University of Virginia
The Rotunda at U.Va.
2004-2005
GRADUATE RECORD
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
General Information  |  Programs and Degress Offered  |  Admission Information  |  Financial Assistance
Graduate Academic Regulations  |  Requirements for Specific Graduate Degrees  |  Departments and Programs 
Faculty
Fellowships
State and Regional Scholarships and Fellowships
International Scholarships
Departmental Fellowships
Special Fellowship
Assistantships
Loans and Part-Time Employment

Financial Assistance

The University offers financial assistance to students in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences through a variety of programs: fellowships, assistantships, work-study plans, and loans. Each of these programs is administered by a separate office and a student interested in applying for one of them should read the sections below to find the office to contact. Most superior students can expect to receive aid of some kind throughout their graduate careers.


Fellowships

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The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences has a number of merit fellowships supported by endowments, gifts, and other sources which it offers to exceptional students. These fellowships are available to all students and are awarded on the individual’s academic achievements and promise. Fellowships are granted with the provisions that good academic standing is maintained and that the recipient remain in residence at the University during the award period. In addition to these fellowships some departments have merit fellowships with comparable stipends which are awarded by the department on the same basis as the Graduate School fellowships.

A student must be nominated by his or her department in order to be considered for a Graduate School fellowship. Students seeking admission to the Graduate School who indicate on the application for admission that they seek financial aid will automatically be considered by the department to which they are applying as candidates for fellowships. Returning graduate students should indicate to their department that they wish to be considered for a fellowship. To be considered for a school wide fellowship, a new student should have the application for admission form in the Admissions Office of the Graduate School, 437 Cabell Hall, by December 2. Closing dates for departmental awards may vary. Returning students should contact their department for deadlines on fellowship applications.

All fellowships, except the President’s and Jefferson’s Fellowships, are awarded for no longer than one academic year and are not automatically renewed. The President’s Fellowship is a three-year award, and the President’s Fellows receive financial assistance of at least $14,000 per session.

The principal endowed and gift fellowships of the Graduate School are listed below:

The Virginia Mason Davidge Fellowships were established through the gift of David Randall-McIver, from the income of the Virginia Mason Davidge Foundation. These fellowships are awarded to men or women students on the basis of "ability, scholarship, character, and need." Appointments are made upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

The Philip Francis du Pont Fellowships were established in 1928 by a gift from Philip Francis du Pont, an alumnus. These fellowships are awarded on the basis of achievement and scholarly promise. Ordinarily only students whose ages do not exceed 35 years are eligible. In some instances these fellowships may be supplemented by graduate assistantships. Appointments are made upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

The Elizabeth B. Garrett Fellowship was founded in 1918 upon the bequest of Mrs. Elizabeth B. White, of Baltimore, Maryland. Appointments are made upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Governor’s Fellowships are funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia. These fellowships are awarded in all Ph.D.-granting departments and are available to Virginia residents only. Appointments are made upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

The Craig W. MacDonald Fellowship was established in 1930 under the will of the late Susan L. Stanard as a memorial to her brother Captain Craig Woodrow MacDonald, who was killed at the Battle of Cold Harbor. Appointments are made upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

The President’s Fellowship was established in 1980 by University President Frank L. Hereford, Jr. and is a three year fellowship. It carries a stipend of $14,000 plus tuition and fees. In the second and third years of the fellowship, President’s Fellows may be required to serve as teaching or research assistants. President’s Fellows are selected on a merit basis from entering students in all Ph.D.-granting departments. Nominations are made to the Dean of the Graduate School by Ph.D.-granting departments.

The William H. Palmer Young Presidential Fellowship was established in 1982 by the estate of his mother, Claudia Palmer Young. Appointments are made by the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

The Anne Francis Stead Memorial Fellowship was established in 1982 by a gift from the estate of Mrs. Anne Francis Stead. Appointment is made by the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.


