2003-2004
UNDERGRADUATE RECORD
College of Arts and Sciences
General Information  |  Academic Information  |  Departments and Programs  |  Faculty
Italian Course Descriptions  |  Portuguese Course Descriptions  |  Spanish Course Descriptions

Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese Languages and Literatures

P.O. Box 400777
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4777
Phone: (434) 924-7159 Fax: (434) 924-7160
www.virginia.edu/~spitpo

Italian

Overview  The University of Virginia is recognized as a leading national center for the study of languages and literature. Thomas Jefferson, in his original plan for the University, established a School of Modern Languages for the study of the language, literature, and culture of each five areas: Anglo-Saxon, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. It should come as no surprise that Italian has been taught at the University without interruption since its founding. Students studying in Italian can choose to concentrate on language and linguistics or literature and culture, or some combination of the two. Through systematic analysis, students learn the way language works as well as a means of promoting the successful exchange between people, businesses, and governments.

Faculty  The faculty of the Italian department has a wide range of interests as well as a desire to work closely with students. Since the number of students actually majoring in Italian is relatively small, advanced classes are small, and there is a close-knit environment in which to learn. The current faculty includes Deborah Parker, Cristina Della Coletta, Adrienne Ward, and Enrico Cesaretti.

Students  Enrollment in Italian classes has increased threefold during the past five years to reach the current number of 300 per academic term. Many of the students who major in Italian are double majors; combinations include Italian and classics, Spanish, English, government/foreign affairs, art history, and music.

Students who concentrate on Italian studies have many options leading to vocational  choices: teaching in secondary schools; applying for a great variety of vocational positions; continuing studies in professional schools or graduate programs; translating texts; or working in film or media relations.

Numerous Italian graduates find employment in school systems. The teaching of Italian in high schools has vastly increased over the past decade. The trend is likely to continue, considering the recent upward turn in college enrollments in Italian. College employment prospects for the specialist in Italian language and literature are outstanding. A majority of Italian majors find employment outside the field of education. Prospective employers include the federal government, international businesses, multinational corporations, press agencies, and the World Bank.

Special Resources

Tavola Italiana  The Tavola Italiana is a weekly informal get-together of students and faculty for conversation and conviviality.

Circolo Italiano  This student-run club has organized film showings, field trips to museum exhibitions in Washington, and volunteer tutoring.

Study Abroad  While the department does not sponsor a program of study in Italy, many students spend at least part of their junior year abroad. The faculty aid in the choice of a program and arrange for the transfer of credit.

Requirements for Minor in Italian  18 credits, exclusive of ITAL 101-202, and including: one ITTR course from the range 226-263; ITAL 301 and 302; ITAL 311 and 312; and one 300- or 400-level course. Substitutions: by agreement with the Italian undergraduate advisor. (change to be effective Fall 2001)

Requirements for Major in Italian  Prerequisite for enrolling in the Program: ITAL 202 or equivalent. Course requirements for the B.A. degree in Italian language and literature: 27 credits (beyond ITAL 202), including: ITAL 301, 302, 311 and 312; one ITTR course from the range 226-263; two ITAL 300-level courses (one of which may be substituted with ARTH 231 or HIEU 321), and two ITAL 400-level courses. Substitutions by agreement with the Italian undergraduate advisor. (change to be effective Fall 2001)

Distinguished Major in Italian  Prerequisites and curricular requirements are the same as for the major. In addition, students must have, at graduation, a GPA of 3.5 in all major courses, and must take 3 credits (thus reaching a total of 30) in connection with the senior thesis, to be written in Italian, of a length and nature accepted by the sponsor (selected by the student), and evaluated by a committee of three faculty.

Distinctions  The Italian program recognizes outstanding students of Italian through its chapter of Gamma Kappa Alpha, the National Italian Honor Society. Each spring (in April), the program awards the Lola Pelliccia Prize, the Sonia Kaiziss Prize, and the Guiliano Prize.

Additional Information  For more information, contact Christina della Coletta, Associate Professor of Italian, 115 Wilson Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22903; (434) 924-7159;  www.virginia.edu/~spitpo.



