Program in Medieval Studies

Overview   Every period in history is better illuminated and better known by making use of evidence from research in different fields, than if it were studied solely from the point of view of a single discipline. People of the past, after all, did not live their lives according to the departmental divisions of a modern university. Medieval studies, particularly in the last half century, have benefited enormously from this interdisciplinary approach. Work, for example, in family history, genealogy, women's studies, folk-lore, anthropology, archaeology, religious and intellectual history, textual criticism, iconography, linguistic analysis and statistical research has advanced and deepened our knowledge of the highways and byways of the period.

Faculty   At the University of Virginia, a strong program in teaching and research is supported by more than thirty-five faculty members who offer upwards of eighty courses on medieval topics in the departments of history, classics, religious studies, philosophy, English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, art history, music, and government; the University libraries have significant holdings of printed works in the primary and secondary sources; and the Medieval Circle at the University, founded in 1968 as a forum for the discussion of current topics and of research in progress, is flourishing in its twenty-fifth year.

Students   For the able and interested student, the major provides a way of pursuing medieval studies free of existing departmental requirements, a program of language study within the field, a sound training for graduate work, and a chance to share knowledge and opinions with other scholars on the incunabulum period of western civilization. Moreover, by its comprehensive structure, it promotes cordiality, collegiality, and an exchange of views across departmental lines.

The major in Medieval Studies, because it helps to develop and refine powers of criticism and imagination, and because it encourages, through practice, the ability to think and write with clarity and precision, furnishes the skills necessary to succeed in a wide variety of vocational fields. The administrative responsibility of the major rests with an interdepartmental committee appointed by the Dean of the College and chaired by Professor Everett U. Crosby in the Department of History.

Requirements for Major   The major is open to all qualified students in the College. Competence in a modern foreign language at the level of a second-year course, or better, will be expected.

Requirements for graduation from the major are:

  1. Thirty credits in courses approved by the student's advisor with passing grades, with at least a 2.0 GPA, distributed over the following fields of study:
  2. The satisfactory completion of Latin 201-202, or the equivalent.
  3. A senior essay on an approved subject and written under the supervision of a member of the faculty to be submitted to the chair of the committee in the spring of the final year (6 credits).
The problems inherent in an interdisciplinary major, that the student faces sources and methods in different fields, and that the work must be organized on the basis of courses selected from a vast array, can be dealt with to a large extent by fitting the program to each student's abilities and needs through individual consultation, by work in seminar, and by careful supervision of the senior essay, which is designed to furnish a measure of coherence in the student's view of the period.

The major may be combined with another departmental program as a double major, or it may be taken as a minor subject provided at least 18 credits are in medieval courses approved by the student's advisor.

Additional Information For more information, contact:

Everett Crosby
Chair of the Department
Department of Medieval Studies
220 Randall Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-6407


Courses

MSP 308 - (3) (Y)
Colloquium in Medieval Studies
Discussion and criticism of selected works of and on the period. Taught by different members of the medieval faculty.

MSP 480 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Medieval Studies
A course for advanced students dealing with methods of research in the field. Taught by different members of the medieval faculty.


