University of Virginia
The Rotunda at U.Va.
2004-2005
GRADUATE RECORD
School of Graduate Engineering and Applied Science
General Information  |  Degree Programs  |  Admission Requirements  |  Financial Assistance  |  General Requirements  |  Program Descriptions  |  Course Descriptions  |  Faculty
Aerospace Engineering
Applied Mathematics
Applied Mechanics
Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Engineering Physics
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Systems and Information Engineering

Course Descriptions

The course descriptions listed below are arranged alphabetically under the heading of the department or program offering the instruction. Courses offered jointly by two or more programs are described under each program involved and cross referenced.

Most graduate study programs include courses offered by departments other than the student’s major department. Students are urged to consider the complete list of course offerings in planning their programs of study.

Courses with 500 numbers are intermediate-level courses that may be taken by both undergraduate and graduate students. Courses with numbers between 600 and 699 are introductory graduate courses recommended for beginning graduate students or non-majors. Courses with numbers of 700 and above are recommended for advanced graduate and doctoral students.

All courses are offered subject to adequate enrollment; thus, any course may be cancelled if enrollment is insufficient.

Unless otherwise indicated, courses meet for three hours of lecture each week. Each semester course in the School of Engineering and Applied Science carries separate credit, whether described separately or not. The number set in brackets following a course title indicates the number of credits granted for that course. Enrollment in courses for which there are no prerequisites listed, or for which prerequisites are not met require the instructor’s permission.


Aerospace Engineering

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See Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.


Applied Mathematics

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APMA 507 - (3) (SI)
Numerical Methods
Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear algebra and differential equations, and the ability to write computer programs.
Introduces techniques used to obtain numerical solutions, emphasizing error estimation. Areas of application include approximation and integration of functions, and solution of algebraic and differential equations.

APMA 602 - (3) (Y)
Continuum Mechanics with Applications
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and Cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as AM 602, CE 602, and MAE 602.

APMA 613 - (3) (SI)
Mathematical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics
Prerequisite: Linear Algebra, Vector Calculus, Elementary PDE (may be taken concurrently).
Describes the mathematical foundations of continuum mechanics from a unified viewpoint. Review of relevant concepts from linear algebra, vector calculus, and Cartesian tensors; kinematics of finite deformations and motions; finite strain measures; linearization; concept of stress; conservation laws of mechanics and equations of motion and equilibrium; constitutive theory; constitutive laws for nonlinear elasticity; generalized Hooke’s law for a linearly elastic solid; constitutive laws for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids; basic problems of continuum mechanics as boundary-value problems for partial differential equations. Cross-listed as AM 613.

APMA 615 - (3) (SI)
Linear Algebra
Prerequisite: Three years of college mathematics or instructor permission.
Analyzes systems of linear equations; least squares procedures for solving over determined systems; finite dimensional vector spaces; linear transformations and their representation by matrices; determinants; Jordan canonical form; unitary reduction of symmetric and Hermitian forms; eigenvalues; and invariant subspaces.

APMA 624 - (3) (O)
Nonlinear Dynamics and Waves
Prerequisite: Undergraduate ordinary differential equations or instructor permission.
Introduces phase-space methods, elementary bifurcation theory and perturbation theory, and applies them to the study of stability in the contexts of nonlinear dynamical systems and nonlinear waves, including free and forces nonlinear vibrations and wave motions. Examples are drawn from mechanics and fluid dynamics, and include transitions to periodic oscillations and chaotic oscillations. Also cross-listed as MAE 624.

APMA 634 - (3) (SI)
Numerical Analysis
Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear algebra, and the ability to write computer
programs.
Topics include the solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations, calculations of matrix eigenvalues, least squares problems, and boundary value problems in ordinary and partial differential equations.

APMA 637 - (3) (O)
Singular Perturbation Theory
Prerequisite: Familiarity with complex analysis.
Analyses of regular perturbations; roots of polynomials; singular perturbations in ODE’s; periodic solutions of simple nonlinear differential equations; multiple-Scales method; WKBJ approximation; turning-point problems; Langer’s method of uniform approximation; asymptotic behavior of integrals; Laplace Integrals; stationary phase; and steepest descents. Examples are drawn from physical systems. Cross-listed as MAE 637.

APMA 641 - (3) (Y)
Engineering Mathematics I
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Review of ordinary differential equations. Initial value problems, boundary value problems, and various physical applications. Linear algebra, including systems of linear equations, matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization, and various applications. Scalar and vector field theory, including the divergence theorem, Green’s theorem, Stokes theorem, and various applications. Partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of partial differential equations by separation of variables, superposition, Fourier series, variation of parameters, d’ Alembert’s solution. Eigenfunction expansion techniques for nonhomogeneous initial-value, boundary-value problems. Particular focus on various physical applications of the heat equation, the potential (Laplace) equation, and the wave equation in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Cross-listed as MAE 641.

APMA 642 - (3) (O)
Engineering Mathematics II
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and APMA 641 or equivalent.
Further and deeper understanding of partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of linear partial differential equations by eigenfunction expansion techniques. Green’s functions for time-independent and time-dependent boundary value problems. Fourier transform methods, and Laplace transform methods. Solution of a variety of initial-value, boundary-value problems. Various physical applications. Study of complex variable theory. Functions of a complex variable, and complex integral calculus, Taylor series, Laurent series, and the residue theorem, and various applications. Serious work and efforts in the further development of analytical skills and expertise. Cross-listed as MAE 642.

APMA 643 - (3) (Y)
Statistics for Engineers and Scientists
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate studies.
Analyzes the role of statistics in science; hypothesis tests of significance; confidence intervals; design of experiments; regression; correlation analysis; analysis of variance; and introduction to statistical computing with statistical software libraries.

APMA 644 - (3) (O)
Applied Partial Differential Equations
Prerequisite: APMA 642 or equivalent.
Includes first order partial differential equations (linear, quasilinear, nonlinear); classification of equations and characteristics; and well-posedness of initial and boundary value problems. Cross-listed as MAE 644.

APMA 648 - (3) (SI)
Special Topics in Applied Mathematics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics vary from year to year and are selected to fill special needs of graduate students.

APMA 672 - (3) (Y)
Computational Fluid Dynamics I
Prerequisite: MAE 631 or instructor permission.
Topics include the solution of flow and heat transfer problems involving steady and transient convective and diffusive transport; superposition and panel methods for inviscid flow; finite-difference methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations; elementary grid generation for odd geometries; and primitive variable and vorticity-steam function algorithms for incompressible, multidimensional flows. Extensive use of personal computers/workstations including graphics. Cross-listed as MAE 672.

APMA 693 - (Credit as arranged) (SI)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate-level material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

APMA 695 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

APMA 702 - (3) (SI)
Applied Partial Differential Equations I
Prerequisite: APMA 642 or equivalent.
Includes first order partial differential equations (linear, quasilinear, nonlinear); classification of equations and characteristics; and well-posedness of initial and boundary value problems.

APMA 708 - (3) (SI)
Inelastic Solid Mechanics
Prerequisite: AM 602.
Emphasizes the formulation of a variety of nonlinear models. Specific topics include nonlinear elasticity, creep, visco-elasticity, and elasto-plasticity. Solutions to boundary value problems of practical interest are presented in the context of these various theories in order to illustrate the differences in stress distributions caused by different types of material nonlinearities. Cross-listed as AM 708.

APMA 714 - (3) (SI)
Nonlinear Elasticity Theory
Prerequisite: AM/APMA 602.
Describes the theory of finite (nonlinear) elasticity governing large deformations of highly deformable elastic solids. Emphasizes new features not present in the linear theory, including instabilities (both material and geometric), normal stress effects, non-uniqueness, bifurcations, and stress singularities. A variety of illustrative boundary value problems that exhibit some of the foregoing features are discussed. Both physical and mathematical implications are considered. The results are applicable to rubber-like and biological materials and the theory serves as a prototype for more elaborate nonlinear theories of mechanics of continuous media. Cross-listed as AM 714.

APMA 734 - (3) (SI)
Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations
Prerequisite: One or more graduate courses in mathematics or applied mathematics.
Topics include the numerical solution of elliptic equations by finite element methods; solution of time dependent problems by finite element and finite difference methods; and stability and convergence results for the methods presented.

APMA 747, 748 - (3) (SI)
Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Content varies annually; topics may include wave propagation theory, shell theory, control theory, or advanced numerical analysis.

APMA 767 - (3) (SI)
Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media
Prerequisite: APMA 602.
Includes averaging principles; equivalent homogeneity; effective moduli; bounding principles; self-consistent schemes; composite spheres; concentric cylinders; three phase model; repeating cell models; inelastic and nonlinear effects; thermal effects; isotropic and anisotropic media; and strength and fracture. Cross-listed as AM 767, and CE 767.

APMA 772 - (3) (Y)
Computational Fluid Dynamics II
Prerequisite: APMA 672 or equivalent.
A continuation of APMA 672. More advanced methods for grid generation, transformation of governing equations for odd geometries, methods for compressible flows, methods for parabolic flows, calculations using vector and parallel computers. Use of personal computers/workstations/supercomputer including graphics. Cross-listed as MAE 772.

APMA 792 - (Credit as arranged) (SI)
Independent Study
Detailed study of advanced graduate-level material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

APMA 847, 848 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course content varies from year to year and depends on students’ interests and needs. See APMA 747 for possible topics.

APMA 895 - (Credit as arranged) (S-SS)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Applied Mathematics degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

APMA 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

APMA 898 - (Credit as arranged) (S-SS)
Thesis
Formal record of student commitment to master’s thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

APMA 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

APMA 999 - (Credit as arranged) (S-SS)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.


Applied Mechanics

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AM 601 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Mechanics of Materials
Prerequisite: Undergraduate mechanics and mathematics.
Reviews basic stress-strain concepts and constitutive relations. Studies unsymmetrical bending, shear center, and shear flow. Analyzes of curved flexural members, torsion, bending, and twisting of thin walled sections. Cross-listed as CE 601.

AM 602 - (3) (Y)
Continuum Mechanics With Applications
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Topics include vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as APMA 602, CE 602, and MAE 602.

AM 603 - (3) (Y)
Computational Solid Mechanics
Analyzes of variational and computational mechanics of solids, potential energy, complementary energy, virtual work, Reissner’s principle, Ritz and Galerkin methods; displacement, force and mixed methods of analysis; finite element analysis, including shape functions, convergence and integration; and applications in solid mechanics. Cross-listed as CE 603 and MAE 603.

AM 604 - (3) (E)
Plates and Shells
Prerequisite: APMA 641 and AM 601 or 602.
Topics include the classical analysis of plates and shells; plates of various shapes (rectangular, circular, skew) and shells of various shape (cylindrical, conical, spherical, hyperbolic, paraboloid); closed-form numerical and approximate methods of solution governing partial differential equations; and advanced topics (large deflection theory, thermal stresses, orthotropic plates). Cross-listed as CE 604 and MAE 604.

AM 606 - (3) (Y)
Applied Boundary Element Analysis
Prerequisite: AM 671 or 603.
Analyzes the fundamental concepts of Green’s functions, integral equations, and potential problems; weighted residual techniques and boundary element methods; poisson type problems, including cross-sectional analysis of beams and flow analyses; elastostatics; and other applications.

AM 607 - (3) (E)
Theory of Elasticity
Prerequisite: AM 602 or instructor permission.
Review of the concepts of stress, strain, equilibrium, compatibility; Hooke’s law (isotropic materials); displacement and stress formulations of elasticity problems; plane stress and strain problems in rectangular coordinates (Airy’s stress function approach); plane stress and strain problems in polar coordinates, axisymmetric problems; torsion of prismatic bars (semi-inverse method using real function approach); thermal stress; and energy methods. Cross-listed as CE 607 and MAE 607.

AM 613 - (3) (Y)
Mathematical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics
Prerequisite: Linear algebra, vector calculus, elementary PDE (may be taken concurrently).
Describes the mathematical foundations of continuum mechanics from a unified viewpoint. The relevant concepts from linear algebra, vector calculus, and Cartesian tensors; the kinematics of finite deformations and motions leading to the definition of finite strain measures; the process of linearization; and the concept of stress. Conservation laws of mechanics yield the equations of motion and equilibrium and description of constitutive theory leading to the constitute laws for nonlinear elasticity, from which the more familiar generalized Hooke’s law for linearly elastic solid is derived. Constitutive laws for a Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid are also discussed. The basic problems of continuum mechanics are formulated as boundary value problems for partial differential equations. Cross-listed as APMA 613.

AM 620 - (3) (Y)
Energy Principles in Mechanics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analyzes the derivation, interpretation, and application of the principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work to engineering problems; related theorems, such as the principles of the stationary value of the total potential and complementary energy, Castigliano’s Theorems, theorem of least work, and unit force and displacement theorems. Introduces generalized, extended, mixed, and hybrid principles; variational methods of approximation, Hamilton’s principle, and Lagrange’s equations of motion. Uses variational theorems to approximate solutions to problems in structural mechanics. Cross-listed as CE 620 and MAE 620.

AM 621 - (3) (Y)
Analytical Dynamics
Prerequisite: Differential equations, undergraduate dynamics course.
Topics include the kinematics of rigid body motion; Eulerian angles; Lagrangian equations of motion, inertia tensor; momental ellipsoid; rigid body equations of motion, Euler’s equation, force-free motion; polhode and herpolhode; theory of tops and gyroscopes; variational principles; Hamiltonian equations of motion, Poinsote representation. Cross-listed as MAE 621.

AM 622 - (3) (O)
Waves
Prerequisite: MAE/AM 602 Continuum Mechanics and Applications, or equivalent.
The topics covered are: plane waves; d’Alembert solution; method of characteristics; dispersive systems; wavepackets; group velocity; fully-dispersed waves; Laplace, Stokes, and steepest descents integrals; membranes, plates and plane-stress waves; evanescent waves; Kirchhoff’s solution; Fresnel’s principle; elementary diffraction; reflection and transmission at interfaces; waveguides and ducted waves; waves in elastic half-spaces; P, S, and Rayleigh waves; layered media and Love waves; slowly-varying media and WKBJ method; Time-dependent response using Fourier-Laplace transforms; some nonlinear water waves. Also cross-listed as MAE 622.

AM 623 - (3) (SI)
Vibrations
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics include free and forced vibrations of undamped and damped single-degree-of-freedom systems and undamped multi-degree-of-freedom systems; use of Lagrange’s equations; Laplace transform, matrix formulation, and other solution methods; normal mode theory; introduction to vibration of continuous systems. Cross-listed as CE 623 and MAE 623.

AM 628 - (3) (SI)
Motion Biomechanics
Prerequisite: BIOM 603 or instructor permission.
Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) which act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopedics and rehabilitation. Cross-listed as BIOM 628.

AM 631 - (3) (Y)
Fluid Mechanics I
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analyzes of hydrostatics, including surface tension; kinematics; non-inertial reference frames; rigorous formulation of conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy; Euler and Bernoulli equations; vorticity dynamics; two-dimensional potential flow theory, complex potentials; applications to airfoils; the Navier-Stokes equations: selected exact and approximate solutions. Cross-listed as MAE 631.

AM 632 - (3) (Y)
Fluid Mechanics II
Prerequisite: AM 631.
Topics include the laminar boundary layer equations, differential and integral; elementary similar and integral solutions; introduction to and modeling of turbulent flows; surface waves; quasi-one-dimensional compressible, perfect gas dynamic analysis; practical applications. Cross- listed as MAE 632.

AM 665 - (3) (Y)
Mechanics of Composite Materials
Prerequisite: ECE 206 and APMA 213.
Analyzes the properties and mechanics of fibrous, laminated composites; 2-D and 3-D anisotropic constitutive equations; classical lamination theory; thermal stresses; material response and test methods; edge effects; design considerations; and computerized implementation. Cross-listed as CE 665.

AM 666 - (3) (Y)
Stress Analysis of Composites
Prerequisite: AM 665.
Analyzes 3-D anisotropic constitutive theory, interlaminar stresses, failure criteria, micromechanics, cylindrical bending, laminated tubes, laminated plates, damage mechanics, and hygro-thermal effects. Cross-listed as CE 666.

AM 671 - (3) (Y)
Finite-Element Analysis
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces finite element methods for solving problems in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, and electrical fields. Emphasizes the basics of one, two, and three-dimensional elements; applications to bars, electrical networks, trusses, conduction and convection heat transfer, ideal and viscous flow, electrical current flow, plane stress, plane strain, and elasticity; development of computer codes to implement finite element techniques. Cross-listed as MAE 671.

AM 675 - (3) (SI)
Theory of Structural Stability
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces the elastic stability of structural and mechanical systems. Topics include classical stability theory and buckling of beams, trusses, frames, arches, rings and thin plates and shells; derivation of design formulas; computational formulation and implementation. Cross-listed as CE 675.

AM 691, 692 - (3) (IR)
Special Problems in Applied Mechanics
Detailed study of special topics in mechanics.

AM 693 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

AM 695 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research under guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated if necessary.

AM 703 - (3) (Y)
Thermal Structures
Prerequisite: AM 602 or instructor permission; corequisite: AM 607.
Topics include the fundamentals of thermal structural analysis; mechanical and thermodynamic foundations; formulation of heat transfer and thermal-structural problems; heat transfer in structures; thermal stresses in rods, beams, and plates; thermally induced vibrations; thermoelastic stability; and computational methods.

AM 704 - (3) (SI)
Theory of Shells
Prerequisite: AM 602 and 604.
Introduces the nonlinear, thermoelastic theory of shells. Governing equations are derived by a mixed approach in which those equations of three-dimensional continuum mechanics that are independent of material properties are used to derive the corresponding shell equations, whereas the constitutive equations of shell theory which, unavoidably, depend on experiments, are postulated. Emphasizes efficient, alternative formulations of initial/boundary value problems, suitable for asymptotic or numerical solution, and discusses variational principles. Some comparisons made with exact, three-dimensional solutions.

