (Y)
Intermediate Techniques in Chemical Experimentation

Prerequisite: CHEM 141, 142 or equivalent; corequisite: CHEM 341, 342.
Execution of laboratory experiments that illustrate important laws and demonstrate quantitative methods of measuring the chemical and physical properties of matter. Four laboratory hours, one class hour.

CHEM 391, 392 - (1) (Y)
Introductory Research Seminar

Introduces research approaches and tools in chemistry including examples of formulation of approaches, literature searches, research methods, and reporting of results. Oral presentations by students, faculty, and visiting lecturers.

CHEM 393, 394 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Covers specialized topics in chemistry not normally covered in formal lecture or laboratory courses. Under the direction of the faculty.

CHEM 395, 396 - (1-3) (Y)
Introduction to Research

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces the methods of research in chemistry that include use of the research literature and instruction in basic experimental and theoretical procedures and techniques. Under the direct supervision of faculty.

CHEM 432 - (3) (Y)
Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 341, 342.
Unified treatment of the chemistry of the important classes of inorganic compounds and their reactions, with emphasis on underlying principles of molecular structure, symmetry, and bonding theory, including molecular orbital descriptions and reactivity. Three class hours.

CHEM 441 - (3) (Y)
Biological Chemistry I

Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry.
Introduces the components of biological macromolecules and the principles behind their observed structures. Examines the means by which enzymes catalyze transformations of other molecules, emphasizing the chemical principles involved. Topics include a description of the key metabolic cycles and pathways, the enzymes which catalyze these reactions, and the ways in which these pathways are regulated. Three class hours.

CHEM 442 - (3) (Y)
Biological Chemistry II

Prerequisite: CHEM 441 or instructor permission.
Covers three main areas: structure and function of biological membranes; complex biochemical systems and processes, including photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, vision, neurotransmission, hormonal regulation, muscle contraction, and microtubules; and molecular biology, including DNA and RNA metabolism, protein synthesis, regulation of gene expression, and recombinant DNA methodology. Three class hours.

CHEM 451 - (3) (Y)
Biological Chemistry Laboratory I

Prerequisite: CHEM 182L or CHEM 222. Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 441 or instructor permission.
Studies the isolation and purification of biological materials. Topics include the chemical properties of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids; and the chemical and physical methods used in the characterization and quantitative determination of proteins. One class hour, four laboratory hours.

CHEM 452 - (3) (Y)
Biological Chemistry Laboratory II

Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 442 and 451.
Analyzes the physical methods used in studying macromolecules. Experiments include spectroscopic, hydrodynamic, and kinetic methods. Topics include enzyme kinetics and the statistical analysis of data. One class hour, four laboratory hours.

CHEM 491, 492 - (1) (Y)
Undergraduate Research Seminar

Corequisite: CHEM 495, 496.
Discussion of research approaches, methods and results for students registered in CHEM 495, 496. Oral presentations by students, faculty and visiting lecturers.

CHEM 495, 496 - (3) (Y)
Supervised and Original Research in Chemistry

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Original research involving experimental or theoretical chemistry carried out under the direct supervision of faculty. A minimum of nine hours per week, including conferences with research supervisor.

CHEM 511 - (3) (Y)
Organic Chemistry III

Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry.
One year of physical chemistry is recommended. Systematic review and extension of the facts and theory of organic chemistry; including the mechanism of reactions, structure and stereochemistry. Three class hours.

CHEM 516 - (3) (Y)
Organic Chemistry of Selected Biological Compounds

Prerequisite: CHEM 241, 242 or 281, 282.
Traces the biosynthesis of naturally occurring substances from their photosynthetic beginnings to their eventual end as complex natural products. Topics include the major metabolic pathways, important enzyme systems, fatty acids, prostaglandins, terpenes, steroids, vitamins, hormones, alkaloids, pheromones, neuro-transmitters, drug development, vision and brain chemistry, insect-plant-herbivore interactions, and the basis of various human illnesses such as inborn errors of metabolism.

CHEM 521 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Physical Chemistry I

Prerequisite: CHEM 341, 342.
Studies introductory quantum mechanics. Topics include the application of group theory to molecular orbital theory; and rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra. Three class hours.

CHEM 522 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Physical Chemistry II

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Studies the laws of thermodynamics and extra-thermodynamic principles; statistical mechanics; theory of reaction rates; and the interpretation of experimental kinetic data. Three class hours.

CHEM 535 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I

Prerequisite: CHEM 432 or instructor permission.
Introduces the electronic structure of atoms and simple molecules, including basic concepts and applications of symmetry and group theory. The chemistry of the main group elements is described using energetics, structure, and reaction pathways to provide a theoretical background. Emphasizes applying these concepts to predicting the stability and developing synthetic routes to individual compounds or classes.

CHEM 536 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II

Prerequisite: CHEM 432 or instructor permission.
Introduces the electronic structure of compounds of the transition metals using ligan field theory and molecular orbital theory. Describes the chemistry of coordination and organometallic compounds, emphasizing structure, reactivity, and synthesis. Examines applications to transformations in organic chemistry and to catalysis.

CHEM 551 - (3) (Y)
Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Corequisite: CHEM 341 or CHEM 361 or instructor permission.
Study of the utilization of modern analytical instrumentation for chemical analysis. Includes emission and mass spectrometry, ultraviolet, visible, and infrared absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption, electrical methods of analysis, chromatography, neutron activation analysis, and X-ray methods. Three class hours.


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