2005-2006
UNDERGRADUATE RECORD
School of Engineering and Applied Science
General Information  |  Degree Programs  |  Curricula  |  Course Descriptions  |  Faculty
Aerospace Engineering
Applied Mathematics
Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Science
Materials Science & Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Science, Technology & Society
Systems Engineering

Curricula

For inquiries concerning curricula and courses, contact the Office of the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs, School of Engineering and Applied Science, P.O. Box 400233, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4233. Additional information may also be available on the school’s Web site at www.seas.virginia.edu.

The degree of Bachelor of Science is granted with the following majors:

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Engineering Science
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Systems Engineering

The curricula leading to these degrees are arranged to prepare a graduate to enter directly into employment or to continue graduate studies in either scientific or engineering fields. The baccalaureate degrees include required and elective courses in technical subjects and applied mathematics; required and elective courses in the physical sciences; and elective mathematics, humanities, and social science courses. The aim of these curricula is to provide the student with a strong foundation in methods of engineering analysis, design, and synthesis, and to ensure a firm grasp of fundamental principles in science, mathematics, and the humanities.

All the curricula are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and the professional engineering programs in aerospace, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, mechanical, and systems engineering are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), the accepted national agency for accrediting curricula in engineering.

The curricula that follow have been developed on the principle that instruction in engineering and applied science should prepare the graduate for professional practice as it has currently evolved and provide a firm foundation in the physical sciences and mathematics that will encourage an imaginative and flexible approach to the problems of engineering and applied science of the future. Included in the student’s first four semesters’ work are elective courses in the humanities taught by the College of Arts and Sciences and a required Science, Technology, and Society (STS) course in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The elective College courses broaden the students’ interests in fields outside of their technical program, and thus prepare them for a balanced and culturally rich life in the community. The School of Engineering and Applied Science STS courses aim to encourage effective oral and written communication in both technical and non-technical pursuits, and to develop an appreciation for the interactions of technology and society students will encounter in both their professional lives and as responsible citizens.

The curriculum of the school does not require premature specialization. A non-departmental core program covering most of the first two years is administered jointly by all departments. Most curricula have some requirements in the second-year program, and students should consult with their advisors and exercise judicious selection of electives to avail themselves of two or more options among major fields until the beginning of the third year.


Aerospace Engineering

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Aerospace engineering is concerned with the science and technology underlying the behavior and design of vehicles and systems that operate within the atmosphere and in space. It requires knowledge of a wide range of subject areas, including the basic sciences, mathematics, and engineering sciences as well as specialized studies in aerodynamics, propulsion systems, structures, materials, flight dynamics, astronautics, planetary atmospheres, and computational methods. This broad background qualifies the graduating engineer not only to handle problems that are special to the aerospace field, but also to meet challenges of an interdisciplinary nature facing society, such as those involving the environment, transportation, and energy resources.

With the changing climate in industry and educational units, increasing pressure is being placed on academic institutions to prepare students properly for the future workplace. Students need different experiences than they did ten years ago in order to be competitive in the changing industrial atmosphere. Rapidly expanding, global industries no longer have the resources for extensive "on the job" training. As indicated by discussions with recruiters and industry leaders, graduating students are now expected to have some practical and/or unique experience that they will be able to apply in an industry in the near term. These experiences may come from either laboratory work at the University, from a co-operative education (co-op) program or from summer jobs or internships with industry.

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering implemented a co-op program in 1996 that is currently placing students with 40 industries. This program builds self-confidence, helps define career goals. The co-op experience often helps students obtain senior thesis topics through industrial projects, eases transition to the industrial world, and enhances the student’s marketability. Salaries for co-op students are typically two-thirds of those for B.S. level engineers. It takes four and one-half years to complete the co-op program, including one extended stay (summer plus semester) in industry, with one or more summers possible. Requirements include third year academic standing and a grade point average of at least 2.000. Participation is optional and non-credit; details can be obtained from the school or department.

Program Objectives

  1. Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and the principles of engineering design to the professional practice of their discipline in modern industry.
  2. Identify and formulate engineering problems in and related to their discipline, and to solve them using modern engineering tools and techniques, through the inspection and analysis of data obtained from the design and execution of experiments, or from the application of theoretical or computational analysis.
  3. Pursue continuous, lifelong learning and professional renewal, including undertaking graduate studies. Possess the tools and motivation for continuous learning, scholarship and self-directed research.
  4. Understand the nature of engineering knowledge and the social context of engineering; appreciate the impact of engineering solutions in a contemporary, global, societal and environmental context; exhibit professionalism, understand and adhere to professional ethics and standards.
  5. Communicate effectively, take leadership positions, and function on multi-disciplinary teams. Understand the importance of diversity in the workplace and of the ethical practice of their profession.

Minor A minor in aerospace engineering is comprised of five courses and requires MAE 201 and two courses from List A and two courses from List B. List A: MAE 210, 230, 231, 232, and 321. List B: 301, 322, 331, 342, 352, 373, 382, 412, and 413.

Candidates must satisfy the following:

Aerospace Engineering Curriculum (128 credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

 
 

Society

3

   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro to Computer Science

3

 

Science elective I(1)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Third Semester

MAE 200L

Mechanics Familiarity Lab

1

MAE 201

Intro to Aerospace Engineering

3

APMA 311

Applied Probability and Statistics(5)

3

MAE 230

Statics

3

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241L

General Physics Lab I

1

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Fourth Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Differential Eq.

4

MAE 210

Thermodynamics

3

MAE 210L

Fluid/Thermal Fam Lab

1

MAE 231

Strength of Materials

3

MAE 232

Dynamics

3

STS ___

STS 2xx/3xx elective

3

   

17

Fifth Semester

APMA 314

Applied Partial Differential Equations

3

MAE 321

Fluid Mechanics

3

MAE 352

Engineering Materials

3

MAE 381

Experimental Methods Lab

2

MAE 301

Astronautics

3

 

Unrestricted elective(3)

3

   

17

Sixth Semester

MAE 322

Adv. Fluid Mechanics

3

MAE 331

Aerospace Structures

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

MAE 382

Aerodynamics Lab

3

 

Unrestricted elective(3)

3

   

15

Seventh Semester

MAE 373

Flight Vehicle Dynamics

3

MAE 412

Air Breathing Propulsion

3

MAE 465

Aerospace Design I

3

STS 401

Western Technology and Culture

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

15

Eighth Semester

MAE 466

Aerospace Design II

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

 

Unrestricted elective(3)

3

   

15

(1) Chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152; ECE 200; PHYS 252; and MSE 209.

(2) Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

(3) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131 and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean’s office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. APMA 109 counts as a three-credit unrestricted elective.

(4) Chosen from the MAE Department’s approved Technical Electives List except for MAE courses required for the degree.

(5) APMA 311 will satisfy the requirements of MAE 209 for the degree.


APPLIED MATHEMATICS

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The program in Applied Mathematics coordinates and administers mathematics instruction through its APMA courses to students in all departments of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The mathematical tools and expertise developed are essential to the professional development of the future engineer and applied scientist. This instruction forms the core of the analytical-mathematical component of an engineering education and lays the foundation for ongoing professional development.

Minor A minor in applied mathematics consists of five courses at the 300 level or above. These courses must include at least two courses from APMA 308, 310, and 314. Courses may be selected from APMA offerings as well as offerings in MATH and/or STAT in the College of Arts and Sciences which are not substantial duplicates of SEAS courses taken by the student.


Biomedical Engineering

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Program Objective Our objective is to impart the knowledge and skills students need to excel during graduate training in biomedical engineering, medicine, law, business, or other disciplines; establish a fulfilling career in industry; contribute in areas that rely on their unique integrative abilities; and ultimately become society’s leaders.

