McIntire Department of Art

History of Art

Overview   A painting, a sculpture, or a building is a monument surviving from the past, bearing the imprint of its creator and its time. The discipline of art history seeks to order and interpret these monuments; it seeks to discover their special characteristics and the value of the age in which they were created. For example, the work of Van Gogh would be examined in terms of his place in the Post-Impressionist generation of artists and his life in a period of religious revivals. The discipline defines the cultural currents of a period, and provides a context for understanding, appreciating, and enjoying art.

The department provides its students with the skills and perspectives of the liberal arts; to think clearly, to write well, and to find, analyze, evaluate, and present facts and ideas. It also provides students with a broad, humanistic background, an advantageous resource among disciplines such as law, business, and medicine. Students often combine Art History with a major in one of these respective areas.

The major also soundly prepares students for graduate study. Professional careers in art history including teaching (most often at the college level), museum work, and work in the art market, usually require additional study at the graduate level leading to the M.A. and Ph.D.

Faculty   The thirteen full-time faculty members are renowned for their teaching ability and scholarship. Among the many honors presented to the faculty are Fulbright, Guggenheim, and National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, as well as a Don D. Waller Award for the year's best article on Western Literature or Culture. Each student is given the opportunity to work closely with one or more of these distinguished professors.

Students   Approximately 100 students major in Art History. Some introductory lecture courses are large; however, many courses are taught as seminars, with enrollment limited to fifteen students. The lecture courses are usually survey courses (e.g., Baroque Art in Europe; Buddhist Art from India to Japan; Modernist Art); the seminars usually focus on one or two artists (e.g., Michelangelo, Bosch and Bruegel). The department offers over thirty courses, so there is a wide range of choices available. Independent study options exist, and most majors take several courses in studio art as well. Students are also encouraged to take courses in Architectural History offered by the School of Architecture.

Special Resources   The Bayly Museum of Art encourages participation in its activities by Art History Majors and students in general. The Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library is a specialized collection of over 100,000 volumes and provides research and study space as well as research assistance by its trained staff.

Requirements for Major   There are no prerequisites for entry into the department, but most students declare a major in art history after taking one or more of the department's introductory survey courses (ARTH 101, 102 and 103). None of these courses, however, is required for majors. Each year a seminar (ARTH 201) is offered for students interested in majoring in art history. This seminar may consider the work of individual artists or particular problems or themes in art history.

For a degree in art history students must complete 30 credits above the 100-level. Courses taken at any time during the student's career can be counted, including those earned while studying abroad, in summer session, or in architectural history courses. By the time of graduation a student must have achieved a minimum GPA of 2.0 in major courses. (A student who does not maintain an average of 2.0 or better in departmental courses will be put on probation, and may be dropped from the program.) No course graded below C- may count for major credit. Distribution requirements: At least one course in each area (ancient, medieval, Renaissance, modern, Asian); a minimum of two seminars (201 or 491); one course in studio art; two electives within the department; two related courses offered by other departments (i.e., in addition to the 30 departmental credits). Related courses should be selected to complement the student's work in art history.

Requirements for the Minor   There are no prerequisites for a minor in Art History. A student must complete 15 credits in the department, beyond the 100- level. Courses taken at any time during the student's career may be counted toward the minor. At the time of graduation, a student must have achieved a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor courses.

Minors must take at least one course in four of the five areas: Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Modern, and Asian. One additional course is required, and this should be selected from advanced lecture courses at the 300- 500 level, or sections of the Art History seminar (ARTH 491).

Minors are also required to take at least one course outside the department which is related to an area in Art History of special interest to them. This course will be chosen in consultation with the undergraduate advisor.

The Distinguished Majors Program in Art History   To Majors who wish to be considered for a degree of Distinction, High Distinction, or Highest Distinction in Art History the department offers a program of advanced courses and research culminating in a thesis of approximately fifty pages. A student should ordinarily apply for admission to the program by the first class day in April of the third year. To apply a student must submit a thesis proposal and have the approval of a faculty member to direct the research. A GPA of 3.4 in major courses and a cumulative GPA at or near 3.4 are required for admission. Application should be made to the Undergraduate Advisors for Art History. In their fourth year students in the program are required to take at least two courses at the 400 or 500-level and to enroll in ARTH 497-498 Distinguished Majors Program Thesis. These are evaluated by a committee chaired by the Undergraduate Advisors that also considers 1) the student's work in the Distinguished Majors Program based on the evaluations of teachers in the student's advanced courses 2) the student's performance in major courses and 3) the student's overall GPA. The committee will recommend either no distinction, distinction, high distinction, or highest distinction, and will pass on its recommendation to the Committee on Special Programs.

Additional Information   For more information, contact the

Undergraduate Advisor
McIntire Department of Art
Fayerweather Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-6123
Art World Wide Web site
Art faculty


Courses

ARTH 101 - (4) (S)
History of Art I
The history and interpretation of architecture, sculpture and painting. The course begins with prehistoric art and follows the main stream of Western civilization to the end of the medieval period.

ARTH 102 - (4) (S)
History of Art II
The history and interpretation of architecture, sculpture and painting from 1400 to the present.

ARTH 103 - (3) (IR)
History of Art III
The history and interpretation of the primary artistic traditions of China and Japan from prehistoric times through the nineteenth century.

ARTH 104 - (3) (S)
Artists and Masterpieces
Studies of masterpieces by major artists such as Phidias, Bosch, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Rubens, Goya, Van Gogh and Picasso.

ARTH 150 - (3) (Y)
Jefferson, Architecture and the UVA
An introduction to Jefferson's achievement in architecture in relation to the classical tradition and the new American nation. Special attention is given to the significance of the Jeffersonian buildings at the University of Virginia.

ARTH 201 - (3) (Y)
Second Year Seminar in the History of Art
A seminar on art historical problems and methods, intended for students who may be interested in majoring in art history.

ARTH 202 - (3) (Y)
Tigris to Tiber: Art of the Ancient World
A survey of major masterpieces of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Prehistoric Europe, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Rome, Constantinople, and Medieval Europe. Style and subject matter are studied as languages expressing the values and meanings associated with changing norms of human personality in relation to the gods, the state, and nature, and as the basis of aesthetic delight.

ARTH 209 - (3) (Y)
Sacred Sites
Examines the art and architecture of ten religious sites around the world focusing on the ritual, culture, and history as well as the artistic characteristics of each site.

ARTH 211 - (3) (IR)
Art of the Ancient Near East and Prehistoric Europe
The art of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and prehistoric Europe, from the sixth to the second millennium B.C. Course examines the emergence of a special role for the arts in ancient religion.

ARTH 213 - (3) (Y)
Greek Art
A view of the painting, sculpture and architecture of the Greeks, from the Dark Ages through the Hellenistic period. The work of art will be studied against its social and intellectual background.

ARTH 214 - (3) (Y)
Etruscan and Roman Art
Painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy and the Roman Empire, from the time of the Etruscans to Constantine the Great, the first Christian emperor. Special emphasis on the political and social role of art in ancient Rome and on the dissolution of Classical art and the formation of Medieval art.

