Curricula

| Aerospace Engineering | Applied Mathematics | Biomedical Engineering | Chemical Engineering |
| Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics | Computer Science | Electrical Engineering |
| Engineering Science | Materials Science and Engineering | Mechanical Engineering |
| Systems Engineering | Division of Technology, Culture, and Communication |


The degree of Bachelor of Science is granted with the following majors:

The curricula leading to these degrees are arranged to prepare a graduate either to enter directly into employment in applied science or engineering or continue graduate studies in either scientific or engineering fields. The baccalaureate degrees include required and elective courses in technical subjects, applied mathematics and humanities in the School of Engineering and Applied Science; required and elective courses in the physical sciences taught in the College of Arts and Sciences; and elective mathematics and humanities courses taught in the College of Arts and Sciences. The aim of these curricula is to provide the student with strong foundations in methods of engineering analysis, design, and synthesis and to ensure a firm grasp of fundamental principles in science, mathematics and the humanities.

All the curricula are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and the professional engineering programs in aerospace, chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical, and systems engineering are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), the accepted national agency for accrediting curricula in engineering.

The curricula which follow have been developed on the principle that instruction in engineering and applied science should prepare the graduate for professional practice as it has currently evolved and also should provide a firm foundation in the physical sciences and mathematics which will encourage an imaginative and flexible approach to the problems of engineering and applied science of the future. Included in the student's first four semesters' work are elective courses in the humanities taught by the College of Arts and Sciences and a required humanities course in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The elective College courses broaden the students' interests in fields outside of their technical program and thus prepare them for a balanced and culturally rich life in the community. The School of Engineering and Applied Science humanities courses aim to encourage effective oral and written communication in both technical and non-technical pursuits and to develop in the students an appreciation for the modes of communication they will be concerned with in their professional lives and as responsible citizens.

The curriculum of the school does not require premature specialization. A nondepartmentalized core program covering most of the first two years is administered jointly by all departments. Certain curricula such as chemical engineering have some requirements in the second year program, and students should consult with their advisor and exercise judicious selection of electives to keep open two or more options among major fields until the beginning of the third year.


Aerospace Engineering

Aerospace engineering is concerned with the science and technology underlying the behavior and design of vehicles and systems that operate within the atmosphere and in space. It requires knowledge of a wide range of subject areas, including the basic sciences, mathematics, and engineering sciences as well as specialized studies in aerodynamics, propulsion systems, structures, materials, flight dynamics, astronautics, planetary atmospheres, and computational methods. This broad background qualifies the graduating engineer not only to handle problems that are special to the aerospace field but also to meet challenges of an interdisciplinary nature facing society, such as those involving the environment, transportation, and energy resources.

Aerospace Engineering Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101Calculus I4
CHEM 151Intro Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 151LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
ENGR 160 Engineering Concepts3
ENGR 164Engineering Design3
TCC 101Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102Calculus II4
PHYS 142EGeneral Physics I4
CS 182Intro FORTRAN3
CHEM 152Intro Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 152LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
18
Third Semester
APMA 205Calculus III4
PHYS 241EGeneral Physics II3
PHYS 241LGeneral Physics Lab I1
ENGR 205Solid Mechanics I3
ENGR 202Thermodynamics3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206Differential Equations I 4
PHYS 242EGeneral Physics III3
PHYS 242LGeneral Physics Lab II1
ENGR 207Dynamics3
AE 202Intro Aeronautics3
AE 202LAeronautics Lab1
TCC 2xxHumanities Elective3
 
Total
18
Fifth Semester
APMA 315Vector Calculus/Complex Variables3
AE 305Fluid Mechanics I3
AE 383Experimental Methods Lab2
ENGR 203Electrical Science3
ENGR 306Solid Mechanics II3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Sixth Semester
APMA 341Differential Equations II3
AE 306Fluid Mechanics II3
AE 310Structural Analysis3
AE 384Applied Engineering Lab2
AE 326Intro to Astronautics3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Seventh Semester
TCC 401Western Technology & Culture3
AE 423Flight Vehicle Dynamics -- or --  
AE 427Spacecraft Attitude Dynamics3
AE 441Aerospace Vehicle Design I3
 Technical Elective 3
 Technical Elective2
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Eighth Semester
TCC 402The Engineer in Society3
AE 442 Aerospace Vehicle Design II3
 Technical Elective3
 Technical Elective 3
 Technical Elective3
 
Total
15

136 Credits -- minimum number required for graduation. 16 design credits required for graduation.

  1. ENGR 202 is prerequisite for third year AE courses.
  2. ME 302 may be substituted for AE 305.
  3. The program of studies must include either ME 450 as a technical elective or formal coursework in economics.
  4. One general education elective may be replaced by an unrestricted elective with the approval of the advisor.
  5. At least three of the following courses must be taken as part of the 14 credits of technical electives with no more than one course selected from any group: (a) AE 406; (b) AE 439 or CE 455 or CE 471; (c) AE 445; and (d) AE 433 or AE 434.