State and Regional Scholarships and Fellowships

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The John B. Adger Scholarships (three to five scholarships or fellowships with a stipend of approximately $500 each) were created under the will of the late Jennie W. Adger in memory of her husband, John B. Adger, M.A. (Virginia, 1880), and are awarded to male students, with preference to those from South Carolina or Virginia, who are taking courses leading to the degree of B.A. or M.A. The awards are made by the Alumni Board of Trustees of the University of Virginia Endowment Fund either to entering students or to students already in the University, and may be renewed from year to year if the holders’ records so justify. Half the award is paid to the recipients at the beginning of the first semester and the balance at the beginning of the second semester. Application should be made to the Vice President for Student Affairs.

The Bayly-Tiffany Scholarships were established in 1930 by a bequest of Mrs. Evelyn May Bayly Tiffany as a memorial to Thomas Henry Bayly and Louis McLane Tiffany. Preference is given to students from Northampton and Accomack counties, Virginia, but if qualified applicants are not available from these counties, awards are available to students from other portions of Virginia or from Maryland. Stipends vary according to need. Application should be made to the Office of Financial Aid.

The John Y. Mason Fellowship was founded in 1892 upon the gift of Col. Archer Anderson (Virginia, 1858), of Richmond. The holder must have been born in Virginia and must be a competent and deserving student in need of financial aid.


International Scholarships

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The Aimee Marteau Scholarship is awarded to a worthy student from the Republic of France on the recommendation of the Department of French Language and Literature. Income derived from a bequest under the will of the late Edith S. Figg.


Departmental Fellowships

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Classics

The Gessner Harrison Fellowship was founded in 1933 by a bequest of Robert Lewis Harrison. Appointment is made upon the recommendation of the Chair of the Department of Classics.

Economics

The William P. Snavely Fellowship was founded in 1977 by Tipton R. Snavely, Professor Emeritus of Economics, in memory of his son. Appointment is made upon recommendation by the Chair of the Department of Economics.

English

The Sidney Ernest Bradshaw Fellowship was founded in 1936 by a bequest of Dr. Sidney Ernest Bradshaw, Ph.D. (Virginia, 1900), of $25,000. Appointment is made on the recommendation of the Department of English to "a graduate student who gives promise of becoming a distinguished college or university professor of English."

The Henry Coalter Cabell Fellowship was founded in 1903 upon the gift of Mrs. Kate Cabell Claiborne and Captain Henry Cabell, of Richmond. Appointments are made upon the recommendation of the Chair of the Department of English.

The Majuel Ewing Fellowship recipients are chosen by the graduate faculty of the Department of English.

The Henry Hoyns Fellowship was established in 1975 through a bequest in the name of Henry Hoyns. The first fellowships were awarded in 1977. The fellowships are awarded only to creative writers. Applications should be made to the Creative Writing Program in the Department of English by February 15 and should include manuscripts of the applicants’ work in either poetry (20 pages), fiction (30-40 pages), or playwriting.

The Robert D. Saltz Memorial Fellowship was established in 1972 upon the gift of the Saltz family and donors’ contributions to the Robert D. Saltz Memorial Fund. Appointment is made on the recommendation of the Department of English.

The James Southall Wilson Fellowship was established in 1954 in honor of Dr. James Southall Wilson, founding editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review, who prior to his retirement was Edgar Allan Poe Professor of English, Chair of the Department of English, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Appointment is made by recommendation of the Chair of the Department of English.

History

The Cincinnati Historical Fellowship was founded in 1955 by the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Virginia. The award is made annually by the society to a graduate student upon nomination of the faculty of the Corcoran Department of History. The award may be renewed for a second year of study at this or another university.

The William Cabell Rives Fellowship was founded in 1905 upon the gift of Dr. William Cabell Rives, of Washington, D.C., in honor of his grandfather, William Cabell Rives, the distinguished statesman. The holder must be a graduate student and must devote a portion of his or her time to work connected with the Department of History. Appointments are made upon the recommendation of the Department of History.

History and Political Science

The Thomas Jefferson Foundation Fellowships have been established by the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation with a view to perpetuating the spirit and ideals of Thomas Jefferson. Preference will be given to applicants who expect to make college teaching their career and whose interests in history or political science focus generally upon the history, political ideas, institutions, and culture of the age of Jefferson.