AM 708 - (3) (SI)
Inelastic Solid Mechanics
Prerequisite: AM 602.
Emphasizes the formulation of a variety of nonlinear models. Specific topics include nonlinear elasticity, creep, visco-elasticity, and elasto-plasticity. Solutions to boundary value problems of practical interest are presented in the context of these various theories in order to illustrate the differences in stress distributions caused by different types of material nonlinearities. Cross-listed as APMA 708.

AM 712 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Theory of Elasticity
Prerequisite: AM 602 or instructor permission and AM 607.
Topics include generalized Hooke’s law, strain-energy density, uniqueness; classes of boundary value problems (Navier’s and Beltrami-Mitchell equations); torsion (Dirlichlet and Neumann problems); flexure; complex variable formulation of torsional (Dirlichlet and Neumann problems) and two-dimensional problems; general solution methodologies based on complex variable techniques and elements of potential theory for torsional and two-dimensional problems; three-dimensional problems; wave propagation; and energy methods.

AM 714 - (3) (SI)
Nonlinear Elasticity Theory
Prerequisite: AM 602.
Describes the theory of finite (nonlinear) elasticity governing large deformations of highly deformable elastic solids. New features not present in the linear theory are emphasized. These include instabilities (both material and geometric), normal stress effects, non-uniqueness, bifurcations and stress singularities. A variety of illustrative boundary value problems will be discussed which exhibit some of the foregoing features. Both physical and mathematical implications considered. The results are applicable to rubber-like and biological materials and the theory serves as a prototype for more elaborate nonlinear theories of mechanics of continuous media. Cross-listed as APMA 714.

AM 725 - (3) (SI)
Random Vibrations
Prerequisite: Background in probability theory and vibration analysis.
Topics include a review of probability theory; stochastic processes, with an emphasis on continuous, continuously parametered processes; mean square calculus, Markov processes, diffusion equations, Gaussian processes, and Poisson processes; response of SDOF, MDOF, and continuous linear and nonlinear models to random excitation; upcrossings, first passage problems, fatigue and stability the considerations; Monte Carlo simulation, analysis of digital time series data, and filtered excitation models. Cross-listed as CE 725.

AM 729 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in Applied Mechanics
Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Subject matter varies from year to year depending on students’ interest and needs. Typical topics may include geophysics, astrodynamics, water waves, or nonlinear methods.

AM 732 - (3) (Y)
Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials
Prerequisite: MSE 731 or instructor permission.
Develops the tools necessary for fatigue and fracture control in structural materials. Continuum fracture mechanics principles are presented. Fracture modes are discussed from the interdisciplinary perspectives of continuum mechanics and microscopic plastic deformation/fracture mechanisms. Cleavage, ductile fracture, fatigue, and environmental cracking are included, with emphasis on micromechanical modeling. Cross-listed as MSE 732.

AM 767 - (3) (SI)
Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media
Prerequisite: AM 602.
Analyzes averaging principles, equivalent homogeneity, effective moduli, bounding principles, self-consistent schemes, composite spheres, concentric cylinders, three phase model, repeating cell models, inelastic and nonlinear effects, thermal effects, isotropic and anisotropic media, strength and fracture. Cross-listed as APMA 767 and CE 767.

AM 793 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

AM 822 - (3) (SI)
Biomechanics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics include the rheological properties of biological tissues and fluids, with emphasis on methods of measurement and data organization; basic principles of continuum mechanics and their application to mechanical problems of the heart, lung, and peripheral circulation; criteria for selecting either lumped or continuous models to simulate mechanical interaction of biological systems (and mechanical prostheses) and application of such models under static and dynamic loading conditions. Cross-listed as BIOM 822.

AM 895 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

AM 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

AM 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.


Biomedical Engineering

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BIOM 601 - (3) (Y)
Engineering Physiology

BIOM 603 - (3) (Y)
Physiology I
Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Suggested preparation: physics, chemistry, cell biology, and calculus.
The integration of biological subsystems into a coherent, functional organism is presented, in a course designed for students with either an engineering or life science background. Topics covered include major aspects of mammalian physiology, with an emphasis on mechanisms. The structure and function of each system is treated, as well as the interrelations and integration of their hormonal and neural control mechanisms. Studies how excitable tissue, nerves, and muscle, and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems work.

BIOM 604 - (3) (Y)
Physiology and Pathophysiology
Prerequisite: BIOM 603 or instructor permission.
This course will emphasize a fundamental understanding of physiology with a focus on mechanisms, and continues the coverage of major systems from BIOM 603. Studies the renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Integration of function from molecule to cell to organ to body. Includes some functional anatomy. Quantitative understanding of problems like salt and water balance through class work and homework sets. Five lectures on specific diseases and their pathophysiology.

BIOM 610 - (4) (Y)
Instrumentation and Measurement in Medicine I
Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Suggested preparation: physics and mathematics through differential equations.
Presentation of the fundamental circuit concepts and signal and system analysis methods used in the design and analysis of medical instrumentation. Circuit concepts include passive electronic circuits, operational amplifier circuits, circuit solution methods, and filter design methods. Special emphasis is placed on circuits commonly employed in medical devices, such as, differential amplifiers and filtering networks used in electrocardiograph systems. Signal and system analysis topics include linear system definitions, convolution, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms. Students perform a project using the signal and systems analysis methods to model and analyze biomedical problems. A laboratory, equivalent to one of the four course credits, provides experience in electronic circuit construction and testing, and numerical modeling and analysis of signals and systems.

BIOM 611 - (4) (Y)
Instrumentation and Measurement in Medicine II
Prerequisite: Instructor permission, and EE 203 or MAE 202.
Preparation: Mathematics through differential equations. Undergraduate Physics, Chemistry, Electronic Circuit Analysis. Review of basic sensor classes (resistive, piezoelectric, etc.). Principles of measurement of various biomedical parameters and effects that limit accuracy. Interfacing and loading issues. Discussion of electronic circuits for pre-amplification and signal conditioning. Noise, signal averaging, A/D conversion and sampling effects. Origin and measurement of biopotentials. Bioinstrumentation techniques used for various physiological signal monitoring methods (blood flow, ECG, respiratory, etc.). Discussion of magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging principles and basic image quality metrics. Laboratory experiments involve construction and characterization of simple transducers and signal conditioning equipment for measuring such biomedical parameters as force, displacement, pressure, flow and biopotentials.

BIOM 628 - (3) (Y)
Prerequisite: BIOM 603.
Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) that act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopedics and rehabilitation. Cross-listed as AM-628.

BIOM 695 - (3) (Y)
Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering

BIOM 701 - (3) (E)
Fundamentals of Biophysical Sciences
Prerequisite: Undergraduate fluid mechanics or transport phenomena.
The major focus of the course is an analysis of the fundamental transport properties relevant to biologic systems: diffusion, momentum and mass transport, hydrodynamics of macromolecules and cells, suspension stability (colloidal) and rheology of concentrated suspensions, and flow through permeable and semi-permeable media. Transport models will be developed to analyze processes such as blood coagulation, biomolecular transport in tissue, hemodialysis, protein-surface interactions, and forces underlying physical organization of cell membranes, which will then be extended to appropriate design problems relevant to the biomedical engineering industry.

BIOM 702 - (3) (Y)
Fundamentals of Biophysical Sciences
Prerequisite: BIOM 603, graduate mechanics.
Review basics of mechanics and their application to problems in circulatory transport. Indicator dilution methods to quantify blood flows, blood volume and mass transport in the circulation are examined. Imaging methods to assess regional perfusion and the hemodynamic abnormalities of tumor circulation are presented.

BIOM 703, 704 - (0) (S)
Biomedical Engineering Seminar
A seminar course in which selected topics in biomedical engineering are presented by students, faculty and guest investigators.

BIOM 706 - (3) (SI)
Biomedical Applications of Genetic Engineering
Prerequisite: BIOM 603, undergraduate-level cell and/or molecular biology course. (e.g., BIOM 304) or instructor permission. Suggested preparation: biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and physiology.
Provides biomedical engineers with a grounding in molecular biology and a working knowledge of recombinant DNA technology, thus establishing a basis for the evaluation and application of genetic engineering in whole animal systems. Beginning with the basic principles of genetics, this course examines the use of molecular methods to study gene expression and its critical role in health and disease. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, translation, recombinant DNA methodology, methods for analyzing gene expression (including microarray and genechip analysis), methods for creating genetically-engineered mice, and methods for accomplishing gene therapy by direct in vivo gene transfer.

BIOM 731 - (4) (Y)
Quantitative Techniques in Biomedical Engineering I
Prerequisite: APMA 641 or equivalent.
A study of mathematical techniques useful in biomedical engineering. Topics cover linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, vector analysis, matrices, and optimization. Applications include diffusion in biological tissues, biochemical kinetics, and optimization of physiological systems.

BIOM 741 - (3) (SI)
Bioelectricity
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Comprehensive overview of the biophysical mechanisms governing production and transmission of bioelectric signals in living systems, biopotential measurement and analysis techniques in clinical electrophysiology (ECG, EEG, and EMG), and the principles of operations for therapeutic medical devices that aid bioelectrical function of the cardiac and nervous systems. Lectures are supplemented by a computer project simulating the action potential generation, review of papers published in professional journals, and field trips to clinical laboratories at the University of Virginia Hospital.

BIOM 783 - (3) (SI)
Medical Image Modalities
Corequisite: BIOM 610 or instructor permission.
Studies engineering and physical principles underlying the major imaging modalities such as X-ray, ultrasound CT, MRI, and PET. A comprehensive overview of modern medical imaging modalities with regard to the physical basis of image acquisition and methods of image reconstruction. Students learn about the tradeoffs, which have been made in current implementations of these modalities. Considers both primarily structural modalities (magnetic-resonance imaging, electrical-impedance tomography, ultrasound, and computer tomography) and primarily functional modalities (nuclear medicine, single-photon-emission computed tomography, positron-emission tomography, magnetic-resonance spectroscopy, and magnetic-source imaging).

BIOM 784 - (3) (SI)
Medical Image Analysis
Prerequisite: BIOM 610 and ECE 682/CS 682, or instructor permission.
Comprehensive overview of medical image analysis and visualization. Focuses on the processing and analysis of these images for the purpose of quantitation and visualization to increase the usefulness of modern medical image data. Topics covered involve image formation and perception, enhancement and artifact reduction, tissue and structure segmentation, classification and 3-D visualization techniques as well as pictures archiving, communication and storage systems. Involves "hands-on" experience with homework programming assignments.

BIOM 822 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Biomechanics
Prerequisite: BIOM 603 and MAE 602, or instructor permission.
The course is to provide a comprehensive coverage of the mechanical properties of living tissues and fluids. The formulation of their mechanical and rheological properties for quantitative analysis of biological deformation and fluid flow in vivo and the implications of the active and passive mechanical properties to biological problems are emphasized.

BIOM 823 - (3) (SI)
Cell Mechanics, Adhesion, and Locomotion
Prerequisite: BIOM 822 or instructor permission.
Biomechanics and structural biology of cell structure and function, focusing on quantitative description and measurements of cell deformability, adhesion, and locomotion. Cell deformability: erythrocyte properties, membrane mechanics, shear, bending, and area elasticity. Leukocyte structure and deformability. Structural basis of plasma membrane, lipid bilayer, surface structures, nucleus, organelles, cell junctions, cytoskeleton, membrane transport, active cytoskeletal functions, specific and non-specific forces between molecules, protein structure, molecular graphics. Cell adhesion molecules: families of adhesion molecules, cell-cell and cell-matrix binding, biochemical characteristics, regulation of expression, regulation of binding avidity, functional role. Cell adhesion assays: detachment assays, aggregation of leukocytes and platelets, controlled shear systems, flow chambers. Mechanics of cell adhesion: equilibrium analysis of cell adhesion, models of cell rolling, adhesion bond mechanics. Liposomes, microbubbles, and applications to targeted adhesion. Cell motility: measurement of active forces and motility in cells, molecular motors. Effects of mechanical stress and strain on cell function.

BIOM 891 - (3) (SI)
Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging
Prerequisite: instructor permission, BIOM 610 and BIOM 611. Preparation: Undergraduate Physics, Electronic circuit analysis, Differential Equations, Fourier and Laplace Transforms, Sampling Theorems.
Underlying principles of array based ultrasound imaging. Physics and modeling techniques used in ultrasound transducers. Brief review of ID circuit transducer models. Use of Finite Element techniques in transducer design. Design considerations for 1.5D and 2D arrays will be reviewed. Diffraction and beamforming will be introduced starting from Huygen’s principle. FIELD propagation model will form an important part of the class. In depth discussion of various beamforming and imaging issues such as sidelobes, apodization, grating lobes, resolution, contrast, etc. The course addresses attenuation, time-gain-compensation and refraction. Finally, speckle statistics and K-Space techniques will be introduced. Laboratories will involve measuring ultrasound image metrics, examining the effect of various beamforming parameters and simulating these on a computer using Matlab.

BIOM 892 - (3) (SI)
Biomolecular Engineering
Using a problem-based approach, a number of current bioengineering technologies applicable to tissue engineering, wound healing, drug delivery, and gene delivery are examined. Special topics include microfluidics and low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, molecular mechanics related to cell and microparticle sorting, and micropatterning surfaces for cell and tissue engineering.

BIOM 895 - (3) (SI)
Research: Biomedical Engineering Entrepreneurship
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
The goal of this course is to give students insight into and experience in utilizing the opportunities available to biomedical engineers as they become successful entrepreneurs. The lectures will cover topics including Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grants, business plans for the development of medical devices, and patent and 510 k applications. Students will form teams of five and draft an SBIR grant and a business plan for a pacemaker, cardiac defibrillator, vascular stent, hemodialysis machine, tissue replacement, or a medical device of students’ own interests.

BIOM 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

BIOM 898 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Master’s Research

BIOM 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

BIOM 999 - (Credit as arranged) (S-SS)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.


Chemical Engineering

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CHE 615 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Thermodynamics
Prerequisite: Undergraduate-level thermodynamics or instructor permission.
Development of the thermodynamic laws and derived relations. Application of relations to properties of pure and multicomponent systems at equilibrium in the gaseous, liquid, and solidphases. Prediction and calculation of phase and reaction equilibria in practical systems.

CHE 618 - (3) (Y)
Chemical Reaction Engineering
Prerequisite: CHE 625 and 665.
Fundamentals of chemical reaction kinetics and mechanisms; experimental methods of determining reaction rates; introduction to heterogeneous catalysis; application of chemical kinetics, along with mass-transfer theory, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics, to the design and operation of chemical reactors.

CHE 625 - (3) (Y)
Transport Processes
Prerequisite: Undergraduate transport processes; corequisite: CHE 665.
Integrated introduction to fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer. Development of the basic equations of change for transport of momentum, energy, and mass in continuous media. Applications with exact solutions, consistent approaches to limiting cases and approximate solutions to formulate the relations to be solved in more complicated problems.

CHE 630 - (3) (Y)
Mass Transfer
Prerequisite: CHE 625 and 665.
Fundamental principles common to mass transfer phenomena, with emphasis on mass transfer in diverse chemical engineering situations. Detailed consideration of fluxes, diffusion with and without convection, interphase mass transfer with chemical reaction, and applications.

CHE 635 - (3) (Y)
Process Control and Dynamics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduction to dynamics and control of process systems, controllers, sensors, and final control elements. Development and application of time- and frequency-domain characterizations of subsystems for stability analyses of closed control loops. State-space models, principles of sampled-data analysis and digital control techniques. Elementary systems identification with emphasis on dead time, distributed parameters, and nonlinearities.

CHE 642 - (3) (Y)
Applied Surface Chemistry
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with emphasis on thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena; applications such as emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, flow through porous media, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, electrocapillarity.

CHE 648 - (3) (Y)
Bioseparations Engineering
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Principles of bioseparations engineering including specialized unit operations not normally covered in regular chemical engineering courses. Processing operations downstream of the initial manufacture of biotechnology products, including product recovery, separations, purification, and ancillary operations such as sterile processing, clean-in place and regulatory aspects. Bioprocess integration and design aspects.

CHE 649 - (3) (Y)
Polymer Chemistry and Engineering
Prerequisite: CHE 321 or instructor permission.
Analyzes the mechanisms and kinetics of various polymerization reactions; relations between the molecular structure and polymer properties, and how these properties can be influenced by the polymerization process; fundamental concepts of polymer solution and melt rheology. Applications to polymer processing operations, such as extrusion, molding, and fiber spinning. Three lecture hours.

CHE 665 - (3) (Y)
Techniques for Chemical Engineering Analysis and Design
Prerequisite: Undergraduate differential equations, transport processes, and chemical reaction engineering.
Methods for analysis of steady state and transient chemical engineering problems arising in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, mass transfer, kinetics, and reactor design.

CHE 674 - (4) (Y)
Process Design and Economics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Factors that determine the genesis and evolution of a process. Principles of marketing and technical economics and modern process design principles and techniques, including computer simulation with optimization.

CHE 716 - (3) (SI)
Applied Statistical Mechanics
Prerequisite: CHE 615, or other graduate-level thermodynamics course, and instructor permission.
Introduction to statistical mechanics and its methodologies such as integral equations, computer simulation and perturbation theory. Applications such as phase equilibria, adsorption, transport properties, electrolyte solutions.

CHE 744 - (3) (SI)
Electrochemical Engineering
Prerequisite: Graduate-level transport phenomena (e.g., CHE 625) and graduate-level mathematical techniques (e.g., CHE 665), or instructor permission.
Electrochemical phenomena and processes from a chemical engineering viewpoint. Application of thermodynamics, electrode kinetics, interfacial phenomena, and transport processes to electrochemical systems such as batteries, rotating disk electrodes, corrosion of metals, and semiconductors. Influence of coupled kinetics, interfacial, and transport phenomena on current distribution and mass transfer in a variety of electrochemical systems.

