Curricula

| Aerospace Engineering | Applied Mathematics | Biomedical Engineering | Chemical Engineering |
| Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics | Computer Science | Electrical Engineering |
| Engineering Science | Materials Science and Engineering | Mechanical Engineering |
| Systems Engineering | Division of Technology, Culture, and Communication |


Electrical Engineering

Many specific technologies of modern civilization are studied as electrical engineering. Digital computers, communication and control systems, electronic devices and instrumentation systems are examples. Electrical equipment is widely used in service and consumer products, and we supply much of our controlled energy in electrical form.

A student can use the elective program in Electrical Engineering to focus learning on a particular interest such as computer engineering, control systems, communication systems, or solid state devices.
Electrical Engineering Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101Calculus I 4
CHEM 151Intro Chemistry for Engineers 3
CHEM 151LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers 1
ENGR 160Engineering Concepts3
ENGR 164Engineering Design 3
TCC 101Humanities 3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102 Calculus II 4
PHYS 142E General Physics I4
CS 101 Intro to Computer Science3
 Science Elective I 3/4
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17/18
Third Semester
APMA 205 Calculus III 4
PHYS 241E General Physics II 3
PHYS 241L General Physics Lab I 1
ENGR 203 Electrical Science3
CS 201 Software Development Methods3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206Differential Equations I4
PHYS 242EGeneral Physics III 3
PHYS 242LGeneral Physics Lab II 1
EE 204Electical Circuits I4
ENGR 208Digital Logic Design 3
TCC 2xxHumanities Elective3
 
Total
18
Fifth Semester
EE 307Electrical Circuits II 4
EE 309Electromagnetic Fields3
EE 323Signals & Systems I3
EE 335Microcomputers4
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
17
Sixth Semester
EE 303Solid State Devices3
EE 310Energy Conversion4
EE 324Signals & Systems II 3
APMA 310Probability3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
16
Seventh Semester
TCC 401Humanities 3
EEElectrical Engineering Elective3
EE Lab Elective 1 1/2
EEElectrical Engineering Elective3
ENGR 202 Thermodynamics 3
 Electrical Engineering Elective3
 
Total
16 1/2
Eighth Semester
TCC 402Humanities 3
EE Electrical Engineering Elective3
EELab Elective1 1/2
EE/CSElectrical Engr/Computer Science Elective3
 Technical Elective 3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
16 1/2

135 or 136 credits -- minimum required for graduation

  1. One general education elective may be replaced by an unrestricted elective.
  2. A course in economics is required.
  3. Check with the EE office for a list of CS courses which are approved for the EE/CS elective.
  4. EE electives are to be chosen, from a list maintained by the department, such that design content requirements are satisfied.
  5. The Science I Elective is to be selected from CHEM 152, MSE 102 or BIOL 201.
  6. At least two of the General Education courses must be in the same subject area.
  7. The Technical Elective should be an upper division course in science, mathematics, or engineering.
  8. Concentration areas - Students must choose electives so that at least two courses and a lab are within a single area of concentration, and at least one course is taken in one other area of concentration. The four areas of concentration available are (1) Applied Electrophysics, (2) Computer Engineering, (3) Communications and Signal Processing, and (4) Controls and Robotics. A list of which elective courses will fulfill the requirements of each concentration may be obtained from the EE Department.


Engineering Science

The Engineering Science Program offers the engineering student an opportunity to select a program of studies to meet special academic interests which do not fall within the other engineering degree programs offered at the University of Virginia. Students select Engineering Science to prepare for special areas in Engineering and Applied Science, such as Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Medical School, and Engineering Physics. In addition students may wish to obtain a broad engineering/science background as preparation for work in non-engineering fields (e.g., teaching, business, etc.). Because of the flexibility of this program in the last two years, it is also an ideal program for students wishing to enter the Bachelor's/Master's program at Virginia.

