2003-2004
UNDERGRADUATE RECORD
School of Architecture
General Information  |  Departmental Curricula Undergraduate Programs  |  Course Descriptions  |  Faculty
Architecture  |  Urban and Environmental Planning  |  Architectural History

Departmental Curricula Undergraduate Program

Architecture

Undergraduate Degrees offered:

Bachelor of Science in Architecture
Pre-Professional Concentration
Studies Concentration
Multi-Disciplinary Concentration

Admission

The Bachelor of Architecture Program attracts a diverse range of students with a wide range of interests that are bound together by an overriding desire to consider and construct environments of enduring value.

Transfer students are accepted into the Department each fall up through the beginning of third year. Students wishing to transfer into the University's Department of Architecture should refer to www.virginia.edu/~admiss/ugadmiss/home.shtml. Those students already a member of the University and wishing to apply for transfer should refer to the Student Handbook at http://www.virginia.edu/arch/.

Curriculum

Years 1-3
The prime objective of the curricular core of the first three years is to provide a framework for the study of contemporary culture through observation, analysis, and considered design of our ongoing constructed occupation of the earth. This exploration uses design as a mode of critical inquiry from the scale of the city to the scale of the hand while maintaining its focus on the value of this effort to the community and the land, both immediate and extended. To make this evaluation possible, the curriculum is based on the foundation of a liberal arts education formed broadly during the first two years of study while subjects directly related to making architecture are pursued in the third year.

Students entering the Department of Architecture follow one curriculum for their first three years. Starting in their second year, the strategic choices of electives will prepare the student to pursue the concentration of their choice.

First Year
Fall Semester
ARCH 101 Lessons of the Lawn 3
AR H 101 History of Architecture Anc.-Med. 4
ENWR 110 Academic Writing(6)
HUM/SCI Elective(1)(7)
Open Elective(4)(5)
3
3
3
    20
Spring Semester
ARCH 102 Lessons in Making 3
AR H 102 Renaissance to Modern 4
ENLT English Elective 3
MATH 121 Applied Calculus(2)
HUM/SCI Elective (1)(7)
3
3
    16

Second Year
Fall Semester
ARCH 201 Intro. to Arch. Design(8) 4
ARCH 305 Intro. to Computer Applications in Design 2
LAR 512 History to Landscape Arch.(9) 3
PHYS Physics Elective
HUM/SCI Elective(1)(7)
3
3
    15
Spring Semester
ARCH 202 Intro. to Arch. Design(8)
Prerequisite ARCH 201
6
AR H Arch. History Elective
Natural SCI Elective
SOC SCI Elective
3
3
3
    15

Third Year
Fall Semester
ARCH 301 Architectural Design(8)
Prerequisite ARCH 202
6
ARCH 303 Building 1(8)
Open Elective
4
3
    16
Spring Semester
ARCH 302 Architectural Design(8)
Prerequisite ARCH 301
6
ARCH 324 Intro. to Structural Design(8)
HUM/SCI Elective(1)(7)
Open Elective
4
3
3
    16

Fourth Year
Election of Concentration
At the end of the spring semester of the third year, each student will elect a course of study for the fourth year from the following list. The choices are designed to maximize the opportunities for undergraduate study given the wide range and scope of student interests and potential career paths.

Fourth Year: Pre-Professional Concentration
This Concentration is for students intent on pursuing a career as a practicing Architect. The curriculum is designed to maximize the opportunities to explore through design complex issues and conditions as well as representing intentions in material form.

Fall Semester
ARCH 401 Architectural Design(8)
Prerequisite ARCH 302
6
ARCH ___ Architecture Elective(3)
SOC SCI Elective
Open Elective(4)(5)
3
3
3
    15
Spring Semester
ARCH 402 Architectural Design(8)
Prerequisite ARCH 401
6
ARCH 406 Building II
Architecture Elective(3)
Open Elective(4)(5)
4
3
3
    16
     
Degree Total 35 125

Fourth Year: Architectural Studies Concentration:
This Concentration is designed for students interested in expanding the scope of their study to include the related design fields of landscape architecture or urban planning. This option also allows students interested in the relationship between the practice of architectural design and research into architectural history or technical issues related to building and the environment to pursue these interests. Minors offered within the School of Architecture are the primary vehicle used to complete the degree requirements.

Fall Semester
  Minor Requirement
Minor Requirement
3
3
ARCH Architecture Elective
Minor Related
SOC SCI Elective
Open Elective(4)(5)
 
3
3
3
    15
Spring Semester
  Minor Requirement-Minor Related 3
  Minor Requirement 3
ARCH Architecture Elective(3)
Open Elective(3)
Open Elective(4)(5)
3
3
3
    15
     
Degree Total 37 124

Fourth Year: Multi-Disciplinary Concentration
This Concentration is for those students interested in exploring the connection between architecture and another discipline. This discipline can be something as close to architecture as art or engineering, or it could also be a more distant field, such as business, archeology, or materials science. It is the student's responsibility to make the case for the connection. Fulfilling the requirements for a minor in the related field is the primary vehicle used to complete the degree requirements.

