M.B.A.-M.A. in Asian Studies

The M.B.A.-M.A. in Asian Studies combines the analysis, decision-making, and managerial concepts and techniques taught at The Darden School with intensive language and area studies in East Asia, primarily Japan and Taiwan.

Students are expected to complete the M.B.A.-M.A. program in three years instead of the four years required if each degree were taken separately.

Administration of the Program   The program is administered by one member of the East Asian Studies faculty and one member of The Darden School faculty, as designated by the respective Deans. The responsibilities of these faculty members extend to admission to the program, development of curricula for the students involved, coordination of courses and examinations, and promotion of joint offerings by the two schools where that seems feasible.

Curriculum   A joint degree candidate must receive passing grades in 16 courses in The Darden School and with at least 13 grades of B-or better. Students must also take the required portion of the M.A. program, which consists of 24 graduate credits.

Following the Darden first year, students normally spend the summer in intensive language study. The second year is followed by a six-month internship in an East Asian location. For their sixth semester, the students return to the University to complete their degree requirements. One research paper based on field work conducted in Asia may be used to satisfy both the directed study requirement at Darden and the master's thesis requirement at GSAS. These research projects are jointly supervised by a faculty member from both The Darden School and the East Asian Studies Faculty.

Students in the joint program must comply with the Darden grading standards for recognized joint programs.

At the successful conclusion of the three years, the student is awarded both an M.B.A. and an M.A.


M.B.A.-M.A. in Government, Foreign Affairs, or Public Administration

The joint degree in Government, or in Foreign Affairs, or in Public Administration meets the growing need for managers to obtain expertise in comparative government, international relations, political risk assessment and public administration in combination with the business concepts and techniques taught at Darden.

Students are expected to complete the M.B.A-M.A. programs in three years instead of the four years required if each degree is taken separately.

Administration of the Program   The program is administered by one faculty member designated by the Chairman of the Department of Government and Foreign Affairs and one member of The Darden School faculty, designated by the Dean. The responsibilities of these faculty members extend to admission to the program, development of curricula for the students involved, coordination of courses and examinations, and promotion of joint offerings by the two schools where that seems feasible. For convenience of reference, these faculty members are referred to as the Program Committee.

Curriculum   The program takes three years to complete. Students in the joint program must complete all the required courses at The Darden School.

Students must earn 15 credits of Darden electives to satisfy the Darden graduation requirements.

The Darden Directed Study is combined with the thesis requirements of the M.A. program. Directed Study projects are jointly supervised by a faculty member from both The Darden School and the Department of Government and Foreign Affairs.

Students must take the required portion of the M.A. program, consisting of 24 graduate credits or 27 graduate credits for the M.A. in Public Administration. The Department will accept six credits (two courses) from Darden toward the completion of this requirement.

One of the required courses for the M.A. may be a tutorial course, 595, Selected Problems (in specific areas). This course may entail a research paper based on experience as an intern.

The M.A. in Government or Foreign Affairs requires successful completion of a proficiency test in a foreign language arranged by the Department and of written comprehensive examinations in two of the subfields into which the Department's curriculum is divided. For the Master's of Public Administration, there is no language requirement, and only one subfield examination is required.


The M.B.A.-M.E. Program

The objective of the Master of Business Administration-Master of Engineering joint-degree program at the University of Virginia is to prepare individuals for leadership positions in technologically intensive organizations.

The M.B.A. program provides an understanding of the fundamental areas of business while it develops the capacity to analyze managerial problems and present resourceful solutions to these problems.

The M.E. program within the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) enhances the professional instruction of the bachelor's program in engineering, while increasing the graduate student's knowledge and understanding in a specific field of engineering or applied science.

The M.B.A.-M.E. joint-degree program will create an opportunity for graduate students to acquire the breadth of understanding and added flexibility needed to operate effectively at the interface between the commercial and technical units of modern industry and society.

Degree Requirements   Students in the M.B.A.-M.E. program will be required to complete 24 credits of course work in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and 69 credits of course work in The Darden School. Normally, the M.E. degree requires 30 credits and the M.B.A. requires 78 credits. In effect, the students in the combined program are given elective credit in one school for courses taken to fulfill the requirements of the other.