ARTH 215 - (3) (IR)
Introduction to Classical Archaeology
Introduction to the history, theory and field techniques of Classical Archaeology. Major sites of the Bronze Age (Troy, Mycenae) as well as Greek and Roman cities and sanctuaries (such as Athens, Olympia, Pompeii) illustrate important themes in Greek and Roman culture and the nature of archaeological data.

ARTH 221 - (3) (Y)
Early Christian and Byzantine Art
Art of the early Church in East and West and its subsequent development in the East under the aegis of Byzantium. Influence of theological, liturgical and political factors on the artistic expression of Eastern Christian spirituality.

ARTH 222 - (3) (Y)
Medieval Art in Western Europe
The arts in Western Europe from the Hiberno-Saxon period up to, and including, the age of the great Gothic cathedrals.

ARTH 231 - (3) (Y)
Italian Renaissance Art
Painting, architecture, and sculpture in Italy from the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. Special attention to the work of major artists such as Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. Social, political, and cultural background of the arts is discussed in detail.

ARTH 236 - (3) (IR)
Painting and Graphics of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries in
Northern Europe
Survey of major developments in painting and graphics in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in the Netherlands and Germany. Rise of Netherlandish naturalism and the origins of woodcut and engraving. Effects of humanist taste on sixteenth century painting as well as the iconographic consequences of the Reformation. Emphasis placed on the work of major artists such as Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Durer, Bosch and Bruegel.

ARTH 241 - (3) (Y)
Baroque Art in Europe
Painting, sculpture, and architecture of the seventeenth century in Italy, the Low Countries, France and Spain. Special attention is given to Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez, Rubens, Rembrandt and Poussin.

ARTH 246 - (3) (Y)
Eighteenth-Century European Art
A survey of European painting and sculpture from the late Baroque period to Neo-Classicism. Emphasis on the artistic careers of major figures and on the larger social, political and cultural contexts of their work. Artists include Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Chardin, Falconet, Pigalle, Greuze, Batoni, Rusconi, Hogarth, Gainsborough and Reynolds.

ARTH 251 - (3) (Y)
Nineteenth-Century European Art
Survey of painting and sculpture from the French Revolution until 1880. Emphasizes artistic careers of major figures and the larger social, political and cultural contexts of their work. Artists include David, Ingres, Canova, Constable, Turner, Delacroix, Friedrich, Courbet, Manet, Monet, and Cezanne.

ARTH 253 - (3) (Y)
The Formation of Twentieth Century Art
The forms, concepts and development of modern art from the Post-Impressionism and Symbolism until World War I. Emphasis on the Synthetism of Gauguin and his followers, the relationship between the Symbolist writers and painters at the fin-de-siecle, Fauvism and Matisse, Cubism, Futurism, German Expressionism and Dada.

ARTH 254 - (3) (Y)
Modernist Art
The forms, concepts and development of modern painting and sculpture from World War I to the present. Emphasis on representational and abstract art of the 1920's and 1930's, abstract expressionism, pop art, color field painting, minimal and idea art, new realism, neo-impressionism and the post-modern.

ARTH 258 - (3) (Y)
American Art
The development of American art in its cultural context from the seventeenth century to World War II.

ARTH 259 - (3) (Y)
Afro-American Art
A survey of visual art produced by black Americans from the early 19th century to the present, focusing on painting, sculpture, graphics and photography, with some discussion of craft activities. Occasional reference will be made to the African past, but primary aim is to place art by North Americans of African descent in the context of American art as a whole.

ARTH 261 - (3) (IR)
Buddhist Art From India to Japan
A survey of the Buddhist sculpture, architecture and painting of India, China and Japan. Consideration will be given to aspects of history and religious doctrine.

ARTH 262 - (3) (IR)
Chinese and Japanese Painting
Survey of Chinese painting through the 18th century, and Japanese painting and prints through the 19th century. Intellectual foundations of the painting traditions are considered, and reading assignments include selections in translation from Chinese poetry and Japanese novels and from Chinese and Japanese writings on aesthetics, art theory and painting history.

ARTH 280 - (3) (IR)*
Art Since 1945
A survey of art production and theory in the U.S. and Europe since World War II. Relationships between artistic practice and critical theory will be stressed in an examination of movements ranging from Abstract Expressionism to Neo-Geo.

ARTH 313 - (3) (IR)
Art and Poetry in Classical Greece
Major themes in Greek sculpture and painting of the fifth century, including mythological narrative, cult practices, banqueting, and athletics. In order to view these themes in the context of classical Greek culture, the course will seek out shared structures of response and feeling in contemporary poetry; readings in translation in Anakreon, Pindar, Aischylos, Sophokles, and Euripides.

ARTH 315 - (3) (IR)
The Greek City
The Greek city from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period, with an emphasis on developing concepts of city planning, public buildings and houses, and the inclusion within the city of works of sculpture and painting.

ARTH 316 - (3) (IR)
Roman Architecture
The history of Roman architecture from the Republic to the late empire with special emphasis on the evolution of urban architecture in Rome. Also considered are Roman villas, Roman landscape architecture, the cities of Pompeii and Ostia, major sites of the Roman provinces, and the architectural and archaeological field methods used in dealing with ancient architecture.

ARTH 327 - (3) (IR)
Russian Art to Peter I
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Mosaics, Wall paintings, icons and church architecture in Russia from the Kievan period to Peter the Great (950-1700); special emphasis on connections with Byzantium and on the theological significance of icons.

ARTH 333- (3) (IR)
Renaissance Art and Literature
An examination of the interrelations between literature and the visual arts in Italy from 1300 to 1600. The writings of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio and their followers will be analyzed in relation to the painting, sculpture and architecture of Giotto, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Raphael, and Michelangelo, among others.

ARTH 342 - (3) (IR)
Rembrandt
The life and work of the great Dutch seventeenth-century master. Topics considered include Rembrandt's interpretation of the Bible and the nature of his religious convictions, his relationship to classical and Renaissance culture, his rivalry with Rubens, and the expressive purposes of his distinctive techniques in painting, drawing, and etching.

ARTH 357 - (3) (IR)
American Art and Literature
Prerequisites: Background in either American art and/or literature (e.g., ARTH 258, ENLT 213, 214, or the ENAM 300/400 sequence) is useful
Studies in the relation between American visual art, especially painting, and American literature as forms of cultural expression, defined around a particular topic: e.g., seascape in art and literature; realism in the late 19th century; New England as region.

ARTH 361 - (3) (IR)
Chinese Painting of the Sund and Yuan Dynasties
(l0th-14th C.)
An examination of the achievements of the leading court masters, Buddhist monk-painters, and scholar-amateur artists of the "golden age" of Chinese painting.

ARTH 380 - (3) (O)
African Art
Africa's chief forms of visual art from prehistoric times to the present.

ARTH 385 - (3) (IR)
Women in American Art
The roles played by women both as visual artists and as the subjects of representation in American art from the colonial period to the present. The changing cultural context and institutions that support or inhibit women's artistic activity and help to shape their public presentation. Some background in either art history or Women's Studies is desirable.

ARTH 437 - (3) (IR)
Michelangelo
Prerequisite: One course in the history of art beyond the level of ARTH 101 and 102 and permission of instructor
The work of Michelangelo in sculpture, painting and architecture, studied in relation to his contemporaries in Italy and the North. Study of preparatory drawings, letters, poems and documents.