CHE 793 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

CHE 795 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

CHE 796 - (1) (S)
Graduate Seminar
Weekly meetings of graduate students and faculty for presentations and discussion of research in academic and industrial organizations. May be repeated.

CHE 819 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Chemical Engineering Kinetics and Reaction Engineering
Prerequisite: CHE 618 or instructor permission.
Advanced study of reacting systems, such as experimental methods, heterogeneous catalysis, polymerization kinetics, kinetics of complex reactions, reactor stability, and optimization.

CHE 820 - (3) (SI)
Modeling of Biological Processes in Environmental Systems
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Use of mathematical models to describe processes such as biological treatment of chemical waste, including contaminant degradation and bacterial growth, contaminant and bacterial transport, and adsorption. Engineering analyses of treatment processes such as biofilm reactors, sequenced batch reactors, biofilters and in situ bioremediation. May include introduction to hydrogeology, microbiology, transport phenomena and reaction kinetics relevant to environmental systems; application of material and energy balances in the analysis of environmental systems; and dimensional analysis and scaling. Guest lectures by experts from industry, consulting firms and government agencies to discuss applications of these bioremediation technologies.

CHE 833 - (3) (SI)
Specialized Separation Processes
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Less conventional separation processes, such as chromatography, ion-exchange, membranes, and crystallization using in-depth and modern chemical engineering methods. Student creativity and participation through development and presentation of individual course projects.

CHE 881, 882 - (3) (SI)
Special Topics in Chemical Engineering
Prerequisite: Permission of the staff.
Special subjects at an advanced level under the direction of staff members.

CHE 893 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

CHE 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

CHE 898 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Master’s Research
Formal record of student commitment to master’s thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

CHE 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

CHE 999 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.


Civil Engineering

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CE 601 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Mechanics of Materials
Prerequisite: Undergraduate mechanics and mathematics.
Reviews basic stress-strain concepts; constitutive relations. Studies unsymmetrical bending, shear center, and shear flow. Analyzes curved flexural members, beams on elastic foundation, torsion, bending, and twisting of thin walled sections. Cross-listed as AM 601.

CE 602 - (3) (Y)
Continuum Mechanics with Applications
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as APMA 602, AM 602, MAE 602.

CE 603 - (3) (Y)
Computational Solid Mechanics
Corequisite: CE 602.
Analyzes the variational and computational mechanics of solids, potential energy, complementary energy, virtual work, Reissner’s principle, Ritz and Galerkin methods; displacement, force and mixed methods of analysis; finite element analysis, including shape functions, convergence and integration; and applications in solid mechanics. Cross-listed as AM 603, MAE 603.

CE 604 - (3) (E)
Plates and Shells|
Prerequisite: APMA 641 and CE 601 or 602.
Includes the classical analysis of plates and shells of various shapes; closed-form numerical and approximate methods of solution of governing partial differential equations; and advanced topics (large deflection theory, thermal stresses, orthotropic plates). Cross-listed as AM 604, MAE 604.

CE 607 - (3) (SI)
Theory of Elasticity
Prerequisite: AM/CE/MAE 602 or instructor permission.
Review of the concepts of stress, strain, equilibrium, compatibility; Hooke’s law (isotropic materials); displacement and stress formulations of elasticity problems; plane stress and strain problems in rectangular coordinates (Airy’s stress function approach); plane stress and strain problems in polar coordinates, axisymmetric problems; torsion of prismatic bars (semi-inverse method using real function approach); thermal stress; and energy methods. Cross-listed as AM 607 and MAE 607.

CE 613 - (3) (Y)
Infrastructure Management
Prerequisite: CE 444 or instructor permission.
Studies the tools required to formulate a prioritization procedure that leads to a realistic and rational way of establishing candidate projects for priority programming at both the network and project level pavement management systems. Topics include methods for obtaining distress measurements and pavement condition ratings for flexible and rigid pavements; prioritizing procedures for establishing priority listings for rehabilitation and maintenance activities.

CE 615 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Soil Mechanics
Prerequisite: CE 316.
Analyzes the chemistry and physics of soils, strength and deformation characteristics of soils, time rate of consolidation, earth pressures, bearing capacity, seepage, and slope stability.

CE 616 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Foundations
Prerequisite: CE 316 and 326.
Topics include subsurface investigation, control of groundwater, analysis of sheeting and bracing systems, shallow foundations, pile foundations, retaining walls, bridge abutments, caissons and cofferdams.

CE 620 - (3) (Y)
Energy Principles in Mechanics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Derivation, interpretation, and application to engineering problems of the principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work. Related theorems such as the principles of the stationary value of the total potential and complementary energy, Castigiliano’s Theorems, theorem of least work, and unit force and displacement theorems. Introduction to generalized, extended, mixed, and hybrid principles. Variational methods of approximation, Hamilton’s principle, and Lagrange’s equations of motion. Approximate solutions to problems in structural mechanics by use of variational theorems. Cross-listed as AM 620, MAE 620.

CE 623 - (3) (Y)
Vibrations
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics include free and forced vibration of undamped and damped single-degree-of-freedom systems and undamped multi-degree-of-freedom systems; use of Lagrange’s equations, Laplace transform, matrix formulation, and other solution methods; normal mode theory; introduction to vibration of continuous systems. Cross- listed as AM 623, MAE 623.

CE 631 - (3) (E)
Intelligent Transportation Systems
Prerequisite: CE 633, 635, and 636 or 638.
Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) can best be defined as the application of information technology to the surface transportation system. This technology, which includes communications, sensors, and computer hardware and software, supports both travelers and transportation providers in making effective decisions. Provides an introduction to the concepts of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) through a systems engineering case study approach. Students work in teams on ITS case studies through the course of the semester. The cases are actual problems for state and federal departments of transportation. Provides students with experience applying systems engineering, exposure to ITS concepts, and opportunities to examine advanced ITS technology.

CE 633 - (3) (Y)
Transportation Systems Planning and Analysis I
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Introduces the legal requirements, framework, and principles of urban and statewide planning. Focuses on describing and applying the methodology of the forecasting system of the transportation planning process, including inventory (data collection and information systems), forecasts of population and economic activity, network analysis, and travel demand analysis. Also introduces computerized models for transportation planning.

CE 634 - (3) (Y)
Geographic Information Systems
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Introduces geographic information systems (GIS) through reading, lecture, discussion, research, and hands-on experience gained through laboratory work using the ArcView GIS package. The primary objective of this course is to investigate the GIS application process.

CE 635 - (3) (Y)
Intermodal Transportation
Prerequisite: CE 633.
Studies the structure of domestic freight and passenger transportation in the United States. Focuses on the integration of modes, economic impacts, national transportation policy and advanced technology. Case studies of contemporary examples of intermodal integration are explored.

CE 636 - (3) (Y)
Traffic Operations
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Covers the methods for evaluating the impact on the quality of traffic operations due to the interaction of the three main components of the highway mode: the driver, the vehicles, and the road. Includes the collection and analysis of traffic operations data, fundamentals of traffic flow theory, analysis of capacity and level of service and accident analysis.

CE 637 - (3) (IR)
Transportation Safety Engineering
Prerequisite: CE 344 and 444 or instructor permission.
A study of different transportation systems management strategies, including their long-range impact on efficient use of the systems and on safety. Focuses on traffic signals, isolated intersections, arterials and networks, geometrics, HOV lanes, and safety. A case study will also be conducted of a system in operation.

CE 638 - (3) (Y)
Public Transportation
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Study of the application of transportation systems and technologies in an urban context. Focuses on the management and operation of public transit systems, and comparative costs and capabilities of transit modes.

CE 639 - (3) (IR)
Financing Transportation Infrastructure
Prerequisite: CE 635.
The financing of transportation systems and services is an important element in the process of developing new or renovated facilities. This course develops familiarity with financing techniques that have been proposed or used by localities and state agencies. Consideration is given to advantages and disadvantages and the conditions appropriate to their application.

CE 640 - (3) (Y)
Wastewater Treatment
Prerequisite: CE 430 or instructor permission.
Presents a concise summary of wastewater treatment processes, with emphasis on applications to municipal and industrial wastewaters. Physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes are discussed. Also covers practices of removing conventional and toxic pollutants in wastewaters.

CE 641 - (3) (Y)
Water Quality Modeling
Prerequisite: CE 430 or instructor permission.
A first course in surface water quality modeling. Emphasizes the basic understanding of the mechanisms and interactions to various types of water quality behavior. Designed to meet a very simple need–dissemination of the fundamentals and principles underlying the mathematical modeling techniques used to analyze the quality of surface waters. Students practice wasteload allocations using a variety of water quality models on microcomputer systems.

CE 644 - (3) (Y)
Water Chemistry for Environmental Engineering
Prerequisite: CHEM 151 and 151L, and graduate standing.
Teaches the basic principles of inorganic and organic chemistry as applied to problems in environmental engineering, including water and wastewater treatment, contaminant hydrology, and hazardous-waste management. Specific topics include analytical instrumentation, acid-base chemistry, reaction kinetics, precipitation and dissolution, organic and surface chemistry, and chlorine chemistry for water disinfection.

CE 653 - (3) (Y)
Hydrology
Prerequisite: CE 336 or instructor permission.
Stresses the quantitative description and the physical basis of hydrology. Both deterministic and stochastic methodology are applied to the analysis of the hydrologic cycle, namely, precipitation, evaporation, overland flow and stream flow, infiltration, and groundwater flow. The use of computer simulation models, especially microcomputer based models, is emphasized.

CE 655 - (3) (Y)
Ground-Water Hydrology
Prerequisite: CS 101, CE 315, CE 336, or equivalent.
Topics include Darcy’s Law, fluid potential, hydraulic conductivity, heterogeneity and anisotropy, the unsaturated zone, compressibility, transmissivity and storativity, the 3-D equation of ground-water flow, steady-state and transient regional ground-water flow, and well hydraulics, including discussions involving Theis’ Inverse Method, Jacob’s Method, slug test analyses, and the principle of superposition. Students solve transient, one-dimensional and steady-state, two-dimensional ground-water flow problems by solving the governing partial differential equations by the finite-difference technique. Also includes numerical solution of tridiagonal systems of linear equations, truncation errors, and stability analysis. Requires writing computer programs using Fortran, C++, or an equivalent.

CE 656 - (3) (Y)
Environmental Systems Management
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Emphasizes the formulation of environmental management issues as optimization problems. Simulation models are presented and then combined with optimization algorithms. Environmental systems to be addressed include stream quality, air quality, water supply, waste management, groundwater remediation, and reservoir operations. Optimization techniques presented include linear, integer, and separable programming, dynamic programming and nonlinear programming.

CE 665 - (3) (Y)
Mechanics of Composite Materials
Prerequisite: Knowledge of strength of materials and a computer language.
Analyzes the properties and mechanics of fibrous, laminated composites; stress, strain, equilibrium, and tensor notation; micromechanics, lamina, laminates, anisotropic materials, classical lamination theory, stiffness and strength, interlaminar stresses, fabrication, and test methods; thermal stresses, analysis, design and computerized implementation. Cross-listed as AM 665.

CE 666 - (3) (Y)
Stress Analysis of Composites
Prerequisite: CE 665 or AM 665.
Focuses on 3-D anisotropic constitutive theory, edge effects and interlaminar stresses, failure criteria, fracture, anisotropic elasticity, micromechanics, laminated plates, hygro-thermal effects, conduction and diffusion. Cross-listed as AM 666.

CE 671 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Finite Element Methods
Prerequisite: CE 471 or equivalent.
Focuses on the fundamentals and basic concepts of the finite element method; modeling and discretization; application to one-dimensional problems; direct stiffness method; element characteristics; interpolation functions; extension to plane stress problems.

CE 672 - (3) (Y)
Numerical Methods in Structural Mechanics
Prerequisite: CE 471.
Focuses on solutions to the static, dynamic, and buckling behavior of determinate and indeterminate structures by numerical procedures, including finite difference and numerical integration techniques.

CE 675 - (3) (SI)
Theory of Structural Stability
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces the elastic stability of structural and mechanical systems. Studies classical stability theory and buckling of beams, trusses, frames, arches, rings and thin plates and shells. Also covers the derivation of design formulas, computational formulation and implementation. Cross-listed as AM 675.

CE 677 - (3) (SI)
Risk and Reliability in Structural Engineering
Prerequisite: Background in probability and statistics.
Studies the fundamental concepts of structural reliability; definitions of performance and safety, uncertainty in loadings, materials and modeling. Analysis of loadings and resistance. Evaluation of existing design codes. Development of member design criteria, including stability, fatigue and fracture criteria; and the reliability of structural systems.

CE 681 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Design of Metal Structures
Prerequisite: CE 401 or equivalent.
Analyzes the behavior and design of structural elements and systems, including continuous beams, plate girders, composite steel-concrete members, members in combined bending and compression. Structural frames, framing systems, eccentric connections, and torsion and torsional stability are also studied.

CE 683 - (3) (O)
Prestressed Concrete Design
Prerequisite: CE 326 or equivalent.
Analyzes prestressing materials and concepts, working stress analysis and design for flexure, strength analysis and design for flexure, prestress losses, design for shear, composite prestressed beams, continuous prestressed beams, prestressed concrete systems concepts, load balancing, slab design.

CE 684 - (3) (E)
Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design
Prerequisite: CE 326.
Study of advanced topics in reinforced concrete design, including design of slender columns, deflections, torsion in reinforced concrete, design of continuous frames, and two-way floor systems. Introduction to design of tall structures in reinforced concrete, and design of shear walls.

CE 685 - (3) (SI)
Experimental Mechanics
Prerequisite: CE 323.
Analyzes the theories and techniques for the determination of static and dynamic stresses, strains, and deformations. Studies include photoelastic, electrical, mechanical, and optical methods and instruments. Both models and full-scale specimens will be used in experimental testing.

CE 691 - (3) (IR)
Special Topics in Civil Engineering
Detailed study of special topics in civil engineering. Master’s-level graduate students.

CE 693 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member. Master’s-level graduate students.

CE 695 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary. Master’s-level graduate students.

CE 696 - (1) (Y)
Graduate Seminar
Weekly meeting of master’s-level graduate students and faculty for presentation and discussion of contemporary research and practice in civil engineering. This seminar is offered for credit every spring semester and should be taken by all students in the master’s program.

CE 700 - (0) (Y)
Graduate Seminar
Prerequisite: For students who have established resident credit.
Weekly meeting of graduate students and faculty for presentation and discussion of contemporary research and practice in civil engineering. This seminar is offered every spring semester.

CE 724 - (3) (Y)
Dynamics of Structures
Prerequisite: Concrete and metal structure design and CE 623.
Study of the dynamic behavior of such structures as beams, rigid frames, floors, bridges, and multi-story buildings under the action of various disturbing forces such as wind, blasts, earthquakes, vehicles, machinery, etc.

CE 725 - (3) (Y)
Random Vibrations
Prerequisite: A background in probability theory and vibration analysis.
Topics include a review of probability theory; stochastic processes, with an emphasis on continuous, continuously parametered processes; mean square calculus, Markov processes, diffusion equations, Gaussian processes, and Poisson processes; response of SDOF, MDOF, and continuous linear and nonlinear models to random excitation; upcrossings, first passage problems, fatigue and stability considerations; Monte Carlo simulation, analysis of digital time series data, and filtered excitation models. Cross-listed as AM 725.

CE 731 - (3) (IR)
Project Planning
Prerequisite: CE 632 and 633.
Analyzes the planning of public facilities in contemporary society; review of common social, economic, and environmental impact considerations in the location and design of corridor or point facilities; cost parameters; comprehensive methods of evaluating and combining tangible and intangible factors including cost benefit, cost effectiveness, goals, achievement, planning balance sheet, risk profiles, preference theories, mapping, and factor analysis methods; case studies.

CE 732 - (3) (E)
Transportation Systems Planning and Analysis II
Prerequisite: CE 633, 634, and 636.
Introduces the non-travel impacts of transportation systems and the methodologies used to capture them for project evaluation; to develop and illustrate methodologies used for evaluating the effectiveness of transportation systems/projects including benefit-cost analysis and multi-objective decision models, and; to illustrate the analysis of different alternatives.

CE 734 - (3) (IR)
Traffic Flow Theory
Prerequisite: CE 636.
Analyzes theoretical and computer applications of mathematical models of traffic flow; deterministic and stochastic traffic flow models; queuing theory and its application including cases where arrival rates exceed service rates; acceleration noise and traffic simulation.

CE 738 - (3) (O)
Integrated Transportation Systems Models
Prerequisite: CE 636.
Introduces the current and advanced optimization and simulation computer models used in traffic operations. Increased familiarity with the concepts and methodologies associated with selecting an appropriate model for a given situation. Covers the advantages and disadvantages of the models considered and is project-oriented, with students spending a significant amount of time in selecting and using these models to solve "real world" problems.

CE 739 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Topics in Transportation
Focuses on selected contemporary problems in transportation that are of interest to the students and faculty. Seminars, guest lecturers, projects.

CE 742 - (3) (SI)
Modeling Environmental Fate and Effects of Contaminants
Prerequisite: CE 641 or instructor permission.
Designed as a follow-up course for Water Quality Modeling, this course covers a number of modeling applications. Designed to apply water quality models to regulatory oriented water quality problems. Emphasis on reading water quality data using models, the results of which serve as a rational basis for making water quality control decisions. Each student conducts an individual water quality modeling study using actual data.