Italian Course Descriptions

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Note  ITTR courses are given in English and may not be taken to fulfill the language requirement in Italian.

ITTR 215 - (3) (E)
Italian Phonetics

ITTR 216 - (3) (O)
History of the Italian Language

ITTR 226 - (3) (Y)
Dante in Translation
Close reading of Dante's masterpiece, the Inferno. Lectures focus on Dante's social, political, and cultural world. Incorporates The World of Dante: A Hypermedia Archive for the Study of the Inferno, and a pedagogical and research website (http: //www.iath. virginia/dante/), that offers a wide range of visual material related to the Inferno.

ITTR 227 - (3) (IR)
Petrarch in Translation

ITTR 228 - (3) (E)
Boccaccio in Translation

ITTR 230 - (3) (E)
Machiavelli in Translation

ITTR 231 - (3) (IR)
Ariosto in Translation

ITTR 236 - (3) (IR)
Tasso in Translation

ITTR 242 - (3) (IR)
Goldoni and Alfieri in Translation

ITTR 252 - (3) (IR)
Foscolo and Leopardi in Translation

ITTR 255 - (3) (E)
Manzoni in Translation

ITTR 258 - (3) (IR)
Verga in Translation

ITTR 262 - (3) (SI)
The Modern Italian Novel in Translation

ITTR 525 - (3) (SI)
Dante's Purgatory in Translation
Prerequisite: ITTR 226 or permission of instructor.
A close reading of Dante's Purgatory in translation. This course explores canto by canto Dante's second realm of the Afterlife. Particular attention will be paid to how various themes and motifs (the phenomenology of love, the relationship between church and state, status of classical antiquity in a Christian universe, Dante's representation of the saved), differ from those explored in the Inferno. Note  ITAL courses are given in Italian.

ITAL 101 - (4) (S)
Elementary Conversation
Introduction to speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Italian. Five class hours and one language laboratory hour. Followed by ITAL 102.

ITAL 102 - (4) (S)
Intermediate Conversation
Continuation of ITAL 101.

ITAL 201, 202 - (3) (S)
Intermediate Conversation
Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or the equivalent. Continued grammar, conversation, composition, readings, and an introduction to Italian literature. In Italian, the sequence satisfying the language requirement is: ITAL 101, 102, 201, 202. Advanced standing is determined by an interview with the Italian undergraduate advisor. Note  The following courses have the prerequisite ITAL 201, 202 or permission of the department.

ITAL 263 - (3) (Y)
Italian History and Culture Through Film: 1860's - 1960's
This course uses the medium of film to discuss the developments in Italian culture and history over a period of one hundred years, from 1860 to 1960.

ITAL 301 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Conversation and Composition I
Prerequisite: ITAL 202. Includes idiomatic Italian conversation and composition, anthological readings of literary texts in Italian, plus a variety of oral exercises including presentations, skits, and debates. Italian composition is emphasized through writing assignments and selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax.

ITAL 302 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Conversation and Composition II
Topics include idiomatic Italian conversation and composition, anthological readings and discussions in Italian of literary texts from the past four centuries of Italian literature (from Tasso to the present), selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax, the elements of essay writing to Italian.

ITAL 311 - (3) (S)
Renaissance Literature
Prerequisite: ITAL 202 or equivalent.
Study of selected masterpieces from the 13th to the 16th century. Readings and discussions in Italian. Exercises in essay writing.

ITAL 312 - (3) (S)
Contemporary Literature
Prerequisite: ITAL 202 or equivalent.
Study of selected masterpieces from the modern period of Italian literature. Readings and discussions in Italian. Exercises in essay writing.

ITAL 370 - (3) (SI)
Lirica (Italian Lyric Poetry)

ITAL 371 - (3) (SI)
Epica (Italian Epic Poetry)

ITAL 372 - (3) (SI)
Novella (Italian Short Narrative)

ITAL 373 - (3) (E)
Romanzo (Italian Novel)
Surveys the major developments in Italian fiction during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Introduces textual analysis and critical interpretation of literary texts.