The purpose of the M.B.A.-degree program requirements is to provide a comprehensive, integrated view of business. M.B.A. students in the joint- degree program are expected to use their elective courses to provide depth in the areas that reflect their joint-degree educational objectives and career interests. For example, M.B.A. students might select electives in international business, marketing, operations/technology, quantitative analysis, and organizational behavior. The Darden Directed Study (3 credits) will normally be combined with the SEAS course requirement of a 3-credit project in the M.E. program. This combined 6-credit requirement will be jointly supervised by a Darden and a SEAS faculty member. Exceptions to a joint project have to be approved by the M.B.A.-M.E. Program Committee.

The M.E. degree is a professionally oriented degree. Of the 24 credits of course work required in SEAS, 21 credits will be normal course work and 3 credits will be a project course taken in an appropriately numbered course. Of these 21 credits, a minimum of 12 credits must be taken in the major department. Also, a maximum of 6 credits may be taken at the 500-level. None of the 24 credits may include a course taken in The Darden School. The project must have one advisor from SEAS and another from The Darden School.

The joint degree will be obtained in approximately one semester less than the time required for the two degrees separately. If a student drops out of either part of the joint-degree program, he or she will be required to complete the normal degree requirements to obtain a single degree in either SEAS or Darden.


The M.B.A.-M.S.N. Program

The objective of the Master of Business Administration and Master of Nursing program is to provide a unique educational experience to specially qualified individuals capable of leadership and innovation in health care organizations and delivery systems.

The M.B.A. program provides an understanding of the fundamental areas of business while it develops the capacity to analyze managerial problems and present resourceful solutions to these problems. The M.S.N. program builds on the theoretical knowledge and clinical experience of the bachelor's prepared nurse and, therefore, the M.B.A.-M.S.N. joint- degree program will create a special opportunity for students to acquire the breadth of understanding and the management skills needed to perform effectively and creatively at the business and clinical interface of our health care delivery organizations.

Degree Requirements   Students in the M.B.A.-M.S.N. program will be required to complete 24 credits of course work in the School of Nursing and 69 credits of course work in The Darden School. Normally, the M.S.N. degree requires 30 credits and the M.B.A. requires 78 credits. In effect, the students in the combined program are given elective credit in one college for courses taken to fulfill the requirements of the other.

Students in this program will be expected to use their elective courses to develop depth in areas that reflect their joint-degree educational objectives and career interests. For example, electives in service operations, marketing, managerial accounting, etc., might be taken at The Darden School and courses in health economics, health policy, etc., could be chosen from the nursing school.

The M.B.A. Directed Study and one of the M.S.N. required practica are combined into an administrative practicum course where the students are required to serve as an administrative resident in a health care organization and be assigned various general management responsibilities. This experience, supervised jointly by faculty from both colleges, is a key element in the practical integration of course work material taken by the student during the program.


The M.B.A.-Ph.D. Program

The Darden School offers a combined M.B.A. and Ph.D. degree in Business Administration which shortens the process of obtaining both degrees without sacrificing either professional or scholastic content. The joint four-year program allows a student to satisfy the M.B.A. degree requirements and the Ph.D. course requirements by the end of the third year. The completion of the required dissertation typically takes at least one additional year of full time work.

To gain admission to this joint program one must first apply to the regular M.B.A. program and check the M.B.A.-Ph.D. box on the application form. When an applicant is admitted to the M.B.A. program, the application materials are passed on to the Doctoral Admission Committee. If the committee decides favorably, the applicant is conditionally admitted to the M.B.A.-Ph.D. degree program. Final admission is granted upon the student's successful completion of the first year in the M.B.A. program.

For more information about the M.B.A.-Ph.D. degree at Darden, contact: Director of Doctoral Program, The Darden School, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 6550, Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550 (804-924-7326).


The Doctoral Program

Objectives

The Darden School offers an intellectually demanding doctoral program for a select group of high-potential applicants, men and women who already have a breadth of knowledge in the functional areas of business and who have a strong interest in teaching and research.

The program aims to be distinctive not only by providing sound training in the theory and methodology of the student's chosen field, but also by training students to perform applied research. Graduates of the program are expected to be able to conduct rigorous research that contributes to the solution of management problems in a creative and original fashion. The program provides exposure to a variety of pedagogies, particularly interactive approaches that allow students to take an active role in the learning process.