Program Description Biomedical engineering is built upon the premise that the tools and methods of engineering can be used to improve human health and enhance our understanding of the biological world. Biomedical engineering education integrates mathematics, science, engineering methodology, and engineering design to train individuals who are uniquely prepared for the collaborative challenges of this field. The end result of this type of training is knowledge, devices, materials, techniques and treatments to enhance human health. The foundation for these applications is the steady stream of discovery emerging from our nation’s academic and industrial research programs.

The Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) has offered degrees at the master’s and doctoral level since 1967. BME introduced a new bachelor’s of science degree in biomedical engineering in 2003. The major begins with an early, sound underpinning in the life sciences via two semesters of quantitative mammalian physiology and one semester of cell and molecular biology. Engineering fundamentals follow, taught in the context of biomedical engineering examples in systems analysis, biomechanics and biotransport, and computational systems. In the 3rd year BME majors complete a two-semester IDEAS Lab, integrating concepts and skills from prior BME and other engineering course work. The BME major culminates in the 4th year with a capstone design project where students undertake a year-long "design-and-build" or "design-of-experiment" project. Throughout all four years, electives offer additional breadth and depth.

Exceptionally prepared students can graduate in five years with both a B.S. and an M.S. in biomedical engineering. These students should plan early to design a senior thesis topic that can continue on to a master’s of science thesis. Students interested in this option are strongly urged to plan early in their 3rd year and discuss this plan with appropriate faculty in biomedical engineering.

The department encourages students to participate in research and inquiry-based learning above and beyond what is required by the curriculum. In the past students have pursued paid or volunteer positions in research labs, "for-credit" independent research projects, and industry or research internships. Research areas in the department include tissue engineering and genetic engineering targeting vascular disease; adhesion biomechanics, molecular bioengineering, cellular mechanics, and vascular remodeling; cellular mechanisms of wound healing; biomechanics; bioelectricity; biotransport; cardiovascular, respiratory, orthopedic, and neurological systems; and medical imaging, particularly ultrasound, X-ray, and MR imaging. Interdepartmental research collaboration links BME with most other School of Engineering and Applied Science departments and many clinical and basic science departments in the School of Medicine and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Biomedical engineers contribute to society from positions in universities, hospitals, government, the medical device and pharmaceutical industries, and a broad range of research enterprises. As the discipline grows, BME graduates are finding that their broad education provides an excellent platform from which to launch rewarding careers; begin graduate studies in biomedical engineering, biotechnology, or biophysics; or pursue advanced degrees in medicine, law, and business.

Because of the great demand for the biomedical engineering major and the need to maintain an excellent laboratory experience for each student, enrollment in the program is limited to 60 students per year. Admission is based on space availability, academic performance, a personal essay, and personal diversity. Application forms are available in the department office (Room 2010) in the Biomedical Engineering and Medical Science Building (MR5) in the School of Medicine, on the department website, and in the Office of the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs (Room A-122) of Thornton Hall.

Minor The department also offers an undergraduate minor in conjunction with any of the majors in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The 18-credit minor in biomedical engineering consists of BIOM 201 and 204, plus 4 approved electives that may include BIOM 310, 315, 322, 406, 411, 428, 441, 483, 484, 490, 495, 496, CHE 347, and MSE 512. One elective may be chosen from BIOM 202 or BIOL 301, 309, 417, 465, or 501.

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

 
 

Society

3

   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro to Computer Science

3

 

Science elective I(1)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Third Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241L

General Physics Lab I

1

BIOM 200

Intro to BME Design & Discovery

3

BIOM 201

Physiology I

3

 

Unrestricted elective(3)

3

   

17

Fourth Semester

BIOM 202

Physiology II

3

BIOM 204

Cell and Molecular Biology

3

BIOM 322

Biomechanics & Biotransport

3

APMA 311

Applied Stats & Probability

3

STS___

STS 2xx, 3xx elective

3

   

15

Fifth Semester

BIOM 310

Systems Analysis & Design

3

BIOM 380

IDEAS Laboratory I

4

 

HSS elective(2)

3

 

Engineering elective(4)

3

 

Technical elective(5)

3

   

16

Sixth Semester

BIOM 390

IDEAS Laboratory II

4

BIOM 315

Computational BME

3

 

Unrestricted elective(3)

3

 

Engineering elective(4)

3

 

Technical elective(5)

3

   

16

Seventh Semester

BIOM 463

BME Capstone Design I

3

STS 401

Western Tech & Culture

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(3)

3

 

BIOM elective(6)

3

   

15

Eighth Semester

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

BIOM 464

BME Capstone Design II

3

 

Unrestricted elective(3)

3

 

BIOM elective(6)

3

 

Bioengineering elective(7)

3

   

15

(1) Chosen from: BIOL 201, BIOL 202 (if premed), CHEM 152, ECE 200, & MSE 209.

(2) Chosen from the approved list available in A122 in Thornton Hall.

(3) Chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131 and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any intro programming course. APMA 109 counts as a 3-credit unrestricted elective.

(4) 200-level or higher engineering courses in a single area of concentration. One course is usually, but not always, a prerequisite for the other. A list of suggested course sequences is available in MR5 2010 (BME main office).

(5) Chosen from any 200-level or higher science, math, or engineering course, unless it is a course for non-science majors, it duplicates required BME class work, or it is a "research-for-credit" or "capstone design" course. Only 3 credits from the BIOL 201-202 (or AP credit) sequence will count as a tech elective.

(6) Chosen from any 300-level or higher BIOM elective, except BIOM 411. Only 3 credits of BIOM 453, 454 will count as either a BIOM or Bioengineering elective.

(7) Chosen from an approved list of engineering electives, 300-level or higher, with a substantial bioengineering component. Typically chosen from MSE 512, CHE 347, CHE 448, or any 300-level or higher BIOM elective, except BIOM 411. Only 3 credits of BIOM 453, 454 will count as either a BIOM or Bioengineering elective.


Chemical Engineering

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Chemical engineering applies physical, chemical, and engineering principles to the processing and utilization of such varied products as fuels, drugs, foods, plastics, metals, and basic chemicals. Given the broad applications of chemical engineering, our program has the following two objectives: (1) Graduates demonstrate technical competency, communication skills and breadth of knowledge in serving effectively in the chemical engineering profession and in becoming technical leaders in industry, government or academe. (2) Graduates engage successfully in advanced study in engineering and applied sciences and in professions such as law, business, and medicine.

Many chemical engineers serve in the traditional chemical process industries of petroleum, chemicals, paper, pharmaceuticals, and plastics. Some develop new products or processes through research, while others carry out the pilot studies and design work to bring innovations from the laboratory into manufacturing operations. Many are engaged in the operation and management of process plants. Others are in marketing, developing new applications for, or solving problems arising from, the use of products. Often a chemical engineer moves from one function to another. Chemical engineers have long aided in energy and materials production from oil, gas, and coal. They are involved in the research, development, and production of energy from alternative energy resources. Similarly, their chemical expertise and broad knowledge of processes are valuable in the identification and control of environmental problems, in health care and pharmaceuticals, and in areas such as electronic materials production. A chemical engineer’s career path is varied and rewarding, allowing individual talents to grow and be fully utilized.