The Engineering Science student in collaboration with his or her advisor are expected to develop a meaningful degree program. Materials Science and Engineering and Biomedical Engineering programs both developed recommended courses for the technical electives to lead to undergraduate degrees in these areas. Those courses for the option in Materials Science and Engineering are described in a later section and can lead to careers in Material Science with a B.S. or preparation for graduate work. Engineering Science students who follow the Biomedical Engineering track choose from among four options: a Pre-Med course of studies, or a course of studies that in addition to Biomedical Engineering includes Electrical, Mechanical or Chemical Engineering as an area of concentration. Their program of studies should be such that at the end of four years a substantial part of the course requirements in their chosen area of concentration will have been covered, in addition to the Pre-Med or Biomedical Engineering courses that they will have taken.

Engineering Science Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101Calculus I 4
CHEM 151Intro Chemistry for Engineers 3
CHEM 151LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers 1
ENGR 160Engineering Concepts3
ENGR 164Engineering Design3
TCC 101Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102Calculus II 4
PHYS 142EGeneral Physics I4
CS 182Intro FORTRAN or 
CS 101Intro to Computer Science3
CHEM 152Intro Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 152LIntro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
18
Third Semester
APMA 205 Calculus III 4
PHYS 241E General Physics II3
PHYS 241L General Physics Lab I1
ENGR 203 Electrical Science3
ENGR 202 Thermodynamics3
 General Education Elective (2)3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206 Differential Equations I 4
PHYS 242E General Physics III 3
PHYS 242L General Physics Lab II 1
ENGR 2xx Core Elective 3
 Technical Elective (3)3
TCC 2xx Humanities Elective3
 
Total
17
Fifth Semester
APMA Advanced Math (4)3
 Advanced Natural Science (5)3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Lab Elective (6) 2
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Sixth Semester
APMA/CS Advanced Math/Computer Sci 3
 Advanced Natural Science3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Lab Elective1
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
16
Seventh Semester
TCC 401 Western Technology & Culture3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Advanced Project (7)3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
15
Eighth Semester
TCC 402 The Engineer in Society3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Technical Elective (3)3
 Advanced Project (7)3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
15

132 credits -- minimum required for graduation.

  1. Electives in an approved plan of study, which constitutes a "learning contract" between the student and the school, will be selected such as to form a coherent whole for a broad-based education in engineering science.
  2. One or two general education electives may be replaced by unrestricted electives.
  3. Technical electives should be chosen from ENGR 2xx, CHEM 241, 242, 271, 272, or other 300-level (or above) technical courses appropriate to the student's program of study. At least two of the technical electives must be 400-level (or above) courses in the School of Engineering and Applied Science.
  4. The program must include two advanced math courses, 300-level or above, or one advanced math course and a computer science course beyond the level of CS 182/101.
  5. Advanced sciences are 300-level or above courses in physics, chemistry, and/or biology, materials science, and/or environmental sciences.
  6. Laboratory electives must be an advanced lab.
  7. Students are expected to define a project to be completed in the fourth year.

Materials Science and Engineering

The undergraduate student may obtain a degree in Materials Science within the framework of the Engineering Science Program. The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a selection of undergraduate courses specifically designed to provide a fundamental background in the structure, properties, processing and performance of materials which is essential to engineers or scientists for understanding the selection of materials for various applications. The Department encourages students to consider the field of materials science and engineering a challenging new field in engineering. In the Materials Science Program, the student may select from a range of basic Materials courses. Two courses are offered which provide a broad background in Materials Science and Engineering, a science elective, MSE 102: Introduction to the Science of Engineering Materials, which develops the terminology and scientific foundation necessary for understanding the behavior of metals, polymers, and ceramics, and an engineering core course, ENGR 209: Materials Science for Engineers. More advanced courses are available to provide the student with modern and classical aspects of corrosion, as well as specific structure-property relationships for various classes of materials such as alloys and polymers. Several laboratory sections introduce the student to typical experimental techniques for characterizing materials and their properties. Qualified Students may also take graduate 600-level courses in Materials Science and Engineering with the approval of the instructor. A general materials course which emphasizes the relationship of materials technology to modern society is offered each semester for students of all disciplines, MSE 201 (EVSC 201).