CE 743 - (3) (E)
Theory of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport
Prerequisite: CE 655 or equivalent.
Provides a theoretical framework for understanding fluid flow and contaminant transport in porous media. Topics include the properties of a porous medium, including types of phases, soil and clay mineralogy, surface tension and capillarity, soil surface area, and soil organic-matter composition; the derivation of the general equations for multi-phase fluid flow and multi-species solute transport; and the fundamentals of the fate and transport processes of organic pollutants in ground-water systems, including advection, dispersion, diffusion, sorption, hydrolysis, and volatilization.

CE 746 - (3) (Y)
Groundwater Modeling
Prerequisite: CE 655 or instructor permission.
Introduces the fundamentals of modeling groundwater systems. Emphasizes the evaluation, development, and application of computer models. Modeling techniques include analytical solutions, finite difference and finite element methods, particle tracking, and inverse modeling. Models are applied to flow and transport in saturated and unsaturated groundwater systems.

CE 748 - (3) (SI)
Design of Waste Containment Facilities
Corequisite: CE 644 and 655.
Covers concepts important to the design and construction of new waste disposal facilities, and to the closure of existing disposal facilities. Emphasizes the fundamentals of contaminant behavior in a porous media, engineering designs to reduce contaminant migration, and issues related to the operation, monitoring, and closure of waste disposal facilities.

CE 750 - (3) (SI)
Hazardous Waste Site Characterization and Remediation
Corequisite: CE 644 and 655.
Covers concepts important to the characterization and remediation of hazardous contamination of soil and groundwater. Theoretical concepts of contaminant behavior in the subsurface, methods of contaminant detection, and remedial systems are combined with issues of practical implementation at the field scale.

CE 754 - (3) (SI)
Stormwater Management and Nonpoint Source Pollution Control
Prerequisite: CE 653 or instructor permission.
Discusses nonpoint source pollution in general, and stormwater-induced pollution in particular. Emphasizes stormwater management planning and design in an urban setting. An integrated watershed management approach in nonpoint source pollution control is described. Topics include sources and impact of nonpoint pollution; stormwater regulations; combined sewer overflow problems; best management practices; such as detention ponds and constructed wetlands; design methodologies; and institutional considerations.

CE 767 - (3) (SI)
Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media
Prerequisite: CE 602.
Analyzes averaging principles, equivalent homogeneity, effective moduli, bounding principles, self-consistent schemes, composite spheres, concentric cylinders, three phase model, repeating cell models, inelastic and nonlinear effects, thermal effects, isotropic and anisotropic media, strength and fracture. Cross-listed as APMA 767, AM 767.

CE 773 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Finite Element Applications in Structural Engineering
Prerequisite: CE 671 or equivalent.
Development and application of two- and three-dimensional finite elements; plate bending; isoparametric formulation; solid elements; nonlinear element formulation with application to material and geometric nonlinearities; stability problems; formulation and solution of problems in structural dynamics; use of commercial computer codes.

CE 776 - (3) (SI)
Non-Linear Structural Systems
Prerequisite: CE 671, 672, or instructor permission.
Discussion of deflection theory. Analysis of arches, suspension bridges, cable supported roof systems, guyed towers, lattice domes and space trusses. Focuses on wind-induced vibration, creep effects, and the visco-elastic behavior of structures.

CE 780 - (3) (SI)
Optimum Structural Design
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Introduces the basic concepts, numerical methods, and applications of optimum design to civil engineering structures; formulation of the optimum design problems; development of analysis techniques including linear and nonlinear programming and optimality criteria; examples illustrating application to steel and concrete structures.

CE 782 - (3) (E-O)
Design of Slab and Shell Structures
Prerequisite: CE 683 or 684.
Using both exact and simplified methods of thin shell theory, such structures as domes, cylindrical roofs, tanks, hyperbolic paraboloids, folder plate roofs, and suspension forms are analyzed and designed. Effects of stiffening beams and edge stress are studied. Considers erection, economy and aesthetics.

CE 791 - (3) (IR)
Special Topics in Civil Engineering
Detailed study of special topics in civil engineering. Doctoral-level graduate students.

CE 793 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Independent Study
Detailed independent study of graduate course material under the guidance of a faculty member. Doctoral-level graduate students.

CE 795 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary. Doctoral-level graduate student.

CE 796 - (1) (Y)
Graduate Seminar
Weekly meeting of doctoral-level graduate students and faculty for presentation and discussion of contemporary research and practice in civil engineering. This seminar is offered for credit every spring semester and should be taken by all students in the Ph.D. program.

CE 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

CE 898 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Thesis
Formal record of student commitment to master’s thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

CE 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

CE 999 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor.


Computer Science

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CS 551 - (3) (SI)
Special Topics in Computer Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course content varies by section and is selected to fill timely and special interests and needs of students. See CS 751 for example topics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

CS 571 - (3) (Y)
Translation Systems
Prerequisite: CS 333 or instructor permission.
Study of the theory, design, and specification of translation systems. Translation systems are the tools used to translate a source language program to a form that can be executed. Using rigorous specification techniques to describe the inputs and outputs of the translators and applying classical translation theory, working implementations of various translators are designed, specified, and implemented.

CS 586 - (3) (Y)
Real-Time Systems
Prerequisites: CS 333 and CS 414, knowledge of C or C++, or instructor permission.
This course presents the underlying theory, concepts, and practice for real-time systems, such as avionics, process control, space travel, mobile computing and ubiquitous computing. The goals of the course include: introducing the unique problems that arise when time constraints are imposed on systems, identifying basic theory and the boundary between what is known today and what is still research, stressing a systems integration viewpoint in the sense of showing how everything fits together rather than presenting a collection of isolated solutions, and addressing multiprocessing and distributed systems. This course also presents some of the basic results from what might be called the classical technology of real-time computing and presents these results in the context of new applications of this technology in ubiquitous/pervasive computer systems.

CS 587 - (3) (Y)
Security in Information Systems
Prerequisites: CS 340 and either CS 457 or CS 414 or instructor permission.
This course focuses on security as an aspect of a variety of software systems. We will consider software implementations of security related policies in the context of operating systems, networks, and data bases. Topics include: operating system protection mechanisms, intrusion detection systems, formal models of security, cryptography and associated security protocols, data base security, worms, viruses, network and distributed system security, and policies of privacy and confidentiality.

CS 588 - (3) (Y)
Cryptology: Principles and Applications
Prerequisites: CS 302 or instructor permission.
Introduces the basic principles and mathematics of cryptology including information theory, classical ciphers, symmetric key cryptosystems and public-key cryptosystems. Develops applications of cryptology such as anonymous email, digital cash and code signing.

CS 616 - (3) (Y)
Knowledge-Based Systems
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Introduces the fundamental concepts for research, design, and development of knowledge-based systems. Emphasizes theoretical foundations of artificial intelligence, problem solving, search, and decision making with a view toward applications. Students develop a working knowledge-based system in a realistic application domain. Cross-listed as SYS 616.

CS 644 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Parallel Computing
Prerequisites: CS 308, 414, and 415, or instructor permission.
Introduces the basics of parallel computing. Covers parallel computation models, systems, languages, compilers, architectures, and algorithms. Provides a solid foundation on which advanced seminars on different aspects of parallel computation can be based. Emphasizes the practical application of parallel systems. There are several programming assignments.

CS 645 - (3) (Y)
Computer Graphics
Prerequisite: Knowledge of C/C++.
Analyzes display devices, line and circle generators; clippings and windowing; data structures; 2-D picture transformations; hidden line and surface algorithms; shading algorithms; free form surfaces; color graphics; 3-D picture transformation. Cross-listed as ECE 635.

CS 650 - (3) (Y)
Building Complex Software Systems
Prerequisite: First-year standing as a CS graduate, good programming skills, undergraduate mastery of operating systems and programming languages, or instructor permission.
This course requires actual implementation of a complex, challenging system such as those encountered in today’s world. Most systems undertaken involve an external interface implementation, such as a real-time controller, robotic management, requiring sophisticated sensor input. Available implementation tools, such a CORBA, distributed RPC calls, and GUI interface systems are mastered as appropriate to the project. Similarly, relevant software engineering concepts, such as system specification and documentation methodologies are developed as appropriate to the project.

CS 651 - (3) (SI)
Special Topics in Computer Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course content varies by section and is selected to fill timely and special interests and needs of students. See CS 751 for example topics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

CS 654 - (3) (Y)
Computer Architecture
Prerequisite: CS 333 or proficiency in assembly language programming.
Study of representative digital computer organization with emphasis on control unit logic, input/output processors and devices, asynchronous processing, concurrency, and parallelism. Memory hierarchies.

CS 655 - (3) (Y)
Programming Languages
Prerequisite: CS 415 or equivalent.
Examines modern and non-imperative languages, the theoretical techniques used to design and understand them, and the implementation techniques used to make them run. Topics include functional languages, object-oriented languages, language safety and classification of errors, type systems, formal semantics, abstraction mechanisms, memory management, and unusual control-flow mechanisms. Example languages include Standard ML, Modula-3, CLU, Scheme, Prolog, and Icon.

CS 656 - (3) (Y)
Operating Systems
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in OS; CS 654 or instructor permission.
Covers advanced principles of operating systems. Technical topics include support for distributed OSs; microkernels and OS architectures; processes and threads; IPC; files servers; distributed shared memory; object-oriented OSs; reflection in OSs; real-time kernels; multiprocessing; multimedia and quality of service; mobile computing; and parallelism in I/O.

CS 660 - (3) (Y)
Theory of Computation
Prerequisite: CS 302 or equivalent.
Analyzes formal languages, the Chomsky hierarchy, formal computation and machine models, finite automata, pushdown automata, Turing machines, Church’s thesis, reductions, decidability and undecidability, and NP-completeness.

CS 661 - (3) (Y)
Design and Analysis of Algorithms
Prerequisite: CS 432 or equivalent.
Analyzes concepts in algorithm design, problem solving strategies, proof techniques, complexity analysis, upper and lower bounds, sorting and searching, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, probabilistic algorithms, intractability and NP-completeness, transformations, and approximation algorithms.

CS 662 - (3) (Y)
Database Systems
Prerequisite: CS462 or equivalent.
Studies new database systems, emphasizing database design and related system issues. Explores advanced topics such as object-oriented and real-time database systems, data warehousing, data mining, and workflow. Makes use of either commercial or research database systems for in-class projects.

CS 682 - (3) (Y)
Digital Picture Processing
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Explores basic concepts of image formation and image analysis: imaging geometries, sampling, filtering, edge detection, Hough transforms, region extraction and representation, extracting and modeling three-dimensional objects. Cross-listed as ECE 682.

CS 685 - (3) (Y)
Software Engineering
Prerequisite: CS 340 or equivalent.
Analyzes project management, software tools, requirements and specification methods; top-down, bottom-up, and data-flow design; structured programming, information hiding, programming language issues, and coding standards; software development environments, fault tolerance principles, and testing.

CS 693 - (Credit as arranged) (SI)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

CS 696 - (1) (Y)
Computer Science Perspectives
Prerequisite: CS graduate student or instructor permission.
This "acclimation" seminar helps new graduate students become productive researchers. Faculty and visitors speak on a wide variety of research topics, as well as on tools available to researchers, including library resources, various operating systems, UNIX power tools, programming languages, software development and version control systems, debugging tools, user interface toolkits, word processors, publishing systems, HTML, JAVA, browsers, Web tools, and personal time management.

CS 715 - (3) (SI)
Performance Analysis of Communication Networks
Prerequisite: CE/ECE 457, APMA 310, or instructor permission.
Analyzes the topologies arising in communication networks; queuing theory; Markov Chains and ergodicity conditions; theory of regenerative processes; routing algorithms; multi-access and random-access transmission algorithms; mathematical methodologies for throughput and delay analyses and evaluations; performance evaluation; performance monitoring; local area networks (LANs); interactive LANs. Cross-listed as ECE 715.

CS 716 - (3) (Y)
Artificial Intelligence
Prerequisite: CS 616 or SYS 616.
In-depth study of a few major areas historically considered to be part of artificial intelligence. Emphasizes the design considerations involved in automatic theorem proving, natural language understanding, and machine learning. Cross-listed as SYS 716.

CS 751 - (3) (SI)
Selected Topics in Computer Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Content varies based on the interest and needs of students. Topics may include safety critical systems, parallel processing, information retrieval, data communications, computer networks, real-time computing, distributed multimedia systems, electronic commerce, and advanced combinatorics and graph theory.. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

CS 756 - (3) (O)
Models of Computing Systems
Prerequisite: CS 656 and either SYS 605 or ECE 611.
Explores studies of user behavior, program behavior, and selected aspects of computer systems such as scheduling, resource allocation, memory sharing, paging, or deadlocks. Analyzes mathematical models and simulation, the use of measurements in the formulation and validation of models, and performance evaluation and prediction.

CS 757 - (3) (Y)
Computer Networks
Prerequisite: CS 656 or instructor permission.
Introduction: switching methods, network services, layered protocol architectures, OSI reference model; Physical Layer: transmission media, modulation, encoding; Data Link Layer: framing, error detection and correction, ARQ protocols, data link layer protocols, multiplexing; Local Area Networks: multiple access protocols, local network topologies, CSMA/CD, token bus, token ring, FDDI, DQDB; Network Layer: packet switching, routing algorithms, traffic control, internetworking, network protocols; Transport Layer: transport services, connection management, transport protocols; Special topics such multimedia, ATM, and protocol design and verification.

CS 771 - (3) (Y)
Compilers
Prerequisite: CS 660 and 655, or equivalent.
Study of techniques used in the implementation of assemblers, compilers, and other translator systems. Analyzes the relationship of available techniques to the syntactic and semantic specification of languages.

CS 782 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Computer Vision
Prerequisite: CS 682.
Analyzes advanced topics in automated reconstruction of imaged objects and computer interpretation of imaged scenes; techniques for three-dimensional object reconstruction; computing motion parameters from sequences of images; computational frameworks for vision tasks such as regularization, and stochastic relaxation; approaches for autonomous navigation. Depth image analysis; novel imaging techniques and applications; and parallel architectures for computer vision. Cross-listed as ECE 782.

CS 793 - (Credit as arranged) (SI)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

CS 851 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
The exact syllabus for the seminar depends on the interests of the participants. Recent publications are read and analyzed. Student presentations followed by intense discussion. Original work and submission to conferences may be required. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

CS 854 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Computer Architecture
Prerequisite: CS 654 or instructor permission.
Studies selected advances in the architecture of computer systems. May include distribution processor systems, memory hierarchies, and secondary storage management schemes.

CS 855 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Programming Languages
Prerequisite: CS 655 or instructor permission.
Studies selected advanced topics in design, definition, and implementation of programming languages. Typical recent topics: parallel language design; formal semantics of programs. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

CS 856 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Operating Systems
Prerequisite: CS 656 or instructor permission.
Topics covered are generally chosen from one or more of the following operating system research areas: detailed case studies, distributed systems, global computing, distributed shared memory, real-time systems, object-oriented systems, security, multimedia, and mobile computing.

CS 860 - (3) (O)
Topics in Theoretical Computer Science
Prerequisite: CS 660 or instructor permission.
Study of selected formal topics in computer science, including computational geometry, advanced searching techniques, proximity and intersection problems, interconnection problems, VLSI CAD, amortized complexity analysis, approximation algorithms, zero-knowledge proofs, biological computing, and quantum computing.

CS 862 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Database Systems
Prerequisite: CS 662 or instructor permission.
Analyzes the implementation of database systems, concurrent and distributed access, backup, and security; query languages and optimization of query access; multi-attribute dependencies and retrieval. Data warehousing and web-based data systems are explored.

CS 882 - (3) (Y)
Special Topics in Computer Vision/Image Processing
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
For M.S. and Ph.D. students conducting research in image processing and machine vision. The contents vary with each semester and each instructor. An in-depth study of recent research in narrowly defined areas of computer vision/image processing. Readings from recently published articles in journals and conference proceedings are assigned. Cross-listed as ECE 882.

CS 885 - (3) (O)
Topics in Software Engineering
Prerequisite: CS 685 or instructor permission.
A special topics course in software engineering. Topics are determined by the individual instructor, but might include software reliability; engineering real-time systems; managing large software projects; resource estimation; validation and verification; or advanced programming environments.

CS 895 - (3) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research for the Master of Computer Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor.

CS 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students who are teaching assistants.

CS 898 - (Credit as arranged) (SI)
Thesis
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

CS 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.

CS 999 - (Credit as arranged) (SI)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.


Electrical and Computer Engineering

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ECE 525 - (3) (SI)
Introduction to Robotics
Prerequisite: ECE 402 or 621, or equivalent.
Analyzes kinematics, dynamics and control of robot manipulators, and sensor and actuator technologies (including machine vision) relevant to robotics. Includes a robotics system design project in which students completely design a robotic system for a particular application and present it in class. Includes literature related to emerging technologies and Internet resources relevant to robotics.

ECE 541 - (3) (SI)
Optics and Lasers
Prerequisite: ECE 303, 309, 323.
Reviews the electromagnetic principles of optics; Maxwell’s equations; reflection and transmission of electromagnetic fields at dielectric interfaces; Gaussian beams; interference and diffraction; laser theory with illustrations chosen from atomic, gas and semiconductor laser systems; detectors including photomultipliers and semiconductor-based detectors; and noise theory and noise sources in optical detection.

ECE 556 - (3) (Y)
Microwave Engineering I
Prerequisite: ECE 309 or instructor permission.
Design and analysis of passive microwave circuits. Topics include transmission lines, electromagnetic field theory, waveguides, microwave network analysis and signal flow graphs, impedance matching and tuning, resonators, power dividers and directional couplers, and microwave filters.