Applied Mathematics

The Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Mathematics. It seeks to attract those students who are interested in using mathematics to solve problems which occur in areas other than mathematics itself. A typical student in applied mathematics takes eleven courses in mathematics (seven courses at the third and fourth-year level). In addition, a minor is taken in an area in which mathematics has been found to be useful, such as any of the engineering disciplines, economics, physics, biology, computer science, etc.

The degree program of the Institute is quite flexible. Each student must complete the standard two years required of all students in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. In the last two years, the student is required to follow broad guidelines, but may tailor a program to get great depth in one area or to learn the fundamentals of several areas.

Applied Mathematics Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101Calculus I4
CHEM 151Intro Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 151LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
ENGR 160Engineering Concepts3
ENGR 164Engineering Design3
TCC 101Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102Calculus II4
PHYS 142EGeneral Physics I4
CS 182Intro FORTRAN or 
CS 101Intro to Computer Science3
 Science Elective I3-4
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17/18
Third Semester
APMA 205 Calculus III4
PHYS 241E General Physics II3
PHYS 241L General Physics Lab I1
ENGR Core Elective3
ENGR Core Elective3
TCC 2xx Humanities3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206 Differential Equations I 4
 Science Elective II 4
ENGR Core Elective 3
ENGR Core Elective 3
CS 360 Scientific Computing or 
CS 201 Software Development Methods 3
 
Total
17
Fifth Semester
APMA 310 Probability 3
APMA 341 Differential Equations II3
 Minor/Technical Elective3
 Minor/Technical Elective3
 General Education Elective3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
18
Sixth Semester
APMA 308 Linear Algebra 3
APMA Elective3
 Minor/Technical Elective3
 Minor/Technical Elective3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
15
Seventh Semester
TCC 401Western Technology & Culture3
APMA 315Vector Calculus/Complex Variables3
APMA 507 Numerical Method 3
 Minor/Technical Elective 3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
15
Eighth Semester
TCC 402 The Engineer in Society3
APMA 484 Math Models 3
 Minor/Technical Elective 3
 Minor/Technical Elective 3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
15

131 Credits -- minimum number required for graduation.

  1. First year students should select from CHEM 152, BIOL 201, or MSE 102 for Science Elective I. MSE 102 and ENGR 209 cannot both be taken for credit.
  2. Science Elective II should be selected from PHYS 242E/242L, CHEM 212/212L, CHEM 152/152L, EVSC 280/280L, BIOL 201/203, or BIOL 202/204.
  3. The one required 3 credit APMA elective is to be chosen from the following: APMA 312, APMA/CS 302, MATH 321, MATH 352, or MATH 531.
  4. Two general education electives may be replaced by unrestricted electives with advisor approval.
  5. Technical electives may be chosen from any third or fourth year technical courses in the University. Some second year courses (biology or chemistry) may be chosen subject to advisor approval.
  6. The fourth core elective may be replaced by a science or technical elective or APMA/CS 202.
  7. A required part of the degree program is a minor consisting of at least four 3 credit courses from University offerings in a single field in which mathematics is used extensively. Approval must be obtained for the minor program from the advisor by the beginning of the third year. Minor areas might be physics, computer science, various engineering fields, biomathematics, operations research, etc.
  8. Students contemplating graduate work in Applied Mathematics or a mathematics based discipline such as statistics, are strongly encouraged to take MATH 531.


Biomedical Engineering

Engineers and physicians share the view that science best serves mankind through its applications. In both professions, deepening understanding is producing a flood of new applications, in the form of devices, materials, and techniques. The vigorous hybrid field of biomedical engineering has sprung from such shared outlooks and growing capabilities. Focusing on problems of living systems, it makes synergistic use of the physical, mathematical, engineering and biological sciences.

A biomedical engineering track in the Engineering Science Program offers undergraduates the opportunity to design a course of study with a strong biomedical component. In addition to taking biomedical engineering courses, students who select this track are expected to work on a senior thesis project under the supervision of a BME faculty member. This undergraduate biomedical engineering track prepares students to pursue advanced graduate degrees in biomedical engineering or in medicine, as well as a career in one of the traditional engineering disciplines, but with a strong interest in biomedical applications of engineering and technology.

