University of Virginia
The Rotunda at U.Va.
2005-2006
GRADUATE RECORD
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
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Faculty
Course Descriptions

Corcoran Department of History

Randall Hall
University of Virginia
P.O. Box 400180
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4180
(434) 924-7147 Fax: (434) 924-7891
history@virginia.edu
www.virginia.edu/history

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in History are required to pass eight semester courses (24 credits including work in seminars and colloquia) and, for those outside United States and European history, an oral examination of one hour covering two special fields of history, and write a thesis. Candidates must also meet the foreign language requirement. This is usually done by showing at least two years (or the equivalent) of satisfactory work in a foreign language on the undergraduate transcript. Candidates who cannot do this must pass a proficiency-level language examination.

Doctor of Philosophy Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History are required to pass 18 semester courses (54 credits including seminar and colloquium requirements), a set of written exams, and a two hour general oral examination covering one major field, a special field within the major field, and a special field outside the major field. This examination must be taken after the colloquium requirement has been met, after the written exams have been passed, and after at least one mastery-level foreign language examination has been passed.

All candidates must demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. Reading knowledge of a second foreign language is regularly required in most non-American fields, and a third or even fourth language may be necessary in certain fields.

After submission of the dissertation, a final oral examination is given in which the candidate must defend the dissertation.

All fields of study are chosen in consultation with the major professor. At least 15 credits must be in topical history research seminars and colloquia, including at least two such seminars beyond the required seminar work of the first-year program. Candidates are also required to present three credits in a related field, in a department other than history, selected with the approval of the major professor.

Program in Legal History The history department, in cooperation with the School of Law, enables students to develop special competency in American legal history and in English legal history. For the M.A. degree students must offer at least one field in legal history in the M.A. oral examination. For the Ph.D. two special fields in legal history are required. A joint committee of the faculty in history and in law administers the program. Admission to the program is through the usual procedures of admission to the Department of History.

Historical Editing The history department offers courses which enable students to develop competency in historical editing while studying for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree. Application is through the usual procedures toward admission to the Department of History.


Course Descriptions

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Graduate courses in the history department fall into four groups, each demarcated by a different first digit. Courses in the 500 and 700 range are colloquia; that is, they are built around reading and group discussion on a weekly basis and writing assignments focused on the reading of secondary works. The 500-level colloquia combine advanced undergraduates and graduate students; they carry full graduate credit. Courses carrying a 700 number and above are for graduate students only. Courses in the 800 range are seminars; that is, they assume some familiarity with the field and involve the writing of a substantial work of primary research on a specific topic. Courses in the 900 range are independent study, designed to permit students to explore fields in which courses are not offered, prepare for comprehensive examinations, or work on their theses or dissertations. Students should discuss enrollment in any of these courses with the instructor beforehand, since specific skills and prior course work are often necessary.

African History

HIAF 511 - (3) (IR)
Slave Systems in Africa and the Americas
Historical study of the growth and evolution of the systems of "slavery" in Africa, the American south, and Latin America (including the Caribbean).

HIAF 701, 702 - (3) (IR)
The History and Historiography of Africa
Taught for graduate students with no previous experience in African history; consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of HIAF 201, 202, and weekly discussions devoted to more detailed examination of the technical and interpretive problems in writing African history.

HIAF 703 - (3) (IR)
History and Historiography of North Africa, ca. 1800-Present
Prerequisite: HIME 201, 202.
Introduces the literature on North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia) from the precolonial period to the postcolonial era. An intensive readings and discussion colloquium devoted to the major issues in the region’s political, economic, social, and cultural history, and to the issues raised by colonial historiography.

HIAF 801 - (3) (IR)
African History
Advanced research in African history. Topics vary with student and instructor interest.

East Asian History

HIEA 515 - (3) (IR)
China Encounters the World
This course, an advanced reading seminar, provides an in-depth investigation of one of the most magnificent, yet destructive, revolutions in human history–the Chinese Communist revolution, as well as the person who led the revolution, Mao Zedong.

HIEA 701, 702 - (3) (IR)
Traditional East Asian History
Offered to graduate students with no previous background in East Asian history. Consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of undergraduate courses on East Asian history and directed readings at an advanced level of the development of the social, political and cultural institutions of East Asia.

HIEA 703, 704 - (3) (IR)
Modern East Asian History
Offered to graduate students with no previous background in modern East Asian history. Consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of undergraduate courses on modern East Asian history and directed readings at an advanced level on the development of the social, political and cultural institutions of East Asia.

HIEA 706 - (3) (IR)
Modern Chinese History
Research and writing on selected topics in modern Chinese history, emphasizing the period since 1919.

HIEA 801, 802 - (3) (IR)
East Asian History
Directed readings, discussions, and research papers on selected topics in Chinese and Japanese history.