ARTH 491 - (3) (S)
Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of art history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Representative subjects include: Life and Art of Pompeii, Roman Painting and Mosaic, History and Connoisseurship of Baroque Prints, Art and Politics in Revolutionary Europe, Picasso and Painting, Politics in Modern China, and Problems in American Art and Culture.

ARTH 497-498 - (6) (S)
Undergraduate Thesis
A thesis of approximately fifty (50) written pages is researched and written during the fall and spring semesters by art history majors in their fourth year who have been accepted into the department's Distinguished Majors Program.

ARTH 501 - (1) (Y)
Library Methodology in the Visual Arts
Printed and computerized research tools in Fine arts, including architecture and archeology. Required of all incoming Art History graduate students.

ARTH 516 - (3) (IR)
Roman Architecture
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
A survey of Roman architecture in Italy and the Roman Empire from the Republic to Constantine with special emphasis on developments in the city of Rome.

ARTH 518 - (3) (IR)
Roman Imperial Art and Architecture I
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Roman sculpture, painting, architecture and minor arts from Augustus to Trajan.

ARTH 519 - (3) (IR)
Roman Imperial Art and Architecture II
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Roman sculpture, mosaics, architecture and minor arts from Trajan to Constantine.

ARTH 522 - (3) (IR)
Byzantine Art
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Art of Byzantium and its cultural dependencies, from its roots in the late Antique period to the last flowering under the Palaeologan dynasty.

ARTH 533 - (3) (IR)
Italian Fifteenth Century Painting I
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The major and minor masters of the Quattrocento in Florence, Siena, Central Italy, Venice and North Italy.

ARTH 537 - (3) (IR)
Italian Renaissance Sculpture I
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
The major developments in Italian sculpture from the late Dugento through the early Quattrocento.

ARTH 541 - (3) (IR)
Northern Art of the Fifteenth Century
Netherlandish ars nova,   its character and purpose. Analysis of the concept of "hidden symbolism." Special attention to Campin, Jan Van Eyck, Roger Van der Weyden, Hugo Van der Goes, Memling, David and Geertgen. In addition, the rise of the graphic media, woodcut and engraving. Emphasis on the Master E.S., Schongauer and Durer.

ARTH 559 - (3) (E)
Representations of Race in American Art
Examines the depiction of Asian, Blacks, Indians and Latinos in American art from colonial times to the present, in order to identify and describe some of the ways in which visual images have functioned in the construction and reinforcement of racial mythologies.

ARTH 580 - (3) (O)
African Art
A survey of Africa's chief forms of visual art from prehistoric times to the present.

ARTH 590 - (3) (Y)
Museum Studies
Prerequisites: 9-12 credits in Art History or permission of instructor
A lecture course on the nature of public art collections, how they have been formed, and the role they play in society. The course will also examine the concept of connoisseurship and its role in collecting art for museums.

ARTH 591, 592 - (3) (S)
Advanced Readings in the History of Art


Review current course offerings in the Course Offering Directory.
Visit the McIntire Department of ArtWorld Wide Web site.


Studio Art

Overview   Studio Art at the University of Virginia is a rigorous pre-professional program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. The department attempts to give students instruction in the basic skills and application in the following areas: drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, electronic media, and contemporary media and techniques. Courses also seek to acquaint the student with the concerns and issues of visual art through practical studio experience.

The Art Department's studio major is a liberal arts program designed to accommodate students with various interests and abilities, serving those who expect to become professional artists and welcoming those who are mainly interested in art as an avocation or as a means toward aesthetic fulfillment. Students are also encouraged to take courses in the history of art so that they may acquire knowledge of pictorial meaning and the wide range of artistic expression and interpretation found in different cultural periods. Students who wish to do intensive work in a single area may work in project courses that provide both flexibility and faculty feedback.

Faculty   There are nine faculty members in the department. One of the department's strengths is the diversity of interests among the faculty. Each faculty member has had highly successful exhibitions at numerous galleries across the country such as the Tatistcheff Gallery in New York, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington D.C., and the Fine Gallery in Princeton. Among the awards and honors garnered by members of this group is a recent Virginia Commission of the Arts Award for printmaking and sculpture, and an Artist's Fellowship Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in painting and sculpture. Works by the faculty are in many prestigious museum collections, such as the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Philadelphia Art Museum, the Hirschhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. The faculty make themselves easily accessible to their students, serving as mentors in and out of the classroom.

Students   Each year, approximately sixty students major in studio art. As there is not a graduate program, all courses are taught by faculty. All studio art courses have limited enrollment, since the courses are taught in atelier style. All majors, in their fourth year, are required to complete a Senior Exhibition.

Many students in studio art are double majors. Art history is the most obvious choice for a second major, though English and Psychology are also common.

Approximately 20 percent of the majors go on to graduate work within the fine arts. Placement has been good, including admission to top national programs. Other students seek graduate work in related fields, including graphic and fashion design, medical illustration, art therapy, illustration, museum work, gallery management, advertising design, and teaching.

Requirements for Major   Majors acquire essential artistic skills, as well as experience in the handling of a wide variety of materials and methods. The program puts the student in touch with the problems of creation and with the ideas of artists in the contemporary world.

The major requires 30 credits in studio art courses above the 100 level. Twelve credits must be at the 200 level and 15 credits at the 300 or 400 level. ARTS 306, Third Year Seminar, is required. During the spring semester of the third year, the major participates in an evaluation of their work by the entire faculty and in the fourth year declares a concentration in Painting, Printmaking, Photography or Sculpture which culminates in an exhibition.

Requirements for Minor   The minor in studio art requires 12 credits in studio art at the 200 level, 6 credits in studio art at the 300 or 400 level and participation in a fourth year exhibition of work of minors.

Additional Information   For more information, contact

Akemi Ohira
Brooks Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 924-7051
Art World Wide Web site
Art faculty


Courses

ARTS 161, 162 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Drawing I, II
Materials and techniques of drawing, training in the coordination of hand and eye. Development of visual analysis. Emphasizes understanding form, space, light and composition.

ARTS 170, 171 - (1-3) (IR)
Liberal Arts Seminar
A seminar designed primarily for the first and second year students. Taught on voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary.

ARTS 199 - (3) (S)
Introduction to the Arts: Drama, Music, Visual Arts
Prerequisite: First year students only
An interdisciplinary study of the arts by critical and practical exercise. The formal and expressive characteristics of Drama, Music and the Visual Arts are examined with particular attention to the qualities they share as well as their distinctive differences. Also listed as DRAM 199 and MUSI 199.

ARTS 251 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Photography
Prerequisite: Three credits in Art History
Independent and group exercises exploring still photography as a means of communication and expression. Lab sessions cover necessary technical aspects of the medium, lectures introduce the photographic tradition, and discussions focus on student work. No pass/fail.

ARTS 263, 264 - (3) (Y)
Life Drawing I, II
Prerequisite: ARTS 161, 162; and three credits in Art History
Drawing from the living model in various media. Artistic anatomy, figure and portrait drawing.

ARTS 267 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Etching and Lithography
Prerequisite: ARTS 161, 162; and three credits in Art History
Introduction to basic black and white etching techniques, basic black and white plate lithography, and techniques of stone lithography.