In preparation for these opportunities, undergraduate studies for the B.S. Ch.E. degree are very broad in both science and engineering. The curriculum progresses from basic sciences and mathematics (with an emphasis on chemistry), through engineering sciences, to applications in chemical process analysis, and culminates in a capstone design project. Computer methods, laboratory techniques, open-ended problem solving, team approaches, and effective written and oral communication are emphasized throughout the UVa program of study. Elective courses permit minors or concentrations in diverse technical and non-technical areas; recent students have minored in all other engineering disciplines, the sciences and many different humanities and liberal arts programs, including languages. Throughout, students are expected not only to develop in technical capability, but also learn to consider the ethical, environmental, cultural, and economic impacts of technological activities.

First-Year and Second-Year Program Chemical engineering students take a two-semester sequence of general chemistry with the standard first-year program. Because of individual long term goals and the various options available for students in the chemical engineering program, consultation with a ChE advisor in the first semester of studies is strongly recommended. For example, the second semester chemistry course and laboratory are required for ChE majors and should be taken in the second semester. Further, those planning on medical school must schedule a full year of organic chemistry as well as the biology requirements.

Concentration in Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering A concentration in Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering prepares chemical engineering students for careers with biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and for further graduate work in these areas. The concentration includes three required courses (CHE 246-Introduction to Biotechnology, CHE 347-Biochemical Engineering, CHE 448-Bioseparations Engineering) as well as two elective bioscience or bioengineering courses taken from a list available in the department.

Minor A minor in chemical engineering consists of CHE 215, 316, 318, 321, and 322.

Chemical Engineering Curriculum (128 Credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3
   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro to Computer Science

3

 

Science elective I(1)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Third Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Differential Eq.

4

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241W

General Physics Wkshp.

1

CHE 215

Material and Energy Balances

3

 

ENGR elective(3)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Fourth Semester

APMA 311

Probability & Statistics

3

CHEM 212

Organic Chemistry

3

CHEM 212L

Organic Chem. Lab

1

CHE 202

Thermodynamics(4)

3

CHE 216

Modeling & Simulation in ChE

3

STS 2xx/3xx

Elective

3

   

16

Fifth Semester

CHE 316

Chem. Thermodynamics

3

CHE 321

Transport Processes I

4

CHEM 361

Physical Chemistry

3

CHEM 371

Physical Chemical Experimentation

3

 

Unrestricted elective(5)

3

   

16

Sixth Semester

CHE 318

Chemical Reaction Engineering

3

CHE 322

Transport Processes II

4

CHE 398

Chem. Engineering Lab I

3

 

Technical elective(6)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

16

Seventh Semester

STS 401

Western Technology and Culture

3

CHE 438

Process Modeling, Dynamics, and Control

3

CHE 491

Chemical Engr. Lab II

3

 

CHEM/SCI elective(7)

4

 

Unrestricted elective(5)

3

   

16

Eighth Semester

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

CHE 476

Chem. Engineering Design

3

 

CHE elective(8)

3

 

Technical elective(6)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(5)

3

   

15

(1) CHEM 152 (3 credits) and CHEM 152L (1 credit) are required for ChE majors and should be taken in the second semester as Science Elective I. If another course, selected from BIOL 201, 202, ECE 200, MSE 209, or PHYS 252, is taken, then CHEM 152/152L will satisfy the CHEM/SCI elective (See note 7).

(2) Humanities and Social Science Electives chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall or from the SEAS website.

(3) Chosen from engineering science courses, such as BIOM 204*, CHE 246*, CE 205; CS 230, CE 231, CE 232; ECE 203, ECE 230; MAE 230, 231, 232; and MSE 209. (CHE 246 is recommended for bio-concentration, MSE 209 is recommended for other CHE majors.)
* Student will not get credit for both BIOM 204 and CHE 246 in overall program

(4) MAE 210 will also satisfy this course requirement.

(5) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131, and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean’s office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. If APMA 109 is taken as part of mathematics sequence, it counts as an unrestricted elective.

(6) Any 200 to 599 course in: APMA, MATH, CHEM, PHYS, BIOL, BIOM, CHE (other than required courses), ENGR, CE, CS, ECE, MSE, MAE, SYS plus TMP 351 and EVSC 215, 280, 320, 340, 386, 428, 444, 446, 470.

(7) CHEM/SCI elective is satisfied by CHEM 152L plus a 3-credit course chosen from: BIOL 200-599, BIOM 301, BIOM 204*, CHE 246*, CHE 347, CHE 442, CHE 449, CHEM 152, CHEM 200-599, PHYS 200-599, EVSC 280. Student will not get credit for both BIOM 204 and CHE 246 in overall program.

(8) Chosen from a list of chemical engineering electives: CHE 347, CHE 442, CHE 448, CHE 449.


Civil Engineering

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Civil engineering is the application of science and technology to the planning, design, analysis, construction, operation, and maintenance of the physical facilities required by society. It is the broadest of all engineering professions, encompassing activities from aerospace to urban planning. Civil engineers are the fabricators of modern society and the protectors of our environment. They deal with people and their management, materials and their use, designs and their application, and the problems of interweaving these factors to serve society. Typical civil engineering projects include environmental facilities, such as systems for water quality control, toxic and hazardous waste control and stormwater networks; structures, such as high-rise buildings, bridges, off-shore platforms, shuttle launch pads, and dams; and transportation facilities, such as Intelligent Transportation Systems, airports, highways, and railways. Civil engineering has a long history and a bright future serving the basic needs of society.

Civil engineering graduates with a BS degree may opt for employment with high technology consulting firms; local, state, or federal governments; contractors or construction firms; public utilities; or industrial corporations. Another option is graduate school, where students pursue an area of specialty within civil engineering. Such studies open up more advanced employment opportunities in government, consulting, construction, or industry, and introduce new choices, including research and teaching. A civil engineering degree also provides a good background for professional training in law, business administration, or medicine.

Minor in Civil Engineering: Completion of five Civil Engineering courses, with no more than two at the 200-level.

Detailed requirements for these degrees are posted on the web site www.ce.virginia.edu.

Undergraduate Research

Advanced Materials and Structures Laboratory conducts thermomechanical testing with an emphasis on multi-scale approaches that establish connections between size-scale and thermomechanical performance of materials and structures. Together with conventional macroscale materials testing, this facility has a state-of-the-art nano-indentation system that allows mechanical testing on length-scales spanning from nanometers to millimeters. This system has force resolution on the order of one billionth of a Newton, and displacement resolution on the order of one angstrom; a unique capability is an environmental temperature chamber, which enables testing in the range of -50oC to 100oC. Current research is directed towards establishing connections between nanoscale material features and thermomechanical stability in thin films and MEMS, with an emphasis on compliant materials such as nano-porous ceramics and polymers.

Center for Transportation Studies focuses on issues and problems related to the development, operation, and maintenance of a safe, efficient intermodal transportation system for the Commonwealth of Virginia and the nation. The Center's research program is noted for being responsive to emerging challenges from the transportation sector and for continually probing into new areas of transportation-related research, like intelligent transportation systems, traffic simulation studies, applications of geographic information systems in facilitating transportation planning and management, and decision support systems using artificial intelligence.

Smart Travel Lab is a state-of-the-art facility of the Center for Transportation Studies that supports research and education in the rapidly emerging area of intelligent transportation systems (ITS). Using the latest information technologies and analysis and modeling techniques, researchers in the lab are developing prototype systems and applications that promise to improve the effectiveness of ITS. The distinguishing characteristic of the lab is the direct connection established between the lab and transportation management systems operated throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. This connection provides researchers with direct access to real ITS data and systems.

Program Objectives

  1. To provide graduates with the technical competencies and insight necessary to practice civil engineering and have an impact on the profession.
  2. To provide a solid foundation for successful study at leading graduate and professional institutions.
  3. To promote a breadth of abilities and knowledge, including quantitative and analytical skills, communication skills and social insight, to allow graduates to pursue careers in a diversity of fields including engineering, business, management, and information technology.
  4. To prepare graduates for a lifetime of learning, for leadership, and for service to the profession and society.