A doctoral student must specialize in a major field of study. The School has major fields in Finance, Management Science, Marketing, Operations Management, and Management. The Management major field is composed of three subfields: Organizational Studies, Strategic Management, and Business Ethics. Only a subset of these major fields admit students in any given year.


Admission

Acceptance of an applicant as a student in the Doctoral Program is based on the following criteria:

An appraisal of the applicant's ability and capacity to undertake and to complete satisfactorily the requirements of the program. Ordinarily this appraisal will include an assessment of the applicant's willingness to commit energy to the expeditious completion of a vigorous program of study in a manner consistent with the high intellectual standards and personal integrity expected of a candidate for a professional degree; the applicant's ability to manage effectively the difficult challenges posed by independent study; the applicant's ability to work cooperatively with others; and an applicant's ordinarily having attained a master's degree in business administration or its equivalent.

Application forms are available upon request from:

Director of the Doctoral Program
The Colgate Darden Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Virginia
P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
Telephone (804) 924-7326
(800) UVA-MBA-1 (toll free outside Virginia)

Applicants are required to take the Graduate Management Admissions Test given by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, NJ. Applicants who have already taken this test should request the Educational Testing Service to forward their test results or should submit a true copy of the scores to the Director of the Doctoral Program.

Foreign applicants must also take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) examination in order to be considered for admission.

Applicants seeking further information regarding the program and admission may write, telephone, or arrange for an interview with the Director of the Doctoral Program.


Administration

The administration of the Doctoral Program has been assigned by The Darden School faculty to the Doctoral Operating Committee, a standing committee of the faculty. Each major field of doctoral study established by the faculty has a major field advisor who is a member of the Doctoral Committee. The general administration of the Doctoral Program is the responsibility of the Director of the Doctoral Program.


Financial Assistance

A student's entire financial requirements ordinarily will not be underwritten by the School. Nevertheless, the faculty hopes that no qualified applicant will be unable to enter the Doctoral Program because of lack of financial resources.

A student with outstanding potential and/or who demonstrates that outside sources are not available may apply for a fellowship for tuition, fees, and living costs. Generous fellowship awards may be received for the two years of full-time course work and for the one year of full-time dissertation research. Recipients must be in good academic standing to qualify for fellowship stipends. The Director of the Doctoral Program will review the academic performance and the financial support needs of each student every 12 months. If a student's financial support needs have changed, revisions in the fellowship stipend will be made. In addition, loans are available. Tuition waivers and part-time teaching and research assistantships are often available to those students needing and desiring them. During the summer research assistantships are available.


Degree Requirements

The degree requirements outlined below apply to all doctoral students. The particular program of study designed to enable a student to fulfill these degree requirements depends on the student's previous experience and education. An individual program of study is structured in close consultation with the student to permit completion of the degree requirements in the most efficient manner. In general, the development of competence within a major field involves doctoral seminars and course work in second-year M.B.A. elective courses and individual reading under the supervision of a member of the major field faculty. Courses in research methods and supportive discipline-based work are usually taken in either the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences or in the School of Engineering.

The overall period of time actually required to satisfy Doctoral Program requirements varies depending upon the student's previous education and experience, the work load and performance, and the nature of the dissertation research.

Breadth Requirements   A student must demonstrate the mastery of the basic functions and disciplines of business administration determined to be most related to the student's major field.

Required Coursework in Quantitative Methods, Economics,and Other Relevant Disciplines   Each field requires advanced-level training in relevant quantitative techniques, economics, and behavioral sciences. This requirement is typically met by satisfactorily completing graduate courses in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The specific types and amounts of courses depend on the major field.

Required Courses for All Doctoral Students   All doctoral students must complete doctoral-level courses in research methodology and pedagogy. Part of these requirements may be satisfied by research and teaching internship assignments.

Major Field Professional Requirements   Each field requires the doctoral student to complete two to four advanced professional courses. This requirement is designed to involve each student in current issues and problems at an advanced level in his/her chosen field.

Major Field Theory and Literature   Students in each major field must complete a group of doctoral seminars in order to broaden and deepen their understanding of the significant literature and theory of their chosen field. For example:

Major Field Research Paper   Under the guidance of a faculty member, each student develops an intensive field or library-based study of a significant problem in the student's major field. Each student is expected to demonstrate independent research abilities, including selection of a research question, selection of research methodology, analyses of appropriate literature and data, and presentation of a written report on the research findings.