HIEA 811 - (3) (IR)
Traditional Chinese History
Studies documents related to social and political philosophy. Emphasizes translated texts, but some attention will be paid to Chinese texts and the problems of translation.

HIEA 821 - (3) (IR)
Japanese History
Discusses selected issues in the social, political, and economic development of Japan from the Tokugawa period to the present.

European History

HIEU 501 - (3) (IR)
Archaic Greece
Prerequisite: HIEU 203 or equivalent.
Study of the rise of Greek civilization. A political and constitutional history of the development of the Greek city-state, emphasizing classic Athens.

HIEU 502 - (3) (IR)
Greece in the Fifth Century
Prerequisite: HIEU 203 or equivalent.
Examination of the political, diplomatic, and social history of Greece from the end of the Persian Wars in 479 B.C. to the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404/3 B.C. Investigates the origins, course, and importance of the latter war, the major watershed in classical Greek history.

HIEU 503 - (3) (IR)
Greece in the Fourth Century
Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent.
Advanced course in Greek history which examines in detail the social and economic history of Greece from the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 B.C. to the defeat of the Greek City-states at Chaeronea in 338.

HIEU 504 - (3) (IR)
Roman Republic
Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent.
Studies the expansion of Rome from city-state to world empire to the death of Caesar.

HIEU 505 - (3) (IR)
Roman Empire
Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent.
Studies the founding and institutions of the Principate, the Dominate and the decline of antiquity.

HIEU 506 - (3) (IR)
Roman Imperialism
Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent.
Examines Roman transmarine expansion to determine how and why it happened, and what consequences it had, both in Rome and abroad.

HIEU 507 - (3) (IR)
Modern Theory
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in intellectual history.
For students with previous knowledge of philosophy, political, or sociological theory, or religious studies. Discusses three or four major nineteenth- or twentieth-century theorists in depth.

HIEU 510 - (3) (IR)
Early Christian Thought
Prerequisite: RELC 205 or instructor permission.
Intensive consideration of a selected issue, movement or figure in Christian thought of the second through fifth centuries.

HIEU 511 - (3) (IR)
Early Medieval England
A documentary history of English society from the late Saxon period to the reign of King John.

HIEU 512 - (3) (IR)
Later Medieval England
A documentary history of English society from the reign of King John to the death of Richard II.

HIEU 513 - (3) (IR)
Medieval France
Studies the societies and governments in medieval Francia from the 11th century to the 14th.

HIEU 516 - (3) (IR)
The Medieval Church
Studies the history of the Western church within the development of medieval society, from the time of Constantine through the 13th century, based on a study of selected texts.

HIEU 517 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Society: Ways of Life and Thought in Western Europe
Introduces social and intellectual history from Charlemagne to Dante.

HIEU 518 - (3) (IR)
Historians in the Middle Ages
Discusses the ways important Latin writers of the medieval period looked at the past.

HIEU 519 - (3) (IR)
War and Society in the Middle Ages
A documentary history of warfare in Western Europe from the 9th century to the 16th with a discussion of its effect on the political, economic, social, and religious development of the emerging nation states.

HIEU 520 - (3) (IR)
The Culture of the Renaissance
Surveys the writing of humanists who lived between 1300 and 1600. Topics include the contributions of humanists to the history of education, political theory, religion, gender relations, and artistic theory. Authors include Petrarch, Machiavelli, Thomas More, and Erasmus. Open to undergraduates by permission of the instructor.

HIEU 521 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern Germany, 1350-1750
Studies late medieval politics, economy, and culture, including the Reformation, Counter-Reformation, and Wars of Religion; pietism and the baroque.

HIEU 522 - (3) (IR)
English Social History, 1550-1800
Prerequisite: undergraduates by instructor permission.
Provides a survey of major themes in English social history, examining agriculture, rural community structures, demography, urban life, religious, political, and legal practices, popular culture, and relations between men and women.

HIEU 526 - (3) (IR)
Russian History to 1700
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Readings and discussion on selected topics in the evolution of the Russian peoples to the reign of Peter the Great.

HIEU 527 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Russian Absolutism, 1613-1855
Studies Russian history from the reign of the first Romanov tsar to the defeat in the Crimean War. Concentrates on the evolution of absolutism in Russia and the effects of the changes introduced by Peter the Great.

HIEU 530 - (3) (IR)
Nationality, Ethnicity, and Race in Modern Europe
Prerequisite: One course in modern European history or instructor permission.
A colloquium on how categories of human identity have been conceived, applied, and experienced in Western and Eastern Europe from 1789 to the present. Topics include the construction of identities, national assimilation, inter-confessional conflict, colonialism, immigration, and the human sciences.

HIEU 544 - (3) (IR)
Modernity, Postmodernism, and History
Prerequisite: instructor permission.
The course examines modernity and postmodernist theory in relation to issues of time and historical change. Such writers as Baudrillard, Danto, Deleuze, Derrida, Foucault, Habermas, Heidegger, Kolakowski, Lyotard, and Vattimo, as well as other authors critically commenting on them, will be considered.