Active research areas in the department include biomechanics, bioelectricity, biotransport (emphasizing cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological systems), biotechnology (especially computer applications to signal and image-processing). Interdepartmental research collaboration links the Department of Biomedical Engineering with most other engineering departments and many clinical and basic science departments in the School of Medicine.

Preferred preparation for graduate study in the Department of Biomedical Engineering is a degree in biomedical, chemical, electrical, or mechanical engineering. Electives in life sciences should be taken to the extent possible, at least through cell biology (BIOL 301). The goal in course selection should be a solid foundation in math and science within a traditional engineering field. Additional electives that are relevant include partial differential equations, linear algebra; solid or fluid mechanics; and signals and systems courses in electrical engineering. Well-prepared students can take Physiology, BIOM 603 and 604, in their fourth year and other electives in biomedical engineering.

Judicious selection of a senior thesis topic that can continue onto a Master of Science thesis and of Biomedical Engineering electives in the fourth year may allow graduation with the Bachelor of Science in four years and the Master of Science in one additional year. Students interested in this option are strongly urged to plan early in their third year and to thoroughly discuss this plan with appropriate faculty in Biomedical Engineering.


Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineering arose from the need to apply physical, chemical, and engineering principles to the processing of such varied products as fuels, drugs, foods, plastics, metals, and basic chemicals. Undergraduate preparation for this field is thus especially broad and balanced, drawing on chemistry as well as on mathematics and physics, and in some cases, biology. The graduates of a chemical engineering program are well prepared not only for industrial practice but also for graduate work in such diverse fields as biochemical, biomedical or nuclear engineering, chemistry, environmental or energy studies, materials science, medicine, business administration, law, and others.

Many chemical engineers serve in the traditional chemical process industries of petroleum, natural gas, chemicals, paper, and plastics. Some develop new products or processes through research, while others carry out the pilot studies and design work to bring innovations from the laboratory into industrial production. Many are engaged in the operation and management of process plants. Others are in marketing, and develop new applications for, or solve problems arising from, the use of these products. Often a chemical engineer moves from one of these functions to the next as an idea develops into a full-scale production facility.

Chemical engineers have long aided in energy production from oil, gas, coal, and high-energy chemicals. They are now also involved in the research, development, and production of energy from alternative energy resources, including solar and geothermal, as well as such renewable resources as recoverable wastes and biomass. Similarly, their chemical expertise and broad knowledge of processes are valuable in the identification and control of environmental effects from man's use of natural resources, health care and pharmaceuticals, and in emerging areas like biotechnology, electrochemical systems and electronic materials. A chemical engineer's career path is varied and rewarding, allowing individual talents to grow and be fully utilized.

First And Second Years Students interested in chemical engineering take a two-semester sequence of general chemistry with the standard first year program. Because of the various options available for the chemistry sequence, as well as the varied uses students may plan for their Chemical Engineering program, early consultation with an advisor from the department is recommended. (A student proposing to meet medical school requirements may, for example, plan to satisfy prerequisites and take a full-year organic chemistry course with laboratory.)

Chemical Engineering Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101Calculus I4
CHEM 151Intro Chemistry for Engineers (1)3
CHEM 151LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
ENGR 160Engineering Concepts3
ENGR 164Engineering Design3
TCC 101Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102Calculus II4
PHYS 142EGeneral Physics I4
CS 101Intro to Computer Science3
CHEM 152Intro Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 152LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
18
Third Semester
APMA 205Calculus III4
ENGR 2xxCore Elective (2)3
ENGR 2xxCore Elective3
PHYS 241EGeneral Physics II3
PHYS 241LGeneral Physics Lab I1
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206Differential Equations I4
CHE 215Material & Energy Balances3
CHEM 212Intro Organic Chemistry3
CHEM 212LIntro Organic Chemistry Lab1
ENGR 202Thermodynamics3
TCC 2xxHumanities Elective3
 
Total
17
Fifth Semester
CHE 316Chemistry Thermodynamics3
CHE 321 Transport Processes I4
CHEM 361Physical Chemistry I3
CHEM 371Physical Chemistry Lab3
 Unrestricted Elective3
 
