South Asian History

HISA 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in South Asia
An introduction to the study of history intended for first or second year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods. Regardless of a particular seminar's subject matter, its emphasis will rest upon enhancing critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HISA 201 - (3) (IR)
History and Civilization of Classical India
The major elements of South Asian civilization, from the Stone Age to 1200, including the Indus Valley, Vedic literatures, Buddhism, Jainism, Epic traditions, the caste system, Mauryan and Guptan Empires, devotional Hinduism.

HISA 202 - (3) (IR)
History and Civilization of Medieval India
The social, political, economic and cultural history of South Asia from 1200 to 1800, from the Turkic invasions through the major Islamic dynasties, especially the Mughal Empire, to the establishment of English hegemony in the maritime provinces.

HISA 203 - (3) (IR)
History of Modern India
A survey of 200 years of Indian history from the mid-18th century to the contemporary present, focusing on the imperial/colonial encounter with the British Raj  before Independence, and the social and political permutations of freedom in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka since.

HISA 301 - (3) (IR)
History of Muslim India
The nature of Islamic political dominance in a non-Muslim society; Turko- Afghan and Mughal political institutions; art, letters and learning under the Delhi Sultanate, regional rulers and Mughals; religious and cultural life during the Muslim period in South Asia.

HISA 302 - (3) (IR)
India From Akbar to Victoria
Society and politics in the Mughal Empire, the Empire's decline and the rise of successor states, the English as a regional power and their expansion, and social, economic and political change under British paramountcy, including the 1857 Revolt.

HISA 303 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century India
One hundred years of Indian history, defining the qualities of the world's first major anti-colonial movement of nationalism and the changes and cultural continuities of India's democratic policy in the decades since 1947.

HISA 311 - (3) (IR)
Social and Political Movements in Twentieth-Century India
A consideration of the relationships between land, people and politics in modern South Asia.

HISA 312 - (3) (IR)
History of Women in South Asia
A survey of the evolving definitions and roles of women in the major social and cultural traditions of South Asia, i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.

HISA 401 - (4) (IR)
Seminar in South Asia
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HISA 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in South Asia
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloguia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia will prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HISA 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in South Asian History
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis. Normally the permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.

HISA 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in South Asia
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

HISA 502 - (3) (IR)
Historiography of Early Modern South Asia
Analysis of historical sources and historians of political systems in Muslim India until the rise of British power.

HISA 510 - (3) (IR)
Economic History of India
Regional economic systems prior to European penetration; the establishment and growth of European trading companies in the 17th and 18th centuries; commercialization of agriculture, the emergence of a unified Indian economy in the 19th century, and industrialization and economic development in the 20th century.


General History

HIST 100 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Seminar in History
An introduction to the study of history intended for first and second year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods. Regardless of a particular seminar's subject matter, its emphasis rests upon enhancing critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIST 301 - (3) (IR)
History of Canada
The development of Canada from the early 16th century to the present. Emphasis is given to Canadian affairs after 1814, particularly to the growth of Canadian political institutions, the interplay of the North Atlantic community countries, and the emergence of Anglo-French dualism in Canadian life.

HIST 302 - (3) (IR)
History of British West Indies
The development of the British islands in the West Indies from the period of settlement to the present.

HIST 304 - (3) (IR)
The British Empire in the 18th Century
surveys the history of the First British Empire to 1815, with concentration on the 18th century and on the loss of the American Colonies as a breaking point. It explores problems inherent in the imperial relationship between Mother Country and colonies and is an introduction to studies in colonialism and imperialism as they relate to the histories of England, early America, the West Indies, and South Asia and Africa.

HIST 401 - (4) (Y)
Major Seminar
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 402 - (4) (Y)
Major Colloquium
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia will prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in History
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis. Normally the permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.

HIST 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

HIST 405 - (4) (Y)
Distinguished Majors Program-Special Colloquium
Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program
Historical approaches, techniques, and methodologies introduced through written exercises and intensive class discussion. Normally taken during the third year.

HIST 406 - (3) (Y)
Distinguished Majors Program-Special Seminar
Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program
Problems in historical research. Preparation and discussion of fourth-year honors theses. Normally taken during the fourth year.