ITAL 374 - (3) (E)
Teatro (Italian Theater)
Studies the major dramatic works from the Renaissance to the present, including productions by Niccolo Machiavelli, Carlo Goldoni, Luigi Pirandello, and Dario Fo.

ITAL 375 - (3) (SI)
Critica (Italian Literary Criticism)

ITAL 376 - (3) (SI)
Italian Travel Literature
Prerequisites: Italian language course 101 through 202, or demonstrated Italian language proficiency per consent of instructor.
Study of major Italian travel writers from medieval to modern times, within a discussion of the definition and history of the literary genre, and the critical perspectives relating to it. In Italian.

ITAL 400 - (3) (E)
Methodologia (Stylistics and Methods)

ITAL 410 - (3) (E)
Medioevo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Middle Ages)

ITAL 420 - (3) (SI)
Umanesimo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Humanistic Period)

ITAL 430 - (3) (SI)
Rinascimento (Italian Culture and Literature During the Renaissance)

ITAL 440 - (3) (SI)
Barocco (Italian Culture and Literature During the Baroque Age)

ITAL 445 - (3) (SI)
Illuminismo (Italian Culture and Literature During the Enlightenment)

ITAL 450 - (3) (O)
Romanticismo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Age of Romanticism)

ITAL 460 - (3) (SI)
Novecentismo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Twentieth Century)

ITAL 461 - (3) (SI)
Italian Pop Culture: 1960's - 1990's
Prerequisites: Students who have completed ITAL 202. Other students admitted with instructor permission. An interdisciplinary approach to the last thirty years of Italian cultural history, from a theoretical and practical perspective. In Italian.

ITAL 499 - (1-3) (S)
Independent Study


Portugese

Requirements for Minor in Portuguese  The Portuguese minor consists of eighteen credits beyond PORT 212.


Portuguese Course Descriptions

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POTR 427 - (3) (Y)
The Civilization of Brazil

Introduces the development of Brazilian culture from 1500 to the present. This course is taught in English and does not fulfill the language requirement. Note  PORT courses are given in Portuguese.

PORT 111 - (4) (Y-SS)
Beginning Intensive Portuguese

Prerequisite: Some previous knowledge of Portuguese or a working knowledge of another modern foreign language. Introduces speaking, understanding, reading and writing Portuguese, especially as used in Brazil. Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by PORT 212.

PORT 212 - (4) (Y-SS)
Intermediate Intensive Portuguese

Prerequisite: PORT 111 or equivalent. Continued study of Portuguese through readings, vocabulary exercises, oral and written compositions, and grammar review.

PORT 301 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Grammar, Conversation and Composition

Prerequisite: PORT 212 or by permission. Studies advanced grammar through analysis of texts; includes extensive practice in composition and topical conversation.

PORT 402 - (3) (E)
Readings in Literature in Portuguese

Prerequisite: PORT 212 or by permission. Studies readings from the chief periods of Brazilian and Portuguese literature.

PORT 441 - (3) (IR)
Brazilian Literature

Studies leading figures and movements from Colonial times to 1900.

PORT 442 - (3) (IR)
Brazilian Literature

Studies leading figures and movements from 1900 to present.

PORT 461, 462 - (3) (SI)
Studies in Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature

Prerequisite: One course at the 300 level or higher, or instructor permission. Studies topics in Portuguese or Brazilian literature or in Portuguese linguistics according to the interests and preparation of the students.


Spanish

Overview  In 1787 Thomas Jefferson wrote: "Spanish. Bestow great attention on this and endeavor to acquire an accurate knowledge of it. Our future connection with Spain and Spanish American will render that language a valuable acquisition." Jefferson's words have never rung more true than they do in today's shrinking world. The major in Spanish is designed to develop a student's proficiency in the language while assuring that he or she receives a strong background in linguistics, literature, culture or a combination of these areas. All courses are taught in Spanish.