Basic Courses

AR H 101 - (3) (Y)
Ancient and Medieval Architecture

ARTH 221 - (3) (Y)
Early Christian and Byzantine Art

ARTH 222 - (3) (Y)
Medieval Art in Western Europe

ARTH 231 - (3) (Y)
Italian Renaissance Art

CLAS 202 - (3) (Y)
Roman Civilization

HIEU 206 - (3) (Y)
The Birth of Europe

HIEU 211 - (3) (Y)
England to 1688

HIME 201 - (3) (Y)
History of the Islamic Middle East, 570-1300

HISA 202 - (3) (IR)
History and Civilization of Medieval India

ITTR 226 - (3) (S)
Dante in Translation

ITTR 227 - (3) (IR)
Petrarch in Translation

ITTR 228 - (3) (E)
Boccaccio in Translation

PHIL 111 - (3) (Y)
Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

RELC 205, 206 - (3) (Y)
History of Christianity

RELC 233 - (3) (E)
Christian Social and Political Thought I

RELC 246 - (3) (Y)
Aspects of Catholic Tradition

RELI 207 - (3) (Y)
Classical Islam


Advanced Courses

ARTH 316 - (3) (IR)
Roman Architecture

ARTH 333 - (3) (IR)
Renaissance Art and Literature

ARTH 516 - (3) (IR)
Roman Architecture

ARTH 518 - (3) (IR)
Roman Imperial Art and Architecture I

ARTH 519 - (3) (IR)
Roman Imperial Art and Architecture II

ARTH 522 - (3) (IR)
Byzantine Art

ARTH 533 - (3) (IR)
Italian Fifteenth Century Painting I

ARTH 537 - (3) (IR)
Italian Renaissance Sculpture I

ARTH 541 - (3) (IR)
Northern Art of the Fifteenth Century

CLAS 314 - (3) (E)
Age of Augustine

ENMD 311, 312 - (3) (Y)
Medieval European Literature in Translation

ENMD 325, 326 - (3) (Y)
Chaucer I, II

ENMD 481, 482 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature I, II

ENMD 501 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Old English

ENMD 505, 506 - (3) (IR)
Old Icelandic

ENMD 520 - (3) (Y)]
Beowulf

FREN 341 - (3) (Y)
Literature of the Middle Ages and 16th Century

FREN 401 - (3) (Y)
Literature of the Middle Ages

FREN 402 - (3) (IR)
Renaissance Literature

FREN 508 - (3) (SI)
Introduction to Reading Old French

FREN 509 - (3) (SI)
Introduction to Old Provencal Language and Literature

FREN 510 - (3) (Y)
Medieval Literature in Modern French

FREN 520, 521 - (3) (Y)
Literature of the 16th Century

GERM 510 - (3) (IR)
Middle High German

GERM 512 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Lyric Poetry

GERM 514 - (3) (IR)
Arthurian Romance

GFPT 301 - (3) (Y)
Ancient and Medieval Political Thought

HIEU 311 - (3) (IR)
Early Medieval Civilization

HIEU 312 - (3) (IR)
Later Medieval Civilization

HIEU 313 - (3) (E)
The World of Charlemagne

HIEU 314 - (3) (IR)
Anglo-Saxon England

HIEU 315 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Iberia

HIEU 316 - (3) (IR)
Byzantine Civilization

HIEU 317 - (3) (IR)
Eastern Christianity

HIEU 318 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Christianity

HIEU 321 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Italy

HIEU 322 - (3) (IR)
Renaissance Culture

HIEU 323 - (3) (IR)
Age of Reformation: 1450-1650

HIEU 324 - (3) (IR)
The Religious Reformation

HIEU 328 - (3) (IR)
Tudor England

HIEU 332 - (3) (IR)
Scientific Revolution

HIEU 379 - (3) (IR)
History of Russia to 1700

HIEU 505 - (3) (IR)
History of the Roman Empire

HIEU 506 - (3) (IR)
Roman Imperialism

HIEU 510 - (3) (IR)
Early Christian Thought

HIEU 511 - (3) (O)
Medieval England: 1042-1216

HIEU 512 - (3) (O)
Medieval England: 1216-1399

HIEU 513 - (3) (IR)
Medieval France

HIEU 516 - (3) (E)
The Medieval Church

HIEU 517 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Society

HIEU 518 - (3) (IR)
Historians in the Middle Ages

HIEU 519 - (3) (IR)
War and Society in the Middle Ages

HIEU 521 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern Germany

HIEU 526 - (3) (IR)
Russian History to 1700

HIEU 527 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Society

HIEU 551 - (3) (IR)
Seminar on Early Christian Thought

ITAL 311 - (3) (S)
Renaissance Literature

ITAL 410 - (3) (E)
Medioevo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Middle Ages)

ITAL 420 - (3) (SI)
Umanesimo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Humanistic Period)

LATI 309 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Latin

LATI 310 - (3) (IR)
Vergil

LATI 311 - (3) (IR)
Ovid

LATI 502 - (3) (SI)
Latin Writings of the Roman Empire

LATI 503 - (6) (SI)
History of Medieval Latin Literature

LATI 505 - (6) (SI)
Latin Paleography

LATI 509 (3) (SI)
Roman Literary Criticism

LATI 516 - (3) (SI)
Vergil's Aeneid

LATI 520 - (3) (SI)
Ovid's Metamorphoses

LATI 522 - (3) SI)
Tacitus

LATI 528 (3) (SI)
Christian Latin Writings of the Empire

MUSI 101 - (3) (Y)
History of Music I, 1100-1750

MUSI 400 - (3) (E)
European Music to 1500

MUSI 500 - (3) (E)
Music History to 1500

PHIL 311 - (3) (E)
Plato

PHIL 312 - (3) (O)
Aristotle

PHIL 314 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Philosophy

PHIL 513 - (3) (O)
Topics in Medieval Philosophy

RELC 323 - (3) (IR)
Images of Christianity

RELC 324 - (3) (O)
Medieval Mysticism

RELC 325 - (3) (E)
Medieval Christianity

RELC 326 - (3) (Y)
The Reformation

RELC 538 - (3) (SI)
The Counter Reformation and the Council of Trent

RELC 551 - (3) (E)
Seminar in Early Christian Thought

RELG 305 - (3) (E)
Religions of Western Antiquity

RELI 311 - (3) (E)
Muhammad and the Qur'an

RELI 312 - (3) (O)
Sufism

SPAN 340 - (3) (Y)
Spanish Literature to 1700

SPAN 450 - (3) (E-O)
Spanish Literature From Middle Ages to Renaissance

Program in Middle East Studies

Overview   Due to the rise in commercial and cultural interaction with Middle East countries, interest in the Middle East-its languages, literature, culture, religions, histories, and peoples-is ever increasing. In order to meet these growing needs, the Middle East Studies Program, with its interdisciplinary approach, provides a unique opportunity to learn about the languages and peoples, literatures and cultures, religions and histories of the region from the Maghrib in the west to Afghanistan in the east. The program encompasses the study of Jewish, Christian, and Islamic civilizations from antiquity to the modern era as they struggle to retain their roots while coping with regional conflicts and the challenge of modernity.