Minor Completion of five Civil Engineering courses, with no more than two at the 200-level.

Civil Engineering Curriculum (128 Credits)

Civil Engineering Proficiency Areas - Minimum Number Required for Graduation (see below)

First Semester

APMA 111

Calculus II

4

CHEM 151

Intro. Chemistry for Engrs.

3

CHEM 151L

Intro. Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Introduction to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro. to Computer Science

3

 

Science elective (1)

3

 

HSS elective (2)

3

17

Third Semester

APMA 308

Linear Algebra

3

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241L

General Physics II Lab

1

CE 201

Civil Engr. Techniques

3

CE 230

Statics

3

 

HSS elective (2)

3

16

Fourth Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Diff. Equations

4

CE 231

Strength of Materials

3

CE 205

Intro to Env. Eng.

3

CE 315/365

Fluid Mechanics/Lab

4

STS ___

STS 2xx/3xx elective

3

17

Fifth Semester

APMA 311

App. Statistics & Prob.

3

CE 319

Structural Mechanics

3

CE 323/363

Properties & Behavior of Materials/Lab

4

CE 336

Water Resources Eng.

3

 

Unrestricted elective (6)

3

16

Sixth Semester

CE 316/316L

Intro. to Geotech. Eng./Lab

4

CE 326

Design of Concrete Str.

3

CE 344

Trans. Facilities Design

3

 

HSS elective (2)

3

 

Science/Eng elective (3)

3

16

Seventh Semester

CE 490

CE Design and Practice

4

STS 401

Western Tech. & Culture

3

 

Civil Eng elective (4)

3

 

Civil Eng elective (4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective (6)

3

16

Eighth Semester

STS 402

Engineer, Ethics & Society

3

 

Civil Eng elective (4)

3

 

Civil Eng elective (4)

3

 

Engineering elective (5)

3

 

Unrestricted elective (6)

3

15

128 credits, 4 Civil Engineering Proficiency Areas and 1 Design Elective - minimum required for graduation.

(1) Science elective: Chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152; ECE 200; MSE 209: and PHYS 252.

(2) Humanities & Social Sciences (HSS) elective: Chosen from the approved list available in Thornton A122.

(3) Science/Engineering elective - chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152, 212; EVSC 280; PHYS 252; all 200-level SEAS courses (with the exception of STS courses) and any course meeting the requirements of the Engineering Elective (Item (5) below).

(4) Civil engineering elective - chosen from all 300-and 400-level Civil Engineering courses. With guidance of advisor, student must select Civil Engineering electives to allow for the completion of one of the following proficiency areas: environmental engineering, transportation engineering or infrastructure engineering and management; and include at least one design elective. Proficiency areas and design electives are approved by the department and descriptions are available through the department.

(5) Engineering Elective - chosen from all 300- and 400-level SEAS courses (with the exception of STS courses, ENGR 488, and TMP 352) plus other approved technical courses).

(6) Unrestricted electives - chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131 and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean's office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. APMA 109 counts as a three-credit unrestricted elective. (Revised 10/04 (v7 updated 3/05).

Civil Engineering Proficiency Areas To complete a proficiency area, at least two courses must be completed within that area. All students will satisfy the first three areas (*) through required courses. One of the last three areas must also be completed. Each student must complete at least one design elective.

Civil Engineering Materials, Structural Engineering, Water Resources Engineering, Transportation Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Infrastructure Engineering and Management.


Computer Engineering (CPE)

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Computer Engineering is an exciting field that spans topics in both electrical engineering and computer science. Students learn and practice the design and analysis of computer systems, including both hardware and software aspects and their integration. Careers in computer engineering are as wide and varied as computer systems themselves, which range from embedded computer systems found in consumer products or medical devices, to control systems for automobiles, aircraft, and trains, to more wide-ranging applications in telecommunications, financial transactions, and information systems.

A recent Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook states that "very favorable opportunities" (more numerous job openings compared to job seekers) can be expected for college graduates with at least a bachelor's degree in computer engineering. It also projects an employment increase of over 21% by 2010 for occupations available to graduates with a bachelor's degree in computer engineering. More details can be obtained from www.bls.gov/oco.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Computer Engineering program at the University of Virginia will have the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will allow them to make tangible contributions, meet new technical challenges, contribute effectively as team members, and be innovators in computer hardware, software, design, analysis and applications. They will communicate effectively and interact responsibly with colleagues, clients, employers and society.

Faculties from the Computer Science and Electrical & Computer Engineering departments jointly administer the computer engineering undergraduate degree program at the University of Virginia.

In order to major in computer engineering, a formal application must be submitted and approved by the Computer Engineering Curriculum Committee. An application form and a description of acceptance policies can be found at www.cpe.virginia.edu.

Computer engineering majors must maintain a C average or better in their computer science and electrical engineering courses.

Computer Engineering Curriculum (128 credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Chem for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Chem for Engineers Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3

   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro to CS

3

 

Science elective I(2)

3

 

HSS elective(1)

3

   

17

Third Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary differential Equations

4

CS 201

Software Development Methods

3

CS 202

Discrete Mathematics I

3

ECE 203

Intro Circuit Analysis

3

 

HSS elective(1)

3

   

16

Fourth Semester

CS 216

Program and Data Representation

3

ECE 204

Electronics I

4

CS/ECE 230

Digital Logic Design

3

 

CS/ECE elective(4)(6)

3

 

STS elective

3

   

16

Fifth Semester

APMA 310

Probability

3

ECE 323

Signals and Systems

3

CS/ECE 333

Computer Architecture

3

PHYS 241E

Physics II

3

PHYS 241W

Physics Workshop

1

 

Unrestricted elective(5)

3

   

16

Sixth Semester

CS 340

Advanced Software Development Techniques

3

CS 414

Operating Systems

3

 

CS/ECE elective(4)(6)

3

 

Technical elective(3)

3

 

HSS elective(1)

3

   

15

Seventh Semester

STS 401

Western Technology and Culture

3

CS/ECE 457

Computer Networks

3

ECE 435

ECE Computer Design

4.5

 

CS/ECE elective(4)(6)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(5)

3

   

16.5

Eighth Semester

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

ECE 436

Advanced Digital Design

4.5

 

CS/ECE elective(4)(6)

3

 

Technical elective(3)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(5)

3

   

16.5

(1) Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

(2) Chosen from: among BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152; ECE 200; MSE 209; and PHYS 252.

(3) A technical elective is a course in engineering, mathematics, or science at the 200 level or above.

(4) Students interested in selected advanced CS electives should take CS 302. Students interested in selected advanced ECE electives should delay this elective until the sixth semester and take a technical elective instead.

(5) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131 including STAT 110 and STAT 112 and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean’s office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. APMA 109 counts as a three-credit unrestricted elective.

(6) Chosen from CS/ECE course at the 300 level or higher. Two CS/ECE electives must be 400-level or above.


Computer Science

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Through the development of sophisticated computer systems, processors, and embedded applications, computer scientists have the opportunity to change society in ways unimagined several years ago. A major goal of the Department is the education and training of a diverse student body who can lead the current information technology revolution. To this end, the computer science program orients students toward the pragmatic aspects of computer science. Good engineering is rooted in solid mathematics and science, and grounding in these fundamentals is essential. Provided in the context of the practice of computing, this early grounding forms the basis for an education that outstandingly prepares students for a computing career.