Faculty  Spanish majors have access to a nationally-ranked group of faculty members whose expertise ranges across a wide range of areas: peninsular literature from the medieval to the modern periods; Latin American literature from Colonial times to the present; Portuguese and Brazilian literature; Spanish cinema; Hispanic women's writing; Spanish and Latin-American culture; and Hispanic linguistics. In addition to these specialists, the department regularly invites a distinguished visiting professor or Hispanic author for a semester (recent visitors have included Isabel Allende, Mempo Giardinelli, Rosa Montero, Lou Charnon-Deutsch, Randolph Pope, Andrew Anderson, Antonio Munoz Molina, and Antonio Cisneros. Students  There are currently more than 150 students majoring in Spanish. More than half of these are double majors. The most popular combinations with the Spanish major include Latin American studies, Politics, or other languages such as French or Italian. Many Spanish majors go on to graduate or professional school to become lawyers, doctors and educators. Others go directly into the working world, finding their Spanish major useful for careers in business, the government, and international agencies.

Prerequisites for Majoring in Spanish  In order to major in Spanish, a student must have completed SPAN 202, or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better. Native speakers of Spanish are encouraged to consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies before taking any Spanish courses in order to determine how best to proceed.

Requirements for the Major in Spanish  A Spanish major consists of thirty graded credits taken above the 301 level. At the moment of declaring a Spanish major, the student is required to choose one of the three tracks described below- the general track, the literature and culture track, and the linguistics and philology track - to give structure to his or her Spanish studies. All three tracks require the student to complete certain core courses meant to provide basic skills and knowledge: SPAN 311 Grammar Review; SPAN 330 Literary Analysis, and a survey of literature (SPAN 340-43). A grade of C or better is required in all subsequent courses. Native speakers of Spanish may not enroll in conversation courses. Students are strongly encouraged to fulfill part of the requirement for their major in the department's study abroad program in Valencia, Spain (see below), but they are welcome to substitute other programs in consultation with their advisor.

General Spanish Major

  1. SPAN 311, Grammar Review
  2. SPAN 330, Literary Analysis
  3. One survey of Spanish literature
    A. EITHER SPAN 340, Survey of Spanish Literature I: Medieval to 1700
    B. OR SPAN 341, Survey of Spanish Literature II: 1700 to present
  4. One survey of Latin American literature:
    A. EITHER SPAN 342, Survey of Latin American Literature I: Colonial to 1900
    B. OR SPAN 343, Survey of Latin American Literature II: 1900 to presen
  5. One Culture and Civilization course from following options:
    A. SPAN 423, 1492 and the Aftermath
    B. SPAN 425, The Inquisition in Spain and Latin America
    C. SPAN 426, Spanish-Arabic Civilization
    D. SPAN 427, Spanish Culture and Civilization
    E. SPAN 428, Latin American Culture and Civilization
  6. Two language courses with a number higher than 300
  7. Three courses at the 400 level or above in either language, literature, or culture and civilization

Major in Literature and Culture

  • A. SPAN 311, Grammar Review
  • B. SPAN 330, Literary Analysis
  • C. One survey of Spanish literature:
    • EITHER SPAN 340, Survey of Spanish Literature I: Medieval to 1700
    • OR SPAN 341, Survey of Spanish Literature II: 1700 to present
  • D. One Survey of Latin American literature:
    • EITHER SPAN 342, Survey of Latin American Literature I: Colonial to 1900
    • OR SPAN 343, Survey of Latin American Literature II: 1900 to present
  • E. One Culture and Civilization Course from the following options:
    • SPAN 423, 1492 and the Aftermath
    • SPAN 425, The Inquistion in Spain and Latin America
    • SPAN 426, Spanish-Arabic Civilization
    • SPAN 427, Spanish Culture and Civilization
    • SPAN 428, Latin American Culture and Civilization
  • F. Five literature and culture courses from SPAN 423 or above