Physics

The Joseph Hall Bodine Scholarship was founded in 1965 by a bequest from Joseph Hall Bodine to be used as a scholarship for married graduate students majoring in physics. Appointment is made on the recommendation of the Department of Physics.

The Leland B. and Virginia C. Snoddy Fellowship was founded in 1964 by a bequest from Virginia Croft Snoddy. Appointment is made on the recommendation of the Department of Physics to a graduate student specializing in research in physics.

Politics

The John Allan Love Presidential Fellowship was established in 1982 from a bequest made in 1961 by John Allan Love, a 1907 graduate of the University. Recipients must be from the State of Missouri, preferably from the St. Louis area. Appointments are made upon recommendation of the Chair of the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics.

The William Wiley Morton Fellowship was established by Mrs. Nina Morton. Appointments are made upon recommendation of the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics.

The Woodrow Wilson Foreign Affairs Fellowship was established in the 1960s and first awarded in 1982. Appointments are made upon recommendation of the Chair of the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics.

Sciences

The BP-America Fellowship was established in 1985 with an endowed gift from the SOHIO Corporation to provide support for an outstanding student in the area of science and technology.

The ARCS Fellowship was established in 1984 as an annual gift from the Washington, D.C., chapter of the Achievement Awards for College Scientists Foundation. This fellowship has a stipend of $12,000 with the recipient chosen from enrolled students nominated by the science departments.

Sociology

The Phelps-Stokes Fellowships in Sociology. Awards are renewable. Founded in 1911 upon the gift of the trustees of the Phelps-Stokes Fund, these fellowships are awarded to beginning or advanced graduate students for the study of the Blacks in the South.


Special Fellowships

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The Henry Clay Marchant Fellowships were founded in 1935 by Mrs. Fanny Bragg Marchant, of Albemarle County, Va., in memory of her husband, Henry Clay Marchant. Appointments are made by the Rector and Visitors of the University from students recommended by the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Preference is given to candidates, regardless of religious denomination, who are preparing to become medical missionaries or to enter the ministry. When proper selection cannot be made from these two classes of students, the awards may be conferred upon any scholars, whatever their educational goal, who are deemed worthy by the Rector and Visitors. The tenure of each fellowship is one year, but the holder may be reappointed upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate School.

The Wallerstein Fellowship (with a stipend not to exceed $5,000) was established by a gift from Ruth C. and Morton L. Wallerstein to foster interest and research in Virginia municipal government. It is hoped, but not required, that recipients either be employees or officials of Virginia municipalities or persons intending to enter or re-enter Virginia municipal service upon completion of graduate work. Application forms may be obtained from the Institute of Government, 207 Minor Hall.


Assistantships

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Assistantships and part-time instructorships are available in most departments. These involve teaching, grading, laboratory assistance, etc. The stipends vary according to the duties and the amount of time required of the student. For information concerning assistantships, applicants should write directly to the chair of the department in which they are interested.

Out-of-state graduate students who are teaching assistants and are paid at least $5,000 may receive a tuition adjustment fellowship to pay the difference between the out-of-state and in-state tuition. Out-of-state research assistants and graduate assistants who are paid at least $5,000 may receive a tuition adjustment fellowship to pay a percentage (up to 100 percent) of the difference between out-of-state and in-state tuition.

Graduate teaching assistants who are employed at half-time or greater (44 hours per month) will have their in-state tuition and required fees (excluding activities fees) remitted during the semester of their employment.


Loans and Part-Time Employment

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In addition to the fellowships and assistantships described above, graduate students may apply for financial assistance through the Office of Financial Aid to Students. All awards from federal loan or employment funds are based on need. To apply for assistance a University financial aid application must be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid to Students and a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must reach the appropriate processing center by March 31. For further information or applications, contact the Office of Financial Aid to Students, P.O. Box 400207, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4207. See chapter 3 for further information.


 
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