As a discipline, computer science has seen many dramatic changes in its brief history. Traditional programming instruction emphasizes writing short programs from scratch in a dead language. This emphasis contrasts with the skills needed by contemporary computing professionals. With funding from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Computer Science has designed, developed, and is currently disseminating a curriculum focused on the practice of computing, yet grounded in the mathematical and scientific fundamentals of computer science. The curriculum is structured around the introduction of modern software development techniques in the very beginning courses and is supported by a coordinated set of "closed laboratories."

In order to provide an environment appropriate to our courses, the department has established several laboratories with more than 150 workstations. These machines have high-resolution graphics and are connected to large file handlers, as well as to the University network. The lab courses expose students to many commercial software tools and systems and are currently introducing modern software development techniques via object-oriented design and implementation in C++ and Java.

The Department of Computer Science co-offers, with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, a degree in Computer Engineering.

To major in computer science or computer engineering, a formal application must be submitted to, and approved by, the Department of Computer Science. An application form and a description of acceptance policies can be found at www.cs.virginia.edu. Applications are normally considered at the end of the spring semester.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Computer Science program at the University of Virginia will have the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will allow them to make tangible contributions, meet new technical challenges, contribute effectively as team members, and be innovators in the design, analysis and application of computer systems.

Grading Policy Majors and minors are required to maintain a C average or better in their CS courses.

Transfer Students in the College of Arts and Sciences with an interest in obtaining a degree in computer science may transfer to the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Like other SEAS students, transfer students must formally apply to, and be approved by, the Department of Computer Science to take the Computer Science program of study. To minimize loss of credit upon transfer, College students must take a rigorous program in mathematics and the sciences. The School of Engineering and Applied Science expects a minimum of 63 credits in the first two years, instead of the 60-credit minimum that is customary in the College of Arts and Sciences. (The additional credits are often completed through summer courses.) Detailed information on curriculum requirements may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Minor The 18-credit computer science minor consists of CS 101, 201, 202, and 216. In addition, two other computer science courses from a prescribed list must be taken. Complete details can be found at the computer science Web site, www.cs.virginia.edu.

Computer Science Curriculum (125.5 credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3
   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Introduction to programming

3

 

Science elective(1)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Third Semester

APMA

APMA 310 or APMA elective(5)

3

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 201

Software Devel. Methods

3

CS 202

Discrete Mathematics I

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

16

Fourth Semester

CS 216

Program and Data Representation

3

CS/ECE 230

Digital Logic Design

3

CS 302

Discrete Mathematics II

3

 

Technical elective(3)

3

SCS 290

CS Seminar

1

STS ___

STS 2xx/3xx elective

3

   

16

Fifth Semester

CS/ECE 333

Computer Architecture

3

CS 432

Algorithms

3

APMA 310

Probability

3

 

Technical elective(3)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(4)

3

   

15

Sixth Semester

CS 340

Advanced Software Development Tech.

3

CS 414

Operating Systems

3

APMA

APMA 310 or APMA elective(5)

3

 

GenEd elective(6)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

15

Seventh Semester

STS 401

Western Technology and Culture

3

ECE 435

Computer Organization and Design

4.5

CS ___

CS elective

3

CS ___

CS elective

3

 

Gen Ed elective(6)

3

   

16.5

Eighth Semester

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

CS ___

CS elective

3

CS ___

CS elective

3

 

Technical elective(3)

3

 

Gen Ed elective(6)

3

   

15

(1) Chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152; ECE 200; MSE 209; and PHYS 252.

(2) Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

(3) Technical electives are courses whose major emphasis is mathematics, science, or engineering. One of the technical electives can be at the 2XX level. The other electives must be at level 3XX or above.

(4) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131 and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean’s office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. APMA 109 counts as a three-credit unrestricted elective.

(5) Electives must be chosen from APMA 213, APMA 308, or APMA 312.

(6) Gen Ed electives include all those allowed for HSS electives and other non-technical courses that broaden one's education. See list of approved courses at www.cs.virginia.edu.


Electrical Engineering

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Electrical engineering is a rapidly expanding field, and includes such areas as communications, microelectronics, control systems, and computer system design. New and exciting areas are continually being developed, and more traditional areas are finding new applications. Because of the rapidly-changing nature of the field, this program is designed to provide a strong preparation in traditional electrical engineering, while providing maximum flexibility to accommodate student interests and current technological developments. The objectives of the undergraduate Electrical Engineering Program are: Graduates of the Electrical Engineering program at the University of Virginia will have the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will allow them to make tangible contributions, meet new technical challenges, contribute effectively as team members, and be innovators in the analysis, design and implementation of electrical and electronic devices and systems. They will communicate effectively and interact responsibly with colleagues, clients, employers and society.

Students can use the flexibility available in the elective program to focus their study on an area of particular interest within electrical engineering, including communication systems, digital system design, control systems, applied electrophysics, and microelectronics. In addition, with careful planning, students can use technical electives for interdisciplinary studies; for example, computer engineering, biomedical engineering, or materials science, perhaps even earning a minor in a related field. Specific suggestions for study in several areas are available from the office of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Program Objectives Graduates of the Electrical Engineering program at the University of Virginia will have the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will allow them to make tangible contributions, meet new technical challenges, contribute effectively as team members, and be innovators in the analysis, design and implementation of electrical and electronic devices and systems. They will communicate effectively and interact responsibly with colleagues, clients, employers and society.

Minor The 19-credit minor consists of ECE 203, 204, and 230, as well as 3 electives (with at least one course at the 400 level or above). The electives are selected from a list of courses available in the office of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Electrical Engineering Curriculum (128 credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3
   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro to Computer Science

3

 

Science elective I(2)

3

 

HSS elective(1)

3

   

17

Third Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Differential Eq.

4

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241W

Physics Workshop

1

ECE 203

Intro Circuit Analysis

3

CS 201

Software Devel. Methods

3

 

HSS elective(1)

3

   

17

Fourth Semester

 

Mathematics elective(3)

3

ECE 204

Electronics I

4

ECE 230

Digital Logic Design(7)

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

STS ___

STS 2xx/3xx elective

3

   

16

Fifth Semester

ECE 309

Electromagnetic Fields

3

ECE 323

Signals and Systems

3

ECE ___

ECE elective(5)

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(6)

3

   

15

Sixth Semester

APMA 310

Probability

3

ECE 333

Computer Architecture(8)

3

ECE ___

ECE elective(5)

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

 

HSS elective(1)

3

   

15

Seventh Semester

STS 401

Western Technology and Culture

3

ECE ___

ECE elective(5)

3

ECE ___

ECE Lab elective(5)

1.5

ECE ___

ECE elective(5)

3

ECE ___

ECE elective(5)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(6)

3

   

16.5

Eighth Semester

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

ECE ___

ECE elective(5)

3

ECE ___

ECE Lab elective(5)

1.5

ECE ___

ECE elective(5)

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(6)

3

   

16.5

(1) Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

(2) Chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152; ECE 200; MSE 209; and PHYS 252.

(3) Selected from courses in the Departments of Mathematics or Applied Mathematics at the 200 level or higher.

(4) A technical elective is defined as a course in engineering (may be ECE), mathematics, or science (intended for science majors) at the 200 level or above. Of the four technical electives, two must be at the 300 level or above. Any course appearing on the approved list of HSS electives may not be used as a technical elective.

(5) ECE 435 and 436 each count as one course and one lab if chosen as electives. One of the ECE electives must be the Major Design Experience Course. At least two courses and one lab must fall within a single area of concentration. The five areas of concentration are applied electrophysics, communications and signal processing, digital systems, controls, and microelectronics. A list of electives that fulfill the requirements of each concentration is included in the Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Handbook.