Fall Semester
  Minor Requirement
Minor Requirement
3
3
ARCH Architecture Elective -
Minor Related(3)
SOC SCI Elective
Open Elective(4)(5)
 
3
3
3
    15
Spring Semester
  Minor Requirement-Minor Related 3
  Minor Requirement 3
ARCH Architecture Elective(3) 3
ARCH Open Elective(3)
Open Elective(4)(5)
3
3
    15
     
Degree Total 37 124

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is required.

(1) HUM or SCI Elective: SCI "Science" electives include Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering, and Computer Science.

(2) Students scoring above 600 on the math SAT are encouraged to take MATH 131. Students who have not completed a trigonometry course prior to matriculation, or who scored below 550 on the math SAT, are required to take MATH 103 Pre-Calculus in lieu of an Open Elective in the first semester.

(3) ARCH Elective: Any course designated with one of the following prefixes: ARCH, AR H, LAR, PLAC, or PLAN. ARCH Elective - Minor Related: An ARCH Elective that is directly related to the Minor Study Area.

(4) One Open Elective per semester may be taken Credit/No Credit. A Maximum of 8 hours of degree credit will be granted for Ensemble Music or Dance. A maximum of 12 hours of degree credit will be granted for AIRS, MISC, & NASC courses. PHYE "Physical Education" credits do not count toward degree totals.

(5) It may be necessary to use Open Electives to complete the requirements of a Minor.

(6) See separate English Advising notes.

(7) ARCH Elective courses do not count towards Humanities or Sciences electives.

(8) A student must receive a grade of at least a C- to pass this course.

(9) L AR 513 may be taken in place of L AR 512.

Note Students who wish to obtain the Master of Architecture professional degree apply to a graduate program. Students expecting to enter graduate studies should have maintained a 3.0 cumulative average, with a 3.5 average in the architectural design sequence. Admission into the graduate program in architecture at the University of Virginia is extremely competitive.

Minors offered:

Minor In Architecture
The Minor in Architecture is offered to all students at the University. Students who complete the Minor range from those whose major is in a related field and who wish to expand the boundaries of that endeavor, to those considering graduate study in architecture.

ARCH 101 Lessons of the Lawn 3
ARCH 102 Lessons in Making 3
ARCH Architecture Department Elective
Prerequisite ARCH 101
3
ARCH Architecture Department Elective
Prerequisite ARCH 101
3
  Elective within the School of Architecture 3
    15


Urban and Environmental Planning

TOP

The Program in Urban and Environmental Planning balances professional planning skills with a liberal education emphasizing interdisciplinary study. Students typically take courses in the social and natural sciences, the humanities, and in design fields that complement professional courses in planning practice and theory. Graduates either begin work in the public or private sectors or go on to graduate professional studies.

The scope of the planner's work encompasses present and future urban and environmental concerns, including such diverse issues as environmental impact, quality of life, and the public and private costs of development. Planners work in the public and private sectors in urban and rural areas. Public sector planners work for all levels of government, formulating plans to redevelop or rehabilitate downtowns and neighborhoods, develop land aesthetically and profitably, and regulate private development to protect public interests. Although planners frame long-range designs, anticipating futures 5 to 15 years away, they are also deeply involved in choosing among current projects. Private sector planners employed with land developers, utilities, banks, property management firms, industries, and other major corporations do similar work according to the particular concerns of each business. Many of these concerns are integrated with the department's focus on sustainable community development.

Students may enter the program directly from high school, or they may transfer from another University school or other accredited universities or colleges. Usually, students transfer in their first or second year and complete the degree requirements without additional sessions. Although the first two years conform closely to the Arts and Sciences core curriculum, students who wish to transfer to the program should consult with the director of undergraduate studies. Students may apply for transfer for the spring or fall semesters. If other prerequisites have been met, it is possible for transfer students to complete the required planning courses in two years.

Bachelor of Urban and Environmental Planning(1)

First Year
First Semester
  English(2) 3
ARCH 101(3) Lessons of the Lawn
Math/Science(4)
Social Science Elective(5)
3
3-4
3
PLAN 103 Introduction to Planning 3
    15-16
Spring Semester
  English(2) 3
AR H 100 History of Arch(3)
Math/Science(4)
Social Science Elective(5)
Humanities
3
3-4
3
3
    15-16

Second Year
First Semester
PLAN 201 Planning Design OR  
ARCH 201 Intro. to Arch. Design
Math/Science
4
3-4
ECON 201 Microeconomics
Humanities Elective
3
3
PLAN 211 Digital Visualization for Planners OR  
CS____ CS computer course 3
    16-17
Spring Semester
PLAN 202 Planning Design
Math/Science
4
3-4
ECON 202 Macroeconomics
Statistics
Open Elective
3
3
3
    16-17