Major in Spanish Linguistics and Philosophy

  1. SPAN 309, Introduction to Spanish Linguistics
  2. SPAN 310, Phonetics
  3. SPAN 311, Grammar Review
  4. SPAN 330, Literary Analysis
  5. SPAN 340, Survey of Spanish Literature I: Medieval to 1700
  6. SPAN 411, Advanced Conversation and Grammar
  7. SPAN 420, History of the Spanish Language
  8. SPAN 421, Spanish Philology
  9. SPAN 431, Sociolinguistics
  10. One seminar (SPAN 492, SPAN 493), whose topics can include
    • Peninsular Spanish Dialectology
    • Latin American Spanish Dialectology
    • Spanish in the United States • Modern Spanish Syntax
    • Sociolinguistics II
    • Comparative Oral Discourse
    • Contrastive Analysis
    • Second Language Acquisition
    • External History of Spanish
    • Semantic Change
    • Problems in Historical Phonology
    • Problems in Historical Morphology
    • Problems in Historical Syntax
    • Problems in Spanish Etymology

Study Abroad  A study abroad program in Valencia, Spain is available through the Spanish department and participation is strongly encouraged. Students may spend a summer term, a semester, or an entire year with a Spanish family, becoming totally immersed in the language and culture. The department also grants credit for foreign study done through programs sponsored by other institutions. Students may apply up to 12 study-abroad credits from a semester abroad, or 15 credits from a year abroad, toward their Spanish major. Up to 9 credits may be applied toward the Spanish minor.

Independent Study  Independent study with a faculty advisor is available to advanced students who wish to pursue specific areas in depth that are not included in the regular curriculum. All of these courses are taught in Spanish.

Distinguished Majors Program  The department has a Distinguished Majors Program (DMP) in Spanish for those students who excel and wish to be considered for a degree with a title of distinction, high distinction, or highest distinction. Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program are required to complete 9 hours of coursework at the 500-level or above as part of the 30 hours required for their Spanish major. They are also required to complete a 6-credit thesis during their final semester of study.

Major in Latin-American Studies  For major and minor requirements see the section on Latin American Studies.

Requirements for the Minor in Spanish  The Spanish minor consists of 18 credits beyond the 202 level. Only grades of C or better count for the minor program.

Five-year Teacher Education Program  Students wishing to enroll in the five-year B.A. - M.T. Teacher Education Program should contact Professor Alicia Belozerco in the Curry School of Education or the program advisor in Spanish (Professor David T. Gies). The five-year program leads toward teaching certification and has special requirements, including a mandatory study abroad and diagnostic and evaluative proficiency exams in Spanish.

Language Requirement  The SPAN 101, 102 courses in this department are reserved for students who present no entrance credits in the language. Students who enter with two or more entrance credits and who wish to continue that language will be placed according to scores obtained on College Entrance Examination Board SAT II tests in the language. The sequence of courses, depending on the level at which the student begins, is as follows: SPAN 101, 102, 201, 202; or SPAN 106, 201, 202; or SPAN 106, 202; or SPAN 201, 202; or SPAN 202. The sequence must be followed to complete the language requirement. Students who place themselves incorrectly will not receive credit.

Additional Information  For more information, contact the Department of Spanish, 115 Wilson Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22903; (434) 924-7159; www.virginia.edu/~spitpo


Spanish Course Descriptions

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Note  The following courses are given in Spanish.

SPAN 101, 102 - (4) (S)
Elementary Spanish

For students who have not previously studied Spanish. Develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. SPAN 101 and 102 enable students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., greeting, narrating, describing, ordering, comparing and contrasting, and apologizing). Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by SPAN 201.

SPAN 201 - (3) (S)
Intermediate Spanish

Prerequisite: Passing grade in SPAN 102, a score of 520-590 on the SAT II test; 326-409 in the placement test; or permission of the department. Further develops the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. SPAN 201 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Spanish-speaking audiences. Three class hours. Laboratory work is required. Followed by SPAN 202.

SPAN 202 - (3) (S)
Advanced Intermediate Spanish

Prerequisite: Passing grade in SPAN 201, SAT II test scores of 600-640; placement test scores of 410-535, 4 in the AP Test or permission of the department.
Enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations and handle complications (e.g., asking for, understanding and giving directions, expressing happiness and affection, and persuading). Students may choose either SPAN 202A, which includes reading literary and cultural selections or SPAN 202C, which includes selected medical readings. Three class hours. Laboratory work is required. Note  Prerequisite for the following courses: SPAN 202 or the equivalent.