HIST 407 - (3) (Y)
Political and Social Thought Seminar
A seminar introducing the interdisciplinary study of political and social thought, focusing each year on a different topic.

HIST 501, 502 - (3) (IR)
Documentary Editing Procedures and Practice
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Principles and methods in interpreting and editing historical manuscripts, with particular emphasis on the colonial and early national periods.

HIST 503 - (3) (IR)
Quantitative Analysis of Historical Data
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Statistics or permission of instructor
The social scientific approach to historical inquiry; the formulation of theories and their testing with historical data. Extensive directed readings in quantitative history and training in quantitative methods: sampling, the organization of a data-set and data analysis.

HIST 504 - (3) (IR)
Monticello Internship
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Directed research, largely in primary source materials, on topics relating to Jefferson's estate, life, and times. Directed by senior members of the Monticello staff. The internships are restricted to graduate students in history and to fourth year undergraduate history majors. A maximum of two students each semester are admitted to the course.

HIST 513 - (3) (IR)
The Atlantic Slave Trade
The growth and development of the international slave trade from Africa to the New World from the 15th to the 19th centuries.


United States History

HIUS 100 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Seminar in U.S. History
An introduction to the study of history intended for first or second year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods. Regardless of a particular seminar's subject matter, its emphasis rests upon enhancing critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIUS 201 - (4) (Y)
American History to 1865
Development of the colonies and their institutions; the Revolution; the formation and organization of the Republic; and the coming of the Civil War.

HIUS 202 - (4) (Y)
American History Since 1865
The evolution of political, social, and cultural history of the United States from 1865 to the present.

HIUS 206 - (3) (Y)
American Economic History
American economic history from colonial origins to the present. Cross-listed with ECON 206.

HIUS 301 - (3) (Y)
The Colonial Period of American History
The English background and the development of colonial institutions, political, social, economic and ecclesiastical.

HIUS 303 - (3) (Y)
The Era of the American Revolution
The growth of ideas and institutions which led to American independence, the creation of an American union, and a distinctive culture.

HIUS 305 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-1845
The history of the United States during the early national and middle periods, including political, constitutional, social and economic developments as well as the westward movement.

HIUS 307 - (3) (IR)
The Coming of the Civil War
An examination of the period from roughly 1815 to 1861 focusing on the interaction between the developing sectional conflict and the evolving political system, with the view of explaining what caused the Civil War.

HIUS 309 - (3) (IR)
The Civil War and Reconstruction
Examines the course of the Civil War and Reconstruction in detail and attempts to assess their impact on 19th century American society, both in the North and in the South.

HIUS 311 - (3) (IR)
The United States in the Gilded Age, 1870-1900
Studies the transformation of American society under the impact of industrialization, from 1870 to 1900. It examines how capitalists, workers, farmers and the middle class attempted to shape the new industrial society to their own purposes and visions. Emphasis is given to social and cultural experience as well as to politics.

HIUS 313 - (3) (IR)
The Emergence of Modern America, 1870-1930
Explores the distinctive characteristics of American modernity as they emerge in the period from the end of reconstruction to the Great Depression. It uncovers first the creation of big business and large-scale bureaucratic organizations. Topics include the first military-industrial complex of World War I, the invention of R& D, the growth of research universities, and the modern organization of knowledge. Describes the landscape of new large urban hinterlands; analyzes the difficult encounters of class, ethnicity, race, and gender both at home and at work; and studies the changing leisure patterns of a consumer culture.

HIUS 315 - (3) (IR)
United States Society and Politics, 1900-1945
The development of modern America is explored by considering the growing interdependence between its politics, economy, culture, and social structure in the first half of the 20th century.

HIUS 316 - (3) (IR)
Viewing America, 1940 to the Present
Built around news reels, photographs, television, films, and reviews, this course explores how Americans viewed some of the major events and trends in the post-war period.