ECE 563 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to VLSI
Prerequisite: ECE 203, ECE 230.
Digital CMOS circuit design and analysis: combinational and sequential circuits. Computer microarchitecture: datapath, control, memory, I/O. Global design issues: clocking and interconnect. Design methodologies: custom, semicustom, automatic. Faults: testing and verification. VLSI circuit design, layout and implementation using the MOSIS service.

ECE 564 - (3) (Y)
Microelectronic Integrated Circuit Fabrication
Prerequisite: ECE 303 or equivalent.
Explores fabrication technologies for the manufacture of integrated circuits and microsystems. Emphasizes processes used for monolithic silicon-based systems and basic technologies for compound material devices. Topics include crystal properties and growth, Miller indices, Czochralski growth, impurity diffusion, concentration profiles, silicon oxidation, oxide growth kinetics, local oxidation, ion implantation, crystal annealing, photolithography and pattern transfer, wet and dry etching processes, anisotropic etches, plasma etching, reactive ion etching, plasma ashing, chemical vapor deposition and epitaxy; evaporation, sputtering, thin film evaluation, chemical-mechanical polishing, multilevel metal, device contacts, rapid thermal annealing, trench isolation, process integration, and wafer yield.

ECE 576 - (3) (Y)
Digital Signal Processing
Prerequisite: ECE 323 and 324, or equivalent.
Fundamentals of discrete time signal processing are presented. Topics include discrete-time linear systems, continuous time signal sampling and reconstruction, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Spectral analysis, Z-transform, FIR and IIR digital filter design, and digital filter implementations. Problem solving using MATLAB is required.

ECE 578 - (1.5) (Y)
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Prerequisite: ECE 323 and 324; corequisite: ECE576.
This course provides hands-on exposure to real-time digital signal sampling (DSP) using general-purpose DSP processors. The laboratory sequence explores sampling/reconstruction, aliasing, quantization errors, fast Fourier transform, spectral analysis, and FIR/IIR digital filter design and implementation. Programming is primarily in C++, with exposure to assembly coding.

ECE 586, 587 - (1-3) (SI)
Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A first-level graduate/advanced undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.

ECE 601 - (3) (SI)
Network Analysis and Synthesis
Prerequisite: ECE 204 and 324, or equivalent.
Design with active and passive elements is introduced from an immittance realization standpoint. Initially, the course deepens the student’s circuit theory to include general passive and active elements and their characterization and manipulation using matrix methods. Passive synthesis is then used as a foundation for active synthesis employing immittance-conversion devices The course also introduces some of the software packages available for approximation, network function extraction, circuit synthesis and tolerance analysis. This material provides a good background for continuing studies in signal processing, communications, passive or active circuit design.

ECE 602 - (3) (SI)
Electronic Systems
Prerequisite: ECE 204/307 or equivalent.
Explores frequency response and stability of feedback electronic circuits. Analysis and design of analog integrated circuits, such as operational amplifiers, multipliers, phase locked loops, A/D and D/A converters and their application to instrumentation, and control.

ECE 611 - (3) (Y)
Probability and Stochastic Processes
Prerequisite: APMA 310, MATH 310, or equivalent.
Topics include probability spaces (samples spaces, event spaces, probability measures); random variables and vectors (distribution functions, expectation, generating functions); and random sequences and processes; especially specification and classification. Includes detailed discussion of second-order stationary processes and Markov processes; inequalities, convergence, laws of large numbers, central limit theorem, ergodic, theorems; and MS estimation, Linear MS estimation, and the Orthogonality Principle.

ECE 613 - (3) (Y)
Communication Systems Engineering
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in probability.
A first graduate course in principles of communications engineering. Topics include a brief review of random process theory, principles of optimum receiver design for discrete and continuous messages, matched filters and correlation receivers, signal design, error performance for various signal geometries, Mary signaling, linear and nonlinear analog modulation, and quantization. The course also treats aspects of system design such as propagation, link power calculations, noise models, RF components, and antennas.

ECE 614 - (3) (Y)
Estimation Theory
Prerequisite: ECE 611 or instructor permission.
Presents estimation theory from a discrete-time viewpoint. One-half of the course is devoted to parameter estimation, and the other half to state estimation using Kalman filtering. The presentation blends theory with applications and provides the fundamental properties of, and interrelationships among, basic estimation theory algorithms. Although the algorithms are presented as a neutral adjunct to signal processing, the material is also appropriate for students with interests in pattern recognition, communications, controls, and related engineering fields.

ECE 621 - (3) (Y)
Linear Automatic Control Systems
Prerequisite: ECE 323 or instructor permission.
Provides a working knowledge of the analysis and design of linear automatic control systems using classical methods. Introduces state space techniques; dynamic models of mechanical, electrical, hydraulic and other systems; transfer functions; block diagrams; stability of linear systems, and Nyquist criterion; frequency response methods of feedback systems design and Bode diagram; Root locus method; System design to satisfy specifications; PID controllers; compensation using Bode plots and the root locus. Powerful software is used for system design. Cross-listed as MAE 651.

ECE 622 - (3) (Y)
Linear State Space Control Systems
Prerequisite: APMA 615, ECE 621, or instructor permission.
Studies linear dynamical systems emphasizing canonical representation and decomposition, state representation, controllability, observability, normal systems, state feedback and the decoupling problem. Representative physical examples. Cross-listed as MAE 652.

ECE 631 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Switching Theory
Prerequisite: ECE 230 or equivalent.
Review of Boolean Algebra; synchronous and asynchronous machine synthesis; functional decomposition; fault location and detection; design for testability techniques.

ECE 634 - (3) (Y)
Fault-Tolerant Computing
Examines techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include fault models and effects, fault avoidance techniques, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software redundancy, combinatorial reliability modeling, Markov reliability modeling, availability modeling, maintainability modeling, safety modeling, trade-off analysis, design for testability, and the testing of redundant digital systems. Includes a research project and investigation of current topics. Cross listed as CS 634.

ECE 635 - (3) (Y)
Computer Graphics in Engineering Design
Prerequisite: Knowledge of C.
Analyzes display devices, line and circle generators; clipping and windowing; data structures; 2-D picture transformations; hidden line and surface algorithm; shading algorithms; free form surfaces; color graphics; 3-D picture transformation. Cross-listed as CS 645.

ECE 642 - (3) (Y)
Optics for Optoelectronics
Prerequisite: ECE 541 or instructor permission.
Covers the electromagnetic applications of Maxwell’s equations in photonic devices such as the dielectric waveguide, fiber optic waveguide and Bragg optical scattering devices. Includes the discussion of the exchange of electromagnetic energy between adjacent guides, (i.e., mode coupling). Ends with an introduction to nonlinear optics. Examples of optical nonlinearity include second harmonic generation and soliton waves.

ECE 652 - (1.5) (Y)
Microwave Engineering Laboratory
Corequisite: ECE 556 or instructor permission.
Explores measurement and behavior of high-frequency circuits and components. Equivalent circuit models for lumped elements. Measurement of standing waves, power, and frequency. Use of vector network analyzers and spectrum analyzers. Computer-aided design, fabrication, and characterization of microstrip circuits.

ECE 655 - (3) (O)
Microwave Engineering II
Prerequisite: ECE 556 or instructor permission.
Explores theory and design of active microwave circuits. Review of transmission line theory, impedance matching networks and scattering matrices. Transistor s-parameters, amplifier stability and gain, and low-noise amplifier design. Other topics include noise in two-port microwave networks, negative resistance oscillators, injection-locked oscillators, video detectors, and microwave mixers.

ECE 663 - (3) (Y)
Solid State Devices
Prerequisite: ECE 303 or equivalent, or solid state materials/physics course.
Introduces semiconductor device operation based on energy bands and carrier statistics. Describes operation of p-n junctions and metal-semiconductor junctions. Extends this knowledge to descriptions of bipolar and field effect transistors, and other microelectronic devices. Related courses: ECE 564, 666, and 667.

ECE 666 - (1.5) (Y)
Microelectronic Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory
Corequisite: ECE 564.
Topics include the determination of semiconductor material parameters: crystal orientation, type, resistivity, layer thickness, and majority carrier concentration; silicon device fabrication and analysis techniques: thermal oxidation, oxide masking, solid state diffusion of intentional impurities, metal electrode evaporation, layer thickness determination by surface profiling and optical interferometer; MOS transistor design and fabrication using the above techniques, characterization, and verification of design models used.

ECE 667 - (3) (Y)
Semiconductor Materials and Devices
Prerequisite: Some background in solid state materials and elementary quantum principles.
Examines the fundamentals, materials, and engineering properties of semiconductors; and the integration of semiconductors with other materials to make optoelectronic and microelectronic devices. Includes basic properties of electrons in solids; electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of semiconductors; survey of available semiconductors and materials choice for device design; fundamental principles of important semiconductor devices; sub-micron engineering of semiconductors, metals, insulators and polymers for integrated circuit manufacturing; materials characterization techniques; and other electronic materials. Cross-listed as MSE 667.

ECE 673 - (3) (Y)
Analog Integrated Circuits
Prerequisite: ECE 303 and 307, or equivalent.
Design and analysis of analog integrated circuits. Topics include feedback amplifier analysis and design including stability, compensation, and offset-correction; layout and floor-planning issues associated with mixed-signal IC design; selected applications of analog circuits such as A/D and D/A converters, references, and comparators; and extensive use of CAD tools for design entry, simulation, and layout. Includes an analog integrated circuit design project.

ECE 682 - (3) (Y)
Digital Image Processing
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Analyzes the basic concepts of image formation and image analysis: imaging geometries, sampling, filtering, edge detection, Hough transforms, region extraction and representation, extracting and modeling three-dimension objects. Students will be assigned analytical and programming assignments to explore these concepts. Cross-listed as CS 682.

ECE 686, 687 - (3) (SI)
Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A first-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.

ECE 693 - (3) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

ECE 695 - (3-6) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. A project report is required at the completion of each semester. May be repeated as necessary.

ECE 712 - (3) (Y)
Digital Communications
Prerequisite: ECE 611.
An in-depth treatment of digital communications techniques and performance. Topics include performance of uncoded systems such as Mary, PSK, FSK, and multi-level signaling; orthogonal and bi-orthogonal codes; block and convolutional coding with algebraic and maximum likelihood decoding; burst correcting codes; efficiency and bandwidth; synchronization for carrier reference and bit timing; baseband signaling techniques; intersymbol interference; and equalization.

ECE 715 - (3) (O)
Performance Analysis of Communication Networks
Prerequisite: ECE /CS 457, APMA 310, or instructor permission.
Analyzes topologies arising in communication networks; queuing theory; Markov Chains and ergodicity conditions; theory of regenerative processes; routing algorithms; multiple-access and random-access transmission algorithms; mathematical methodologies for throughput and delay analyses and evaluations; performance evaluation; performance monitoring; local area networks (LANs); interactive LANs; multimedia and ATM networks. Cross-listed as CS 715.

ECE 717 - (3) (Y)
Information Theory and Coding
Prerequisite: ECE 611 or instructor permission.
A comprehensive treatment of information theory and its application to channel coding and source coding. Topics include the nature of information and its mathematical description for discrete and continuous sources; noiseless coding for a discrete source; channel capacity and channel coding theorems of Shannon; error correcting codes; introduction to rate distortion theory and practice of data compression; information and statistical measures.

ECE 722 - (3) (SI)
Robotics
Prerequisite: ECE 525, 621, or instructor permission.
Analyzes kinematics of manipulator robots in terms of homogeneous matrices, solution of the kinematics equations; differential translations and rotations, the Jacobian and the inverse Jacobian; manipulator path control; manipulator dynamics, the Lagrange’s and Newton’s formulations; manipulator control; principles of machine vision applied to robots, sensors, edge and feature detection, object location and recognition; stereo vision and ranging; programming of robot tasks.

ECE 723 - (3) (O)
Optimal Control Systems
Prerequisite: ECE 622 or instructor permission.
Analyzes the development and utilization of Pontryagin’s maximum principle, the calculus of variations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory and dynamic programming in solving optimal control problems; performance criteria including time, fuel, and energy; optimal regulators and trackers for quadratic cost index designed via the Ricatti equation; introduction to numerical optimization techniques. Cross-listed as MAE 753.

ECE 725 - (3) (SI)
Multivariable Robust Control Systems
Prerequisite: ECE 622 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Studies advanced topics in modern multivariable control theory; matrix fraction descriptions, state-space realizations, multivariable poles and zeroes; operator norms, singular value analysis; representation of unstructured and structured uncertainty, linear fractional transformation, stability robustness and performance robustness, parametrization of stabilizing controllers; approaches to controller synthesis; H2-optimal control and loop transfer recovery; H2-optimal control and state-space solution methods. Cross-listed as MAE 755.

ECE 726 - (3) (O)
Nonlinear Control Systems
Prerequisite: ECE 621 and 622.
Studies the dynamic response of nonlinear systems; analyzes nonlinear systems using approximate analytical methods; stability analysis using the second method of Liapunov, describing functions, and other methods. May include adaptive, neural, and switched systems. Cross-listed as MAE 756.

ECE 728 - (3) (E)
Digital Control Systems
Prerequisite: ECE 412 and 621, APMA 615, or equivalent.
Includes sampling processes and theorems, z-transforms, modified transforms, transfer functions, and stability criteria; analysis in frequency and time domains; discrete state models of systems containing digital computers. Some in-class experiments using small computers to control dynamic processes. Cross-listed as MAE 758.

ECE 735 - (3) (Y)
Digital and Computer System Design
Prerequisite: ECE 435 or equivalent.
Studies the design of the elements of special purpose and large scale digital processors using a hardware description language. Selected topics from the literature.

ECE 736 - (3) (Y)
Advanced VLSI Systems Design
Prerequisite: ECE 563 or instructor permission.
Includes structured VLSI design, special purpose VLSI architectures, and algorithms for VLSI computer-aided design. A major part of the class is devoted to the design and implementation of a large project. Uses papers from current literature as appropriate.

ECE 738 - (3) (Y)
Computer System Reliability Engineering
A mathematical introduction to system reliability theory, emphasizing the analysis of digital computer systems. Includes time-to-failure models and distributions, fault tree analysis, Markov models and counting processes, failure and repair dependencies, sensitivity and importance analysis, hardware and software redundancy management, and dependability measurement.

ECE 741 - (3) (SI)
Fourier Optics
Prerequisite: ECE 324 and 541, or instructor permission.
Presents the fundamental principles of optical signal processing. Begins with an introduction to two-dimensional spatial, linear systems analysis using Fourier techniques. Includes scalar diffraction theory, Fourier transforming and imaging properties of lenses and the theory optical coherence. Applications of Wavefront-reconstruction techniques in imaging. Applications of Fourier Optics to analog optical computing.

ECE 753 - (3) (O)
Electromagnetic Field Theory
Prerequisite: ECE 409 or instructor permission.
Topics include techniques for solving and analyzing engineering electromagnetic systems; relation of fundamental concepts of electromagnetic field theory and circuit theory, including duality, equivalence principles, reciprocity, and Green’s functions; applications of electromagnetic principles to antennas, waveguide discontinuities, and equivalent impedance calculations.

ECE 757 - (3) (Y)
Computer Networks
Prerequisite: CS 656 or instructor permission.
Analyzes network topologies; backbone design; performance and queuing theory; data-grams and virtual circuits; technology issues; layered architectures; standards; survey of commercial networks, local area networks, and contention-based communication protocols; encryption; and security. Cross-listed as CS 757.

ECE 763 - (3) (Y)
Physics of Semiconductors
Prerequisite: ECE 663 or instructor permission.
Analyzes semiconductor band theory; constant energy surfaces and effective mass concepts; statistics treating normal and degenerate materials; spin degeneracy in impurities; excited impurity states and impurity recombination; carrier transport; scattering mechanisms; and prediction techniques.

ECE 768 - (3) (Y)
Semiconductor Materials and Characterization Techniques
Prerequisite: ECE 663 or instructor permission.
Analyzes semiconductor growth and characterization methods applicable to III-V heteroepitaxial growth along with etching and contact formation mechanisms; and the physical, structural, and electrical characterization tools including X-ray diffraction, Auger, Hall and C(V).

ECE 774 - (3) (E)
Adaptive and Statistical Signal Processing
Prerequisite: ECE 611, 576, or equivalent; corequisite: ECE 614.
Topics include a review of probability and stochastic processes, parametric and non-parametric spectral estimation, optimal filtering, linear prediction, methods of steepest descent, LMS filters, methods of least squares, RLS filters, Kalman filters, and array signal processing techniques.

ECE 776 - (3) (O)
Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing
Prerequisite: ECE 576 or instructor permission.
Provides the background of multi-dimensional digital signal processing, emphasizing the differences and similarities between the one-dimensional and multi-dimensional cases. Includes M-D Fourier transforms, M-D sampling and reconstruction, M-D DFT, M-D filtering, M-D spectral estimation, and inverse problems such as tomography, iterative signal reconstruction, and coherent imaging. Broad applications in radar, sonar, seismic, medical, and astronomical data processing are introduced.

ECE 781 - (3) (Y)
Pattern Recognition
Prerequisite: ECE 611 or equivalent.
Studies feature extraction and classification concepts: analysis of decision surfaces, discriminant functions, potential functions, deterministic methods, automatic training of classifiers, analysis of training algorithms and classifier performance, statistical classification including optimality and design of optimal decision rules, clustering and non-supervised learning, feature selection and dimensionality reduction. Assignments include programming and analytical problem sets and a final computer project.

ECE 782 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Computer Vision
Prerequisite: ECE 682.
Studies automated reconstruction of imaged objects and computer interpretation of imaged scenes; techniques for three-dimensional object reconstruction; computing motion parameters from sequences of images; computational frameworks for vision tasks such as regularization, and stochastic relaxation; approaches for autonomous navigation; depth image analysis; novel imaging techniques and applications; parallel architectures for computer vision. Cross-listed as CS 782.