Middle East Studies courses are offered in the departments of anthropology, art, Asian and Middle Eastern languages and cultures, French, government and foreign affairs, history, and religious studies. Moreover, Middle East Studies are of growing interest to students in the School of Law, the McIntire School of Commerce, the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Medicine, and the School of Nursing. There are four core fields of study in the Middle East Studies Program: 1) language(s), and literature(s); 2) government and foreign affairs; 3) history; 4) religious studies.

Language courses are available in Arabic, Biblical Hebrew, Persian, and occasionally Turkish. Non-language courses cover the history, literatures, religions, and civilizations of the areas extending from Morocco to Iran; the politics of the region; history of Islam; Islamic thought and culture; Middle Eastern literatures in translation; women's studies; mysticism; Judaism; relations between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Faculty   The faculty of the Middle East Studies Program are recognized scholars, researchers, and teachers with national and international reputations in their respective fields. Many hold positions in regional and national organizations in Middle East Studies. The faculty members are dedicated to their fields and to their students, making themselves easily accessible for consultation outside of the classroom.

Students   Students have the choice of majoring in Middle East Studies, minoring in it, or including it a s a dual major. The major is directed at preparing students for graduate study or professional fields involving Middle Eastern relations. Our undergraduates go on to graduate or professional schools, work in numerous governmental, federal, and congressional agencies,and some have joined the Peace Corps in Middle Eastern and North African countries, and are now serving as rural community development specialists, teachers in schools for the blind, and teachers of English as a Second Language.

Special Resources   Media Center/Language Laboratory: The language laboratory is used extensively to help students practice and reinforce their speaking and listening skills. The language laboratory is also available for student use outside of class time. Study Abroad: Students of Arabic may choose to apply for admission to the University of Virginia-Yarmouk University Summer Arabic Program. This study abroad program provides an opportunity to study intensive Arabic at the intermediate, upper intermediate, and advanced levels, in Irbid, Jordan, and to partake of a unique cultural experience. The program periodically receives grants from which it can offer fellowships to participants.

Requirements for Major   The major is open to all qualified students with a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Admission to the program is determined by the Chair and Coordinator of the Major on the basis of an interview and after review of the applicant's undergraduate record. One year of language instruction in any of the Middle Eastern languages (Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, or Turkish) is a corequisite for the major. Language courses completed beyond the first-year requirement may be counted toward the major.

A total of 36 credits is required distributed in the following manner:

  1. At least six courses (3 credits or more each) at the 200-level or higher in three of the four core fields of study: (a) language(s) and literature(s), (b) government and foreign affairs, (c) history, (d) religious studies.
  2. Five courses (15 credits) at the 200-level or higher in these or other areas related to the Middle East, but not necessarily in the core areas.
  3. Of the above requirements, at least three courses (9 credits or more) must be at the 300-level or higher.
  4. Completion of course MEST 496 (Majors Seminar).
Students in the major are expected to maintain a GPA of at least 2.5. Up to 12 credits toward the major will be accepted as transfer credit from other accredited institutions. Each individual case will be examined and approved by the Director of the Program in consultation with other faculty members in Middle East Studies.

Distinguished Majors Program   The Middle East Studies Program offers a DMP for qualified majors with the opportunity to pursue in-depth analysis of issues and topics related to the major. Students seeking admission to the DMP should have major and University GPA of 3.4 or above. Applicants will make their application to the DMP in the second semester of the second year, at the same time as they are declaring their majors. Notification of acceptance will be made in the fall of their third year. Students in the DMP are required to: (1) take courses to satisfy general major distribution rules for Middle East Studies; (2) take at least 12 credits at the 400- and 500-levels; and (3) write a thesis during the fourth year while enrolled in the thesis courses MEST 498 and MEST 499 (6 credits).

Students who successfully complete the requirements of the DMP will be evaluated according to the following rankings: distinction, high distinction, or highest distinction. Evaluations will be based upon quality of the thesis, overall work in major field of study, and overall College record.

Requirements for Minor   The requirements consist of 20 credits pertaining to the Middle East. The courses may include: (1) no more than nine credits pertaining to the Middle East in one discipline; (2) two semesters of Middle Eastern language not exceeding eight credits; and (3) at least three credits in a course at the 300-level or above.

Additional Information   For more information, contact:

Abdulaziz Sachedina
Director of the Middle East Studies Program
Cocke Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-6725
E-Mail aas@virginia.edu.


Courses

The following list includes courses which have content in Middle East Studies. Other courses may be substituted with the permission of the Director of the program.

Middle East Studies

MEST 101 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to the Middle East
A survey course dealing with the languages, literatures, cultures, religions, and histories of the area. An historical and topical examination of the different geographical regions covered in the Middle East.

MEST 496 (3) (Y)
Majors Seminar
Intended for Middle East Studies majors to be taken during their final year. An introduction to the study of Middle East as an interdisciplinary subject, utilizing methods in history and political science, anthropology and sociology, religion and literature.