SPAN 309 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

SPAN 310 - (3) (Y)
Phonetics

SPAN 311 - (3) (S)
Grammar Review

SPAN 312 - (3) (S)
Composition

SPAN 313 - (3) (S)
Advanced Conversation

SPAN 314 - (3) (S)
Business Spanish

SPAN 330 - (3) (S)
Literary Analysis

Note  SPAN 330 or instructor permission is prerequisite for any course in Spanish literature or culture with a number above SPAN 330.

SPAN 340 - (3) (Y)
Survey of Spanish Literature I (Middle Ages to 1700)

SPAN 341 - (3) (Y)
Survey of Spanish Literature II (1700 to Present)

SPAN 342 - (3) (Y)
Survey of Latin American Literature I (Colonial to 1900)

SPAN 343 - (3) (Y)
Survey of Latin American Literature II (1900 to Present)

SPAN 411 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Grammar and Composition

SPAN 413 - (3) (S)
Advanced Conversation/Cinema

Prerequisite: Ability to comprehend Spanish and to converse with some fluency (generally recommended: at least three 300- or 400-level Spanish classes); students who have had SPAN 313 (Conversacion) abroad or who are native speakers (or who come from native-speaking backgrounds) are not permitted to take this course. This class is designed as an advanced-level conversation class, with a cultural component.

SPAN 420 - (3) (Y)
History of the Language

SPAN 422 - (3) (S)
Translation From Spanish to English

SPAN 425 - (3) (O)
The Inquisition in Spain and Latin America

Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 330 or instructor permission. Explores the history of the ecclesiastical court dedicated to the eradication of heresy in early modern Spain, its impact on culture, religion and social behavior.

SPAN 426 - (3) (Y)
1492 and the Aftermath

Prerequisite: SPAN 330 or instructor permission.
Examines Spanish attempts to understand and figure the Americas, as well as American indigenous reactions to them.

SPAN 427 - (3) (Y)
Spanish Culture and Civilization

SPAN 428 - (3) (Y)
Latin American Culture and Civilization

SPAN 430 - (3) (Y)
Hispanic Dialectology and Bilingualism

SPAN 431 - (3) (Y)
Hispanic Sociolinguistics

SPAN 440 - (3) (SI)
Hispanic Intellectual History

SPAN 450 - (3) (IR)
Spanish Literature From the Middle Ages to the Renaissance

SPAN 455 - (3) (IR)
Spanish Literature of the Golden Age

SPAN 456 - (3) (IR)
Don Quixote

SPAN 460 - (3) (IR)
Spanish Literature From the Enlightenment to Romanticism

SPAN 465 - (3) (IR)
Spanish Literature From Realism to the Generation of 1898

SPAN 470 - (3) (IR)
Modern Spanish Literature

SPAN 473 - (3) (IR)
Literature and Cinema

Prerequisite: SPAN 311 and SPAN 330 or instructor permission.
Explores the relationship between literature and film as narrative arts, focusing on contemporary classics of the Spanish and Spanish-American novel and their cinematic adaptations.

SPAN 479 - (3) (IR)
Hispanic Women Writers

Examines writings by women authors of Spain and Latin America, using the texts as a basis for studying the evolving roles and paradigms of women in these societies.

SPAN 480 - (3) (IR)
Latin-American Literature From Colonial Period to 1900

SPAN 485 - (3) (IR)
Latin-American Literature After 1900

SPAN 486 - (3) (IR)
Contemporary Latin-American Short Fiction

SPAN 487 - (3) (IR)
Contemporary Latin-American Novel

SPAN 488 - (3) (Y)
Spanish Contemporary Poetry

Prerequisite: One course of grammar (SPAN 311 Grammar Review) and one course of Literary Analysis (SPAN 330).
This is an introduction to poetry in Spanish, including the study of some of the most relevant Spanish and Latin American poets of the twentieth century.

SPAN 490, 491 - (3-6) (Y)
Special Topics Seminar: Literature

SPAN 492, 493 - (3-6) (Y)
Special Topics Seminar: Language

SPAN 499 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study

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