ARTS 271, 272 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Painting I, II
Prerequisite: ARTS 161, 162 or permission of instructor
An introduction to the basic oil painting techniques and materials with an emphasis upon perception and color. Assignments are designed to assist the student in understanding the creative process and interpreting the environment through a variety of subject matter expressed in painted images. Encouragement is given to individual stylistic development.

ARTS 281, 282 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Sculpture I, II
Prerequisite: ARTS 161, 162; and three credits in Art History
The sculptural process is investigated by modeling, carving, fabricating and casting. Traditional and contemporary concerns of sculpture are examined by analyzing historical examples and work done in class.

ARTS 306 - (3) (Y)
Third-Year Seminar for Studio Majors
An investigation of the ideas and issues that the modern artist must confront, over and beyond the technical problems that are dealt with in studio courses. Assigned readings on contemporary critical issues in art. Field trips to museums and galleries.

ARTS 351, 352 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Photography
Prerequisite: Six credits in Art History
Requirements: Basic black and white lab techniques. Creative camera work with 35mm and larger-format cameras. Students who need review in lab techniques should take the introductory course. Portfolios must be submitted at first class meeting.

ARTS 367 - (3) (Y)
Intermediate Etching and Lithography
Prerequisite: ARTS 267; and six credits in Art History
Relief printing,Advanced lithography techniques, including color lithography, color etching, monoprinting, and further development of black and white imagery.

ARTS 371, 372 - (3) (Y)
Intermediate Painting I, II
Prerequisite: ARTS 271, 272; and six credits in Art History
The exploration of contemporary painting materials, techniques, and concepts as well as the continuation of the basic oil painting processes. Assignments are designed to assist the student in developing their perceptions and imagination and translating them into painted images. Direction is given to the formation of personal original painting styles.

ARTS 381, 382 - (3) (Y)
Sculpture
Prerequisite: ARTS 281, 282; and six credits in Art History
A continuation of ARTS 281, 282 with greater emphasis on the special problems of the sculptural discipline.

ARTS 407 - (3) (S)
Advanced Projects in Art I
Prerequisite: Only open to Studio majors with permission of the studio staff
Investigation and development of a consistent idea or theme in painting, sculpture, or the graphic arts. The course may be taken more than once under the same course number(s) by students who are sufficiently advanced in studio work.

ARTS 451, 452 - (3) (S)
Distinguished Major Project
Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program
Intensive independent work using either sculpture, photography, printmaking, or painting as the primary medium, culminating in a coherent body of work under direction of a faculty member.

ARTS 453, 454 - (3) (Y)
The Photographic Sequence
Prerequisites: ARTS 251; and six credits in Art History
The advanced problems of making a structured body of photographic work. Emphasis is on new solutions to new problems in this mode.

ARTS 467, 468 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Problems in Printmaking
Prerequisites: ARTS 267, ARTS 367; and six credits in Art History
Designed for students who have completed two or more semesters of study of a specific printmaking technique (woodcut, etching, or lithography) and wish to continue their exploration of that technique.

Division of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures

Overview   Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures (formerly Oriental Languages) offers a comprehensive program in the languages, literatures, and cultures of Asia and the Middle East. Both undergraduate and graduate courses are offered in Arabic, Chinese, Hindi-Urdu, Japanese, Persian and Sanskrit, classical and modern literatures, and methodologies of translation. The program also offers courses in literature in translation, with emphasis on the relevance of these literatures to the sociopolitical, historical and cultural aspects of the Asian and Middle Eastern peoples.

The languages offered by the division are designed to serve the individual needs of students in various departments and disciplines. The undergraduate student may seek a minor in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures. At the present time, there is no major available, but the courses can be combined with courses in other departments for an interdisciplinary degree in Asian Studies or Middle East Studies. The division is currently working on establishing a major in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures for Arabic, Chinese and Japanese, which hopefully will be instituted in the next year or two.

Faculty   The faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures are recognized scholars, researchers, and teachers with national and international reputations in their respective fields, dedicated to their fields and to teaching their students. Faculty members are easily accessible for consultation outside of the classroom. In order to provide as much individualized attention as possible to students new to the languages, they maintain a small student-teacher ration in all of their courses.

Students   There are more than four hundred students taking language courses through the division of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures. Students study the languages offered through the program for a variety of reasons: to supplement a cultural interest in the field; to prepare for graduate work where they may need to translate original texts; or to prepare for the job market. A significant percentage of minors go on to graduate or professional schools. Many work in numerous governmental, federal, and congressional agencies, and national and international corporations.

Special Resources   Arts and Sciences Media Center: A resource containing many audio visuals, which are used to help bring the culture surrounding our different languages alive for the students. The language laboratory is used extensively to help students practice and reinforce their speaking and listening skills. Study Abroad: In addition to the University of Virginia- Yarmouk University Summer Arabic Program, many other study-abroad programs are available for students of all languages. Students are encouraged to participate in such programs so that they may experience, firsthand, the languages and surrounding cultures.

Requirements for Minor   The minor in the Division of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures (formerly Oriental Languages) consists of 15 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. Successful completion of 12 credits in any language(s) above 202 offered by the Division of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures (Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Persian, Sanskrit, and Urdu), with the approval of the Division's Minor Advisor.
  2. Three credits of literature in translation or culture courses which are offered by the Division of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures, may count toward the minor.
    The maximum number of credits allowed to be transferred from other accredited institutions toward the minor is six. Only courses beyond 202 or its equivalent in a language offered by the Division of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures (Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Persian, Sanskrit, and Urdu) may transfer toward the minor.

Additional Information   For more information, contact

Mohammed Sawaie
Chair, Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures
B027 Cabell Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 982-2304
Asian and Middle Eastern faculty


Courses

AMEL 493, 494 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Independent study in special field under the direction of a faculty member in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures.

AMTR 301 - (3) (SI)
Men and Women of Asia and the Middle East
Focuses on literature of Asia and the Middle East (Chinese, Japanese, Persian) which depicts the world as seen through the eyes of men and women. Poetry and prose from Ancient to Modern. Taught in English.

AMTR 311/511 - (3) (IR)
Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures
Explores some of the basic issues of women's identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it will explore both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature. Taught in English.


Arabic

ARAB 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Arabic
Prerequisite for ARAB 102: ARAB 101 or equivalent
Introduces students to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentences with brief dialogues and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice.

ARAB 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Arabic
Prerequisite for ARAB 201: ARAB 102, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Prerequisite for ARAB 202: ARAB 201, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching follows primarily the audio-lingual approach to language learning, with minimal translation at times. The instructor generally introduces a grammatical point and follows up by drilling the students intensively.

ARAB 225 - (3) (IR)
Conversational Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized.

ARAB 226 - (3) (IR)
Conversational Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 225 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Conversation based on everyday situations. Enables communication with native speakers.

ARAB 227 - (3) (Y)
Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East
Introduces the cultural traits and patterns of contemporary Arab society based on scholarly research, recent field work, and personal experiences and observations in the Arab world. No knowledge of Arabic is required.

ARAB 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Literary Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 202, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Emphasizes reading of modern texts for oral-aural practice, as well as writing, use of translation being minimal.

ARAB 323/523 - (3) (Y)
Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)
Prerequisite: ARAB 302 or permission of instructor
Emphasizes development of writing and speaking skills, with special attention on grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the organization and style of different genres.