MEST 498, 499 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Research


Languages

AMEL 493, 494 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures

AMTR 301 - (3) (IR)
Men and Women of Asia and the Middle East

AMTR 311/511 - (3) (IR)
Women and Middle Eastern Literatures

ARAB 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Arabic

ARAB 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Arabic

ARAB 225, 226 - (3) (IR)
Conversational Arabic

ARAB 227 - (3) (Y)
Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East

ARAB 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Literary Arabic

ARAB 323/523 - (3) (Y)
Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)

ARAB 324/524 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)

ARAB 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Arabic

ARAB 528 - (3) (SI)
The History of the Arabic Language

ARAB 583, 584 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Arabic Prose

ARAB 585 - (3) (Y)
Media Arabic (in Arabic)

ARAB 586 - (3) (Y)
Nineteenth Century Arabic Prose

ARAB 701 - (3) (Y)
Modern Arabic Fiction (in Arabic)

ARAB 702 - (3) (Y)
Modern Arabic Drama (in Arabic)

ARAB 703 - (3) (Y)
Modern Arabic Poetry (in Arabic)

ARAB 783 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Arabic/Islamic Texts (in Arabic)

ARAB 801, 802 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Arabic

ARTR 329/529 - (3) (Y)
Modern Arabic Literature in Translation

ARTR 339 - (3) (Y)
Love, Alienation and Politics in theContemporary Arabic Novel

PERS 101, 102 - (4) (E)
Introductory Persian

PERS 201, 202 - (4) (E)
Intermediate Persian

PERS 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Modern Persian Poetry-Prose/Fiction

PERS 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Persian

PERS 801, 802 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Persian

PETR 321, 521 - (3) (IR)
Classical Persian Literature in Translation

PETR 322, 522 - (3) (IR)
20th Century Persian Literature in Translation

RELJ 111, 112 - (4) (O)
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

TURK 521, 522 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to Turkish


History

HIME 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in Middle East History

HIME 201 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 570-ca. 1500

HIME 202 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 1550-Present

HIME 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in Middle East and North Africa History

HIME 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in Middle East History

HIME 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in Middle Eastern History


Religious Studies

RELC 328 - (3) (Y)
Eastern Christianity

Islam

RELI 207 - (3) (Y)
Classical Islam

RELI 208 - (3) (Y)
Islam in the Modern World

RELI 311 - (3) (E)
Muhammad and the Qur'an

RELI 312 - (3) (O)
Sufism

RELI 367 - (3) (E)
Religion and Politics in Islam

RELI 540 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Islamic Theology

RELI 540C (3) (IR)
War and Peace in Islamic Tradition: A Comparative Ethics Approach

RELI 540D - (3) (IR)
Islamic Fundamentalism

Judaism

RELJ 111, 112 - (4) (O)
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

RELJ 121 - (3) (Y)
Hebrew Scriptures

RELJ 201, 202 (3) (Y)
Advanced Readings in Biblical Hebrew

RELJ 203 - (3) (Y)
The Judaic Tradition

RELJ 301 - (3) (SI)
Modern Jewish Thought

RELJ 307 - (3) (E)
Modern Jewish Thought

RELJ 309 - (3) (E)
Israelite Prophecy

RELJ 322 - (3) (Y)
Judaism and Zionism

RELJ 330 - (3) (Y)
The Jewish Mystical Tradition

RELJ 331 - (3) (Y)
Jewish Law

RELJ 337 - (3) (Y)
Modern Movements in Judaism

RELJ 505 - (3) (SI)
Judaism in Antiquity

RELJ 529 - (3) (SI)
Seminar in Old Testament Studies


Government

GFCG 441 - (3) (Y)
Comparitive Politics in the Middle East and North Africa

GFCG 541 - (3) (Y)
Democracy in Islam

GFIR 465 - (3) (Y)
International Relations in the Middle East

GFIR 765 - (3) (Y)
Middle East in World Affairs


Anthropology

ANTH 282 - (3) (Y)
Rise of Civilizations

ANTH 384 - (3) (Y)
Near Eastern Archaeology

ANTH 583 - (3) (Y)
Archaeology of the Ancient Near East


History of Art

ARTH 221 - (3) (Y)
Early Christian and Byzantine Art

ARTH 263 - (3) (IR)
Art of the Islamic World

ARTH 491 - (3) (IR)
Antioch and the Roman Rast

ARTH 522 - (3) (IR)
Byzantine Art

McIntire Department of Music

Overview The Department of Music serves all students who have, or want to develop, a serious interest in music, as well as students who aspire to careers in music. Academic courses and performance instruction are available at all levels, from introductory courses or lessons, requiring no previous musical study, to advanced work for ambitious majors and graduate students.

The academic faculty includes historians, theorists, and composers. Academic courses address the historical development of music, relations between music and cultural contexts, and the specific concepts and materials of music. The Department offers a comprehensive program in Western European art music, as well as opportunities for study of computer music, jazz, and African music and other non-western traditions.

The performance faculty includes an orchestral conductor, a choral conductor, and several jazz musicians, along with artist/teachers for strings, brass, winds, percussion, piano, harp, guitar and voice. In addition to private lessons, instructors coach small ensembles and teach specialized courses such as jazz improvisation and vocal chamber music. The performance faculty contributes significantly to the cultural life of the University, performing frequently in faculty recitals and as principals in the orchestra.

The Department offers courses for non-majors ranging from an introduction to music, basic music theory, and keyboard skills, to special topics such as the history of jazz, orchestral music, Bach, Beethoven, and opera. Courses for majors cover the history and theory of European and American art music from 1500 to the present. We also offer courses in special topics such as performance practice, women and music, or musical aesthetics. Many courses have no prerequisites; courses at the 300 level and above require knowledge of music notation and may have other prerequisites.