(6) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131, , including STAT 110 and STAT 112, and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean’s office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. APMA 109 counts as a three-credit unrestricted elective.

(7) ECE 230 is offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One could take it in the 3rd semester.

(8) ECE 333 is offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One could take it in the 5th semester.


Engineering Science

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Engineering Science is a flexible undergraduate engineering program. It offers imaginative students in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences the opportunity to design a course of studies that appeals to their special academic interests and prepares them for graduate school. This flexibility allows students to develop expertise in topical areas in the biological, environmental, mathematical, and physical sciences. Students typically select engineering science to prepare for a career in applied mathematics, engineering physics, materials science, or medicine, all of which have strong graduate programs at the University of Virginia but do not have undergraduate programs. Alternatively, some students seek to obtain a broad engineering/science background as preparation for work in non-engineering fields, such as teaching.

Engineering science students, in collaboration with their advisors, define their program of studies. The study plan for each student must show direction by including an approved minor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The equivalent of a minor in a science area is also strongly encouraged. The advanced project course in the fourth year, which supplements the senior thesis, allows the student to complete an in-depth research project. Minors in Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Applied Mathematics and Biomedical Engineering are common choices, but any minor in SEAS is allowed. The MSE option in Engineering Science is excellent preparation for either graduate school in MSE or to obtain a position in the materials industry. The courses required for the minor are listed under the relevant departments. Students using Engineering Science as preparation for medicine, business or law should also consult the office of the pre-professional advisor for undergraduates in Bryant Hall.

Engineering Science Curriculum (127 credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3
   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro to Computer Science

3

 

Science elective I(1)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Third Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Differential Eq.

4

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241W

Physics Workshop

1

 

Engr Science elective(3)

3

 

Engr Science elective(3)

3

 

HSS elective(3)

3

   

17

Fourth Semester

 

Math elective I(4)

3

 

Science elective II(5)

3

 

Science elective II Lab(5)

1

 

Engr Science elective(3)

3

 

Technical elective 2xx(5)

3

STS ___

STS 2xx/3xx elective

3

   

16

Fifth Semester

 

Adv. Math/CS elective II(4)

3

 

Adv. Natural Science elec.(6)

3

 

Adv. Natural Science Lab elec.(6)

1

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

16

Sixth Semester

 

Adv. Math/CS elective II(4)

3

 

Adv. Natrl. Science elec.(6)

3

 

Adv. Natural Science Lab elec.(6)

1

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(9)

3

   

16

Seventh Semester

STS 401

Western Technology and Culture

3

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

Advanced Project(8)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(9)

3

   

15

Eighth Semester

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

Technical elective(7)

3

 

Advanced Project(8)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(9)

3

   

15

(1) Chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM152; MSE 209; ECE 200; and PHYS 252.

(2) Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

(3) Chosen from: 2xx courses in SEAS approved by advisor.

(4) Math elective I: 200-level or higher course in mathematics. Advanced math/CS elective II: Two advanced mathematics courses, 300-level or higher, in SEAS or CLAS, or one advanced-level mathematics and one 200-level or higher computer science course. Mathematical modeling courses in the various departments of SEAS may be used, as approved by the advisor.

(5) Chosen from 200-level or higher courses in astronomy, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, or physics for science majors. Should have a science, mathematics or computer science pre-requisite. Chosen from: ASTR 211, 212; BIOL 201, 202, 203, 204; CHEM 152, 152L, 210, 222, 241, 241L, 242, 242L, 252, 281, 281L, 282, 282L; EVSC 280, 280L; MSE 209; PHYS 252, 252L; and PSYC 221. The four-course sequence for science majors (CHEM 181/181L, 182/182L, 281/281L, 282/282L) may be taken to replace CHEM 151/151L, two science electives, and the 2xx technical elective. The course sequence for science majors (PHYS 151, 152, 251, 252, and labs PHYS 221, 222) may replace PHYS 142E, 241E/241W, and two science electives.

(6) Advanced sciences are 300-level or above courses in astronomy, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, or physics. The course must have mathematics or science prerequisites. For students with minors in engineering other than the materials science minor, 300-level courses in materials science may be used. Two credits of advanced laboratory work should be included. The science elective and technical electives can be used to obtain the equivalent of a science minor.

(7) Advanced technical electives should be chosen from 300- to 400-level science, mathematics, or engineering courses for science and engineering majors (i.e., courses not open to non-science majors). At least two of the technical electives must be 400-level or higher SEAS courses. The technical electives must be chosen to include an approved minor in SEAS.

(8) Students are expected to define a research project to be completed in the fourth year. The advanced project courses are graded research courses supplementing the student’s thesis work.

(9) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131, including STAT 110 and STAT 112, and courses that substantially duplicate others used for the student’s degree.


Materials Science and Engineering

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The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a selection of undergraduate courses with the objective of providing students with a fundamental background in the structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials. This background is essential to engineers or scientists in understanding the selection of materials for various applications. A minor in Materials Science and Engineering is available to all engineering majors in SEAS. The purpose of the minor is to provide instruction on how the processing, structure, and properties of materials affect and complement your major field of study. Additionally, a materials science and engineering concentration is available to the undergraduate student within the framework of the Engineering Science Program.

A broad background in materials science and engineering is available by selecting MSE 209 (Introduction to the Science and Engineering of Materials), which develops the terminology and scientific foundation necessary for understanding the behavior of metals, polymers, and ceramics. More advanced courses (300-500) are available to introduce the student to structure-property relationships for various classes of materials, such as alloys and polymers, as well as modern and classical aspects of corrosion. Students are introduced to the typical experimental techniques for characterizing materials and their properties through laboratory demonstrations in the courses. Qualified students may also take 600-level graduate courses in materials science and engineering with the approval of the instructor. Research opportunities exist for undergraduate students interested in working with faculty on project areas identified in the Graduate Record. A general materials course, MSE 201 (EVSC 201), emphasizing the relationship of materials technology to modern society, is offered each semester for students of all disciplines throughout the university.

Minor in Materials: Five courses constitute a minor, as outlined below:

  1. MSE 209 (MAE 352 may substitute).
  2. Select 2 of the following 3: MSE 305, 306, 367
  3. Select 2 more from the following list: MSE 301, 304, 305, 306, 367, 512, 524, 532, 567, and special topics (491, 492, 500)
  4. Finally, a minor advisor must be assigned.
The minor advisor can help guide course selection to best match the student's major and career objectives. Minor students who are interested in focused laboratory experience, and perhaps graduate school, are encouraged to enroll in MSE 451 or 452. For more information, please consult the department website, www.virginia.edu/ms/.

Mechanical Engineering

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Mechanical engineering is the broadest of the engineering disciplines, providing opportunities for employment in industry, business, government, research, and education. The mechanical engineer is concerned with the development of machines and systems for diverse applications in our modern technological society. Talents and interests of a graduate M.E. include those required to plan, analyze, design, and improve components and systems. The practice of mechanical engineering is applied to manufacturing, energy conversion, transportation, construction, and environmental control. In the future, mechanical engineers must provide leadership in developing new sources of power and new systems to accommodate societal demands.

The curriculum begins with the study of chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science, and general engineering courses. As students progress, they take advanced analysis, design, and laboratory courses related to mechanical and thermal systems. One-fourth of the program is devoted to the humanities and social sciences, which broaden the student's education and assist in developing communication and leadership skills.

Young engineers need relevant experiences to be competitive in the global economy. As indicated by discussions with recruiters and industry leaders, graduating students are now expected to have some practical and/or unique experience that they will be able to apply in an industry in the near term. These experiences may come from laboratory work, projects at the University, or a co-operative education (co-op) program.