HIEU 545 - (3) (IR)
The History of Twentieth-Century Europe, 1900-1941
A systematic and intensive study of monograph literature dealing with the first half of the 20th century, concentrating on some major problems that have incited scholarly controversy.

HIEU 546 - (3) (IR)
The History of Twentieth-Century Europe Since 1941
An intensive study of the monographic literature dealing with controversial issues in European history since World War II.

HIEU 555 - (3) (IR)
The German World After 1918
Studies the problems in German politics and society, including those of Austria, Switzerland, and such border areas as Alsace-Lorraine, Luxemburg and the German regions of Czechoslovakia.

HIEU 556, 557 - (3) (IR)
British History Since 1760
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Readings and discussion on selected topics in British history since the reign of George III.

HIEU 558 - (3) (Y)
The British Empire
This seminar surveys the history of British expansion over four centuries, moving between the history of the imperial center, and the stories of encounter, settlement, violence, resistance, and of the transformation of lifeways and identity, at the American, Asian, African, and Pacific peripheries of British influence. It is, at the same time, a thorough introduction into the historiography of Imperialism, and a space in which advanced undergraduates and graduates may pursue related research.

HIEU 559 - (3) (IR)
The British Economy Since 1850
Studies the structure, performance and policy in the British economy since 1850, focusing on the causes and consequences of Britain’s relative economic decline. Cross-listed as ECON 507.

HIEU 561 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Reform and Revolution in Russia, 1855-1917
Addresses the social and political effects of efforts to modernize and industrialize Russia, which led to the growth of political and revolutionary opposition and the overthrow of the monarchy.

HIEU 562 - (3) (IR)
Russia Since 1917
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Examines the development of the Soviet state, investigating the causes of the collapse of the Tsarist regime and the triumph of the Bolsheviks.

HIEU 564 - (3) (IR)
Russian and Soviet Diplomatic History
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Intensive examination, through readings and discussion, of aspects of Soviet diplomatic history between the wars; attempts by the revolutionary regime to overthrow the capitalist states and to coexist with them; and the road to World War II.

HIEU 566 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth Century Russian Intellectual History
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Readings and discussion of seminal Russian intellectuals and their ideas under the later Romanov Tsars.

HIEU 567 - (3) (IR)
Russian Social History
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Readings and discussions on selected topics in Russian social history during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

HIEU 572 - (3) (IR)
Germany 1500-2000
Prerequisite: advanced undergraduates with prior coursework in European History. or graduate students.
A course that proceeds by comparing topics from early modern German history with their modern manifestations. Topics such as the history of warfare, death, religion, politics, intellectual life, and the economy are considered.

HIEU 573 - (3) (IR)
European Social History
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Reading and discussion of the evolution of private life, emphasizing methodology and the interpretation of sources in social history.

HIEU 575 - (3) (IR)
Evolution of the International System, 1815-1950
Prerequisite: Graduate students and instructor permission.
Studies the evolution of great-power politics from the post-Napoleonic Congress of Vienna and the systems of Metternich and Bismarck to the great convulsions of the twentieth century and the Russo-American Cold War after World War II. Covers same thematic material as HIEU 375 on a more intensive level.

HIEU 577 - (3) (IR)
History of Modern Science
Reading and discussion on selected topics in the history of the natural and social science since 1600.

HIEU 578, 579 - (3) (IR)
European Intellectual History
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Reading, discussion, and papers on selected topics in European intellectual history since the 17th century.

HIEU 580 - (3) (IR)
Postmodernism: Contexts and Anticipations
Prerequisite: Some modest prior background in intellectual history, philosophy, literature, art, architecture, or music.
Studies the notions of postmodernism and postmodernity. The names are recent and much in dispute, but the various phenomena they designate seem interesting and important. Plays postmodernism off against modernism in its several senses (aesthetic, sociological, philosophical), and examines earlier anticipations of the recent intellectual conflict.

HIEU 701 - (3) (Y)
Colloquium in Medieval European History
The first semester of a two-semester sequence of graduate colloquia introducing students to the major themes in European history and historiography in the period before the eighteenth century and structured around central themes in medieval history.

HIEU 702 - (3) (Y)
Colloquium in Early Modern European History
The second semester of a two-semester sequence of graduate colloquia introducing students to the major themes in European history and historiography in the period before the eighteenth century and structured around central themes in early modern European history.

HIEU 703 - (3) (Y)
Colloquium in Modern European History I
The first semester of a two-semester sequence of graduate colloquia introducing students to the major themes in European history and historiography in the period from the eighteenth century to the present and structured around central themes in European history between c. 1750 and c. 1870.