ARAB 324/524 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)
Prerequisite: ARAB 323 or equivalent or permission of instructor
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing.

ARAB 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Arabic

ARAB 528 - (3) (SI)
The History of the Arabic Language
Prerequisite: At least one year of Arabic or Hebrew, and/or historical linguistics
Traces history of Arabic and its development up to present day. Studies relation of Arabic to other languages that come in contact with it either through genetic relationship, such as Hebrew, Aramaic, or through conquest, such as Persian, Coptic, Berber, and others. External and internal factors of linguistic change to be examined in some detail.

ARAB 583 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Arabic Prose
Prerequisite: ARAB 302/502, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Emphasis on reading modern Arabic prose, and writing descriptive and narrative short essays.

ARAB 584 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Arabic Prose
Prerequisite: ARAB 583, or permission of instructor
Exposure to selected reading material in modern Arabic prose, and writing of short essays, summaries, descriptive pieces, in Arabic.

ARAB 585 - (3) (Y)
Media Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 583 and 584 or ARAB 301/501 and 302/502 or permission of instructor
Examination of electronic (television and radio) and print (newspapers, magazines, periodic publications) Arabic.

ARAB 586 - (3) (Y)
Nineteenth Century Arabic Prose
Prerequisite: ARAB 583 and 584 or permission of instructor
Examination of Arabic writing in the 19th century, a period of renaissance in the Arabic language.

ARTR 329/529 - (3) (Y)
Modern Arabic Literature in Translation
Introduction to the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). Taught in English.

ARTR 339 - (3) (Y)
Love, Alienation, and Politics in Contemporary Arabic Novel
Introduction to the Arabic Novel with emphasis on a medium for expounding political issues of the Arab World.


Chinese

CHIN 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Chinese
Prerequisite for CHIN 102: CHIN 101
Using modular materials, the course covers the basic necessities of daily communication: speaking, comprehending, and writing modern standard Chinese. The course is tape-based, modular in design, and fosters individualized learning. The goal is the ability to communicate in everyday situations.

CHIN 170 - (1-3) (SI)
Chinese Calligraphy
Introduction to the history, masters, styles and techniques of Chinese Brush Calligraphy. Goals of the course are familiarity with use of brush and ink, active and passive differentiation of styles and techniques, appreciation of Chinese Calligraphy as an art form.

CHIN 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Chinese
Prerequisite: CHIN 102, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Continued training in speaking, reading, and writing standard modern Chinese, to gain further familiarity with the culture and society. The same series of modular materials is used.

CHIN 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Modern Chinese Literature
Prerequisite: CHIN 202, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Modern Chinese at the advanced level: reading and discussion in Chinese of various aspects of Chinese culture, society, and literature, using radio broadcasts and selections from newspapers, recent essays, short stories, etc.

CHIN 323/523- (3) (Y)
Chinese Conversation and Composition ( in Chinese)
Prerequisite: CHIN 302 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Focus is on the development of writing and speaking skills at a higher level than CHIN 302.

CHIN 324/524 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Chinese Conversation and Composition (in Chinese)
Prerequisite: CHIN 323/523 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Further develops writing and speaking skills to an advanced level.

CHIN 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Chinese

CHIN 528 - (3) (Y)
History of the Chinese Language (in Chinese)
Prerequisite: CHIN 323/523 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Examination of the evolution of the spoken and written language, diachronically and synchronically, from syntactic, phonological, lexical, and graphic perspectives.

CHIN 581, 582 - (3) (Y)
Media Chinese
Prerequisite: CHIN 302/502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Introduces the electronic and print media in Chinese with special emphasis on current events as reported in the Chinese speaking world, to further develop oral and written proficiency.

CHIN 583, 584 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Classical Chinese
Prerequisite: CHIN 583 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Introduction to the grammar and structure of classical Chinese.

CHIN 585, 586 - (3) (SI)
Classical Chinese Literature
Prerequisite: CHIN 583-584 or equivalent
Advanced readings in classical Chinese.

CHTR 321, 322 - (3) (Y)
Chinese Literature in Translation
The literary heritage of China. The course will examine the major genres through selected readings of representative authors. Taught in English.


Hindi

HIND 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Hindi-Urdu
Prerequisite for HIND 102: HIND 101
Introductory training in the speaking, understanding, reading and writing of Hindi.

HIND 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Hindi
Prerequisite for HIND 201: HIND 102, or equivalent
Prerequisite for HIND 202: HIND 201, or equivalent
An introduction to various types of written and spoken Hindi; vocabulary building, idioms and problems of syntax; conversation in Hindi.

HIND 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Hindi
Prerequisite: HIND 202, or equivalent or permission of instructor
Readings are drawn from areas of particular interest to the students involved, and include readings from various disciplines. Restricted to area studies majors and minors.

HIND 323, 324 - (3)(Y)
Fourth-Year Hindi
Prerequisite: HIND 302/502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
HIND 323 (first semester)includes readings in Hindi from a variety of the literary works, including selections from Manasarovar  , (a collection of short stories by Premchand) and Usha Nilsson's "Anthology of Hindi Stories." HIND 324 (second semester) includes readings from college textbooks on social institutions (social anthropology) among others. Restricted to area studies majors and minors.

HIND 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Hindi


Japanese

JAPN 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Japanese
Prerequisite for JAPN 102: JAPN 101, or equivalent
Introduces the basic speech patterns and grammatical units, including casual, daily spoken style as well as the polite speech used in formal occasions. Emphasis is on speaking, hearing, and reading. Writing hiragana, katakana, and 200 kanji are also introduced.

JAPN 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Japanese
Prerequisite: JAPN 102 or equivalent
Continuation of Elementary Japanese introduces more complex sentence patterns, idioms and vocabulary to prepare students for an intermediate-level communication. Reinforces spoken Japanese skills with writing and reading exercises, 250 kanji are introduced.

JAPN 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Reading and Conversation in Japanese I
Prerequisite: JAPN 202, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Emphasizes comprehension and active reproduction of modern Japanese beyond the basic patterns of speech and writing. Various topics on current Japanese culture and society are introduced.

JAPN 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Japanese

JAPN 531 - (3) (Y)
A Cultural Understanding of U.S.-Japan Relations
Prerequisite: At least one course in Japanese literature, history or political science, or equivalent
Introduction to the socio-cultural aspects of the Japanese society and people, and how these affect the Japanese response to international events, in particular, those in the United States. Implications of cultural differences in interpersonal relationships, basic behavioral patterns, motivations and communication style, are explored.

JAPN 583, 584 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Reading and Conversation in Japanese II
Prerequisite: JAPN 302/502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
An advanced reading and free conversation course designed to expose the student to selected modern Japanese literary works, newspapers, and television dramas, including books on Japanese society, culture and politics.

JAPN 585, 586 - (3) (Y)
Media Japanese I & II
Prerequisite: JAPN 584 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Conversation and composition based upon selections from major Japanese newspapers and television programs covering a wide range of topics on current issues in contemporary Japan. In addition to reading, listening, and interpreting newspaper articles and television programs, course examines the journalistic writing style which is markedly different from other writings in Japanese literature or business.