Third Year
First Semester
PLAN 303 Neighborhoods, Communities & Regions 3
PLAN 306 Land, Law and Environ
Social Science Elective(5)
Open Elective (non-Western studies included)
3
3
 
6
    15
Spring Semester
PLAN 305 Measuring Communities
Professional Elective(7)
Social Science Elective(5)
Open Elective
Open Elective
3
3
3
3
3
    15

Fourth Year
First Semester
  Professional Elective(7)
Professional Elective(7)
3
3
PLAC ___ Planning app. course(6)
Social Science Elective(5)
Open Elective
3
3
3
    15
Spring Semester
PLAN 404 Planning in Government 3
PLAC 401 Community Planning(6)
Social Science Elective(5)
3
3
PLAN PLAN Elective OR  
  Fourth Year Project
Open Elective
3
3
    15

(1) Students must have a minimum of 122 credits with at least a 2.0 average in order to graduate with a Bachelor of Urban and Environmental Planning degree.

(2) Proficiency at ENWR 110 level plus a second writing requirement.

(3) Select two from among ARCH 101, ARCH 102, AR H 100, or AR H 105.

(4) Environmental science and math are encouraged.

(5) Six credits in GFAP are required.

(6) Planning applications courses are designated as PLAC. They emphasize field work, analysis, plan development, document preparation, and formal presentation. PLAC401 is designed for planning undergraduates seeking a culminating workshop.

(7) A Professional Elective related to planning can be taken in a professional school, at the 300-level or above, with advisor's permission.


Architectural History

TOP

The undergraduate curriculum provides an introduction to the discipline of architectural history within a liberal arts program. A minimum of 38credits in architectural history is required for the major. These include AR H 101, AR H 102 , AR H 401 and AR H 490. AR H 401 or ARTH 490 is taken in the 3rd year as a research and writing preparatory course. AR H 490 is taken during the fourth year, which allows students to research and write an independent advanced paper on a topic of their choice while working closely with a faculty member. This paper, with faculty comments, becomes part of the student's permanent record. Students must also complete the first year of architectural design course ARCH 201 and ARCH 305. Appropriate preservation and art history courses may be used to fulfill architectural history requirements after consultation with academic advisor.

Bachelor of Architectural History(1)

First Year
First Semester
AR H 101 History of Architecture Ancient-Medieval 4
ENWR 110 Accelerated Academic Writing 3
MATH 121 Applied Calculus I OR
Approved substitute(2)
Foreign Language(3)
Open Elective (ARCH 101 recommended)
 
3
3-4
3
    16-17
Spring Semester
AR H 102 Renaissance to Modern
Foreign Language(3)
English Elective
Open Elective (ARCH 102 recommended)
Social Science Elective
4
3-4
3
3
3
    16-17

Second Year
First Semester
ARCH 201 Intro. to Arch. Design 4
ARCH 305 Intro. to Digital Analysis
Foreign Language(3)
AR H Elective
(Area Requirement)
Natural Science Elective
2
3-4
 
3-4
3
    15-17
Spring Semester
  AR H Elective
AR H Elective
(Area Requirement)
Foreign Language(3)
Natural Science Elective
Social Scienc Elective
3
 
3
3-4
3-4
3
    15

Third Year
First Semester
  AR H Elective
(Area Requirement)
AR H Elective(4)
English Elective
History Elective
Open Elective(4)
 
3
3
3
3
3
    15
Spring Semester
  AR H Seminar
(AR H 401 or ARTH 490)
English Elective
History Elective
Open Elective
Open Elective(4)
 
3
3
3
3
3
    15

Fourth Year
First Semester
  History of Arch. Electives(5)
Open Electives(4)
6
9
    15
Spring Semester
AR H 490 Major Special Study
History of Arch. Elective(5)
Open Electives(4)
3
3
9
    15

(1) Students must have a minimum of 122 credits with at least 2.0 average in order to graduate with a Bachelor of Architectural History degree.

(2) If ENWR 110 or MATH is waived, any open elective may be substituted.

(3) Students must attain, at a minimum, an intermediate level in one foreign language, usually by completing 12 credits of foreign language study through the 202 level. Any remaining course slots may be used for additional languages or as open electives. Those with previous language study may contact the appropriate department for placement in advanced level courses (i.e., to begin study at the University with a 200- rather than a 100-level language course). Students scoring at least 620 on a SAT II foreign language achievement examination have satisfied this requirement. Those intending to continue in the field of architectural history are advised to study a second language.

(4) Students should take advantage of courses in preservation and building technology when they are available.

(5) Related art history courses offered by the McIntire Department of Art and related courses in the history of landscape architecture may be taken for architectural history credit with advisor permission.

 

 
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