HIUS 317 - (3) (IR)
United States Society and Politics, 1945-1990
This survey of post World War II U.S. politics uncovers the links between long range social and economic phenomenon (suburbanization, decline of agricultural employment, the rise and fall of the labor movement, black urbanization and proletarianization, economic society and insecurity within the middle class, the changing structure of multinational business) and the more obvious political movements, election results and state policies of the last half century.

HIUS 321 - (3) (IR)
The History of New England
Emphasis is on New England from its founding in the 17th century through its "Indian Summer" in the late 19th century. Most attention is given to social, intellectual, and cultural development.

HIUS 323 - (3) (IR)
The South in the Nineteenth Century
The economic, political, and cultural evolution of the Old South, the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the development of the New South.

HIUS 324 - (3) (IR)
The South in the Twentieth Century
A history of the South from 1900 to the present focusing on class structure, race relations, cultural traditions, and the question of southern identity.

HIUS 326 - (3) (IR)
The Trans-Mississippi West
Economic, social, and cultural history of the Far West from the Mexican War to World War II. Focuses on continuity and change in the region's history and the social experience of its peoples from the era of conquest, migration, and settlement to the era of agribusiness, Hollywood, and national park tourism.

HIUS 328 - (3) (IR)
History of Virginia to 1865
The development of colonial institutions as influenced by frontier conditions and British policy and culture. A survey of Virginia history from colonial times to 1865.

HIUS 340 - (3) (IR)
Development of American Science
A history of the development of American science from the colonial period to the present with special emphasis on the process of the professionalization of American science and on the relationships between the emergent scientific community and such concerns as higher education and the government.

HIUS 341 - (3) (IR)
American Business
Ssurvey of the rise of the modern corporate form of American business and an analysis of the underlying factors which shaped that development.

HIUS 345 - (3) (IR)
History of Urban America
Evolution of the American city from colonial times to the end of the nineteenth century with emphasis on both the physical growth of the system of cities and the development of an urban culture, including comparisons with European and Asian cities.

HIUS 346 - (3) (IR)
History of Urban America
Evolution of the American city from the end of the nineteenth century to the present with emphasis on both the physical growth of the system of cities and the development of an urban culture, including comparisons with European and Asian cities.

HIUS 347 - (3) (IR)
History of American Labor
American labor viewed in terms of the changing nature of work and its effect on working men, women, and children. Emphasis on social and cultural responses to such changes, as well as the organized labor movement.

HIUS 348 - (3) (IR)
American Social History to 1870
Demographic change, the emergence of regional social orders, the shaping of American religion, the impact of the industrial revolution, and the development of important elites.

HIUS 349 - (3) (IR)
United States Social History Since 1870
Development of a predominantly urban society, with particular emphasis on sources of stability: class and stratification, ethnic patterns, religious identities, social elites, education, etc.

HIUS 351 - (3) (IR)
Diplomatic History of the United States to 1914
American foreign relations from colonial times to 1914.

HIUS 352 - (3) (IR)
Diplomatic History of the United States Since 1914
American foreign relations from 1914 to the present.

HIUS 355 - (3) (IR)
The History of Early American Law
The major developments in American law, politics, and society from the colonial settlements to the Civil War with primary emphasis on the period 1776-1860. The primary focus is on legal change. Approximately equal attention is devoted to constitutional law, legislation, and the common law.

HIUS 356 - (3) (IR)
The History of Modern American Law
The major developments in American law, politics, and society from the era of Reconstruction to the recent past. The primary focus is on legal change. Approximately equal attention is devoted to constitutional law, legislation, and the common law.

HIUS 357 - (3) (Y)
Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States
The main traditions of thought and belief in the relationship to significant historical events and cultural changes from the 17th century to the Civil War.

HIUS 358 - (3) (Y)
Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States
The main traditions of thought and belief in the relationship to significant historical events and cultural changes from the Civil War to the present.

HIUS 361 - (3) (Y)
History of Women in America, 1600 to 1865
A study of the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.

HIUS 362 - (3) (IR)
History of Women in America, 1865 to Present
A study of the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.

HIUS 365 - (3) (IR)
Afro-American History to 1865
A study of the history of black Americans from the introduction of slavery in America to the end of the Civil War.

HIUS 366 - (3) (IR)
Afro-American History Since 1865
The history of black Americans from the Civil War to the present.

