5: Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

General Information | Programs and Degrees Offered | Admission Information
Financial Assistance | Graduate Academic Regulations
Requirements for Specific Graduate Degrees | Departments and Programs | Faculty

Non-Departmental | Anthropology | Art | Asian and Middle Eastern | Asian Studies | Astronomy
Biochemistry | Biology | Biological and Physical Sciences | Biophysics | Cell and Molecular Biology
Cell Biology | Chemistry | Classics | Commerce | Drama | Economics | English | Environmental Sciences
French | German | Government and Foreign Affairs | Health Evaluation Sciences | History | Linguistics
Mathematics | Microbiology | Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics | Music | Neuroscience
Pharmacology | Philosophy | Physics | Psychology | Religious Studies | Russian and East European Studies
Slavic | Sociology | Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese | Statistics | Surgery

Division of Statistics
Course Descriptions | Division Degree Requirements

Division Degree Requirements

Programs of Study   The Division of Statistics administers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. These programs provide diverse opportunities for advanced study and research in all areas of applied and theoretical statistics, and practical experience in statistical consulting.

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree is normally completed within three semesters, though in some cases, the degree can be completed in one calendar year (two semesters and a summer session). Candidates for the M.S. degree complete specific course requirements covering the breadth of applied and theoretical statistics, and statistical consulting, and pass certain general examinations based on those courses.

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is normally completed within five years. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree fulfill certain course requirements and examinations beyond the M.S. degree. The fundamental addition is the Ph.D. dissertation, which presents original research performed under the supervision of a faculty member.

All full-time graduate students are required, as part of their training, to gain instructional experience by assisting with the teaching of undergraduate courses.

Master of Science Degree
Course requirements   The M.S. degree requires 24 credits of statistics and approved mathematics courses at the 500 level and above. These credits include applied linear models (STAT 512), applied multivariate statistics (STAT 513), experimental design (STAT 516), sample surveys (STAT 718), statistical consulting (STAT 995), and stochastic processes (MATH 511).

Excluding STAT 501, STAT 520, directed reading (STAT 996), non-topical research (STAT 997 and 999), and statistics seminar (STAT 912), all other statistics courses at the 500 level or above may be counted toward the M.S. degree. In addition, statistical consulting (STAT 995) may be counted for at most 6 credits.

Mathematics courses which may be counted without special permission are MATH 531, 551, 731 and 736. Moreover, MATH 509 or 510 may not be counted toward the 24-credit requirement. Other mathematics courses, and courses from other university programs such as applied mathematics, computer science, economics, and systems engineering, may be counted subject to successful petition to the Graduate Committee of the Division of Statistics.

General examinations   Candidates for the M.S. degree will take the general examinations immediately upon completion of the course requirements. These examinations will be based on the following courses: STAT 512, STAT 513, one of STAT 516 or STAT 531 or STAT 718, and MATH 511.

Language requirement   There is no foreign language requirement, but there is a computing requirement in which candidates for the M.S. degree, as part of the general examinations, are required to demonstrate competency in a programming language (e.g., FORTRAN, PASCAL, C) and in a standard statistical package (e.g., BMDP, MINITAB, SAS, S-PLUS, SPSS).

Doctor of Philosophy Degree
Course requirements   The Ph.D. degree requires 72 credits of statistics and approved mathematics courses at the 500 level and above. Excepting STAT 501 and STAT 520, all statistics courses at the 500 level and higher may be counted toward the Ph.D. degree. However, statistical consulting (STAT 995) is limited to a minimum of 3 credits and a maximum of 6 credits. Further, statistics seminar (STAT 912), directed reading (STAT 996), and non-topical or dissertation research (STAT 997 and 999) are limited to a combined total of 18 credits.

Mathematics courses which may be counted without special permission are MATH 511, 531, 532, 551, 552, 731, 732 and 736. Moreover, MATH 509 or 510 may not be used for the Ph.D. degree requirements. Other mathematics courses, as well as courses from other University programs such as applied mathematics, computer science, economics, and systems engineering, may be counted subject to successful petition to the Graduate Committee of the Division of Statistics.

General examinations   These are written examinations based on all first-year courses taken by the candidate. These examinations test whether the candidate has the inventiveness and command of basic material necessary to pursue a Ph.D. degree, and are taken after the candidate has completed one calendar year within the program.

Qualifying examination   The qualifying examination is an oral examination or presentation set by a committee consisting of the candidate's major advisor and at least one other faculty member. The examination tests whether the student is prepared to embark on dissertation work in a specific area of research. Candidates take this examination by the end of their fifth semester in the program.

Language requirement   There is no foreign language requirement, but there is a computing requirement in which candidates for the Ph.D. degree will be required to demonstrate competency in a programming language (e.g., FORTRAN, PASCAL, C) and in a standard statistical package (e.g., BMDP, MINITAB, SAS, S-PLUS, SPSS).


Continue to: Department of Surgery
Return to: Chapter 5 Index