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering implemented a co-op program in 1996 that is currently placing students with 40 industries. This program builds self-confidence, helps define career goals. The co-op experience often helps students obtain senior thesis topics through industrial projects, eases transition to the industrial world, and enhances the student's marketability. Salaries for co-op students are typically two-thirds of those for B.S. level engineers. It takes four and one-half years to complete the co-op program, including one extended stay (summer plus semester) in industry, with one or more summers possible. Requirements include third year academic standing and a grade point average of at least 2.000. Participation is optional and non-credit; details can be obtained from the school or department.

Program Objectives

  1. Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and the principles of engineering design to the professional practice of the discipline in modern industry.
  2. Identify and formulate engineering problems in and related to the discipline, and to solve them using modern engineering tools and techniques, through the inspection and analysis of data obtained from the design and execution of experiments, or from the application of theoretical or computational analysis.
  3. Pursue continuous, lifelong learning and professional renewal, including undertaking graduate studies. Possess the tools and motivation for continuous learning, scholarship and self-directed research.
  4. Understand the nature of engineering knowledge and the social context of engineering; appreciate the impact of engineering solutions in a contemporary, global, societal and environmental context; exhibit professionalism, understand and adhere to professional ethics and standards.
  5. Communicate effectively, take leadership positions, and function on multi-disciplinary teams. Understand the importance of diversity in the workplace and of the ethical practice of their profession.

Minor A minor in mechanical engineering is comprised of five courses and one lab and requires MAE 200, and either MAE 200L or MAE 210L and two courses from List A and two courses from List B. List A: MAE 210, MAE 230, MAE 231, MAE 232, MAE 321. List B: MAE 312, MAE 314, MAE 362, MAE 371, MAE 471, MAE 473, MAE 474, MAE 476.

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum (128 credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Introductory Chemistry for Engineers

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3
   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro Computer Science

3

 

Science elective I(1)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

17

Third Semester

MAE 200

Intro to Mechanical Engr.

2

MAE 200L

Mechanics Familiarity Lab

1

APMA 311

Applied Probability and Statistics(7)

3

MAE 230

Statics

3

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241W

Physics Workshop

1

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

16

Fourth Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Differential Eq.

4

MAE 210

Thermodynamics

3

MAE 210L

Fluid/Thermal Fam Lab

1

MAE 231

Strength of Materials

3

MAE232

Dynamics

3

STS ___

STS 2xx/3xx elective

3

   

17

Fifth Semester

MAE 321

Fluid Mechanics

3

MAE 371

Mechanical Sys. Modeling

3

MAE 381

Experimental Methods Lab

2

 

Math/Science II elective(3)

3

 

Technical elective(4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(5)(6)

3

   

17

Sixth Semester

MAE 314

Elements of Heat & Mass Transfer

3

MAE 362

Machine Elements and Fatigue in Design

4

MAE 384

Mech Engr Lab

2

 

Technical elective(4)

3

 

HSS elective(2)

3

   

15

Seventh Semester

MAE 461/463

Design I elective

3

STS 401

Western Technology & Culture

3

MAE 471

Mechatronics

4

 

Technical elective(4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(5)

3

   

16

Eighth Semester

MAE 462/464

Design II elective

3

 

Technical elective(4)(6)

3

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

 

Technical elective(4)(6)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(5)(6)

3

   

15

(1) Chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152; ECE 200; a PHYS 252, and MSE 209.

(2) Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

(3) Chosen from the MAE Department’s Math Science II approved list or the Science Elective I list. See Department’s web site.

(4) Chosen from the MAE Department’s approved Technical Elective List of courses. Three of these technical electives must be MAE courses not required for the degree. See Department’s website.

(5) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131 and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean’s office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. APMA 109 counts as a three-credit unrestricted elective.

(6) Indicates five courses that could be used to obtain a minor within SEAS. A minor can be obtained in the College of Arts and Sciences by appropriate use of HSS and unrestricted electives.

(7) APMA 311 will satisfy the requirements of MAE 209 for the degree.


Department of Science, Technology, and Society

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The Department of Science, Technology, and Society (STS) provides instruction in subjects that are essential to the education of professional engineers. This instruction forms the core of a liberal education and lays the foundation for ongoing professional development. All STS courses emphasize the relationships among science, technology, and society; ethics; and oral and written communication.

In addition to the first- and fourth-year courses (STS 101, STS 401-402), required of all School of Engineering and Applied Sciences undergraduates, the Department offers an array of 200-level courses from which each student must choose at least one. Additional elective courses are offered at the 300-level. Drawing on disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, these courses provide a variety of perspectives - social, historical, esthetic, ethical, religious - on engineering, science, and technology. They also help students to develop written and oral communication skills.

In their senior year all engineering undergraduates undertake a senior thesis project. Students work with a faculty member in their major and with an STS faculty member teaching STS 401-402; the thesis work includes integration of the technical subject matter with its ethical and social context. STS courses supplement the student's general education (furthered by course work in the College of Arts and Sciences) and connect the humanities and social sciences to engineering knowledge and practice. The STS component of the UVA engineering degree ensures that students will have seriously considered the moral and social aspects of their future life's work.

Minor in Engineering Business

This minor offers engineering students the opportunity to study how technology and business interact. Through coursework in Commerce and Economics, students gain an overview of business enterprise and also study how new products are developed and marketed. In contrast to the STP minor which explores the role of technology in the larger realms of policy-making and political economy, the engineering business minor focuses on decision-making within a company or organization. Overall, the minor serves to develop the student's potential as a leader and decision-maker in technology-driven industries.

Requirements The six-course minor requires COMM 180, ECON 201, and TMP 351. The other three courses are selected from a list of electives available from the course coordinator or in A122 Thornton Hall. The program is administered by a coordinator and committee appointed by the dean of the school. For further information, contact the EB Minor Coordinator, Department of Science, Technology, and Society, Thornton Hall, P.O. Box 400744, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4744; (434) 924-6113.

Minor in the History of Science and Technology In conjunction with the History Department, the Department of Science, Technology, and Society offers a minor in the history of technology and science. Open to all undergraduates, this minor provides students with an opportunity to become familiar with humanistic perspectives of technology and science. For the engineering student, the minor offers an occasion for placing his or her professional education in a larger social and intellectual context; likewise, it provides the liberal arts student with a better understanding of science and technology as key components in human culture.

Requirements The minor consists of 18 credits. College students may include the non-College courses as general electives upon completion of the requirements for the minor. The list of eligible courses and requirements can be obtained from the HST Minor Coordinator, Department of Science, Technology, and Society, Thornton Hall, P.O. Box 400744, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4744; (434) 924-6113.

Minor in Science and Technology Policy

Science, technology, engineering, and government are intertwined. Federal, state, local, and foreign governments shape science and technology in a variety of ways, including through grants, contracts, regulations, and foreign policy. Science and engineering reshape governments in turn by supplying tools and expertise and, indirectly, by transforming social and economic structures.

This minor equips students with the basic skills to understand those interactions. Along with two courses in politics and economics, all students take a course in science and technology policy designed for this minor. Three electives--from fields such as history, philosophy, and planning as well as politics and economics-deepen and broaden students' education.

Students completing this minor will gain a deeper understanding of the interdependence of science, technology, engineering, and policy. They will also prepare themselves to lead organizations inside and outside of government, including those in industry, consulting, law, and medicine.

Students interested in this minor should contact the Science, Technology, and Society Department in Thornton A-237.

Minor in Technology and the Environment

The increasing prevalence of technology has affected the environment in complex and often unforeseen ways. Society is now demanding that all disciplines of engineering be environmentally aware. Furthermore, those that use and distribute technology need to appreciate its far-ranging impacts. For a more sophisticated understanding of the relationships between technology and the environment, engineers, managers, and historians require interdisciplinary expertise.