HIUS 367 - (3) (Y)
History of the Civil Rights Movement
Examines the history of the southern civil rights movement. Beginning in 1900-but concentrating heavily on the activist years between 1955 and 1968- the aim is to familiarize students with knowledge of the civil rights movement's philosophies, tactics, events, personalities, and consequences.

HIUS 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in United States History
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIUS 402 - (4) (IR)
Colloquium in United States History
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia will prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIUS 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics in United States History
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis. Normally the permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.

HIUS 404 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in United States History
In exceptional circumstances and with permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

HIUS 405 - (4) (IR)
American Studies Colloquium
An introductory colloquium for third-year majors admitted to the American Studies Program. Cross-listed with ENAM 483.

HIUS 406 - (4) (IR)
Research Seminar in American Studies
A research seminar for third-year majors admitted to the American Studies Program who have completed HIUS 405.

HIUS 407 - (4) (IR)
Fourth Year Seminar in American Studies
A seminar for fourth-year majors in the American Studies Program.

Latin American Studies

Requirements for Major The requirements for a major in Latin American Studies are as follows: (1) Language: SPAN 202 and PORT 212, or the equivalents; (2) 30 credits of courses in the Latin American field offered by the departments of anthropology, economics, English, government and foreign affairs, history, Spanish and Portuguese, and others. Not more than 15 credits in any one department may be counted toward the major. Students must take courses in at least four departments.

Students may enroll in any courses listed in the course description that is issued by the department every semester. Students need their advisors permission to enroll in other courses.

Students may be required to perform additional exercises or to submit additional material in connection with the Major Assessment Program.

The majors thesis is not required, but is offered as an option for students interested in specific topics of research. Majors who have chosen to write a thesis shall register, in their fourth year, for LAST 491-492, which count toward the 30 credits required for the major.

Requirements for Minor The requirements for a minor in Latin American Studies are as follows: (1) Language: Either SPAN 202 or PORT 212, or the equivalents; (2) 18 credits of courses in the Latin American field offered by the departments of anthropology, economics, English, government and foreign affairs, history, Spanish, Italian and Portugese, and others. Not more than nine credits in any one department may be counted towards the minor. Students must take courses in at least three departments.

Additional Information For more information, contact:

Mr. Fernando Operé
Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese
405 Cabell Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-4653
Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese World Wide Web site
Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese faculty


Courses

The courses listed below have counted for the Latin American Studies major in the past.

ANTH 236 - (3) (Y)
Don Juan and Castaneda

ANTH 282 - (3) (IR)
The Rise of Prehistoric Civilizations

ANTH 352 - (3) (IR)
Peoples and Cultures of South America

ANTH 357 - (3) (E)
Peoples of the Caribbean

ANTH 384 - (3) (Y)
South American Civilizations

ANTH 553 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in the Ethnology of Latin America

ECON 451 - (3) (Y)
Economic Development

ENTC 315 - (3) (Y)
Literature of the Americas

FRTR 329 - (3) (Y)
Literature of Empire and Decolonization

GFCG 312 - (3) (Y)
Politics of Developing Areas

GFCG 531 - (3) (E)
Government and Politics of Latin America

GFCG 533 - (3) (O)
Political Parties and Movements in Latin America

GFCG 536 - (3) (IR)
Role of the Military in Latin America

GFCG 595 - (3) (S)\
Selected Problems in Comparative Government

GFIR 562 - (3) (Y)
Latin America in World Affairs

HILA 201 - (3) (Y)
Colonial Latin America, 1500-1824

HILA 202 - (3) (Y)
Modern Latin America, 1824 to Present

HILA 304 - (3) (IR)
Mexico, Revolution and Evolution, 1854 to Present

HILA 305 - (3) (IR)
Modern Central America

HILA 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics in Latin American History

HIAF 511 - (3) (IR)
Slave Systems in Africa and the Americas

LAST 491, 492 - (3) (Y)
Majors Thesis

PORT 402 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Literature in Portuguese