JAPN 590 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Classical Japanese Literature
Prerequisite: JAPN 583, 584 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Provides a basic understanding of classical Japanese. Readings are taken from a variety of classical texts and introduce several literary genres such as the monogatari, uta-monogatari, zuihitsu, nikki, waka,  and haiku  of pre-modern Japan.

JAPN 591 - (3) (SI)
Modern Japanese Literary Prose
Prerequisite: JAPN 583, 584 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Appreciation of Japanese literary works by modern (1868-present) Japanese novelists through a close reading and examination of the original prose, which is markedly different from spoken Japanese and other non-literary Japanese writings.

JAPN 592 - (3) (Y)
Conflicting Postwar Images in Modern Japan
Prerequisite: JAPN 583, 584 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
This course challenges the stereotypic image of Japan, and looks at postwar Japan as it is embroiled in conflict, oppression and doubt. Emphasis is on a close reading of the texts along with gaining an understanding of how the Japanese confront the unsettling issues of dissent and conflict.

JAPN 593, 594 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Readings on Society and Culture I and II
Prerequisite: JAPN 583, 584 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Exposes students to the most advanced training in modern Japanese language, these courses read, interpret, and discuss Japanese books written by Japanese for the general Japanese audience on such subjects as the cultural differences between U. S. and Japan, economics, education, journalism and politics.

JPTR 321 - (3) (Y)
The Tale of Genji: Love and Marriage, Japanese Style
An introduction to the elegant world of classical Japanese literary tradition represented by one of the world's masterpieces. The Tale of Genji (1010 A.D.) written by Lady Murasaki. Students examine 1) the ritual of courting and women's position in the marriage institution; 2) rituals of birth, marriage and death; 3) the search for inner peace and unity with nature; 4) non-verbal communication and the problem of ambiquity; 5) the power of intuition and implication; 6) the aesthetics of mono no awars, an aesthetic of longing imbued with Buddism, or the ephemerality of human existence.

JPTR 322/522 - (3) (Y)
Women, Nature, and Society in Modern Japanese Fiction
Introduces students to representative works of modern Japanese literature from 1885 to the present. Focuses on the essential characteristics of the Japanese people and society, their inter- personal relationships, and world view which is deeply linked with nature. Attempts to look at each topic from cross-cultural disciplines such as psychology, anthropology, sociology and various schools of modern literary criticism. Taught in English.

JPTR 341/541 - (3) (Y)
Ideas and Images in Traditional Japan
Introduction to traditional Japanese culture from the ancient period up through the Meiji period. Includes an examination of early folk beliefs, creations myths and ideas about language. Topics include aesthetics of court society, warrior practices and castle towns, encounter with Europeans and Christianity in Japan, consumerism and hedonism of the merchant class in the Edo period.

JPTR 351/551 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Pre-Modern Japanese Literature
Introduction to the major texts of pre-modern Japanese literature covering the period from the seventh to eighteenth centuries. By primarily examining the classical narrative and poetic traditions in ancient Japan, with a short segment devoted to the dramatic arts of the No and puppet theatre, this course chronologically focuses upon the literary genres unique to each period and provides an aesthetic and cultural background to the events surrounding those texts. No knowledge of Japanese language necessary.

JPTR 352/552 - (3) (Y)
Classical Japanese Poetry in Translation
Close reading of various forms of classical poetry written between the eighth and nineteenth centuries. Discussion focuses on the privileged position of the poetic tradition in Japanese literature, classical themes and conventions, major poetic anthologies, the ritual and social function of poetry, and poetry as an integral part of narrative and the dramatic arts. No knowledge of Japanese language necessary.

JPTR 581 - (3) (Y)
Women Writers in Classical Japan
Prerequisite: JPTR 321/521 or permission of instructor, or equivalent
Introduces the most celebrated period in Japanese literary history in which women of the Heian court (797-1190) produced the flowering of vernacular literature, nikki bunqaku   (a mixture of prose and poetry called a poetic diary).

JPTR 382/582 - (3) (Y)
Modern Japanese Women Writers
Prerequisite: JPTR 322 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Introduction to the resurgence of the female literary tradition from 1904 to the present. Course focuses on how literary women in Japan express their subversive voice often through the autobiographical fiction. Taught in English.


Persian

PERS 101, 102 - (4) (E)
Elementary Persian
Prerequisite for PERS 102: PERS 101, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
An introductory language sequence focusing on reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking of modern Persian through audio-lingual methods. Persian grammar is introduced through sentence patterns in the form of dialogues and monologues.

PERS 201, 202 - (4) (E)
Intermediate Persian
Prerequisite: PERS 102, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Each course focuses on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension using selections from classical and modern Persian prose and poetry, preparing students for advanced studies in Indo-Persian language and literature.

PERS 301/501 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Modern Persian Poetry
Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
The works of major and some minor poets of the twentieth century will be studied. The form and content of "New Poetry" will be discussed as distinguishing features of twentieth-century Persian poetry in contrast with those of classical Persian poetry. Emphasis will also be given to the themes of modern poetry as reflections of Iranian society.

PERS 302/502 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Modern Persian Prose Fiction
Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Selections from the works of major writers of the century are read, and the development of modern Persian fiction as it reflects a changing society is the basis of discussions. Improves the students' reading ability in Persian and to familiarizes them with Iran, its people, and its culture, through the literature.

PERS 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Persian

PETR 321/521 - (3) (IR)
Persian Literature in Translation
The works of major figures in classical Persian literature, especially Rudaki, Ferdowsi, Khayyam, Attar, Mowlavi, Sa'adi, and Hafez, as well as the most important minor writers of each period, will be read. Special attention to the role of the Ma'shuq (the beloved), Mamduh (the praised one), and Ma'bud (the worshiped one) in classical verse as well as the use of allegory and similar devices in both prose and verse. Taught in English.

PETR 322/522 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Persian Literature in Translation
Introduces modern Persian literature in the context of Iranian society and civilization. Lectures and discussions follow the development of modern Persian poetry and prose, and trace the influence of Western and other literature as well as Iranian literary and cultural heritage, on the works of contemporary Iranian writers. Facilitates understanding of contemporary Iran, especially its people, both individually and collectively, with their particular problems and aspirations in the twentieth-century world. Taught in English.


Sanskrit

SANS 501, 502 - (3) (Y)
Elementary Sanskrit
Prerequisite for SANS 502: SANS 501 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Sanskrit grammar, phonology and Devanagari script. Selected readings and exercises. Textual analysis with considerable required memorization and oral drill.

SANS 503 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Sanskrit Poetry
Prerequisite: SANS502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Readings in Sanskrit from a variety of poetic works including Kalidasa's Ritusamhara   (The Seasons) and Bilhana's Caurapancasika  (The Thief: His Fifty Verses), with special emphasis on metrical forms and poetic devices.

SANS 504 - (3) (Y)
Sanskrit Poetry-The Poet Kalidasa
Prerequisite: SANS 502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Readings in Sanskrit from a variety of poetic works of Kalidasa, including his long poem Meghadutam   (The Cloud Messenger) and his collection Srngaratilakam  , among others.


Urdu

URDU 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Urdu
Prerequisite for URDU 201: HIND 102 or equivalent; for URDU 202: HIND 201 or equivalent
An introduction to various types of written and spoken Urdu; vocabulary building, idioms and problems of syntax; conversation in Urdu.