Individual performance instruction for credit is available on all instruments and voice. Students receive academic credit for participation in faculty-directed ensembles, which include a fine symphony orchestra, a large chorus, a chamber choir, Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Collegium Musicum, New Music Ensemble, and ensembles for flute, double reeds, clarinets, saxophones, brass, percussion, strings, pianos, and jazz improvisation.

In addition there are numerous student-directed and community performance groups, including a chamber orchestra, Virginia Swing Orchestra, singing groups such as the Glee Club, Women's Chorus, Black Voices, and an Indonesian gamelan.

The Faculty The Department has outstanding faculty in music composition. The two senior composers have received numerous commissions as well as several awards from the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1995, the composition faculty will have a new member who has received major awards for her electronic music and also for her critical writing on electronic music, opera, and film sound.

The Department has an exceptionally strong faculty of active, innovative scholars. Members of the history and theory faculty have published influential articles in prominent journals such as the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Music Theory Spectrum, and Cambridge Opera Journal. Most have served as officers or committee members in major scholarly organizations such as the American Musicological Society and the Society for Music Theory, and they lecture frequently on their research at national and international scholarly meetings. Faculty members have held major fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the American Musicological Society.

The Department's scholars have been chosen to cover a broad range of musical repertory and interpretive approaches, including Renaissance and Baroque music, Italian opera, jazz, African music and ethnomusicology, recent American music, aesthetics, feminist criticism, and gender studies.

The Department has a fine performance faculty of over thirty members, experienced musicians trained at such institutions as Eastman, Yale, Boston Conservatory, and the Manhattan School of Music. The orchestral conductor was trained at Peabody Conservatory and subsequently studied with Leonard Bernstein and other outstanding teachers; his performances and recordings have earned many awards. The Department's two ensembles-in-residence have made commercial recordings and perform exciting concerts of traditional repertory and new compositions. The director of jazz performance has toured and recorded with Quincy Jones, Mel Torme, Bruce Hornsby and others, and has released a commercial recording of original compositions.

Students Usually there are about fifty music majors. Some will continue professionally in music, but many will have careers in other areas such as law or medicine. Many students combine a major in music with a major or minor in another Department.

Majors have extensive contact with faculty. Classes for the major are small, ranging from five to twenty-five students, and all are taught by faculty members. Consultation with the Chair of the Department or any other faculty member is readily available to all students.

Though the Department has no formal performance requirement for majors, almost all music majors choose to supplement their academic studies with musical performance in ensembles and/or individual instruction, for which scholarships are available.

Special Resources The Music Library is the largest in the commonwealth. It contains over 50,000 books and scores and 32,000 sound recordings. The collection has traditionally focussed on classical music, jazz, and folk music; recently it added an excellent collection of opera videos, and has begun to build up its popular music collection. Students may borrow recordings and videos as well as books and scores.

The Virginia Center for Computer Music, founded in 1988, is the region's most advanced facility for work in computer sound generation and related topics. In 1991, in recognition of its achievements, the program was awarded an Academic Enhancement Award by the University.

The Center offers multiple workstations for music composition and research applications. The Mac-based platforms are used primarily for MIDI-based work. Program environments include MAX, HMSL, and traditional sequencer and notation packages, used to drive synthesizers, digital effects processors, and samplers. These sound generators and effects processors include Yamaha, Roland, and Matrix units, and all are connected via patch bays to MIDI keyboard controllers. A NeXT network enables students to explore direct digital synthesis and manipulation of recorded sound using programs such as C-Sound, C-Mix, RtApp, and RtLisp. Both the Mac-based and NeXT systems have direct-to-disk recording capabilities and DAT decks for final mix.

Requirements for Major This program presents the study of music as one of the liberal arts. Students develop their understanding of music through analysis, compositional exercises, musicianship labs, and exploration of significant historical styles.

The 31 credits that constitute the major program are: MUSI 300, MUSI 301, MUSI 302, MUSI 303, MUSI 311, MUSI 331, MUSI 332, MUSI 431, and six additional credits at the 400-level or above. Although the major can be completed in two years, students are strongly encouraged to complete MUSI 300, MUSI 311 and MUSI 332 by the end of their second year.

No more than eight credits of musical performance may be counted toward the 120 credits required for graduation in the College.

Students interested in pursuing graduate study in music history, music theory, or composition should take a more intensive program that includes the 25 credits of required courses for the major, and adds the following:

  1. Advanced Musicianship and/or Conducting;
  2. Three courses (9 credits) in the following areas (at least one course from each area): History: European Music to 1500, Music Since 1945, Ethnomusicology, American Music, Slavic Music. Theory and Composition: Analysis, Modal Counterpoint, Tonal Counterpoint, Composition, Computer Music.
  3. Six additional credits at the 400-level or above in areas of particular interest to the student, or in special-topic courses such as MUSI 419/420 Studies in Musical Literature or MUSI 471/472 Music Seminar.
Students interested in pursuing a more intensive program in performance should take Advanced Musicianship, Chamber Ensemble, Analysis, and courses at the 400-level that have direct application to issues of performance (repertory classes, conducting, special-topic seminars). In addition, advanced performing students should perform a full recital in their fourth year.