HIEU 704 - (3) (Y)
Colloquium in Modern European History II
The second semester of a two-semester sequence of graduate colloquia introducing students to the major themes in European history and historiography in the period before the eighteenth century to the present and structured around central themes in European history c. 1870.

HIEU 705 - (3) (IR)
Historiography
Introduces the theory of historiography. Examines various works of historiographical theory (Collingwood, Veyne, Ricoeur, and others), bringing them to bear on a sampling of historical writing.

HIEU 706 - (3) (IR)
Roman Religion
This seminar examine the institutions, practices, and attitudes associated with Roman religion, focusing chiefly on aspects of Roman religion as practiced in the city of Rome itself, and devoting itself primarily to the Republican and early imperial periods. Cross listed as LATI 706.

HIEU 707 - (3) (IR)
Anthropology of Ancient Greece
A survey of anthropological methods useful for the study of the past: simultaneously an economic introduction to the Great Books of anthropology, to a prominent aspect of contemporary classical scholarship, and to the opportunities and problems presented by using the methods of one field to illuminate another.

HIEU 708 - (3) (IR)
Ancient History
Introduces non-literary materials of use to the historian in correcting and/or amplifying the literary record, including inscriptions, papyri, coins, etc.

HIEU 711 - (3) (IR)
Medieval History
Reading and discussion of selected topics in medieval history.

HIEU 721 - (3) (IR)
The Renaissance
Studies European politics and society from the commercial revolution to Cateau Cambresis.

HIEU 722 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Reformation
Surveys current problems in the history of the religion, science, philosophy, politics, economics, and social structure. Covers Europe (especially England, France, Germany, and Italy), 1350-1750.

HIEU 723 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern Europe
A colloquium on central topics of European history, 1400-1789, emphasizing developments in social, political, economic, and cultural history.

HIEU 724 - (3) (IR)
Popular Religion 1300-1800
Traditionally, the history of religion was limited to the study of formal theology and ecclesiastical institutions. It has now become common to ask what the religious ideas and experience of ordinary people was, and to examine the connection between formal dogma and lay piety. Course introduces some of the most exciting works of this new direction and establishes bridges between history and religious studies, between the late medieval and early modern periods, and between intellectual and social history. Cross-listed as RELC 724.

HIEU 726 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern England
Readings and discussion on special topics in the period 1485 to 1760.

HIEU 727 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern Inquisitions
Prerequisite: Graduate students or instructor permission.
Close examination of the Spanish and Roman Inquisitions: their initial and later targets, the theological and legal premises on which they operated, the ways in which modern scholars can use surviving Inquisition records.

HIEU 729 - (3) (IR)
Modern European Social History
A comparative approach to major changes and problems in political, social, and cultural history.

HIEU 730 - (3) (IR)
History of Science
Introduces the historiography of science, and especially to new approaches which integrate the history of the natural and social sciences into intellectual, social, political, and economic history.

HIEU 731 - (3) (IR)
The Enlightenment
Intensive reading and discussion of the primary and secondary literature.

HIEU 732 - (3) (IR)
Europe in the Eighteenth Century and Revolutionary Period
Intensive readings on Europe, 1715-1799, emphasizing the origins of the French Revolution.

HIEU 733 - (3) (IR)
The Fortune of Gender in Early Modern Europe
After tracing the emergence in the 1790s of the history of women and a decade later the history of gender as coherent modes of investigation, we shall examine recent developments and tensions in these fields by discussing important monographs and collections of essays.

HIEU 739 - (3) (IR)
Europe Since 1789
Intensive reading and discussion of topics in comparative European history since 1789.

HIEU 740 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth-Century Europe
Intensive reading and discussion of the secondary literature.

HIEU 745 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Europe
Intensive reading in selected topics, emphasizing new or emerging nations in Europe.

HIEU 750 - (3) (IR)
Modern France
Prerequisite: HIEU 350 or equivalent.
A reading course devoted to the historiography of France 1700. Emphasizes recent trends in the literature.

HIEU 756 - (3) (IR)
Victorian England
Selected topics in the history of England from 1815 to the late 19th century.

HIEU 761 - (3) (IR)
Russia 1894-1917
Russia in the revolutionary era, 1894-1917. Study of Russian society, its institutions, culture, and the revolutionary forces confronting the Tsarist regime in the reign of Nicholas II.

HIEU 766 - (3) (IR)
Russian Social and Cultural History, 1815 to the Present
A comparative approach, through readings and discussion, to trends in social and cultural history during the last century of the monarchy and in the Soviet period.

HIEU 778 - (3) (IR)
Modern European Intellectual History
Selected literature in modern European intellectual history, broadly defined.

HIEU 801 - (3) (IR)
Ancient History
Topics to be chosen by the instructor.

HIEU 802 - (3) (Y)
Intermediate Research Seminar
Prerequisite: An 800-level course or instructor permission.
For master’s candidates in European history emphasizing individual research projects. Allows students to complete their master’s essays. Provides training in research techniques and general historiographical issues.