ECE 786, 787 - (3) (SI)
Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A second level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. Topics usually reflect new developments in electrical and computer engineering and are based on student and faculty interests.

ECE 793 - (3) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

ECE 814 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Detection and Estimation
Prerequisite: ECE 611 or instructor permission.
Analyzes classical detection theory and hypothesis testing (Bayes, Neymon-Pearson, minimax); robust hypothesis testing; decision criteria; sequential and nonparametric detection; classical estimation theory (Bayes, minimax, maximum likelihood); performance bounds; robust-outlier resistant estimation of location parameters; stochastic distance measures; parametric and robust operations in time series (Prediction, interpolation, filtering). Applications to problems in communications, control, pattern recognition, signal processing.

ECE 825 - (3) (SI)
Adaptive Control
Prerequisite: ECE 621 and 622, or instructor permission.
Analyzes parametrized control system models, signal norms, Lyapunov stability, passivity, error models, gradient and least squares algorithms for parameter estimation, adaptive observers, direct adaptive control, indirect adaptive control, certainty equivalence principle, multivariable adaptive control, stability theory of adaptive control, and applications to robot control systems.

ECE 862 - (3) (SI)
High Speed Transistors
Prerequisite: ECE 663 or 768 or instructor permission.
Includes the principles of operation, device physics, basic technology, and modeling of high speed transistors. A brief review of material properties of most important compound semiconductors and heterostructure systems, followed by the discussion of high speed Bipolar Junction Transistor technology, Heterojuction Bipolar Transistors, and Tunneling Emitter Bipolar Transistors and by the theory and a comparative study of MESFETs, HFETs, and Variable-Threshold and Split-gate Field Effect Transistors. Also includes advanced transistor concepts based on ballistic and hot electron transport in semiconductors such as Ballistic Injection Transistors and Real Space Transfer Transistors (RSTs) concepts.

ECE 863 - (3) (SI)
High Frequency Diodes
Prerequisite: ECE 556, 663, or instructor permission.
Lectures on the basic two terminal solid state devices that are still extensively used in high frequency microwave and millimeter-wave detector and oscillator circuits. Devices discussed are PIN Diode limiters and phase shifters; Schottky Diode mixers and varactors; Planar-Doped Barrier and Heterostructure Barrier mixer diodes; Superconducting-Insulating- Superconducting mixer devices; Metal-Semiconductor-Metal photodetectors; Transferred Electron Devices; IMPATT Diodes; and Resonant Tunelling Diodes. Basic concepts related to Noise in high frequency circuits, Mixers, Resonators, and Oscillators are reviewed. Emphasis on basic device theory, and device fabrication.

ECE 886, 887 - (3) (SI)
Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
A third-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.

ECE 895 - (3-6) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

ECE 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

ECE 898 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Thesis
Formal record of student commitment to master’s thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

ECE 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

ECE 999 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.


Engineering Physics

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Opportunities for research project work and special topics are provided through the following courses:

EP 693 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

EP 695 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Supervised Project
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated.

EP 700 - (0) (S)
Graduate Seminar
Weekly seminars for graduate students in Engineering Physics offered every semester. All resident EP graduate students enroll each semester.

EP 733, 734 - (3) (IR)
Special Topics in Engineering Physics
Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Advanced-level study of selected problems in engineering physics.

EP 793 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

EP 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

EP 898 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Master’s Degree Research
Formal record of student commitment to master’s thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

EP 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

EP 999 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Ph.D. Dissertation Research
Formal record of commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.


Materials Science and Engineering

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MSE 512 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Biomaterials
Provides a multi-disciplinary perspective on the phenomenon and processes which govern material-tissue interactions with the soft tissue, hard tissue, and cardiovascular environments. Emphasizes both sides of the biomaterials interface, examining the events at the interface, and discussing topics on material durability and tissue compatibility.

MSE 524 - (3) (Y)
Modeling in Materials Science
Computational (primarily classical) methods of atomistic, mesoscopic, continuum, and multiscale modeling are discussed in the context of real materials-related problems (mechanical and thermodynamic properties, phase transformations, microstructure evolution during processing). Success stories and limitations of contemporary computational methods are considered. The emphasis of the course is on getting practical experience in designing and performing computer simulations. A number of pre-written codes are provided. Students use and modify the pre-written codes and write their own simulation and data analysis codes while working on their homework assignments and term projects.

MSE 532 - (3) (Y)
Deformation and Fracture of Materials during Processing and Service
Prerequisites: MSE 306 or instructor permission.
Deformation and fracture are considered through integration of materials science microstructure and solid mechanics principles, emphasizing the mechanical behavior of metallic alloys and engineering polymers. Metal deformation is understood based on elasticity theory and dislocation concepts. Fracture is understood based on continuum fracture mechanics and microstructural damage mechanisms. Additional topics include fatigue loading, elevated temperature behavior, material embrittlement, time-dependency, experimental design, and damage-tolerant life prediction.

MSE 567 - (3) (Y)
Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials
Explore the fundamental physical laws governing electrons in solids, and show how that knowledge can be applied to understanding electronic, optical and magnetic properties. Students will gain an understanding of how these properties vary between different types of materials, and thus why specific materials are optimal for important technological applications. It will also be shown how processing issues further define materials choices for specific applications.

MSE 601 - (3) (Y)
Materials Structure and Defects
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Provides a fundamental understanding of the structure and properties of perfect and defective materials. Topics include: crystallography and crystal structures, point defects in materials, properties of dislocations in f.c.c. metals and other materials, surface structure and energy, structure and properties of interphase boundaries.

MSE 602 - (3) (Y)
Materials Characterization
Prerequisite: MSE 601 and MSE 623.
Develops a broad understanding of the means used to characterize the properties of solids coupled with a fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms in the context of material science and engineering. The course is organized according to the type of physical property of interest. The methods used to assess properties are described through integration of the principles of materials science and physics. Methods more amenable to analysis of bulk properties are differentiated from those aimed at measurements of local/surface properties. Breadth is achieved at the expense of depth to provide a foundation for advanced courses.

MSE 604 - (3) (SS)
Scanning Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Covers the physical principles of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Laboratory demonstrations and experiments cover the operation of the SEM and EPMA. Applications of secondary and backscattered electron imaging, energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, wave- analysis are applied to materials characterization. Laboratory experiments may include either materials science or biological applications, depending on the interests of the student.

MSE 605 - (3) (Y)
Structure and Properties of Materials I
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
This is the first of a sequence of two basic courses for first-year graduate students or qualified undergraduate students. Topics include atomic bonding, crystal structure, and crystal defects in their relationship to properties and behavior of materials (polymers, metals, and ceramics); phase equilibria and non-equilibrium phase transformations.

MSE 606 - (3) (Y)
Structure and Properties of Materials II
Prerequisite: MSE 605 or instructor permission.
This is the second of a two-course sequence for the first-year graduate and qualified undergraduate students. Topics include diffusion in solids; elastic, anelastic, and plastic deformation; and electronic and magnetic properties of materials. Emphasizes the relationships between microscopic mechanisms and macroscopic behavior of materials.

MSE 608 - (3) (Y)
Chemical and Electrochemical Properties of Solid Materials
Prerequisite: Physical chemistry course or instructor permission.
Introduces the concepts of electrode potential, double layer theory, surface charge, and electrode kinetics. These concepts are applied to subjects that include corrosion and embrittlement, energy conversion, batteries and fuel cells, electro-catalysis, electroanalysis, electrochemical industrial processes, bioelectrochemistry, and water treatment.

MSE 623 - (3) (Y)
Thermodynamics of Materials
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Emphasizes the understanding of thermal properties such as heat capacity, thermal expansion, and transitions in terms of the entropy and the other thermodynamic functions. Develops the relationships of the Gibbs and Helmholtz functions to equilibrium systems, reactions, and phase diagrams. Open systems, chemical reactions, capillarity effects and external fields are also discussed.

MSE 624 - (3) (Y)
Kinetics of Solid-state Reactions
Prerequisite: MSE 623.
Course serves as an introduction to kinetic processes in solids, develops basic mathematical skills necessary for understanding kinetics in materials research, and reinforces basic numerical and computer programming skills. Students learn to formulate partial differential equations and boundary conditions which describe kinetic phenomena in the solid state including mass and heat diffusion in single- and two-phase systems, the motion of planar phase boundaries, the growth of intermediate phases, multicomponent alloys, and interfacial reactions. Students develop analytical and numerical techniques for solving these equations and apply them to understanding diffusion in one, two and three dimensions.

MSE 635 - (3) (E)
Physical Metallurgy of Light Alloys
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Develops the student’s literacy in aluminum and titanium alloys used in the aerospace and automotive industries. Considers performance criteria and property requirements from design perspectives. Emphasizes processing-microstructure development, and structure-property relationships.

MSE 647 - (3) (O)
Physical Metallurgy of Transition-Element Alloys
Prerequisite: MSE 606 or instructor permission.
Reinforces fundamental concepts, introduces advance topics, and develops literacy in the major alloys of transition elements. Emphasizes microstructural evolution by composition and thermomechanical process control. Topics include phase diagrams, transformation kinetics, martensitic transformation, precipitation, diffusion, recrystallization, and solidification. Considers both experimental and model-simulation approaches.

MSE 662 - (3) (Y)
Mathematics of Materials Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Representative problems in materials science are studied in depth with emphasis on understanding the relationship between physical phenomena and their mathematical description. Topics include rate processes, anelasticity, eigenvalue problems, tensor calculus, and elasticity theory.

MSE 667 - (3) (Y)
Semiconductor Materials and Devices
Prerequisite: Some background in solid state materials and elementary quantum principles.
Provides an understanding of the fundamentals, materials, and engineering properties of semiconductors; and the integration of semiconductors with other materials to make optoelectronic and microelectronic devices. Topics include basic properties of electrons in solids; electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of semiconductors; survey of available semiconductors and materials choice for device design; fundamental principles of important semiconductor devices; sub-micron engineering of semiconductors, metals, insulators and polymers for integrated circuit manufacturing; materials characterization techniques; and other electronic materials. Cross-listed as ECE 667.

MSE 691, 692 - (3) (SI)
Topics in Materials Science

A study of special subjects related to developments in materials science under the direction of members of the staff. Offered as required.

MSE 693 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

MSE 694 - (3) (Y)
Materials Science Laboratory

Introduces student to the specialized experimental techniques used in materials science research. Particular attention given to the techniques of X-ray diffractions and electron microscopy. The student is also introduced to several of the latest experimental methods such as field ion microscopy, electron spin resonance, and low voltage electron diffraction. This course builds on MSE 602.

MSE 695 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Science or Master of Materials Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

MSE 701, 702 - (1) (Y)
Materials Science Seminar
Broad topics and in-depth subject treatments are presented. The course is related to research areas in materials science and involves active student participation.

MSE 703 - (3) (Y)
Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials
Prerequisite: MSE 601 or instructor permission.
Covers the theory and application of transmission electron microscopy in materials science. Topics include electron optics and instrumentation, coherent electron scattering, inelastic scattering and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, formation and interpretation of electron diffraction patterns and Kikuchi patterns, and diffraction contrast imaging of defects such as dislocations, stacking faults and precipitates.

MSE 706 - (3) (E)
Advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy
Prerequisite: MSE 703 or instructor permission.
Emphasizes the theory and application of advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques in materials analysis. Topics include high-resolution imaging of crystals and defects, convergent-beam electron diffraction for point and space group determination, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy-filtered imaging, quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, multislice and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and imaging.

MSE 712 - (3) (Y)
Diffusional Processes in Materials
Prerequisite: MSE 623, 624.
The Cahn-Hilliard phenomenological theory of diffusion in stressed crystalline solids is developed for binary and multicomponent systems. Beginning with the concept of a gradient energy, athermodynamics of heterogeneous systems is developed and used to derive the Cahn-Hilliard diffusion equations. Elastic deformation is then incorporated into the thermodynamic framework and the effect of compositional and epitaxial strains on diffusion and microstructural evolution is examined.

MSE 714 - (3) (SI)
Quantization in Solids
Quantization arising from eigenvalue problems is discussed in relation to the classical and quantum wave equations. This theory is applied to lattice vibrations (phonons) and electrons in a solid. Topics studied in detail include cohesion, thermal properties (e.g., specific heat and conductivity), electrical properties (e.g., metallic conductivity and semiconductor junctions) and optical properties (e.g., luminescence and photoconductivity).

MSE 722 - (3) (SI)
Surface Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analyzes the structure and thermodynamics of surfaces, with particular emphasis on the factors controlling chemical reactivity of surfaces; adsorption, catalysis, oxidation, and corrosion are considered from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Modern surface analytical techniques, such as Auger, ESCA, and SIMS are considered.

MSE 731 - (3) (Y)
Mechanical Behavior of Materials
Prerequisite: MSE 532 or instructor permission.
Studies the deformation of solids under stress; emphasizing the role of imperfections, state of stress, temperature and strain rate; description of stress, strain, strain rate and elastic properties of materials comprise the opening topic. Then considers fundamental aspects of crystal plasticity, along with the methods for strengthening crystals at low temperatures. Covers deformation at elevated temperatures and deformation maps. Emphasizes the relationships between microscopic mechanisms and macroscopic behavior of materials.

MSE 732 - (3) (SI)
Fatigue and Fracture of Engineering Materials
Prerequisite: MSE 731 or instructor permission.
Develops the tools necessary for fatigue and fracture control in structural materials. Presents continuum fracture mechanics principles and discusses fracture modes from the interdisciplinary perspectives of continuum mechanics and microscopic plastic deformation/fracture mechanisms. Includes cleavage, ductile fracture, fatigue, and environmental cracking, emphasizing micromechanical modeling. Cross-listed as AM 732.

MSE 734 - (3) (Y)
Phase Transformations
Prerequisite: MSE 623 or comparable thermodynamics.
Includes the fundamental theory of diffusional phase transformations in solid metals and alloys; applications of thermodynamics to calculation of phase boundaries and driving forces for transformations; theory of solid-solid nucleation, theory of diffusional growth, comparison of both theories with experiment; applications of thermodynamics and of nucleation and growth theory to the principal experimental systematics of precipitation from solid solution, the massive transformations, the cellular and the pearlite reactions, martensitic transformations, and the questions of the role of shear in diffusional phase transformations.

MSE 741 - (3) (Y)
Crystal Defect Theory
Prerequisite: MSE 662 or instructor permission.
Studies the nature and major effects of crystal defects on the properties of materials, emphasizing metals. The elasticity theory of dislocations is treated in depth.

MSE 751 - (3) (Y)
Polymer Science
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Emphasizes the nature and types of polymers and methods for studying them. Surveys chemical structures and methods of synthesis, and develops the physics of the special properties of polymers (e.g., rubber elasticity, tacticity, glass transitions, crystallization, dielectric and mechanical relaxation, and permselectivity). Discusses morphology of polymer systems and its influence on properties.

MSE 752 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Polymer Science II
Prerequisite: MSE 751 or instructor permission.
Focuses on the experimental methods of polymer science. Develops a picture of polymer structure and properties by examining the use of solutions (viscosity and chromatography), thermal (DSC, DTA, TGA), microscopic (electron and optical), spectroscopic (IR, Raman, NRM, mechanical and dielectric), scattering (neutron, X-ray, and visible light), and diffraction (neutron, electron and X-ray) techniques as they are applied to the characterization and study of polymeric materials.

MSE 757 - (3) (SI)
Materials Processing
Prerequisite: MSE 731 or instructor permission.
Discusses scientific and technological bases of material processing. Examines solidification, deformation, particulate and thermomechanical processing from a fundamental point of view and discusses their current technological applications.

MSE 762 - (3) (E)
Modern Composite Technology
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Discusses the technology of modern composite materials including basic principles, mechanics, reinforcements, mechanical properties and fracture characteristics, fabrication techniques, and applications. Emphasizes high performance filamentary reinforced materials. Discusses the principles of chemical vapor deposition and the application of this technology to the area of composite materials.

MSE 771 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Electrochemistry
A specialized course detailing specific subject matter in the areas of corrosion of stainless steel, cyclic voltammetry, and the adsorption of hydrogen on and diffusion of hydrogen through Palladium. Associated experimental methods are discussed.

MSE 791, 792 - (3) (SI)
Advanced Topics in Materials Science
Prerequisite: Permission of the staff.
An advanced level study of special subjects related to developments in materials science under the direction of members of the staff. Offered as required.

MSE 793 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

MSE 795 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Doctor of Philosophy degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

MSE 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

MSE 898 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Thesis
Formal record of student commitment to master’s thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

MSE 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

MSE 999 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.


Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

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Listed prerequisites represent ordinary and reasonable preparation. Equivalent preparation is acceptable. Enrollment without prerequisites is allowed with instructor’s permission.

Graduate students in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering often take courses in applied mathematics and other engineering and science departments.

MAE 602 - (3) (Y)
Continuum Mechanics with Applications
Introduction to continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Topics include Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as AM 602, APMA 602, and CE 602.

MAE 603 - (3) (IR)
Computational Solid Mechanics
Prerequisite: MAE 602.
Analyzes variational and computational mechanics of solids; potential energy; complementary energy; virtual work; Reissner’s principle; Ritz and Galerkin methods; displacement; force and mixed methods of analysis; finite element analysis including shape functions, convergence, and integration. Applications in solid mechanics. Cross-listed as AM 603 and CE 603.

MAE 604 - (3) (O)
Plates and Shells
Prerequisite: APMA 641, AM 601 or AM 602.
Topics include the classical analysis of plates and shells; plates of various shapes (rectangular, skew) and shells of various shapes (cylindrical, conical, spherical, hyperbolic, paraboloid); closed-form numerical and approximate methods of solution governing partial differential equations; and advanced topics (large deflection theory, thermal stresses, orthotropic plates). Cross-listed as AM 604 and CE 604.