All students declaring a major in music will be required to take a diagnostic test of basic musical skills, including the ability to read elementary keyboard music. Those students not meeting the requirements will be assigned remedial coursework within the department. Such coursework will not be counted toward the 31 credits required for the major.

Students who are majoring in music and who have had instrumental or vocal training should continue their studies by registering for MUSI 351 through 358, Performance. Enrollment in these courses requires permission of the Chair of the Department of Music. Majors are encouraged to participate in a curricular performing group, MUSI 360 through 369.

Distinguished Majors Program Superior students with a GPA of at least 3.4 who seek independent study culminating in a thesis, a composition or the performance of a full recital should apply for admission to the program no later than March 15 of the sixth semester. At that time the student should be nearing completion of requirements for the major. After a preliminary discussion with the undergraduate advisor, the student must submit a formal proposal to the departmental chair, to the advisor, and to the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the project. The Distinguished Majors Committee will inform the applicant of the decision by April 15. To complete the program, the student must complete all 31 credits required for the music major plus six additional credits of Independent Study, MUSI 493-494, resulting in an extended essay on some historical or theoretical topic, in a substantial musical composition, or in a recital performance. Three weeks prior to the last day of classes in the semester, the student shall submit the project for examination. After the committee has evaluated the quality of the project, the student's work in the program, in the major courses, and the overall scholastic accomplishment, it will recommend the degree with either no distinction, distinction, high distinction, or highest distinction. Recommendations for all forms of distinction will then be passed on to the Committee on Special Programs.

Additional Information For more information, contact:

Phyllis Hill
McIntire Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-3052
Music World Wide Web site
Music faculty


Courses

MUSI 101 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Musical Literature I
No previous knowledge of music required. A survey of Western music from the Middle Ages to 1750; the elements of musical perception.

MUSI 102 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to Musical Literature II
No previous knowledge of music required. A survey of Western music from 1750 to the present; the elements of musical perception.

MUSI 131 - (3) (S)
Basic Musicianship
No previous knowledge of music required. Not open to students already qualified to elect MUSI 231 or MUSI 331. The rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.

MUSI 151-158 - (1) (S)
Performance

MUSI 193, 194 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 199 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to the Arts: Drama, Music, Visual Arts
An interdisciplinary study of the arts by critical and practical exercise. The formal and expressive characteristics of the three arts is examined with particular attention to the qualities they share as well as their distinctive differences.

MUSI 202 - (3) (IR)
Opera
No previous knowledge of music required
Musical, literary, and dramatic aspects of representative operatic works.

MUSI 203 - (3) (IR)
Poetry and Song
No previous knowledge of music required
Formal and expressive correlation of text and music in selected vocal works.

MUSI 204 - (3) (IR)
Orchestral Music
No previous knowledge of music required
Symphonic music, including the concerto, from 1700 to the present.

MUSI 205 (3) (IR)
Keyboard Music
No previous knowledge of music required
Harpsichord, organ, and piano music after 1600.

MUSI 206 - (3) (IR)
Musical Criticism
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An inquiry into meaning in music.

MUSI 208 - (3) (IR)
The Music of Black Americans
No previous knowledge of music required
The African heritage; Black music in South American and the Caribbean; Folk music; Blues; Ministrelsy; Ragtime; Jazz; Gospel; Black composers and performers in the classical tradition.

MUSI 209 - (3) (IR)
History of Slavic Music I
No previous knowledge of music required
The history of music in Russia, its stylistic orientation, and its relation to Western European musical culture.

MUSI 210 - (3) (IR)
History of Slavic Music II
No previous knowledge of music required
The history of music in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia and its relation to Western European musical culture.

MUSI 212 - (3) (Y)
History of Jazz Music
No previous knowledge of music required
Survey of jazz music from before 1900 through the stylistic changes and trends of the twentieth century; important instrumental performers, composers, arrangers, and vocalists.

MUSI 221, 222 - (3) (S)
Great Composers
No previous knowledge of music required
The life, works, and cultural environment of a major figure in the history of music (e.g., Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, etc.). The topic for each semester will be announced in advance.

MUSI 230 - (2) (S)
Keyboard Harmony
Prerequisites: MUSI 131, or permission of instructor
A study of the diatonic chord vocabulary, melody, and accompaniment at the keyboard.

MUSI 231 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Musical Theory
Prerequisite: Ability to read music and permission of instructor
Not open to students already qualified to elect MUSI 331. The material of music: rhythm, melody, timbre, and harmony; the elements of musical composition.

USI 271, 272 - (1-3) (IR)
Music Seminar

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings, discussion and individual projects in the literature and theory of music.

MUSI 293, 294 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 300 - (3) (S)
Approaches to European Art Music
Prerequisite: Ability to read music
Detailed study of selected compositions from the European art music tradition; developing listening skills, writing about music, and examining the impact of historical context on musical understanding.