Major Field Examination   This examination is normally taken by the end of the student's second year of full-time work. Administered by a committee which draws some of its members from outside The Darden School faculty, the examination is primarily concerned with a student's knowledge of the substantive content of the major field as defined by his/her general program of study. Each student should demonstrate doctoral-level skills and knowledge concerning the field's fundamental problems, theories, and conceptual frameworks and should show a well developed capacity to reason logically, orally and in writing. Each student should also demonstrate in-depth competence within an area of specialization within the major field.

Dissertation Research Proposal   Each student is required to prepare a dissertation research proposal and to pass a proposal examination before conducting the research and writing the dissertation. The purpose of the proposal and the examination is to obtain assurance from the viewpoint of both the faculty and the student that the student has a worthwhile and feasible research project.

Dissertation   Each student is required to present an acceptable dissertation based on an approved proposal. A reading committee, of which the dissertation supervisor is normally chairman, will determine whether a dissertation is acceptable. The dissertation is expected to contribute to knowledge in the field and to the resolution of a significant management problem.

Residence Requirements and Program Length   University requirements for the doctoral degree are two continuous academic semesters of full-time graduate study in residence, or the equivalent, toward the doctoral degree-not including previous semesters in residence at the University of Virginia for the purpose of obtaining another degree. Experience suggests, however, that a minimum two years of full-time work in residence is usually needed to complete the formal requirements of the degree.


Academic Standards

Breadth Requirements   The failure of a student to meet the breadth requirements within three years shall be considered unsatisfactory academic progress and shall terminate the student's enrollment in the program.

Course Requirements   No course at The Darden School in which the student's grade is not at least B shall be counted toward the completion of the major field course requirements. Courses taken in other schools to fulfill degree requirements shall be counted for this purpose only if the student receives at least the minimum grade acceptable for credit toward a graduate degree in the schools within which the courses are taken. A student whose work in a major field course fails to meet these standards and whose work is otherwise satisfactory may arrange for remedial work with the course instructor or may take another course; any student whose work in more than two major field courses has not been acceptable shall have failed to meet the academic standards of the Doctoral Program.

Major Field Examination   A student who fails the major field examination shall have failed to meet the academic standards of the Doctoral Program.

Dissertation Proposal Examination   A student ordinarily is expected to pass the initial dissertation research proposal examination within six months following the major field examination. A student whose initial examination is not scheduled within 12 months or who fails the examination twice shall have failed to meet the academic standards of the Doctoral Program.

Time to Complete Program   The maximum time a student is allowed to complete the program is 60 months of elapsed time beginning with initial registration. Not completing the program within the 60 months automatically terminates the student's enrollment in the program.

Failure of a student to meet the academic standards of the Doctoral Program will result in the termination of the student's enrollment in the program. The Doctoral Program Committee is authorized to act on behalf of the faculty in receiving and acting on petitions for readmission. In acting on these requests, the Committee may establish such requirements and conditions for readmission as it considers appropriate. Students may appeal decisions to The Darden School faculty.

After the residence year has been completed, a student's tuition is calculated according to the number of semester course credits for which the candidate is registered.


Darden Student Life

Activities

The Darden Student Association   The students of The Colgate Darden Graduate School of Business Administration have formed a student government organization represented by an Executive Committee. Members of the Committee include the student body President, Executive Vice President, Vice President-Honor, Vice President-Finance, Student Council Representative (all second-year students), and four first-year Section Representatives. The Association sponsors an Orientation Program for incoming students, funds social activities, and provides for class gifts, among other things. During the 1995-96 session, students are expected to pay a $115 activities fee to support the Student Association activities for their two years.

The Darden News   is a student newspaper that serves the Darden School Community.

The 10-K   is The Darden School student yearbook.

The Darden Partners Association   organizes activities for partners in the Darden community, produces Tips, sponsors an orientation, and coordinates and contributes funds to social events.

The Finance Club, The Marketing Club, The Operations Club, The Consulting Club, The Entrepreneurs Club, The Real Estate Club, Health Care Forum, Students for Responsible Business, The Human Resources Club, and the IT/Computing Club are groups of Darden School students who share an interest in those areas of business. Current issues and career opportunities are examined by sponsoring speakers, panel discussions, and other club functions.