Total
16
Sixth Semester
CHE 318Chemical Reaction Engineering3
CHE 322Transport Processes II4
CHE 398Chemical Engineering Lab I3
CHEM 362Physical Chemistry II3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
16
Seventh Semester
TCC 401Western Technology & Culture3
CHE 475Chemical Process Simulation3
CHE 438Process Modelling Dynamics & Control3
CHE 491Chemical Engineering Lab II3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
18
Eighth Semester
TCC 402The Engineer in Society3
CHE 476Chemical Engineering Design4
 Technical Elective3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Technical Elective3
 
Total
16

135 Credits -- minimum required for graduation.

  1. Qualified students may take CHEM 161, 162 sequence in place of CHEM 151, 152.
  2. Core electives are selected from ENGR 203, 205, 207, 208, 209 and 306; with ENGR 209 recommended as one of them.
  3. Technical electives should be courses in engineering, mathematics, or natural sciences chosen in consultation with the advisor. Two technical electives must be selected from CHE 442, 447, 449 and 625. One technical elective must be an advanced chemistry course chosen from a list available in the department.


Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Civil engineering is the application of science and technology to the planning, design, analysis, construction, operation, and maintenance of the physical facilities required by society. Typical civil engineering projects include environmental and sanitary facilities, such as water treatment plants, storm water networks and waste water treatment; structures, such as high-rise buildings, bridges and dams; and transportation facilities, such as airports, highways and rail. Civil engineering has a long history and a bright future because it serves the basic needs of society.

Upon completion of the B.S. degree in civil engineering, graduates have many options. The first is employment with consulting firms, local, state or federal government, contractors or construction firms, public utilities or industrial corporations. A second option is graduate school to pursue an area of specialty within civil engineering. Some graduates enter other fields because a civil engineering education is a good background for professional training in law, business administration, and medicine, or to enter sales or management positions.

In recognition of the broad scope of civil engineering practice and the diversity of knowledge required, the undergraduate program is carefully balanced to prepare for immediate employment upon graduation or for advanced graduate studies in civil engineering or other professional fields. During the first two years, the program consists primarily of courses in mathematics, science, computers, engineering science and humanities. During the third and fourth years, each student completes a broad array of basic civil engineering courses that provide a contemporary introduction to the profession. Required courses in the fifth semester include fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, engineering materials and engineering systems analysis. Civil engineering courses in the sixth through eighth semesters are elective to give the student maximum flexibility to design a program of studies to meet academic objectives. These offerings comprise the three major areas of concentration in the department: structural engineering, environmental engineering, and transportation engineering. The program of studies is brought together in a capstone design course during the fourth year where students work in teams to solve interdisciplinary problems.

Civil Engineering Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101 Calculus I 4
CHEM 151 Intro Chemistry for Engineers 3
CHEM 151L Intro Chemistry Lab for Engineers 1
ENGR 160 Engineering Concepts 3
ENGR 164 Engineering Design 3
TCC 101 Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102 Calculus II 4
PHYS 142E General Physics I 4
CS 182 Intro FORTRAN or  
CS 101 Intro to Computer Science3
 Science Elective I (1)3/4
 General Education Elective (2)3
 
Total
17/18
Third Semester
APMA 205 Calculus III4
PHYS 241E General Physics II3
PHYS 241L General Physics Lab I1
ENGR 205 Solid Mechanics I3
 Core Course 3
 General Education Elective (2)3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206Differential Equations I4
 Science Elective II (1)4
ENGR 306Solid Mechanics II3
ENGR 207Dynamics3
TCC 2xxHumanities Elective3
 
Total
17
Fifth Semester
CE 315/365 Fluid Mechanics/Lab 4
CE 319 Structural Mechanics 3
APMA 310 Probability 3
CE 341 Engineering Systems Analysis 3
CE 323/363 Prop & Behavior of Materials/Lab4
 
Total
17
Sixth Semester
CE 3xx Civil Engineering Elective (3)3
CE 3xx Civil Engineering Elective (3)3
CE 3xx Civil Engineering Elective (3)3
 Civil Engineering Elective (3)3
 Civil Engineering Lab Credits2
 General Education Elective (2) 3
 
Total
17
Seventh Semester
TCC 401 Western Technology & Culture3
CE 470 Civil Engineering Design I2
CE Civil Engineering Elective (3) 3
CE Civil Engineering Elective (3)3
 Technical Elective (4) 3
 General Education Elective (2)3
 
Total
17
Eighth Semester
TCC 402 The Engineer in Society3
CE 472 Civil Engineering Design II2
CE Civil Engineering Elective (3)3
CE Civil Engineering Elective (3) 3
 Technical Elective (4)3
 General Education Elective (2) 3
 
Total
17
136 Credits -- minimum required for graduation.