HIEU 811 - (3) (IR)
Medieval History

HIEU 821 - (3) (IR)
The Renaissance

HIEU 822 - (3) (IR)
The Reformation
A research seminar.

HIEU 823, 824 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern Europe
A research seminar in topics pertaining to the history of Europe in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Offered as required.

HIEU 825 - (3) (IR)
History of Russian Empire
Topics to be chosen by the instructor. Offered as required.

HIEU 826 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern England

HIEU 833 - (3) (IR)
Saints and Society
Prerequisite: Graduate student status in History or another humanities discipline.
This seminar examines Christian holy people in medieval and early modern Europe, and in other regions coming under European influence. With emphasis on change over time, topics include popular perceptions and official definitions of holiness, literary and artistic genres in which holiness was represented, differences between the Catholic Church’s and other denominations’ use of holy people. Major research paper required.

HIEU 840 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth-Century European History
Reading and research in selected topics, with emphasis on Germany and Austria.

HIEU 845 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Europe
A research seminar.

HIEU 846 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Europe and Russia
For students working in any geographical area of 20th-century Europe. Topics selected by students in consultation with instructor. Helps students begin research for M.A. theses and doctoral dissertations.

HIEU 856 - (3) (IR)
Victorian England
A research seminar.

HIEU 864, 865 - (3) (IR)
Soviet Domestic and Foreign Policy
Offered as required.

HIEU 867 - (3) (IR)
Russian History
A discussion of selected problems in Russian history during the late Imperial and Soviet periods with emphasis upon political, social, and cultural history.

HIEU 878 - (3) (IR)
Modern European Intellectual History
A research seminar.

Latin American History

HILA 501 - (3) (IR)
Colonial Latin American History
Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduates with consent of instructor and graduate students with a reading knowledge of Spanish.
An intensive reading program in the historiography of major issues of the colonial field, in preparation for graduate-level research.

HILA 502 - (3) (IR)
Modern Latin American History
Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduates with consent of instructor and graduate students with a reading knowledge of Spanish.
An intensive reading program in the historiography of major issues of the modern field, in preparation for graduate-level research.

HILA 701 - (3) (IR)
Colonial Latin America
A readings course open to graduate students with a reading knowledge of Spanish.

HILA 702 - (3) (IR)
Modern Latin America
A readings course open to graduate students with a reading knowledge of Spanish.

HILA 801 - (3) (IR)
Colonial Latin America
A research seminar open to graduate students with a reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese.

HILA 802 - (3) (IR)
Modern Latin America
A research seminar open to graduate students with a reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese.

Middle Eastern History

HIME 502 - (3) (IR)
Revolution, Islam and Gender in the Middle East
Comparative study of revolutions in 20th-century Turkey, Egypt, Algeria, and Iran, with particular reference to colonial and post-colonial class, religious, and gender movements.

HIME 701 - (3) (IR)
History and Historiography of the Middle East, ca. 570-1500
Prerequisite: HIME 201.
Introduces the history and historiography of the medieval Middle East and North Africa (areas from Morocco to Iran) from the period immediately preceding the rise of Islam until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century. Primarily a readings-and-discussion colloquium devoted to political, social, economic, and cultural evolution of the regions and peoples situated in arid and semi-arid zones stretching from Gibraltar to the Oxus River. After surveying the general contours of the field, and isolating the principal scholarly approaches to it, the course proceeds chronologically, starting with the Byzantine and Sassanian Empires in the 6th century and concluding with assessment of the Turkic-Mongolian impact upon the historical configuration of the regions.

HIME 702 - (3) (IR)
History and Historiography of the Middle East, ca. 1500-Present
Prerequisite: HIME 201, 202, or HIME 701.
Introduces the history and historiography of the early modern and modern Middle East and North Africa from the period of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires until the emergence of a system of nation-states in the 20th century. Primarily a readings-and-discussion colloquium devoted to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the region.

South Asian History

HISA 502 - (3) (IR)
Historiography of Early Modern South Asia
Analyzes historical sources and historians of political systems in Muslim India until the rise of British power.

HISA 510 - (3) (IR)
Economic History of India
Studies regional economic systems prior to European penetration; the establishment and growth of European trading companies in the 17th and 18th centuries; commercialization of agriculture; the emergence of a unified Indian economy in the 19th century; and industrialization and economic development in the 20th.

HISA 701 - (3) (IR)
Society and Politics in Eighteenth-Century India
Examines the social, political, cultural, and economic configurations of South Asia from the Mughal decline to British paramountcy, 1720-1818, using original sources and translations.

HISA 703 - (3) (IR)
Social History of Modern India
Applies social science methods and concepts to the study of modern India.

HISA 704, 705 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Indian History
For graduate students with no background in South Asian history; consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of HISA 202, 203, and directed readings on the growth of social and cultural institutions in South Asia.