The Black Business Student Forum   is a group of students devoted to developing an awareness of and sensitivity to issues of concern to black business people in the business arena.

The Darden Gay Network   provides gay and lesbian members of the Darden community (including alumni) the opportunity to meet and share their experiences. The Network also provides a forum for the discussion of gay and lesbian concerns as they relate to The Darden School, the University, and the business world.

The Business Women's Forum   is a group of men and women devoted to addressing the issues of gender at Darden and in the workplace.

The International Business Society   organizes activities and speakers on current issues and career opportunities for students interested in international business careers.

The Business Forum   sponsors guest speakers for the School at meetings which are open to other schools of the University. It gives students an opportunity to discuss current business problems with leaders in management, labor, and government.

Each spring the student body elects a chairman, vice chairman, and secretary who are responsible for the administration of the speaker program and other Forum activities.


Service Organizations

Opportunity Consultants, Inc.   is a nonprofit corporation of students in The Darden School assisting small businesses in solving current management problems. These problems range from starting a new business or setting up an accounting system to marketing-program analysis. Through OCI students are given an opportunity for practical application of skills and techniques learned in the classroom while fulfilling a pressing need for social and economic responsibility.

Incorporated in 1969, OCI has expanded and, with the assistance of the Small Business Administration in Richmond, is serving clients throughout Virginia. M.B.A. students are encouraged to participate as consultants following their first semester.

Darden Outreach   The Darden Student Association initiated Darden Outreach, an organization committed to taking the goodwill of the Darden community to the Charlottesville area.


Darden School Regulations

Students of the University are subject to two sets of regulations, those of the University as a whole and those of the respective schools. Listed below are rules that apply within The Darden School. Appropriate excerpts from the University regulations are set forth in the next section.


Performance in the School

In addition to (1) following the University standards of conduct, (2) abiding by the obligations of the Honor System, and (3) meeting the standards of The Darden School for scholastic achievement, a Darden School student is expected (4) to perform in a manner that is consistent with the academic good order and educational processes of both the individual courses and The Darden School of Business Administration in general and to demonstrate by seriousness of purpose that he or she is profiting or likely to profit from the instruction offered. Such behavior is referred to herein as performance.

The faculty has provided a process for the review of the performance of a student whose actions suggest he or she is not profiting or likely to profit from the instruction offered, whose neglect or irregular performance of duties indicates indifference, or whose character and habits are inconsistent with the academic good order or educational process of individual courses or The Darden School in general.

It is not intended that this process shall be used in cases that fall solely within the jurisdiction of the Honor Committee or the Judiciary Committee of the University or the Academic Standards Committee of The Darden School. In such cases, proceedings brought before any of these committees shall preclude action under this review procedure.

The procedure shall not abrogate an instructor's rights and responsibilities for maintaining an effective and orderly learning atmosphere in classes.

The process, in brief, provides for the establishment of an ad hoc Committee of Inquiry, which may include a student member, to hear the issue and on behalf of the faculty impose the penalty, if any, that it considers appropriate, up to and including enforced withdrawal from The Darden School.

The Committee's decision may be appealed to the School's faculty.

Full details of the procedure shall be provided by the Dean to any student whose performance is being reviewed or to anyone else who has a legitimate interest.


Attendance Policy

Darden students are expected to attend all classes. The rationale of this policy is found in the commitment faculty and students make to the case-method form of instruction. The case method is a group experience that depends heavily on the active participation of all members of the community, who bring their varying perspectives to the issues at hand.

The faculty recognizes that certain activities outside the classroom are an integral part of the Darden experience. These activities (e.g., field research for Directed Studies, off-grounds employment interviews, etc.) may from time to time result in the students' being unable to attend class. Other reasons for missing class include illness, personal emergency, religious holidays, and military service. In all cases, students are expected to make every effort to avoid missing a class. When a class is missed, for any reason, the student's actions in notifying the instructor, explaining the absence, and determining what additional work may be required should reflect the serious nature of the absence.

Rules associated with the implementation of this attendance policy or the effect of missing class on student grades are the responsibility of individual instructors and should be communicated to the students at the start of the semester.


Auditing Courses

M.B.A. students and students enrolled in other schools of the University may audit elective courses with the permission of the instructor.


Withdrawals

The Dean's Office may ask a student at any time to withdraw from a particular course or from the School because of unsatisfactory academic work or for other adequate reasons.