The Department provides a broad based graduate education in materials, one component of which emphasizes the commonality among the various classes of engineering solids. Thus thermodynamics, kinetics, structural analysis and crystallography, defect theory and principles of the solid state are strong features of our program. In addition, other courses relative to the application of materials and the relationships among materials properties, structure and the manner in which materials have been processed are also offered. Extensive research programs complement formal course work. Active recent programs on polymers, environmental effects on material behavior, electronic materials, analytical electron microscopy, solid state phase transformations, fatigue and fracture, tribology, composite materials and materials processing reflect the diversity of the faculty's research interests. In addition, the Department houses the Center for Light Metals which oversees a variety of research on A1, Mg and Ti alloys and composites containing these metals, and the related Center for Light Thermal Structures, which conducts interdisciplinary research among five departments, and the Center for Electrochemical Sciences and Engineering, a VCIT Center.

The graduate program consists of regular graduate courses and thesis research. While a few courses are considered fundamental, there is great flexibility in allowing a student to adapt his or her choice of courses according to his or her particular field of interest and specialization. Major emphasis is placed on acquisition of knowledge and understanding by the student, rather than on passing a certain number of courses. The Master of Materials Science and Engineering, the Master of Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered.


Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest of the engineering disciplines, providing opportunities for employment in industry, business, government, research and education. The mechanical engineer is often concerned with the development of machines and systems for diverse applications in the modern technological society. His or her talents and interests include those required to plan, analyze, design and develop systems. The practice of mechanical engineering is often applied to manufacturing, energy conversion, transportation, construction and environmental control. In the future mechanical engineers must provide leadership in establishing new sources of power and developing new methods to accomplish societal demands.

The curriculum begins with the study of chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science and general engineering courses. As the students progress, they are able to undertake advanced analysis, design and laboratory courses related to mechanical and thermal systems. One-fourth of the program is in the humanities and social sciences, which broaden the student's education and assist in developing communication and leadership skills.

An option in Nuclear engineering, including up to three nuclear engineering courses, is offered to undergraduate mechanical engineering students.

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101 Calculus I 4
CHEM 151 Intro Chemistry for Engineers 3
CHEM 151L Intro Chemistry Lab for Engineers.1
ENGR 160 Engineering Concepts 3
ENGR 164 Engineering Design 3
TCC 101 Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102 Calculus II 4
PHYS 142E General Physics I 4
CS 182 Intro FORTRAN 3
CHEM 152 Intro Chemistry for Engineers 3
CHEM 152L Intro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
18
Third Semester
APMA 205 Calculus III4
PHYS 241E General Physics II3
PHYS 241L General Physics Lab I 1
ENGR 205 Solid Mechanics I 3
ENGR 203 Electrical Science 3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206 Differential Equations I 4
PHYS 242E General Physics III 3
PHYS 242L General Physics Lab II 1
ENGR 202 Thermodynamics3
ME 242 Kinematics & Dynamics of Machinery3
TCC 2xx Humanities Elective3
 
Total
17
Fifth Semester
ME 302 Fluid Mechanics3
ENGR 207 Dynamics3
ENGR 306 Solid Mechanics II 3
ME 323 Thermal Systems Analysis3
ME 383 Experimental Methods Lab2
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Sixth Semester
APMA 341 Differential Equations II 3
ME 339 Materials3
ME 329 Elements of Heat & Mass Transfer3
ME 346 Elements of Mechanical Design 3
ME 384 Applied Engineering Lab2
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Seventh Semester
TCC 401 Western Technology & Culture3
ME 471 Digital Instrumentation 2
ME 488 Senior Mechanical Engineering Lab 2
ME 445 Automatic Controls 3
ME 431/447 Design I Elective3
 Technical Elective3
 
Total
16
Eighth Semester
TCC 402 The Engineer in Society3
ME 450 Financial Engineering3
ME 472 Electromechanical Systems2
ME 432/448 Design II Elective3
 Technical Elective3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
17

136 credits -- minimum number required for graduation. 16 Design Credits required for graduation.

  1. One general education elective may be replaced by an approved unrestricted elective.
  2. AE 305 may be substituted for ME 302.
  3. The sixth semester general education elective and an eighth semester technical elective may be interchanged.
  4. A year-long design sequence ME 431/432 or ME 447/448 is required as a design elective in the fourth year.
  5. ME 484/485 are recommended but not required for students completing undergraduate theses in Mechanical Engineering.