PORT 427 - (3) (Y)
The Civilization of Brazil

PORT 441 - (3) (IR)
Brazilian Literature to 1900

PORT 442 - (3) (IR)
Brazilian Literature since 1900

PORT 461, 462 - (3) (SI)
Studies in Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature

SPTR 223 - (3) (SI)
Contemporary Spanish-American Narrative in Translation

SPAN 330 - (3) (Y)
Literary Analysis

SPAN 342 - (3) (Y)
Survey of Latin American Literature to 1900

SPAN 343 - (3) (Y)
Survey of Latin American Literature since 1900

SPAN 428 - (3) (Y)
Latin American Culture and Civilization

SPAN 440 - (3) (SI)
Hispanic Intellectual History

SPAN 480 - (3) (Y)
Latin American Literature from Colonial Period to 1900

SPAN 485 - (3) (Y)
Latin American Literature after 1900

SPAN 486 - (3) (Y)
Contemporary Latin American Short Fiction

SPAN 487 - (3) (Y)
Contemporary Latin American Novel

Program in Linguistics

Overview Language is central to virtually all human activity--indeed, many argue that language was the single most important factor in the differentiation of the human species from other hominoids. Linguists study language as a specialized communicative system with its own distinctive principles of structure and patterning. Apart from the traditional subfields of phonology (the patterning of speech sounds), morphology (word-building processes), and syntax (rules of phrase and sentence formation), there are a number of research areas that are interdisciplinary in nature: semantics and discourse analysis, with connections to philosophy, psychology, anthropology, and literature; sociolinguistics; psycholinguistics; linguistic anthropology; and others.

Faculty The linguistics faculty are housed in several University departments, including Anthropology, Psychology, and various language departments. Their research interests span all the subfields mentioned above, and their publications range over a wide number of languages and language families, including Romance, Slavic, Germanic, Sanskrit, Chinese, Arabic, African and Native American languages, and American Sign Language.

Students There are usually fewer than ten linguistics majors in a given year. Many combine linguistics with a major in a related field such as a foreign language, psychology, or anthropology. Linguistics classes generally are small, with emphasis on class participation and problem-solving. All courses in the program are taught by faculty members.

Graduates with a B.A. in linguistics pursue a variety of careers. Although some go on to do graduate work in a related field, such as language and literature, language teaching, or speech pathology, others become involved in non-academic pursuits, ranging from law to computer programming. Yet even those who do not continue in linguistics find the analytical skills and knowledge acquired in the major to be relevant and useful.

Interdepartmental Major in Linguistics A major in Linguistics permits a student to explore both the independent and the interdisciplinary aspects of the study of human language. Courses give attention to historical as well as synchronic analysis, and cover several modern approaches to data.

Requirements for Major The major program consists of 30 credits. The following courses, yielding 12 credits, are required of all majors: LING 325; LING 502; a course in the structure of a language (note: this must be a linguistics course); a course in theoretical linguistics. A maximum of three credits of study of an ancient language (e.g., Sanskrit, Old Icelandic, etc.) may be counted toward the major. The major program is to be chosen in consultation with an advisor (Contini- Morava, Elson, Rini, Saunders).

Requirements for Minor The minor is the same as the major with respect to required courses. Two electives are required in addition, for a total of 18 credits.

Distinguished Majors Program in Linguistics Students with superior academic performance are encouraged to apply to the Distinguished Majors Program in which they write a thesis demonstrating original research. Requirements for admission to the Distinguished Majors Program are as follows:

  1. An overall grade point average of at least 3.4, and a GPA of at least 3.4 in all courses counted toward the major. This GPA must be maintained throughout the fourth year in order for Distinction to be awarded.
  2. A thesis proposal, signed and approved by the faculty member who will have primary responsibility for supervising the thesis, and by a second faculty member who will be the second reader.
After being admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program, the student registers for three credits of LING 498 (Independent Research) in the first semester of the fourth year. During this time, the student does background reading and/or data collection under the supervision of the thesis supervisor, and begins writing the thesis. In the second semester of the fourth year, the student signs up for LING 499 (Senior Thesis), in order to finish writing and revision. The first draft of the thesis must be submitted to readers by March 1, and the final draft by April 15.