HISA 711 - (3) (IR)
Peasant Movements in Modern India
Considers agrarian relationships and the economic conflict in those relations that give rise to peasant movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. Discussions are based on texts concerned with peasant societies.

HISA 801 - (3) (IR)
Society and Politics in Eighteenth-Century India
Examines the social, political, cultural, and economic configurations of South Asia from the Mughal decline to British paramountcy, 1720-1818, using original sources and translations.

HISA 802 - (3) (IR)
Readings and Research in the History of Early Modern South Asia
Reading and research in the history of India, Pakistan, and other states of the subcontinent.

HISA 803 - (3) (IR)
Readings and Research in the History of Modern South Asia
Reading and research in the history of the Indian subcontinent in the modern period.

HISA 806 - (3) (IR)
Social History of Modern India
Research and writing utilizing gazetteers, settlement reports, censuses, and other sources.

HISA 811 - (3) (IR)
Peasant Movements in Modern Indian History
A workshop seminar on peasant movements in modern India, Bengla Desh, and Pakistan utilizing original documents.

General History

HIST 501, 502 - (3) (IR)
Documentary Editing: Procedures and Practice
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
The principles and methods of interpreting and editing historical manuscripts, emphasizing the colonial and early national periods.

HIST 503 - (3) (IR)
Quantitative Analysis of Historical Data
Prerequisite: An introductory course in statistics or instructor permission.
Studies the social scientific approach to historical inquiry, the formulation of theories, and their testing with historical data. Includes extensive directed readings in quantitative history and training in quantitative methods, sampling, the organization of a data-set, and data analysis.

HIST 504 - (3) (IR)
Monticello Internship
Prerequisite: Instructor permission; graduate students in history and fourth year undergraduate history majors. Two students are admitted per semester.
Directed research, largely in primary source materials, on topics relating to Jefferson’s estate, life, and times. Directed by senior members of the Monticello staff.

HIST 505 - (3) (IR)
History, Memory, Subjectivity
Considers a portion of the very extensive, and growing, literature on issues of memory, subjectivity, and historical evidence. "Memory" is taken in a broad sense, to include not only the recall and narrativization of experience but also tradition and commemoration, since in the historical literature these different senses of memory are often mixed together. Students must find their own paper topics, and are encouraged to discuss the course with the instructor in advance.

HIST 506 - (3) (SI)
Philosophy of History
Examines the theoretical presuppositions of historical research and writing.

HIST 507 - (3) (IR)
Internship in History: Interpreting African-American Life at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello
This internship program, devised and presented by Monticello staff, and offered in conjunction with UVa’s History Department, is designed for students interested in the interpretation of African-American history to the public. The interns are trained as historical interpreters and present Monticello’s Plantation Community tour. This walking tour explores Mulberry Row, the center of plantation activity where enslaved African-American families lived and worked, and examines the philosophical issue of Thomas Jefferson and slavery. Lectures, discussions and readings cover the historical content and interpretive techniques that allow interns to develop their individualized Plantation Community tours.

HIST 509 - (3) (Y)
Multiculturalism in the Ottoman Empire
Study of how a large empire governed a diverse population, between 1453 and 1981, from the perspective of concerns about recent nationalist, racial and ethnic conflicts in modern nation-states. Course first examines how the Ottomans managed relations between ethnic and religious groups to 1750. Course then examines reasons for increased communal conflict after 1750, and Ottoman efforts to re-engineer relations among groups along liberal, constitutional lines.

HIST 513 - (3) (IR)
The Atlantic Slave Trade
Studies the growth and development of the international slave trade from Africa to the New World from the 15th to the 19th centuries.

HIST 705 - (3) (IR)
Economic History
Extensive directed readings on selected topics, covering both substantive historical literature and relevant theoretical works. Students must write a minimum of two papers during the term.

HIST 706 - (3) (IR)
Comparative Readings in British America and Latin America Before 1800
Graduate colloquium devoted to comparative readings in colonial Latin America and colonial British America, co-taught by specialists in each of the respective fields. Identifies broad areas of similarity and contrast in the settlement and development of the two colonial societies.

HIST 707 - (3) (IR)
Methods in Social History
A colloquium open to students in all fields and periods. Examines new approaches, methods, and subject matter in the broad area of social history.

HIST 708 - (3) (IR)
Colloquium in Methodological Perspectives
Surveys different methodological perspectives currently exhibited in historical scholarship, such as social history, intellectual history, political history, feminist history, and economic history, as reflected in distinctive works of scholarship.

HIST 711 - (3) (IR)
Modern French Imperialism

Topics in the study of France’s political, social, and cultural influence in Africa and Asia since 1798. Emphasis on indigenous perspectives of those who lived under French colonial rule in the Middle East and North Africa.