Systems Engineering

The Department offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in Systems Engineering. The principal objective of the undergraduate program is to prepare men and women with the technical skill, intellectual balance, and humane perspective required to pursue professional careers and advanced studies in systems engineering. This demands not only a thorough understanding of the engineering fundamentals of systems analysis, design, and control, but also training in economics, behavioral science, and decision-making.

Systems engineering seeks comprehensive solutions to complex problems which require the integration of technological, organizational, behavioral, human and economic factors. Our students are expected to develop the full range of problem-solving, decision-making, and design skills needed to participate successfully in these activities. The undergraduate program in Systems Engineering is designed with these considerations in mind.

The interdisciplinary nature of systems engineering precludes a narrow educational experience. For this reason, our undergraduate curriculum is more flexible than many traditional engineering programs. In addition to required courses, 12 credits of general education electives, nine credits of applications electives and three credits of technical electives are available to the student. Each student normally is expected to structure his or her elective course work into two elective sequences.

Appropriate humanities sequences include economics, psychology, political science, philosophy, religion, history, literature, fine arts, sociology, anthropology, and foreign languages. Appropriate applications sequences include biomedical systems, communication systems, computer and information systems, control systems, economic systems, environmental and water-resource systems, management systems, manufacturing systems, mathematical systems, and transportation and land-use systems. An appropriate sequence of ROTC courses may be counted as an application area in military systems and students with special interests and abilities can design their own application sequences.

The undergraduate program culminates in a capstone design project, spanning both the fall and spring semesters of the fourth year. Each project matches a small team of students with a client from the private or public sectors. Students work with the client, under the direction of an individual faculty member, toward the resolution of an actual, open-ended design problem.

The undergraduate program leads to the Bachelor of Science in Systems Engineering. The program is accredited as a nontraditional engineering program by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology and received the Board's first Award for Curricular Innovation. Because of the overwhelming student demand for the major in recent years, enrollments in the program are limited. Further information about the undergraduate and graduate programs is available in the Department office in Olsson 112.

Systems Engineering Curriculum
First Semester
APMA 101 Calculus I 4
CHEM 151 Intro Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 151L Intro Chemistry Lab for Engineers1
ENGR 160 Engineering Concepts3
ENGR 164 Engineering Design3
TCC 101 Language Comm & Technical Society3
 
Total
17
Second Semester
APMA 102 Calculus II4
PHYS 142E General Physics I4
CS 101 Intro to Computer Science 3
 Science Elective I3
 General Education Elective3
 
Total
17
Third Semester
APMA 205Calculus III 4
PHYS 241E General Physics II 3
PHYS 241L General Physics Lab I 1
ENGR 202 Thermodynamics 3
ENGR 2xx Core Elective 3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206 Differential Equations I 4
 Science Elective II4
ENGR 203 Elective Science3
CS 201 Software Development Methods3
TCC 2xx Humanities Elective3
 
Total
17
Fifth Semester
APMA 310Probability3
SYS 301 Design of Engineering Systems4
SYS 321 Operations Research 3
SYS 323 Computational or 3
 General Education Elective 3
 
Total
16
Sixth Semester
APMA 312 Statistics3
SYS 360 Probabilistic Systems4
SYS 362 Discrete Event Simulation4
 General Education Elective 3
 Application Elective3
 
Total
17
Seventh Semester
TCC 401 Western Technology & Culture3
SYS 421 Intelligent Decision Systems4
SYS 453 Systems Design I4
 Technical Elective 3
 Application Elective3
 
Total
17
Eighth Semester
TCC 402The Engineer in Society3
SYS 401 Decision Theory4
SYS 434 Production & Service Systems4
SYS 454 Systems Design II 4
 Application Elective 3
 
Total
18

136 credits -- minimum required for graduation.