This minor, open to all undergraduates, addresses these concerns with an interdisciplinary course of studies. A cornerstone of the minor is a basic knowledge of the technologies that directly impact environmental systems. This technological foundation allows students to build a more sophisticated understanding of how technology and the environment are interrelated. In addition to the technological courses, complementary interdisciplinary courses are selected to complete the minor.

Requirements The minor consists of six courses (18 credits), with no more than two courses taken in the student's major department. Each student must complete at least two courses related to environmental technology, including either CE 205 or EVSC 148. In addition, each student must choose an emphasis by completing at least three courses in one of three areas: environmental planning and policy, history of technology and the environment, or management and economics. A full description of suitable course work for this minor is available from the TE Minor Coordinator, Department of Science, Technology, and Society, Thornton Hall, P.O. Box 400744, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4744; (434) 924-6375.

Science and Technology Policy Internships

Second and third-year undergraduates in SEAS are eligible to participate in the school's Washington D.C. Internship Program in Science and Technology Policy. The program places interns on Capitol Hill, in executive agencies, and in think tanks to work on science and technology policy for about 10 weeks each summer. Admission is competitive and takes place during fall term. Those selected take a preparatory course during spring term. The program provides shared dormitory housing and a stipend during the summer. In Washington, our program merges with a similar endeavor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Interns from the two schools share dormitory rooms, attend a speaker series, carry out service projects, and socialize together.


Systems Engineering

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The undergraduate program in Systems Engineering prepares graduates to engage in development, implementation, and optimization of systems that include humans, data and information, hardware, software, and natural and technology resources; embark on sustainable, productive careers in systems engineering, applied science, and technology management; excel in the practices of analytical modeling and integrative systems engineering; seek and succeed in lifelong professional education that includes advanced schooling and mentoring; and contribute to the profession of systems engineering and to human welfare through professional societies, public service, and civic activities.

The program in Systems Engineering is designed for students interested in bringing people and technologies together to improve the productivity and effectiveness of organizations and address complex, multidimensional problems in society and industry. Students receive exposure to a wide range of topics, including the economic, political, managerial, environmental, and technical aspects of large scale systems design and implementation. Students are provided with diverse opportunities for hands-on experience with real-world situations and problems.

The Systems Engineering curriculum is more flexible than many traditional engineering programs. In addition to the courses specifically required in the curriculum, students are able to take nine credits of unrestricted electives, nine credits of electives tailored to an application area, and six credits of technical electives.

The curriculum allows students to pursue a specific area of interest within the broad framework of systems engineering. The following areas are available as application sequences: biomedical systems, communication systems, computer and information systems, control systems, economic systems, energy and environmental systems, financial systems, human factors, intelligent transportation systems, management systems, and mathematical systems. Appropriate ROTC courses may be counted as an application sequence in military systems. Additionally, there are opportunities for students with special interests and abilities to design their own unique application sequences.

The program culminates in a capstone design project, spanning both the Fall and Spring semesters of the fourth year. Students working in small teams under the direction of a faculty advisor are matched with a client from the public or private sector. Each team is assigned an open-ended design problem, and they apply the perspectives, methods, and tools of systems engineering that they learn in the classroom to the resolution of a problem for a client.

A degree in Systems Engineering from the University of Virginia confers employability in a wide range of industries, governmental agencies, and non-profits. It offers students a variety of career choices in engineering and management, and also provides excellent pre-med, pre-business, and pre-law preparation. The award-winning program is one of the largest systems engineering programs in the Unites States, and the graduates of the program consistently receive higher salary offers than the national average for other systems programs and other engineering disciplines. The program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology and received the first award of the Board for Curricular Innovation. The program also received the Outstanding Educator Award from the Boeing Company, which recognized the Department of Systems and Information Engineering for its potential to "develop leaders prepared to shape the future." An award from the U.S. Department of State enables a select group of fourth year Systems Engineering students to study in Brazil with their capstone team for a semester.

Admission to the program is based on space availability, academic performance, and extracurricular activities. Application forms and further information are available in the department office in Olsson 114.

Minor Students who wish to minor in systems engineering must complete APMA 310 and 312, and four courses from SYS 201, 204, 257, 321, and 360 with a cumulative grade point average of 2.000. Students who wish to pursue a minor in systems should complete the necessary courses and then fill out a Minor Declaration Form. The forms may be obtained in the SEAS Undergraduate Office, Thornton A122.

Systems Engineering Curriculum (128 credits)

First Semester

APMA 111

Single Variable Calculus

4

CHEM 151

Intro Chem. for Engr.

3

CHEM 151L

Intro Chemistry Lab

1

ENGR 162

Intro to Engineering

4

STS 101

Engineering, Technology, and Society

3
   

15

Second Semester

APMA 212

Multivariate Calculus

4

PHYS 142E

General Physics I

3

PHYS 142W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 101

Intro to Computer Science

3

 

Science elective I(1)

3

 

HSS elective(3)

3

   

17

Third Semester

APMA 213

Ordinary Differential Eq.

4

PHYS 241E

General Physics II

3

PHYS 241W

Physics Workshop

1

CS 201

Software Devel. Methods

3

SYS 201

Systems Engr. Concepts

3

 

HSS elective(3)

3

   

17

Fourth Semester

APMA 310

Probability

3

APMA 308

Linear Algebra

3

SYS 202

Data & Information Engr.

3

STS ___

STS 2xx/3xx elective

3

 

Science elective II(2)

3

   

15

Fifth Semester

APMA 312

Statistics

3

SYS 321

Deterministic Decision

 
 

Models

3

SYS 323

Human Machine Interface

3

SYS 355

SE Design Colloquium I

1

 

Technical elective(5)

3

 

HSS elective(3)

3

   

16

Sixth Semester

SYS 334

System Evaluation

3

SYS 360

Stochastic Decision

 
 

Models

3

SYS 362

Discrete Event Simulation

4

 

Application elective(4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(6)

3

   

16

Seventh Semester

STS 401

Western Technology and Culture

3

SYS 421

Linear Statistical Models

4

SYS 453

Systems Design I

3

SYS 455

SE Design Colloquium II

1

 

Application elective(4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(6)

3

   

17

Eighth Semester

STS 402

The Engineer, Ethics, and Society

3

SYS 454

Systems Design II

3

 

Technical elective(5)

3

 

Application elective(4)

3

 

Unrestricted elective(6)

3

   

15

(1) Chosen from: BIOL 201, 202; CHEM 152; ECE 200; MSE 209; and PHYS 252.

(2) Chosen from the list of SIE approved science elective II courses, as well as from any 200 to 400-level science or mathematics course approved for science majors.

(3) Chosen from the approved list available in the SEAS Undergraduate Office, Thornton Hall A122.

(4) Nine credits of applications electives should be selected in a related applications area of systems engineering. Appropriate sequences include biomedical systems, communications systems, computer and information systems, control systems, economic systems, energy and environmental systems, financial systems, human factors, intelligent transportation systems, management systems, mathematical systems, and military systems (ROTC). Students may define alternative application sequences with the advice and consent of their academic advisor.

(5) Chosen from 200-level (or higher) courses in SEAS, other than STS.

(6) Unrestricted electives may be chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131, including STAT 110 and STAT 112, and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any introductory programming course. Students in doubt as to what is acceptable to satisfy a degree requirement should get the approval of their advisor and the dean’s office, located in Thornton Hall, Room A122. APMA 109 counts as a three-credit unrestricted elective.

 

 
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