MUSI 301 - (3) (Y)
European Art Music From Josquin to Bach, 1500-1750
Prerequisite or corequisite: MUSI 300

MUSI 302 - (3) (Y)
Classical and Romantic European Art Music, 1720-1850
Prerequisite: MUSI 300 and 331; or permission of instructor

MUSI 303 - (3) (Y)
European and American Art Music From Wagner to the Present, 1850-Present
Prerequisite: MUSI 300 and 331; or permission of instructor

MUSI 308 - (3) (IR)
Roots of American Music
Prerequisite: Ability to read music, or permission of instructor
Historical overview of folk and popular music in America up to World War I, with an emphasis on the African-American tradition, including spirituals, work songs, minstrelsy, brass bands, blues, and ragtime.

MUSI 311 - (1) (S)
Introduction to Music Bibliography
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Survey of music resources, printed music and writings about the literature and theory of music, principles of bibliographical analysis.

MUSI 321 - (3) (Y)
Music and Technology
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Acoustic theory and practice: audio tape and tape recorders, tape editing, transducers, wave-form modulation, analog voltage-controlled synthesizers; survey of electro-acoustic music from its origins in the late 1940's. Enrollment is limited to 20.

MUSI 326 - (3) (IR)
Piano Jazz
Historical overview of improvisational solo jazz piano styles based, for the most part, on either the American popular song or the blues, from the 1920s to the present. No previous knowledge of music is required.

MUSI 331 - (4) (Y)
Theory I
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; students wishing to enroll will be required to pass a diagnostic test of basic musical skills, including the ability to read elementary keyboard music. Diatonic harmony and an introduction to counterpoint. Ear training, sight-singing, and analysis; written and keyboard exercises. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.

MUSI 332 - (4) (Y)
Theory II
Prerequisite: MUSI 331
A continuation of Theory I; chromatic harmony; modulation. Ear training, sight-singing, and analysis; written and keyboard exercises. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.

MUSI 351-358 - (1-2) (S)
Advanced Performance
Prerequisite: Music majors with permission of department chair by audition; all other students must register for Applied Music through the Music Department Office

MUSI 351 Voice
MUSI 352 Piano
MUSI 353 Organ, Harpsichord
MUSI 354 Strings
MUSI 355 Woodwinds
MUSI 356 Brass
MUSI 357 Percussion
MUSI 358 Harp, Guitar

Because the subject matter changes each semester, courses numbered 351-358 may be repeated as often as desired, but no more than eight performance credits may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree in the College. These courses may not be applied toward the major.

MUSI 360 - (2) (S)
Jazz Ensemble
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition

MUSI 361 - (2) (S)
Orchestra
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition

MUSI 362 - (2) (S)
Wind Ensemble
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition

MUSI 363 - (1) (S)
Chamber Ensemble
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition

MUSI 364 - (2) (S)
Coro Virginia
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition

MUSI 365 - (2) (S)
University Singers
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition

MUSI 367 - (1) (S)
Collegium Musicum
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition
Performance of music written before 1750 on instruments appropriate to the period.

MUSI 368 - (1) (S)
New Music Ensemble
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition
Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

MUSI 369 - (1) (Y)
African Music Performance
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor by audition
Study and performance of West African music, with particular emphasis on the concept of polyrhythm. Singing and drumming on authentic instruments.

Because the subject matter changes each semester, courses numbered 360-369 may be repeated as often as desired, but no more than eight performance credits may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree in the College. These courses may not be applied toward the major.

MUSI 371, 372 - (1-3) (IR)
Music Seminar
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings, discussion and individual projects in the literature and theory of music.

MUSI 393, 394 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 400 - (3) (E)
European Music to 1500
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 404 - (3) (O)
Music Since 1945
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 408 - (3) (IR)
American Music
Prerequisite: Ability to read music or permission of instructor
Topics, announced in advance, about folk, popular, jazz or art music.

MUSI 419, 420 - (3) (IR)
Studies in Musical Literature
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Specific problems in the history of Western music. Content varies from semester to semester according to students' needs and interests.

MUSI 421 - (3) (IR)
Music and Technology
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 423 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to Ethnomusicology
Prerequisite: Ability to read music or permission of instructor
Survey of selected musical cultures from around the world, including India, Indonesia, sub-Saharan Africa, Anglo-American, and African-American folk traditions.

MUSI 431 - (4) (Y)
Theory III
Prerequisite: MUSI 332
Studies in tonal and twentieth-century practices.

MUSI 432 - (3) (Y)
Musical Analysis

Prerequisite: MUSI 431 or permission of instructor
Various approaches to musical analysis; readings from the most important theoretical literature; practical exercises in analysis of music from all periods.

MUSI 433 - (3) (IR)
Modal Counterpoint
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Written and aural exercises based on analyses of the contrapuntal style of Palestrina and his contemporaries.

MUSI 434 - (3) (IR)
Tonal Counterpoint
Prerequisite: MUSI 332 or the equivalent
Written and aural exercises based on analyses of the contrapuntal style of J.S. Bach and his successors.

MUSI 440 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Musicianship
Prerequisites: MUSI 431 and permission of instructor
Advanced ear-training, sight-singing and keyboard harmony.

MUSI 441, 442 - (3) (Y)
Conducting I & II
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 and permission of instructor
The theory and practice of conducting, score analysis and rehearsal technique.