Additional Information For more information, contact:

Ellen Contini-Morava
Chair, Program in Linguistics
Department of Anthropology
204 Brooks Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-7044


Courses

The following list includes courses approved for the major. Students should consult the Graduate Record for prerequisites of courses at the 500 level.

LING 200 - (3) (O)
Grammatical Concepts in Foreign Language Learning
Prerequisite: Some foreign language experience strongly recommended
Intended for all students interested in language. Treats the grammatical concepts traditionally considered relevant in the teaching and study of foreign languages, including the study of English as a second language.

LING 325 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis
An introduction to sign systems, language as a sign system, and approaches to linguistics description. The course emphasizes the application of descriptive techniques to data.

LING 496 - (Credit to be arranged) (SI)
Independent Study in Linguistics
Independent study conducted by the student under the supervision of an instructor of their choice.

LING 497 - (Credit to be arranged) (SI)
Supervised Research in Linguistics
Supervised research by the student under the direction of an instructor of his/her choice.

LING 498 - (Credit to be arranged) (SI)
Independent Research in Linguistics
Independent research by the student under the supervision of an instructor of their choice.

LING 499 - (3) (SI)
Senior Honors Thesis
Independent research for the senior thesis for students in the honors program in linguistics.

LING 501 - (3) (IR)
Synchronic Linguistics
Prerequisite: LING 325 and permission of instructor
A study of the theoretical foundations of major linguistic models with attention to problem solving and descriptive techniques. Emphasis is currently given to the American structuralist and transformational-generative models of language.

LING 502 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Comparative-Historical Linguistics
Prerequisites: LING 325 and permission of instructor
A survey of the elements of comparative-historical linguistics.

LING 506 - (3) (IR)
Syntax and Semantics
Prerequisite: LING 325 and permission of the instructor
Analysis and description of sentence structure and its relationship to meaning.

LING 507 - (3) (SI)
Syntactic Theory
Prerequisite: LING 325 and permission of the instructor
A study of the major schools of syntactic theory.

LING 509 - (3) (Y)
Teaching English as a Second Language
Prerequisite: LING 325 and permission of instructor
Theory, problems, and methods in teaching English as a second language, with attention to relevant areas of general linguistics and the structure of English.

LING 525, 526 - (3) (SI)
Romance Linguistics
Vulgar Latin origins and patterns of linguistic change in principal Romance languages.

ANTH 341 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Sociolinguistics

ANTH 345 - (3) (SI)
American Indian Languages

ANTH 504 - (3) (Y)
Field Methods

ANTH 540 - (3) (Y)
Linguistic Anthropology

ANTH 542 - (3) (IR)
Modern Structural Linguistics

ANTH 545 - (3) (IR)
African Languages and Folklore

ANTH 549 - (Credit to be arranged) (IR)
Selected Topics in Theoretical Linguistics and LinguisticAnthropology

EDSA 505 - (3) (Y)
Experimental Phonetics

EDSA 508 - (3) (Y)
Laboratory in Experimental Phonetics

ENLS 303 - (3) (Y)
History of the English Language

ENCR 333 - (3) (Y)
Ethnopoetics

ENMD 501 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to Old English

ENMD 505, 506 - (3) (IR)
Old Icelandic

FREN 427 - (3) (S)
French Phonetics and Phonology
Conducted in French.

FREN 428 - (3) (Y)
History of the French Language
Conducted in French.

PHIL 550 - (3) (IR)
Philosophy of Language

PSYC 311 - (3) (IR)
Psychology of Language

PSYC 411 - (3) (Y)
Psycolinguistics

PSYC 555 - (3) (IR)
Developmental Psycholinguistics

RUSS 521 - (3) (SI)
The Structure of Modern Russian

RUSS 522 - (3) (SI)
History of the Russian Language

SANS 501, 502 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Sanskrit

SLAV 525 - (3) (SI)
Introduction to Slavic Linguistics

SPAN 309 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 310 - (3) (S)
Phonetics

Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 420 - (3) (Y)
History of the Language

SPAN 430 - (3) (IR)
Hispanic Dialectology and Bilingualism

SPAN 514 - (3) (E)
Applied Linguistics