  1. Suitable Science Electives include CHEM 152, 152L, BIOL 201, MSE 102, PHYS 242E, CHEM 212, EVSC 280/280L, and BIOL 202.
  2. One (3 credit) General Education Elective may be replaced by an "unrestricted" elective with the approval of the advisor.
  3. Approved CE Electives include all 300- and 400-level Civil Engineering courses.
  4. Any CE Elective or Approved Technical Elective will satisfy this requirement. Typical courses include advanced courses in mathematics, environmental science, and systems engineering.


Computer Science

Through the development of sophisticated computer systems, processors and embedded applications, computer scientists have the opportunity to change society in ways unimagined a generation ago. The goal of the Department of Computer Science is the education and training of students who can take part in, and indeed lead, the current information and technological revolution. Specifically, we feel that it is appropriate that our graduates be oriented toward the pragmatic, "engineering" aspects of computer science. Good engineering is rooted in solid mathematics and science, and a grounding in these fundamentals is essential for our students. This early grounding, provided in the context of the practice of computing, forms the basis for an education far better preparing students for a computing career.

As a discipline, computer science has seen many dramatic changes in its brief history. Traditional programming instruction emphasizes writing short programs from scratch, in a dead language. This emphasis is in contrast to the skills needed by a contemporary computing professional. With funding from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Computer Science has undertaken to design, develop and disseminate a new curriculum focused on the practice   of computing, yet grounded in the mathematical and scientific fundamentals of computer science. The curriculum is structured around the introduction of modern software development techniques in the very beginning courses, and the curriculum is supported by a coordinated set of "closed laboratories."

In order to provide an environment appropriate to our courses, we have established two laboratories with a Total of 50 workstations. These machines have high resolution graphics and are connected to large file handlers as well as the University network. The lab courses are intended to expose students to many commercial software tools and systems. The courses currently introduce modern software development techniques via object-oriented design and implementation in C++.

Transfer   Students in the College of Arts and Sciences with an interest in majoring in computer science may spend two years in the College of Arts and Sciences, taking a rigorous program in mathematics and the sciences, and then transfer to the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and receive a Bachelor of Computer Science degree after completing two years in a computer science curriculum. (Note, however, that the School of Engineering and Applied Science expects a minimum of 68 credits in the first two years instead of 60 credits which is customary in the College of Arts and Sciences. The extra eight credits are often completed through summer courses.) Detailed information on curriculum requirements may be obtained from the Office of the Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Minor   We regard 18 credits of computer science courses as a satisfactory minor. These courses include CS 101, CS 201, CS 202, CS 216, CS 308, and CS 340.

Computer Science Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101 Calculus I 4
CHEM 151E Intro Chemistry for Engineers 3
CHEM 151LIntro Chemistry Lab1
ENGR 160 Engineering Concepts 3
ENGR 164 Engineering Design 3
TCC 101 Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102 Calculus II 4
PHYS 142E General Physics I 4
CS 101 Intro to Computer Science3
 Science Elective* 3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
17
Third Semester
APMA 205 Calculus III 4
PHYS 241E General Physics II3
PHYS 241L Physics Lab1
CS 201 Software Development Methods3
ENGR Core Elective3
CS 202 Discrete Math I3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206Differential Equations 4
CS 216Program & Data Representation3
ENGR 208Digital Logic Design3
CS 302Discrete Math II 3
TCC 2xxHumanities Elective 3
 
Total
16
Fifth Semester
CS 308Computer Architecture3
APMA 310Probability 3
CSComputer Science Elective3
 General Education Elective 3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
15
Sixth Semester
CS 340 Advanced Software Development4
CS 332 Algorithms 3
APMA 308Linear Algebra3
 General Education Elective3
 Technical Elective3
 
Total
16
Seventh Semester
TCC 401 Western Technology & Culture3
CS 491 Senior Seminar I1
EE 435 Computer Organization & Design4
CS Computer Science Elective3
CS Computer Science Elective3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Eighth Semester
TCC 402 The Engineer in Society3
CS 492 Senior Seminar II1
CS Computer Science Elective3
CS Computer Science Elective3
 Technical Elective3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
16

131 credits are the minimum required for the degree in Computer Science.

  1. Up to six credits of general education electives may be replaced with unrestricted electives.
  2. ROTC students can count up to six credits of ROTC courses as unrestricted electives.
* First Year students should select from CHEM 152, BIOL 201, BIOL 202, or MS 102 for their science elective.