MAE 607 - (3) (E)
Theory of Elasticity
Prerequisite: AM 602 or instructor permission.
Review of the concepts of stress, strain, equilibrium, compatibility; Hooke’s law (isotropic materials); displacement and stress formulations of elasticity problems; plane stress and strain problems in rectangular coordinates (Airy’s stress function approach); plane stress and strain problems in polar coordinates, axisymmetric problems; torsion of prismatic bars (semi-inverse method using real function approach); thermal stress; and energy methods. Cross-listed as AM 607 and CE 607.

MAE 608 - (3) (E)
Constitutive Modeling of Biosystems
Prerequisite: Continuum Mechanics.
The course covers state-of-the-art mechanical models to describe the constitutive behavior of hard and soft tissues with emphasis on biological form following physiological function. The course will cover linear and nonlinear elasticity, viscoelasticity, poroelasticity, and biphasic constitutive relations in the context of biological systems and will include the dependence of macroscopic behavior and properties on material microstructure.

MAE 610 - (3) (Y)
Thermomechanics
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Review of classical thermodynamics; introduction to kinetic theory; quantum mechanical analysis of atomic and molecular structure; statistical mechanical evaluation of thermodynamic properties; chemical thermodynamics and equilibria.

MAE 611 - (3) (Y)
Heat and Mass Transport Phenomena
Prerequisite: Undergraduate fluid mechanics or instructor permission.
Fundamentals of conduction and convection heat and mass transfer. Derivation and application of conservation equations for heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flows. Steady, unsteady and multidimensional transport. Applications to free and confined flows in forced, natural and mixed convection regimes. Phase change problems with moving boundaries, condensation and evaporation. High speed flows.

MAE 612 - (3) (E)
Microscale Heat Transfer
Prerequisite: MAE 610.
This course will begin with a study of the fundamental microscopic energy carriers (definitions, properties, energy levels and disruptions of photons, phonons, and electrons.) Transport of energy will then be investigated with an emphasis on microscale effects in space and in time. The approaches used to describe microscale heat transportation differ significantly from the macroscopic phenomenological approaches and include new physical mechanisms. They often involve solution of the Boltzman transport equation and the equation of phonon radiative transfer. These approaches will be introduced with an emphasis on ultra-short time scale heating and ultra-low temperatures.

MAE 613 - (3) (E)
Kinetic Theory and Transport Properties
Prerequisite: MAE 610 or instructor permission.
Derivation of Boltzmann equation; Molecular derivation of Navier-Stokes equations; dynamics of molecular collisions; Chapman-Enskog solution of Boltzmann equation; transport properties of gases; analyses of shock structure, flows with chemical reactions, radiative nonequilibrium, rarefied gases, etc.

MAE 616 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Thermodynamics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analyzes basic concepts, postulates, and relationships of classical thermodynamics; thermodynamics potentials and derivatives; energy minimum and entropy maximum principle; generalized Maxwell relations; stability considerations; phase transitions; application to perfect and imperfect systems; and extension to chemically reacting and solid systems.

MAE 617 - (3) (IR)
Microscopic Thermodynamics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics include the thermodynamics of gases developed from a microscopic point of view; kinetic theory derivation of equilibrium thermodynamic and transport properties of gases; introduction to advanced non-equilibrium kinetic theory; quantum mechanical treatment of atomic and molecular energy level structure; statistical mechanics derivation of the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium gases; chemical thermodynamics and chemical equilibrium of reacting gas mixtures; applications of the theory of high temperature gas behavior, gas-phase combustion and equilibrium and non-equilibrium gas dynamics.

MAE 620 - (3) (IR)
Energy Principles in Mechanics
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Analyzes the derivation, interpretation, and application to engineering problems of the principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work; related theorems, such as the principles of the stationary value of the total potential and complementary energy, Castigliano’s Theorems, theorem of least work, and unit force and displacement theorems. Introduces generalized, extended, mixed, and hybrid principles; variational methods of approximation, Hamilton’s principle, and Lagrange’s equations of motion; and approximate solutions to problems in structural mechanics by use of variational theorems. Cross-listed as AM 620 and CE 620.

MAE 621 - (3) (Y)
Analytical Dynamics
Prerequisite: Undergraduate physics, ordinary differential equations.
Classical analytical dynamics from a modern mathematical viewpoint: Newton’s laws, dynamical variables, many particle systems; the Lagrangian formulation, constraints and configuration manifolds, tangent bundles, differential manifolds; variational principles, least action; non-potential forces; constrained problems; linear oscillations; Hamiltonian formulation: canonical equations, Rigid body motion. Cross-listed as AM 621.

MAE 622 - (3) (O)
Waves
Prerequisite: MAE/AM 602 or equivalent.
The topics covered are: plane waves; d’Alembert solution; method of characteristics; dispersive systems; wavepackets; group velocity; fully-dispersed waves; Laplace, Stokes, and steepest descents integrals; membranes, plates and plane-stress waves; evanescent waves; Kirchhoff’s solution; Fresnel’s principle; elementary diffraction; reflection and transmission at interfaces; waveguides and ducted waves; waves in elastic half-spaces; P, S, and Rayleigh waves; layered media and Love waves; slowly-varying media and WKBJ method; Time-dependent response using Fourier-Laplace transforms; some nonlinear water waves. Cross-listed as AM 622.

MAE 623 - (3) (Y)
Vibrations
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics include free and forced vibrations of undamped and damped single- and multi-degree-of-freedom systems; modal analyses; continuous systems; matrix formulations; finite element equations; direct integration methods; and eigenvalue solution methods. Cross-listed as AM 623 and CE 623.

MAE 624 - (3) (E)
Nonlinear Dynamics and Waves
Prerequisite: Undergraduate ordinary differential equations or instructor permission.
Introduces phase-space methods, elementary bifurcation theory and perturbation theory, and applies them to the study of stability in the contexts of nonlinear dynamical systems and nonlinear waves, including free and forces nonlinear vibrations and wave motions. Examples are drawn from mechanics and fluid dynamics, and include transitions to periodic oscillations and chaotic oscillations. Cross-listed as APMA 624.

MAE 625 - (3) (O)
Multibody Mechanical Systems
Prerequisite: Engineering degree and familiarity with a programming language.
Analytical and computational treatment for modeling and simulation of 3-Dimensional multibody mechanical systems. Provide a systematic and consistent basis for analyzing the interactions between motion constraints, kinematics, static, dynamic, and control behavior of multibody mechanical systems. Applications to machinery, robotic devices and mobile robots, biomechanical models for gait analysis and human motions, and motion control. Matrix modeling procedures with symbolic and numerical computational tools will be utilized for demonstrating the methods developed in this course. Focus on the current research and computational tools and examine a broad spectrum of physical systems where multibody behavior is fundamental to their design and control.

MAE 631 - (3) (Y)
Fluid Mechanics I
Prerequisite: MAE 602 and APMA/MAE 641.
The topics covered are: dimensional analysis; physical properties of fluids; kinematic descriptions of flow; streamlines, path lines and streak lines; stream functions and vorticity; hydrostatics and thermodynamics; Euler and Bernoulli equations; irrotational potential flow; exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation; effects of viscosity - high and low Reynolds numbers; waves in incompressible flow; hydrodynamic stability. Cross-listed as AM 631.

MAE 632 - (3) (E)
Fluid Mechanics II
Prerequisite: MAE 631.
The topics covered are: thin wing theory; slender-body theory; three-dimensional wings in steady subsonic and supersonic flows; drag at supersonic speeds; drag minimization; transonic small-disturbance flow; unsteady flow; properties and modeling of turbulent flows. Cross-listed as AM 632.

MAE 633 - (3) (IR)
Lubrication Theory and Design
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics include the hydrodynamic theory of lubrication for an incompressible fluid; design principles of bearings: oil flow, load-carrying capacity, temperature rise, stiffness, damping properties; influence of bearing design upon rotating machinery; computer modeling methods; and applications to specific types.

MAE 634 - (3) (O)
Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems
Prerequisite: Introductory fluid mechanics and/or heat or mass transfer, or instructor permission.
Fundamentals of momentum, energy and mass transport as applied to complex biological systems ranging from the organelles in cells to whole plants and animals and their environments. Derivation of conservation laws (momentum, heat and mass), constitutive equations, and auxiliary relations. Applications of theoretical equations and empirical relations to model and predict the characteristics of diffusion and convection in complex biological systems and their environments. Emphasis placed on the bio-mechanical understanding of these systems through the construction of simplified mathematical models amenable to analytical, numerical or statistical formulations and solutions, including the identification and quantification of model uncertainties.

MAE 636 - (3) (O)
Gas Dynamics
Prerequisite: MAE 610.
Analyzes the theory and solution methods applicable to multi-dimensional compressible inviscid gas flows at subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic speeds; similarity and scaling rules from small-petrurbation theory, introduction to transonic and hypersonic flows; method-of-characteristics applications to nozzle flows, jet expansions, and flows over bodies one dimensional non-steady flows; properties of gases in thermodynamic equilibrium, including kinetic-theory, chemical-thermodynamics, and statistical-mechanics considerations; dissociation and ionization process; quasi-equilibrium flows; and introduction to non-equilibrium flows.

MAE 637 - (3) (IR)
Singular Perturbation Theory
Prerequisite: Familiarity with complex analysis.
Analyzes regular perturbations, roots of polynomials; singular perturbations in ODE’s, periodic solutions of simple nonlinear differential equations; multiple-Scales method; WKBJ approximation; turning-point problems; Langer’s method of uniform approximation; asymptotic behavior of integrals, Laplace Integrals, stationary phase, steepest descents. Examples are drawn from physical systems. Cross-listed with APMA 637.

MAE 641 - (3) (Y)
Engineering Mathematics I
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Review of ordinary differential equations. Initial value problems, boundary value problems, and various physical applications. Linear algebra, including systems of linear equations, matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization, and various applications. Scalar and vector field theory, including the divergence theorem, Green’s theorem, and Stokes theorem, and various applications. Partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of partial differential equations by separation by variables, superposition, Fourier series, variation of parameter, d’Alembert’s solution. Eigenfunction expansion techniques for non-homogeneous initial-value, boundary-value problems. Particular focus on various physical applications of the heat equation, the potential (Laplace) equation, and the wave equations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Cross-listed as APMA 641.

MAE 642 - (3) (Y)
Engineering Mathematics II
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and APMA/MAE 641 or equivalent.
Further and deeper understanding of partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of linear partial differential equations by eigenfunction expansion techniques. Green’s functions for time-independent and time-dependant boundary value problems. Fourier transform methods, and Laplace transform methods. Solution of variety of initial-value, boundary-value problems. Various physical applications. Study of complex variable theory. Functions of complex variable, the complex integral calculus, Taylor series, Laurent series, and the residue theorem, and various applications. Serious work and efforts in the further development of analytical skills and response. Cross-listed as APMA 642.

MAE 643 - (3) (Y)
Statistics for Engineers and Scientists
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate studies or instructor permission.
Role of statistics in science, hypothesis tests of significance, confidence intervals, design of experiments, regression, correlation analysis, analysis of variance, and introduction to statistical computing with statistical software libraries. Cross-listed as APMA 643.

MAE 644 - (3) (IR)
Applied Partial Differential Equations
Prerequisite: APMA/MAE 641 or equivalent.
Includes first order partial differential equations (linear, quasilinear, nonlinear); classification of equations and characteristics; and well-posed-ness of initial and boundary value problems. Cross-listed as APMA 644.

MAE 651 - (3) (Y)
Linear Automatic Control Systems
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Studies the dynamics of linear, closed-loop systems. Analysis of transfer functions; stability theory; time response, frequency response; robustness; and performance limitations. Design of feedback controllers. Cross-listed as ECE 621.

MAE 652 - (3) (Y)
Linear State Space Systems
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
A comprehensive treatment of the theory of linear state space systems, focusing on general results which provide a conceptual framework as well as analysis tools for investigation in a wide variety of engineering contexts. Topics include vector spaces, linear operators, functions of matrices, state space description, solutions to state equations (time invariant and time varying), state transition matrices, system modes and decomposition, stability, controllability and observability, Kalman decomposition, system realizations, grammians and model reduction, state feedback, and observers. Cross-listed as SYS 612 and ECE 622.

MAE 662 - (3) (IR)
Mechanical Design Analysis
Prerequisite: Undergraduate mechanical design or instructor permission.
Topics include the design analysis of machine elements subject to complex loads and environments; emphasis on modern materials and computer analysis; theory of elasticity, energy methods; failure theories, fracture, fatigue, creep; contact, residual, and thermal stresses; experimental stress analysis; and corrosion.

MAE 668 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Machine Technologies
Prerequisite: MAE 665 and 667.
Studies new technologies for machine automation, including intelligent machines, robotics, machine vision, image processing, and artificial intelligence. Emphasis on computer control of machines; intelligent automatic control systems; and distributed networks. Focuses on research problems in each of these areas.

MAE 671 - (3) (Y)
Finite Element Analysis
Prerequisite: MAE/AM 602 or equivalent.
The topics covered are: review of vectors, matrices, and numerical solution techniques; discrete systems; variational formulation and approximation for continuous systems; linear finite element method in solid mechanics; formulation of isoparametric finite elements; finite element method for field problems, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics. Cross-listed as AM 671.

MAE 672 - (3) (E)
Computational Fluid Dynamics I
Prerequisite: MAE 631 or instructor permission.
Includes the solution of flow and heat transfer problems involving steady and transient convective and diffusive transport; superposition and panel methods for inviscid flow, finite-difference methods for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic partial differential equations, elementary grid generation for odd geometries, primitive variable and vorticity-steam function algorithms for incompressible, multidimensional flows. Extensive use of personal computers/workstations, including interactive graphics. Cross-listed as APMA 672.

MAE 685 - (3) (E)
Measurement Theory and Advanced Instrumentation
Prerequisite: Undergraduate electrical science.
Studies the theory and practice of modern measurement and measurement instrumentation; statistical analysis of data; estimation of errors and uncertainties; operating principles and characteristics of fundamental transducers and sensors; common electrical circuits and instruments; and signal processing methods.

MAE 687 - (3) (IR)
Applied Engineering Optics
Prerequisite: PHYS 241E.
Analyzes modern engineering optics and methods; fundamentals of coherence, diffraction interference, polarization, and lasing processes; fluid mechanics, heat transfer, stress/strain, vibrations, and manufacturing applications; laboratory practice: interferometry, schlieren/shadowgraph, and laser velocimetry.

MAE 692 - (3) (Y)
Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level
Study of a specialized, advanced, or exploratory topic relating to mechanical or aerospace engineering science, at the first-graduate-course level. May be offered on a seminar or a team-taught basis. Subjects selected according to faculty interest. New graduate courses are usually introduced in this form. Specific topics and prerequisites are listed in the Course Offering Directory.

MAE 693 - (3) (Y)
Independent Study in Mechanical or Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level
Independent study of first-year graduate level material under the supervision of a faculty member.

MAE 694 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Special Graduate Project in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering: First-Year Level
A design or research project for a first-year graduate student under the supervision of a faculty member. A written report must be submitted and an oral report presented. Up to three credits from either this course or MAE 794 may be applied toward the master’s degree.

MAE 703 - (3) (E)
Injury Biomechanics
Prerequisite: MAE 608.
This is an advanced applications course on the biomechanical basis of human injury and injury modeling. The course covers the etiology of human injury and state-of-the-art analytic and synthetic mechanical models of human injury. The course will have a strong focus on modeling the risk of impact injuries to the head, neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities. The course will explore the biomechanical basis of widely used and proposed human injury criteria and will investigate the use of these criteria with simplified dummy surrogates to assess human injury risk. Brief introductions to advanced topics such as human biomechanical variation with age and sex, and the biomechanics of injury prevention will be presented based on current research and the interests of the students.

MAE 715 - (3) (IR)
Combustion
Prerequisite: Undergraduate thermodynamics and MAE 631, or instructor permission.
Reviews chemical thermodynamics, including conservation laws, perfect gas mixtures, combustion chemistry and chemical equilibrium; finite-rate chemical kinetics; conservation equations for multicomponent reacting systems; detonation and deflagration waves in premixed gases; premixed laminar flames; gaseous diffusion flames and droplet evaporation; introduction to turbulent flames; chemically-reacting boundary-layer flows; ignition; applications to practical problems in energy systems, aircraft propulsion systems, and internal combustion engines. Projects selected from topics of interest to the class.

MAE 753 - (3) (O)
Optimal Dynamical Systems
Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear and vector calculus. Classical and state spaced controls and undergraduate design courses are recommended.
Introduces the concept of performance metrices for dynamical systems and examines the optimization of performances over both parameter and function spaces. Discusses both the existence of optimal solutions to dynamic problems and how these may be found. Such results provide via limits to performance of dynamic systems, which delineate what can and cannot be achieved via engineering. Constitutes a basis for more advanced study in design synthesis and optimal control. Cross-listed as ECE 723.

MAE 755 - (3) (E)
Multivariable Control
Prerequisite: MAE 652.
State space theories for linear control system design have been developed over the last 40 years. Among those, H2 and Hinf control theories are the most established, powerful, and popular in applications. This course focuses on these theories and shows why and how they work. Upon completion of this course, student will be confident in applying the theories and will be equipped with technical machinery that allows them to thoroughly understand these theories and to explore new control design methods if desired in their own research. More importantly, students will learn a fundamental framework for optimal system design from a state perspective. Cross-listed as ECE 725.

MAE 756 - (3) (E)
Nonlinear Control Systems
Prerequisite: ECE 621 or instructor permission.
Studies the dynamic response of nonlinear systems; approximate analytical and graphical analysis methods; stability analysis using the second method of Liapunov, describing functions, and other methods; adaptive, learning, and switched systems; examples from current literature. Cross-listed as ECE 726.