HIST 801 - (3) (IR)
Summer Research Seminar
Prerequisite: Permission of the director of graduate studies or chair of the department.
A general research seminar for students needing to meet seminar requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degrees during the nine-week summer session. Not open to degree candidates enrolled during the regular academic session.

HIST 805 - (3) (IR)
Economic History
Prerequisite: Some background in economics, particularly micro-economics.
In-depth exploration of selected problems in United States economic history.

HIST 821 - (3) (IR)
English Legal Thought
Studies English legal thought in the nineteenth century, particularly the background, opinions, and conception of law held by Blackstone, Bentham, John Austin, Lord Eldon, Sir Henry Maine, Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, A.V. Dicey, and F.W. Maitland. (See School of Law listing.)

HIST 822 - (3) (IR)
English Legal History
Research seminar on topics of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century English legal history. Limited (if necessary) to 18, and preference is given (if necessary) to those who have taken English Legal Thought.

HIST 842 - (3) (IR)
Writing Transnational History
This seminar will focus on ways of writing about the past that transcend the limitations of strictly national history. Students will be encouraged to develop substantial research projects concerning the movement of individuals, peoples, goods, or ideas across national boundaries or the establishment of transnational and/or colonial relationships, associations, or spaces.

HIST 897 - (3-12) (IR)
Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research
For master’s research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.

HIST 898 - (3-12) (IR)
Non-Topical Research
For master’s thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.

HIST 901, 902 - (3) (IR)
Advanced Research Seminar
Prerequisite: Third-year standing in the graduate program, or permission of the graduate committee.
A general research seminar for students preparing for the oral qualifying examination and for the dissertation.

HIST 993 - (3) (IR)
Independent Research

HIST 995 - (3) (IR)
Supervised Research
Normally required of first-year graduate students in the second semester. Reading and/or research in particular fields under supervision of an instructor.

HIST 996 - (3) (IR)
Independent Research

HIST 997 - (3-12) (IR)
Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.

HIST 999 - (3-12) (IR)
Non-Topical Research
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

United States History

HIUS 701, 702 - (6) (IR)
Introductory Colloquium in American History
Surveys American history from 1607 to the present, emphasizing various approaches and current problems in recent historiography.

HIUS 703 - (3) (IR)
Social History of Early America
Introduces American social history through intensive readings on historical demography, immigration, the family, and social structure.

HIUS 704 - (3) (IR)
The Early American Republic, 1783-1830
Reading and discussion in national political history from 1789 to 1815.

HIUS 705 - (3) (IR)
Antebellum America
Studies selected problems and developments in the period 1830-1860 through reading and discussion.

HIUS 706 - (3) (IR)
New Approaches to American Political History
Studies the 19th century, introducing the new conceptual and methodological approaches historians and political scientists have brought to bear on American political history. Explores critical realignment, collective biography, content analysis, legislative roll-call analysis, and popular voting analysis.

HIUS 707 - (3) (IR)
Civil War and Reconstruction
Studies selected problems and developments through reading and discussion.

HIUS 710 - (3) (IR)
Early American Military History
Introduces the military history of the American colonies and the U.S. between 1689-1815. Topics include the history of early conflicts with the Indians; the colonial wars; the American Revolution; and the War of 1812. Explores the significance of warfare for the emerging republican culture of the U.S., focusing on the social contexts of war as these have been revealed in the "new military history."

HIUS 713 - (3) (IR)
The Emergence of Modern America, ca. 1870-ca. 1930
Studies the distinctive characteristics of American modernity as they emerged in the period from the end of reconstruction to the 1930s. Concentrates on the interplay between large national changes and local life as America became a world power. Investigates the reciprocal relations between society and politics, social organization and science and technology, large-scale bureaucratic organizations and the changing class structure, culture, and ideology.

HIUS 714 - (3) (IR)
The New Deal Order, 1929-1973
Studies the rise and fall of domestic liberalism and the political economy that sustained it.

HIUS 715 - (3) (IR)
The United States, 1945-Present
An intensive reading course emphasizing historiographic approaches to synthesizing post-war America.

HIUS 716 - (3) (IR)
The United States, 1945-Present
This is a readings and discussion course on U.S. history from 1945 to the present. Students will be graded based upon participation in discussion and short historiographic essays.

HIUS 717 - (3) (IR)
The American Culture of Consumption, 1920-1990
An intensive readings course exploring the cultural, social, and political implications and evolution of consumption.

HIUS 719 - (3) (IR)
History of Technology: Theory and Methods
Examines the role of technology in both American history and world history. Readings introduce major issues and methodology. No technical or scientific expertise required.

HIUS 723 - (3) (IR)
The American South Before 1900
Surveys major themes and interpretations of the American South, especially 19th century.

HIUS 724 - (3) (IR)
The South Since 1900
A colloquium on selected themes in 20th century southern history.

HIUS 725 - (3) (IR)
Southern History
Reading and discussion on selected topics of southern history.