URDU 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Urdu

Program in Asian Studies

Overview   The growth of interaction among the Pacific Rim nations has been accompanied by an increase in the study of the countries of East and South Asia. Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary program that studies the countries and peoples of East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia in the areas of culture, history, language, literature, politics, economics, international relations, philosophy and religion. Courses offered in the disciplines of anthropology, art history, government and foreign affairs, history, languages, literatures, religious studies, women's studies and sociology allow students to design a major to meet their own personal needs and interests.

In addition to the departments mentioned above, some courses on Asia may also be found in the schools of Architecture, Commerce, Graduate Business, Law, Medicine, and Nursing. Language courses are available in Chinese, Japanese, Hindu, Urdu, Sanskrit, and Tibetan.

Faculty   The faculty of the Asian Studies Program are recognized scholars and teachers with international reputations in their fields. Many hold positions in regional, national and international organizations in Asian studies. The faculty have well-deserved reputations as dedicated teachers who make themselves easily accessible to their students.

Students   There are 40-50 students majoring in Asian Studies, with an average of 20 students graduating each year. A significant percentage of students pursue graduate degrees upon graduation, with a substantial number following careers in government, art, international banking and business, communications, the Peace Corps, teaching abroad, and business management in Asia.

Special Resources   Arts and Sciences Media Center: This facility is used extensively to help students in language and culture courses, and offers a wide variety of materials to supplement classroom work. Study Abroad: Students in the Asian Studies Program are going abroad in increasing numbers. The East Asia Center, through the East Asia Travel Fund, offers support to students traveling to programs abroad and scholarships for students participating in the summer China Culture Institutes. The South Asia Center also offers graduate language and area fellowships. Computer Facilities: There is currently under renovation, a micro-computer lab for use by students of Chinese, with facilities planned for other languages in the near future.

Requirements for Major   The Committee on Asian Studies offers an interdisciplinary program that provides a broad and balanced understanding of the basic institutions and problems of Asia. The Committee's cooperating departments are: anthropology, architecture, art history, language and literature, government and foreign affairs, history, religious studies, and sociology. There are two primary fields of concentration: East Asia (China and Japan) and South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tibet).

A prospective major must have completed a minimum of three credits in the Asian fields with a major GPA and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0. Early enrollment in basic Asian language and history courses is encouraged.

The student's individual major, planned in consultation with a program advisor, must include: (a) 36 credits, 21 of which must focus on one country or geographical area as defined above. Before embarking on a major in a particular area, students should consult with the program director concerning availability of courses and appropriate substitutes. 15 of the 36 credits are elective courses on Asia; (b) proficiency at the 202 level in one Asian language. Only courses numbered 201 and above may count toward the major; (c) transfer credit of courses counting toward the major are limited to a maximum of 15 credits.

Requirements for Minor   A minor program in Asian Studies consists of at least 18 credits in the Asian field, with no fewer than nine credits and no more than twelve credits in one of the cooperating areas. Students planning to minor in Asian Studies should register with the Undergraduate Director of the Committee.

Additional Information   For more information, contact

Gilbert W. Roy
Director of Asian Studies
B027 Cabell Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(804) 982-2304
Asian and Middle Eastern faculty


Courses

The following courses are primarily in the Asian field, but related courses are also included.

ASPR 497, 498 - (3) (IR)
Asian Studies Senior Thesis


South Asia

AMEL 301 - (3) (IR)
Men and Women of Asia and the Middle East

AMEL 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures

ANTH 109 - (3) (Y)
Colloquia for First-Year Students
The Hindu world study of reincarnation.

ANTH 222 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Civilization

ANTH 233- (3) (IR)
Cults and Prophets

ANTH 234 - (3) (O)
Anthropology of Birth and Death

ANTH 239 - (3) (SS)
Consciousness

ANTH 260 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Indian Civilization

ANTH 325 - (3) (E)
Anthropological Perspectives on the Third World

ANTH 329 - (3) (Y)
Food, Society and Culture

ANTH 331 - (3) (IR)
Biography and Society

ANTH 361 - (3) (O)
Contemporary Hindu World Views

ANTH 522 - (3) (Y)
Economic Anthropology

ANTH 529 - (3) (Y)
Selected Topics in Social Anthropology
Buddhism and Society
Buddhist Monasticism
Social Change in Modern India
Ethnography in South Asia

ANTH 539 - (3) (O)
Selected Topics in Symbolic Anthropology
Comparative Science and Technology Policy

ANTH 561 - (3) (Y)
Selected Topics in Ethnology of South Asia

ANTH 599 - (3) (Y)
Selected Topics in Theory
Comparative Legal Cultures
South Asia Seminar

ARTH 261 - (3) (IR)
Buddhist Art

ARTH 491 - (3) (S)
Seminar in Asian Art

AR H 583 - (3) (O)
World Buddhist Architecture

EVSC 205 - (3) (E)
Climates of Hunger

EVSC 462 - (3) (Y)
Land Use Management

EVSC 560 - (3) (Y)
Land Use Policies

GFCG 101 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Comparative Government

GFCG 424 - (3) (IR)
The Gandhis in Politics

GFCG 561 - (3) (Y)
Government and Politics of South Asia I

GFCG 562 - (3) (SI)
Government and Politics of South Asia II

GFCG 567 - (3) (O)
Comparative Science and Technology Policy

GFIR 375 - (3) (E)
South Asia in World Affairs

GFIR 575 - (3) (O)
South Asia in World Affairs I

GFIR 576 - (3) (IR)
South Asia in World Affairs II

GFIR 595 - (3) (S)
Selected Problems in International Relations

HIND 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Hindi-Urdu

HIND 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Hindi

HIND 301, 302 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Hindi

HIND 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Hindi

HISA 100 - (3) (IR)
First Year Seminar on South Asia

HISA 201 - (3) (O)
History and Civilization of Classical India

HISA 202 - (3) (O)
History and Civilization of Medieval India

HISA 203 - (3) (Y)
History and Civilization of Modern India

HISA 301 - (3) (E)
History of Muslim India

HISA 302 - (3) (O)
India From Akbar to Victoria

HISA 303 - (3) (Y)
Modern India: From Colonialism to Democracy

HISA 311 - (3) (IR)
Social and Political Movements in Twentieth Century India

HISA 502 - (3) (E)
Historiography of Early Modern India

HISA 510 - (3) (IR)
Economic History of India

HIST 100, 102 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Seminar
The Indian Cinema
Pakistan: Islamic Front
Pakistan and Afghanistan
Orientalism and India
British India: Fact and Fiction

MUSI 207 - (3) (E)
Music of World Cultures

RELB 210 - (3) (Y)
Buddhism

RELB 211 - (3) (O)
Buddhist Thought

RELB 212 - (3) (IR)
Buddhist Literature

RELB 245 - (3) (Y)
Zen Buddhism

RELB 249 - (3) (E)
Buddhist Yoga

RELB 251 -
Religions of Tibet and the Himalayas

RELB 315 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Buddhist Studies

RELB 317 - (3) (E)
Buddhist Meditation

RELB 415 - (3) (Y)
Epistemology of India and Tibet

RELB 500, 501 - (4) (SS)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan I & II

RELB 502 - (3) (O)
Seminar in Tibetan Buddhism

RELB 526 - (3) (E)
Seminar in Tibetan Buddhism

RELB 535, 536 - (3) (E)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan III & IV