MAE 758 - (3) (O)
Digital Control Systems
Prerequisite: MAE 652 or instructor permission.
Topics include sampling processes and theorems, z-transforms, modified transforms, transfer functions, stability criteria; analysis in both frequency and time domains; discrete-state models for systems containing digital computers; and applications using small computers to control dynamic processes. Cross-listed as ECE 728.

MAE 772 - (3) (IR)
Computational Fluid Dynamics II
Prerequisite: MAE 672 or instructor permission.
A continuation of MAE 672. More advanced methods for grid generation, transformation of governing equations for odd geometries, methods for compressible flows, methods for parabolic flows, calculations using vector and parallel computers. Use of personal computers/workstations/supercomputer, including graphics. Cross-listed as APMA 772.

MAE 791 - (0-1) (S)
Research Seminar, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Master’s Students
Required one-hour weekly seminar for master’s students in mechanical and aerospace and nuclear engineering. Students enrolled in MAE 898 or 694/794 make formal presentations of their work.

MAE 792 - (3) (Y)
Special Topics in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering Science: Advanced Level
A specialized, advanced, or exploratory topic relating to mechanical or aerospace engineering science, at the second-year or higher graduate level. May be offered on a seminar or team-taught basis. Subjects selected according to faculty interest. Topics and prerequisites are listed in the Course Offering Directory.

MAE 793 - (Usually three credits) (Y)
Independent Study in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering Science: Advanced Level
Independent study of advanced graduate material under the supervision of a faculty member.

MAE 794 - (Credit as arranged) (Y)
Special Graduate Project in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering: Advanced Level
A design or research project for an advanced graduate student under the supervision of a faculty member. A written report must be submitted and an oral report must be presented. Up to three credits of either this course or MAE 694 may be applied toward the master’s degree.

MAE 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

MAE 898 - (1-12) (Y)
Master’s Thesis Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of thesis research. Each full-time, resident Master of Science student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 791 seminar) and 12.

MAE 991 - (0-1) (S)
Research Seminar, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Doctoral Students
Required one-hour weekly seminar for doctoral students in mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering. Students enrolled in MAE 999 may make formal presentations of their work.

MAE 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

MAE 999 - (1-12) (Y)
Dissertation Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of dissertation research. Each full-time resident doctoral student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 991 seminar) and 12.


Systems and Information Engineering

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SYS 601 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Systems Engineering
Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program.
An integrated introduction to systems methodology, design, and management. An overview of systems engineering as a professional and intellectual discipline, and its relation to other disciplines, such as operations research, management science, and economics. An introduction to selected techniques in systems and decision sciences, including mathematical modeling, decision analysis, risk analysis, and simulation modeling. Elements of systems management, including decision styles, human information processing, organizational decision processes, and information system design for planning and decision support. Emphasizes relating theory to practice via written analyses and oral presentations of individual and group case studies.

SYS 602 - (3) (Y)
Systems Integration
Prerequisite: SYS 601 or instructor permission.
Provides an introduction to the problems encountered when integrating large systems, and also presents a selection of specific technologies and methodologies used to address these problems. Includes actual case-studies to demonstrate systems integration problems and solutions. A term project is used to provide students with the opportunity to apply techniques for dealing with systems integration.

SYS 603 - (3) (Y)
Mathematical Programming
Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including linear algebra, and the ability to write computer programs.
Presents the foundations of mathematical modeling and optimization, with emphasis on problem formulation and solution techniques. Coverage includes linear programs, nonlinear programs, combinatorial models, optimality conditions, search strategies, and numerical algorithms. Topics are illustrated through classic problems such as service planning, operations management, manufacturing, transportation, and network flow.

SYS 605 - (3) (Y)
Stochastic Systems
Prerequisite: APMA 310, 312, or equivalent background in applied probability and statistics.
Covers basic stochastic processes with emphasis on model building and probabilistic reasoning. The approach is non-measure theoretic but otherwise rigorous. Topics include a review of elementary probability theory with particular attention to conditional expectations; Markov chains; optimal stopping; renewal theory and the Poisson process; martingales. Applications are considered in reliability theory, inventory theory, and queuing systems.

SYS 609 - (3) (IR)
The Art and Science of Systems Modeling
Focuses on learning and practicing the art and science of systems modeling through diverse case studies. Topics span the modeling of discrete and continuous, static and dynamic, linear and non-linear, and deterministic and probabilistic systems. Two major dimensions of systems modeling are discussed and their efficacy is demonstrated: Dimension I: The building blocks of mathematical models and the centrality of the state variables in systems modeling, including: state variables, decision variables, random variables, exogenous variables, inputs and outputs, objective functions, and constraints. Dimension II: Effective tools in systems modeling, including: multiobjective models, influence diagrams, event trees, systems identification and parameter estimation, hierarchical holographic modeling, and dynamic programming.

SYS 612 - (3) (IR)
Dynamic Systems
Prerequisite: APMA 213 or equivalent.
Introduces modeling, analysis, and control of dynamic systems, using ordinary differential and difference equations. Emphasizes the properties of mathematical representations of systems, the methods used to analyze mathematical models, and the translation of concrete situations into appropriate mathematical forms. Primary coverage includes ordinary linear differential and difference equation models, transform methods and concepts from classical control theory, state-variable methods and concepts from modern control theory, and continuous system simulation. Applications are drawn from social, economic, managerial, and physical systems. Cross-listed as MAE 652.

SYS 613 - (3) (IR)
Applied Multivariate Statistics
Prerequisite: SYS 605, SYS 618, or STAT 512.
This course covers the major methods for multivariate data analysis. Topics include multivariate Gaussian distribution, multivariate regression, MANOVA, principal components, factor analysis, canonical correlation, structure equation models, discriminant analysis, and logistic regression. The course illustrates the use of these methods using modern statistical software. Cross-listed as STAT 513.

SYS 614 - (3) (Y)
Decision Analysis
Prerequisite: SYS 603, 605, or equivalent.
Principles and procedures of decision-making under uncertainty and with multiple objectives. Topics include representation of decision situations as decision trees, influence diagrams, and stochastic dynamic programming models; Bayesian decision analysis, subjective probability, utility theory, optimal decision procedures, value of information, multiobjective decision analysis, and group decision making.

SYS 616 - (3) (Y)
Knowledge-Based Systems
Introduces the fundamental concepts necessary for successful research in, and real world application of, knowledge-based decision support systems. Emphasizes knowledge acquisition, system design principles, and testing systems with human subjects. Students are required to work through several design and testing exercises and develop a final project that applies principles learned in class. Cross-listed as CS 616.

SYS 618 - (3) (Y)
Data Mining
Prerequisite: SYS 605 or STAT 512.
Data mining describes approaches to turning data into information. Rather than the more typical deductive strategy of building models using known principles, data mining uses inductive approaches to discover the appropriate models. These models describe a relationship between a system’s response(s) and a set of factors or predictor variables. Data mining in this context provides a formal basis for machine learning and knowledge discovery. This course investigates the construction of empirical models from data mining for systems with both discrete and continuous valued responses. It covers both estimation and classification, and explores both practical and theoretical aspects of data mining.

SYS 623 - (3) (Y)
Cognitive Systems Engineering
Introduces the field of cognitive systems engineering, which seeks to characterize and support human-systems integration in complex systems environments. Covers key aspects of cognitive human factors in the design of information support systems. Reviews human performance (memory, learning, problem-solving, expertise and human error); characterizes human performance in complex, socio-technical systems, including naturalistic decision making and team performance; reviews different types of decision support systems, with a particular focus on representation aiding systems; and covers the human-centered design process (task analysis, knowledge acquisition methods, product concept, functional requirements, prototype, design, and testing).

SYS 634 - (3) (Y)
Discrete-Event Stochastic Simulation
Prerequisite: SYS 605 or equivalent.
A first graduate course on the theory and practice of discrete-event simulation. Coverage includes Monte Carlo methods and spreadsheet applications, generating random numbers and variates, sampling distributions, the dynamics of discrete-event stochastic systems, simulation logic and computational issues, specifying input probability distributions, output analysis, comparing simulated alternatives, model verification and validation, and simulation optimization. Applications in manufacturing, transportation, communication, computer, health-care, and service systems.

SYS 650 - (3) (Y)
Risk Analysis
Prerequisite: APMA 310, SYS 321, or equivalent.
A study of technological systems, where decisions are made under conditions of risk and uncertainty. Part I: Conceptualization: the nature of risk, the perception of risk, the epistemology of risk, and the process of risk assessment and management. Part II: Systems engineering tools for risk analysis: basic concepts in probability and decision analysis, event trees, decision trees, and multiobjective analysis. Part III: Methodologies for risk analysis: hierarchical holographic modeling, uncertainty taxonomy, risk of rare and extreme events, statistics of extremes, partitioned multiobjective risk method, multiobjective decision trees, fault trees, multiobjective impact analysis method, uncertainty sensitivity index method, and filtering, ranking, and management method. Case studies.

SYS 654 - (3) (Y)
Financial Engineering
Prerequisite: SYS 603 or equivalent graduate-level optimization course. Students need not have any background in finance or investment.
Provides an introduction to basic topics in finance from an engineering and modeling perspective. Topics include the theory of interest, capital budgeting, valuation of firms, futures and forward contracts, options and other derivatives, and practical elements of investing and securities speculation. Emphasis is placed on the development and solution of mathematical models for problems in finance, such as capital budgeting, portfolio optimization, and options pricing; also predictive modeling as it is applied in credit risk management. One of the unique features of this course is a stock trading competition hosted on www.virtualstockexchange.com or a similar site.

SYS 670 - (3) (Y)
Environmental Systems Analysis
Prerequisites: CHEM 152, PHYS 241.
This course focuses on the infrastructure for the provision of drinking water, wastewater/sewage, and solid waste management services in the context of the environmental systems in which they are embedded and the institutional framework within which they must operate. It begins with coverage of the infrastructure design, operation, and maintenance, proceeds to a treatment of the concept of integrated sanitation systems, then considers the major environmental issues relevant to these services, including global worming, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, and hazardous waste. It progresses to a study of the common tools in environmental systems analysis: lifecycle assessment, environmental economics, mass and energy balances, benefit-cost analysis, risk analysis, and environmental forecasting. Includes an analysis of the global picture of water and sanitation service availability and closes with the relevance of this issue to sustainable development.

SYS 674 - (3) (Y)
Total Quality Engineering
Prerequisite: Basic statistics or instructor permission.
Comprehensive study of quality engineering techniques; characterization of Total Quality Management philosophy and continuous improvement tools; statistical monitoring of processes using control charts; and process improvement using experimental design.

SYS 681, 682 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
Detailed study of a selected topic, determined by the current interest of faculty and students. Offered as required.

SYS 693 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

SYS 695 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

SYS 702 - (3) (SS)
Case Studies in Systems Engineering
Prerequisite: SYS 601, 603, and 605.
Under faculty guidance, students apply the principles of systems methodology, design, and management along with the techniques of systems and decision sciences to systems analysis and design cases. Primary goal is the integration of numerous concepts from systems engineering using real-world cases. Focuses on presenting, defending, and discussing systems engineering projects in a typical professional context. Cases span a broad range of applicable technologies and involve the formulation of the issues, modeling of decision problems, analysis of the impact of proposed alternatives, and interpretation of these impacts in terms of the client value system. Cases are extracted from actual government, industry, and business problems.

SYS 705 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Stochastic Processes
Prerequisite: SYS 605 or equivalent.
Provides a non-measure theoretic treatment of advanced topics in the theory of stochastic processes, focusing particularly on denumerable Markov processes in continuous time and renewal processes. The principal objective of the course is to convey a deep understanding of the main results and their proofs, sufficient to allow the students to make theoretical contributions to engineering research.

SYS 716 - (3) (Y)
Artificial Intelligence
Prerequisite: SYS 616 or CS 616.
In-depth study of major areas considered to be part of artificial intelligence. In particular, detailed coverage is given to the design considerations involved in automatic theorem proving, natural language understanding, and machine learning. Cross-listed as CS 716.

SYS 721 - (3) (IR)
Research Methods in Systems Engineering
Corequisite: SYS 601, 603, 605, or equivalent.
Study of the philosophy, theory, methodology, and applications of systems engineering provides themes for this seminar in the art of reading, studying, reviewing, critiquing, and presenting scientific and engineering research results. Applications are drawn from water resources, environmental, industrial and other engineering areas. Topics discussed and papers reviewed are selected at the first meeting. Throughout the semester, students make a one-hour presentation of their chosen paper, followed by a one and one-half hour discussion, critique, evaluation, and conclusions regarding the topic and its exposition.

SYS 730 - (3) (IR)
Time Series Analysis and Forecasting
Prerequisite: SYS 605 or equivalent.
An in-depth study of time series analysis and forecasting models from a statistical and engineering perspective. Emphasizes the process of stochastic model building including model identification, estimation, and model diagnostic checking. Topics include smoothing and filtering, ARIMA models, frequency domain analysis, and vector processes.

SYS 734 - (3) (IR)
Advanced System Simulation
Prerequisite: SYS 605, 634, or equivalent.
Seminar on contemporary topics in discrete-event simulation. Topics are determined by student and faculty interests and may include model and simulation theory, validation, experiment design, output analysis, variance-reduction techniques, simulation optimization, parallel and distributed simulation, intelligent simulation systems, animation and output visualization, and application domains. Term project.

SYS 742 - (3) (IR)
Heuristic Search
Prerequisite: SYS 605 or instructor permission.
Characterization and analysis of problem solving strategies guided by heuristic information. The course links material from optimization, intelligence systems, and complexity analysis. Formal development of the methods and complete discussion of applications, theoretical properties, and evaluation. Methods discussed include best-first strategies for OR and AND/OR graphs, simulated annealing, genetic algorithms and evolutionary programming, tabu search, and tailored heuristics. Applications of these methods to engineering design, scheduling, signal interpretation, and machine intelligence.

SYS 750 - (3) (IR)
Risk Analysis
Prerequisite: APMA 310, SYS 321, or equivalent.
A study of technological systems, where decisions are made under conditions of risk and uncertainty. Part I: Conceptualization: the nature of risk, the perception of risk, the epistemology of risk, and the process of risk assessment and management. Part II: Systems engineering tools for risk analysis: basic concepts in probability and decision analysis, event trees, decision trees, and multiobjective analysis. Part III: Methodologies for risk analysis: hierarchical holographic modeling, uncertainty taxonomy, risk of rare and extreme events, statistics of extremes, partitioned multiobjective risk method, multiobjective decision trees, fault trees, multiobjective impact analysis method, uncertainty sensitivity index method, and filtering, ranking, and management method. Case studies.

SYS 752 - (3) (IR)
Sequential Decision Processes
Prerequisite: SYS 605, 614, or equivalent.
Topics include stochastic sequential decision models and their applications; stochastic control theory; dynamic programming; finite horizon, infinite horizon models; discounted, undiscounted, and average cost models; Markov decision processes, including stochastic shortest path problems; problems with imperfect state information; stochastic games; computational aspects and suboptimal control, including neuro-dynamic programming; examples: inventory control, maintenance, portfolio selection, optimal stopping, water resource management, and sensor management.

SYS 754 - (3) (IR)
Multiobjective Optimization
Prerequisite: SYS 603, 614, or equivalent.
Analyzes the theories and methodologies for optimization with multiple objectives under certainty and uncertainty; structuring of objectives, selection of criteria, modeling and assessment of preferences (strength of preference, risk attitude, and trade-off judgments); vector optimization theory and methods for generating non-dominated solutions. Methods with prior assessment of preferences, methods with progressive assessment of preferences (iterative-interactive methods), methods allowing imprecision in preference assessments; group decision making; building and validation of decision-aiding systems.

SYS 763 - (3) (IR)
Response Surface Methods
Prerequisite: SYS 601, 605, and 674, or instructor permission.
Response surface methods provide process and design improvement through the collection and analysis of data from controlled experimentation. This course investigates the construction of response models for systems with discrete and continuous valued responses. The course will cover design of experiments for optimization and methods for building and using response surfaces from simulation, known as simulation-optimization.

SYS 770 - (3) (IR)
Sequencing and Scheduling
Prerequisite: SYS 603, 605, or equivalent.
A comprehensive treatment of scheduling theory and practice. The formal machine-scheduling problem: assumptions, performance measures, job and flow shops, constructive algorithms for special cases, disjunctive and integer programming formulations, branch-and-bound and dynamic programming approaches, computational complexity and heuristics. Includes alternative scheduling paradigms and scheduling philosophies and software tools in modern applications.

SYS 775 - (3) (IR)
Forecast-Decision Systems
Prerequisite: SYS 605, 614, or equivalent.
Presents the Bayesian theory of forecasting and decision making; judgmental and statistical forecasting, deterministic and probabilistic forecasting, post-processors of forecasts; sufficient comparisons of forecasters, verification of forecasts, combining forecasts; optimal and suboptimal decision procedures using forecasts including static decision models, sequential decision models, stopping-control models; economic value of forecasts; communication of forecasts; and the design and evaluation of a total forecast-decision system.

SYS 781, 782 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Topics in Systems Engineering
Detailed study of an advanced or exploratory topic determined by faculty and student interest. Offered as required.

SYS 793 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Independent Study
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.

SYS 796 - (1) (S)
Systems Engineering Colloquium
Regular meeting of graduate students and faculty for presentation and discussion of contemporary systems problems and research. Offered for credit each semester. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

SYS 895 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Supervised Project Research
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

SYS 897 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For master’s students.

SYS 898 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Thesis
Formal record of student commitment to master’s research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.

SYS 997 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Graduate Teaching Instruction
For doctoral students.

SYS 999 - (Credit as arranged) (S)
Dissertation
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.


 
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