  1. Suitable science electives are CHEM 152, 152L, BIOL 201/203, BIOL 202/204, EVSC 280/280L, PHYS 242E/242L, and MSE 102. MSE 102 can be used as Science I elective only.
  2. Suitable core electives are ENGR 205, 207, 208, 209 and 306. ENGR 208 is recommended. Credit cannot be received for both MSE 102 and ENGR 209.
  3. Six to twelve credits of general education electives should be selected in a related subject area of humanities and social sciences. This sequence must contain advanced as well as introductory materials. Suitable sequences include economics, psychology, political science, philosophy, religion, history, literature, fine arts, sociology, anthropology and foreign language.
  4. Nine credits of applications electives should be selected in a related applications area of systems engineering. Appropriate sequences include biomedical systems, communication systems, computer and information systems, control systems, economic systems, environmental and water resource systems, management systems, manufacturing systems, mathematical systems, military systems (ROTC), and transportation land-use systems.
  5. A three-credit technical elective must be selected at the 300-level or higher from within SEAS.


Division of Technology, Culture, and Communication

The Division of Technology, Culture, and Communication provides instruction in various studies essential to the professional development of a future engineer or applied scientist. Most prominent of these are skills in oral and written communication, developed through written as well as audio-visual media, and an understanding of the social, historical, esthetic, and ethical dimensions of technology.

In addition to the prescribed first- and fourth-year courses (TCC 101, TCC 401-402), required of all School of Engineering and Applied Sciences undergraduates, the division offers an array of 200-level courses from which each student must choose at least one, and additional elective courses on a 300-level. These courses deal with the relations between technology and human needs and aspirations as these are interpreted by disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. They also require extensive written and oral work.

The work of the Division supplements, on the one hand, the student's general education (furthered by course work in the College of Arts and Sciences) and, on the other, his or her technical studies. It guarantees that students will have seriously considered the moral, social, and environmental consequences of their future life's work.

Graduate courses include seminars in science and society (TCC 501) and advanced scientific writing (TCC 502 and TCC 600).

Minor in the History of Technology and Science  While not offering a major, the Division of Technology, Culture, and Communication does offer, in conjunction with the History Department, a minor in the history of technology and science. Open to all undergraduates, this minor provides students with an opportunity to become familiar with humanistic perspectives on technology and science. For the engineering student, the minor offers an occasion for placing their professional education in a larger social and intellectual context; likewise, it provides the liberal arts student with a better understanding of science and technology as key components in human culture.

Requirements for Minor in the History of Science and Technology  The minor consists of 18 credits with courses selected from the following groups.

Group A -- Select three of the following courses, one of which must be a history course, and another which must be a TCC course:
HIEU 332 The Scientific Revolution, 1450-1700
HIEU 377 Science in the Modern World
HIUS 340 Development of American Science
TCC 210 Technology and Social Change in Nineteenth Century America
TCC 312 History of Technology and Invention
PHIL 245 Philosophy and History of Science
Group B -- Select one of the following courses:
HIUS 341 American Business
HIUS 345, 346 History of Urban America
HIUS 357, 358 Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States
HIEU 379 Intellectual History of Modern Europe
HIEU 380 Origins of Contemporary Thought
Group C -- Select one of the following courses:
TCC 201 Thomas Jefferson's interest in Science and Technology
TCC 203Man and Machine
TCC 204 Technology, Aggression, and Peace
TCC 207 Utopias and the Technological Society
TCC 208 History of Flight
TCC 212 Religion and Technology
HIEU 577 History of Modern Science
ARCH 518P History of Modern Technology, 1870-1920

In addition, students must select one additional course from any of the courses listed in groups A, B, and C.

At least one course in Group C will serve as a capstone course in which the student will synthesize what he or she has learned about the history of science and technology by preparing one or more special writing assignments. Consequently, when taking one of the courses in Group C, students must simultaneously enroll in TCC 301 for one credit hour. The purpose of enrolling for this additional course will be to give credit for the extra work that the writing assignments will entail. TCC 301 is not required if the student elects to take HIEU 577 to satisfy the Group C requirement. TCC 301 is also not required to be taken in conjunction with TCC 210 which is a Group A course.

College students may include the non-College courses as general elective credit upon completion of the requirements for the minor.

Additional Information  For more information, contact the

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Corcoran Department of History
Randall Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-7146