MUSI 463, 464 - (1-3) (IR)
Solo and Ensemble Repertory
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Analysis of selected scores for instrumental and vocal solo and ensemble; the practical and aesthetic demands of the performance style of the period. Class demonstrations.

MUSI 471, 472 - (1-3) (IR)
Music Seminar
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings, discussions, and individual projects in the literature and theory of music.

MUSI 481, 482 - (3) (Y)
Composition
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 493, 494 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 500 - (3) (IR)
European Music to 1500
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 501 - (3) (IR)
Music History Survey, 1500-1750
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 502 - (3) (IR)
Music History Survey, 1720-1850
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 503 - (3) (IR)
Music History Survey, 1850-Present
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 504 - (3) (IR)
Music Since 1945
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUSI 505 - (3) (IR)
Vocal Music
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or the equivalent and permission of instructor
Topics, announced in advance, selected from opera, oratorio, choral music, or song.

MUSI 506 - (3) (IR)
Instrumental Music
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or the equivalent and permission of instructor
Topics, announced in advance, selected from the orchestral, chamber music or solo repertories.

MUSI 507 - (3) (IR)
Composers
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or the equivalent and permission of instructor
Study, announced in advance, of the life and works of a composer (or school of composers).

MUSI 508 - (3) (IR)
American Music
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or the equivalent and permission of instructor
Topics, announced in advance, about folk, popular, or art music, or jazz.

MUSI 509 - (3) (IR)
Studies in the History of Slavic Music I
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or equivalent and permission of instructor
Selected topics in the history of music in Russia and its relationship to Western European musical cultures.

MUSI 510 - (3) (IR)
Studies in the History of Slavic Music II
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or equivalent and permission of instructor
Selected topics in the history of music in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia and its relationship to Western European musical cultures.

MUSI 519, 520 - (3) (SI)
Studies in Musical Literature
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Selected topics or genres, to be announced in advance, from various periods of music history.

MUSI 521 - (3) (IR)
Studies in Jazz Literature
Prerequisite: MUSI 332 or equivalent and permission of instructor
Historical and theoretical concepts in jazz literature with emphasis on critical analysis.

MUSI 522 - (3) (IR)
Resources in Afro-American Music
Prerequisite: MUSI 332 or equivalent and permission of instructor

MUSI 523 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in Ethnomusicology
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or the equivalent and permission of instructor
The methodology of the discipline of Ethnomusicology. Specific cultural areas to be covered will depend on the interests of the students.

MUSI 526 - (3) (IR)
Artistry of Jazz Piano
Prerequisite: Intermediate keyboard facility; permission of instructor by audition
Analysis and practice in Jazz Piano improvisation; class discussions and demonstration. Enrollment is limited to ten.

MUSI 531 - (3) (Y)
Theory Review
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Studies in tonal and twentieth-century practices.

MUSI 532 - (3) (Y)
Musical Analysis
Prerequisite: MUSI 431 or permission of instructor
Various approaches to musical analysis; readings from the most important theoretical literature; practical exercises in analysis of music from all periods.

MUSI 533 - (3) (IR)
Modal Counterpoint
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Written and aural exercises based on analyses of the contrapuntal style of Palestrina and his contemporaries.

MUSI 534 - (3) (IR)
Tonal Counterpoint
Prerequisite: MUSI 332 or the equivalent
Written and aural exercises based on analyses of the contrapuntal style of J.S. Bach and his successors.

MUSI 535 - (3) (O)
Instrumentation
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The characteristics of orchestral instruments.

MUSI 536 - (3) (O)
Orchestration
Prerequisite: MUSI 535
Composing and arranging music for orchestral instruments in various combinations.

MUSI 537 (3) (IR)
Materials of Contemporary Music
Prerequisite: MUSI 431 or the equivalent
Tonal and non-tonal techniques; harmonic and contrapuntal writing and analysis.

MUSI 538 - (3) (Y)
Electro-Acoustic Music
Prerequisite: MUSI 537 or the equivalent
Use of musique concrete as well as analog-and-digital-synthesis in musical compositions. Original student compositions analyzed in weekly discussions.

MUSI 541, 542 - (3) (Y)
Conducting I & II
Prerequisites: MUSI 332 or equivalent and permission of instructor
Theory and practice of conducting rehearsal technique.

MUSI 551-558 - (2) (S)
Graduate Performance
Prerequisite: Graduate students in music with permission of department chair by audition

MUSI 560-570 - (1-2) (S)
Performing Ensembles
Prerequisites: Graduate student in music with permission of instructor by audition

MUSI 571 - (3) (IR)
Canon and Fugue
Prerequisite: MUSI 431 and permission of instructor
Composition and analysis of canons and fugues focusing on works of J.S. Bach.

MUSI 581, 582 - (3) (Y)
Composition
Prerequisites: MUSI 431 and permission of instructor

MUSI 593, 594 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Independent study dealing with a specific topic. Primary emphasis is not on research.


Personal Skills

PLSK 101, 102 - (1-3) (S)
Personal Skills
Courses aimed at the communication of practical skills such as career planning. Students may count no more than two credits in such courses toward the degree. The College of Arts and Sciences shall be responsible for deciding which courses should use the PLSK designation.