HIUS 726 - (3) (IR)
American Political Development in Action

Readings drawn from the leading works in this field that span history, political science, and sociology. Students will also attend colloquia where works in progress will be presented by leading scholars.

HIUS 730 - (3) (IR)
American Studies Seminar
A co-taught, interdisciplinary seminar combining the study of a chronological period with a significant focus on the implications of the material for public historians. Includes the disciplines of art history, architecture, literature, anthropology, archaeology, music, government, and history. Period of focus is defined by co-faculty.

HIUS 745 - (3) (IR)
Urban History
Reading and discussion of primary and secondary sources focused on different topics annually.

HIUS 747 - (3) (IR)
American Labor History
Readings and discussion on U.S. working class, including its institutions, consciousness, social composition, politics.

HIUS 748 - (3) (IR)
Approaches to Social History
Study of the relationships between social history and other disciplines through readings and discussions about broad interpretative problems in 19th and 20th century American society.

HIUS 751 - (3) (IR)
The History of United States Foreign Relations
Colloquium on selected themes and topics in the history and historiography of U.S. foreign relations.

HIUS 755 - (3) (IR)
American Legal History
Intensive study along topical and chronological lines of the ways in which fundamental legal forms–federalism or property or contract–have shaped (and been shaped by) American politics and society from the eighteenth century to the recent past.

HIUS 757 - (3) (IR)
Topics in American Intellectual History
Prerequisite: HIEU 578, 579 or the equivalent.
Studies selected aspects and problems in the history of American thought.

HIUS 758 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth-Century American Social and Cultural History
Reading and discussion of primary and secondary sources.

HIUS 761 - (3) (IR)
Women’s History
Readings and discussion on selected topics in the history of women in the U.S.

HIUS 802 - (6) (IR)
First-Year Seminar in American History
A seminar for master’s candidates in American history, emphasizing research methods and techniques, writing, and general historiographical approaches to American history.

HIUS 803 - (3) (IR)
The Early Period of American History

HIUS 804 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Jefferson
Intensive study of different aspects of problems of this period of American history by means of discussions, readings, and research papers.

HIUS 805 - (3) (IR)
Antebellum America
Research on selected topics in the period 1830-1860.

HIUS 806 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth-Century American Political History
Research on selected topics in American political history, 1840-1880. Students write a research paper utilizing one or more of the techniques and concepts studied the first semester.

HIUS 812 - (3) (IR)
Civil War and Reconstruction
Examines special problems, with critical analysis of papers presented by students. Focus of study is national rather than sectional.

HIUS 813 - (3) (IR)
The Emergence of Modern America, ca. 1870-ca. 1930
Explores the distinctive characteristics of American modernity as they emerged in the period from the end of reconstruction to the 1930s. Concentrates on the interplay between large national changes and local life as America became a world power. Investigates the reciprocal relations between society and politics, social organization and science and technology, large-scale bureaucratic organizations, and the changing class structure, culture, and ideology.

HIUS 814 - (3) (IR)
American History, 1929-1945
Prerequisite: Graduate status; at least one upper-division undergraduate course, including this period or a relevant graduate course.
A research seminar in which students write a major paper on some aspect of American history during this period.

HIUS 815 - (3) (IR)
American History, 1945-Present
A research seminar that addresses problems in post-war historical research.

HIUS 823 - (3) (IR)
The Nineteenth-Century South
Research on selected topics in the history of the American South during the eras of slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the New South.

HIUS 824 - (3) (IR)
Topics in Modern Southern History
Prerequisite: HIUS 724 or instructor permission.
A research seminar.

HIUS 847 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century United States Labor History
Research seminar in labor history, covering topics from the era of Samuel Gompers to the decomposition of the post World War II socio-political order. Emphasizes the cultural and political conditions which gave rise to the industrial union movement of the 1930s and 1940s and to the internal dynamics of the trade unions of that era. Examines state politics and the labor policies of the leading firms in the core sectors of the economy.

HIUS 851 - (3) (IR)
The History of United States Foreign Relations
A research seminar.

HIUS 855 - (3) (IR)
American Legal History
Directed research in selected areas of American legal history.

HIUS 856 - (3) (IR)
Lawyers in American Public Life
Reading and biographical research on the legal profession and the role of lawyers in American government and politics since 1789.

HIUS 857 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth-Century American Social and Cultural History
A research seminar.

HIUS 861 - (3) (IR)
Graduate Seminar in Women’s History
Examines American women’s history culminating in the composition of an original research paper based on primary source materials from any era. Paper either deals with some aspect of the history of American women or examines the history of gender relations. Includes peer readings and critiques.

HIUS 867 - (3) (IR)
The Civil Rights Movement
A research seminar on the ideas, individuals, social forces, protest movements, and public policies that dismantled the southern system of segregation and disfranchisement.


 
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