RELB 543, 544 - (3) (SI)
Sanskrit Religious Texts

RELB 546 - (3) (IR)
Seminar in Mahayana Buddhism

RELB 547, 548 - (4) (O)
Literary and Spoken Tibetan V & VI

RELB 555 - (3) (IR)
Buddhist Philosophy

RELB 560 - (3) (SI)
Elementary Pali

RELB 561 - (3) (SI)
Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit

RELB 566 - (3) (SI)
Approaches to Buddhist Studies

RELB 599 - (3) (SS)
South Asian and Inner Asian Buddhist Bibliography

RELC 329 - (3) (Y)
Christianity and Islam

RELG 104 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions

RELG 308 - (3) (IR)
Creation Myths

RELG 575 - (3) (IR)
Myth and Ritual

RELH 209 - (3) (Y)
Hinduism

RELH 313 - (3) (SI)
Philosophy of Ghandi

RELH 314 - (3) (SI)
Modern Religious Movements in India

RELH 320 - (3) (E)
Hindu Mysticism

RELH 373 -
Hindu Mythology

RELH 521 - (3) (E)
Seminar in the Bhagavadgita

RELH 533 - (3) (E)
Seminar in Sikhism

RELH 556 - (3) (IR)
Seminar in the Yoga Sutras

RELH 557 - (3) (IR)
Seminar in Vedanta

RELH 558 - (3) (E)
Myth and Ritual in the Mahabharata

RELH 565 - (3) (IR)
Seminar in Modern Hindu Thought

RELI 207 - (3) (Y)
Classical Islam

RELI 312 - (3) (O)
Sufism

RELI 367 - (3) (O)
Religion and Politics in Islam

SANS 501, 502 - (3) (Y)
Elementary Sanskrit

SOC 338 - (3) (O)
India and South Asia

URDU 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Urdu

URDU 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Urdu


East Asia

AMEL 301 - (3) (IR)
Men and Women of Asia and the Middle East

AMEL 493,494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study

ANTH 363 - (3) (E)
Social Structure of China

ANTH 364 - (3) (E)
Ethnology of Southeast Asia

ANTH 365 - (3) (IR)
Overseas Chinese

ANTH 562 - (3) (IR)
Ethnology of East Asia

ANTH 563 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in Ethnology of East Asia

ANTH 565 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in Ethnology of Southeast Asia

AR H 585 - (3) (IR)
World Buddhist Architecture

ARTH 103 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to the Arts of East Asia

ARTH 261 - (3) (IR)
Buddhist Art From India to Japan

ARTH 262 - (3) (IR)
Asian Art

ARTH 361 - (3) (IR)
Chinese Painting of the Sung and Yuan Dynasties (960-1368)

ARTH 362 - (3) (IR)
Chinese Painting of the Ming and Ch'ing Dynasties (1368-1911)

ARTH 363 - (3) (IR)
Japanese Painting and Prints of the Memoyana and Edo Periods (1573-1867)

CHIN 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Chinese

CHIN 170 - (3) (SI)
Chinese Calligraphy

CHIN 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Chinese

CHIN 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

CHIN 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Chinese

CHIN 581, 582 - (3) (Y)
Media Chinese

CHIN 585, 586 - (3) (Y)
Classical Chinese Literature

CHTR 321, 322 - (3) (Y)
Chinese Literature in Translation

GFCG 551 - (3) (Y)
Government and Politics of China

GFCG 553 - (3) (Y)
Government and Politics of Japan

GFCG 563 - (3) (Y)
The Politics of Vietnam

GFIR 571 - (3) (Y)
China in World Affairs

GFIR 572 - (3) (Y)
Japan in World Affairs

HIEA 201 - (3) (Y)
Chinese Culture and Institutions

HIEA 203 - (3) (IR)
Modern China: The Road to Revolution

HIEA 204 - (3) (IR)
Korean Culture and Institutions

HIEA 311 - (3) (IR)
The Traditional Chinese Order, Antiquity to Sixth Century A.D.

HIEA 312 - (3) (IR)
The Traditional Chinese Order, Seventh Century to Seventeenth Century

HIEA 314 - (3) (IR)
Political and Social Thought in Modern China

HIEA 321 - (3) (Y)
Japan's Economic Miracle

HIEA 322 - (3) (Y)
Japan's Political History

HIEA 331 - (3) (IR)
Peasants, Students, and Women: Social Movements in Twentieth Century China

JAPN 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Japanese

JAPN 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Japanese

JAPN 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Modern Japanese Literature

JAPN 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Japanese

JAPN 531 - (3) (Y)
A Cultural Understanding of U.S.-Japan Relations

JAPN 583, 584 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Japanese Literature

JPTR 321/521 - (3) (Y)
Tale of Genji: Love and Marriage Japanese Style

JPTR 322/522 - (3) (Y)
Women, Nature and Society in Modern Japanese Fiction

JPTR 581 - (3) (Y)
Women Writers in Classical Japan

ORLN 170, 171 - (1-3) (SI)
Chinese Calligraphy

RELB 245 - (3) (Y)
Zen

RELB 317 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Meditation

RELB 525 - (3) (E)
Seminar in Japanese Buddhism

RELB 527 - (3) (O)
Seminar in Chinese Buddhism

RELG 104 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions

RELG 213 - (3) (O)
The Religions of China

RELG 316 - (3) (Y)
The Religions of Japan

RELG 503 - (3) (SI)
Readings in Chinese Religion


The Middle East, Southeast Asia and Others

AMEL 301 - (3) (IR)
Men and Women of Asia and the Middle East

AMEL 493, 494 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study

ANTH 222 - (3) (Y)
Buddhist Civilization

ANTH 233 - (3) (IR)
Cults and Prophets: Symbols of Social Change

ANTH 364 - (3) (E)
Ethnology of Southeast Asia

ANTH 369 - (3) (IR)
Sex, Gender, and Culture

ANTH 529 - (3) (Y)
Selected Topics in Social Anthropology
Western Impact on non-Western Societies

ANTH 539 - (3) (SI)
Selected Topics in Symbolic Anthropology

ANTH 558 - (3) (IR)
Ethnology of the Middle East

ANTH 559 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in Ethnology of the Middle East

ANTH 565 - (3) (IR)
Selected Topics in Ethnology of Southeast Asia

AR H 585 - (3) (O)
World Buddhist Architecture

ECON 451 - (3) (Y)
Economic Development

EVSC 465 - (3) (E)
Urban Spatial Systems

GFCG 101 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Comparative Government

GFCG 506 - (3) (Y)
Political Development and Developmental Politics

GFIR 507 - (3) (Y)
Ideological Influences in International Relations

HISA 312 - (3) (IR)
History of Women in Asia

LING 325 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Linguistics

MUSI 207 - (3) (Y)
Music in World Cultures

RELG 104 - (3) (S)
Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions

RELG 354 - (3) (Y)
Comparative Religious Ethics

RELG 517 - (3) (Y)
Seminar: The History of Religions

RELI 207 - (3) (Y)
Classical Islam

RELI 312 - (3) (O)
Sufism

RELI 367 - (3) (E)
Religion and Politics in Islam

RELI 540 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Islamic Theology