6: Graduate School of Architecture

General Information | Programs and Degrees Offered | Course Descriptions | Faculty

Ownership of Student Works | Applications | Master of Architecture
Master of Landscape Architecture | Master of Planning | Master of Architectural History
Doctor of Philosophy in the History of Architecture | Interdisciplinary Programs | Programs Abroad

Master of Landscape Architecture

Admission   Students from two types of academic backgrounds are admitted to the graduate degree program: those without degree backgrounds in architecture or landscape architecture, and those with backgrounds in these fields of study.

Students without prior background study constitute the majority of the student body. They are from a wide diversity of academic fields. Normally, they complete the degree requirements in six semesters, plus a prerequisite summer session studio taken prior to the first fall semester. This three and a half year program comprises the Path A curriculum. Prior to enrollment, students are encouraged to take a drawing course.

Students with degree backgrounds in architecture and landscape architecture can be granted advanced standing and may complete the degree requirements in four semesters. The Path A advanced standing program is for applicants with undergraduate degrees in Architecture. The Path B program is for applicants with professional undergraduate degrees in landscape architecture (B.L.A. or B.S.L.A.).

Curriculum   The department offers a professional degree program at the graduate level with an emphasis on design. Graduates are prepared for professional work in private offices, teaching, and public service. Design is understood to be the intentional expression of values in built form. As a landscape architect, one translates cultural values about humanity's relationship to the natural world and then embodies those values in built work. This translation and interpretation leads one to explore the intersection of design, history, ecology, ethics, philosophy, social sciences, and engineering. Thus, students are required to take a wide range of studios, lecture courses, and reading seminars which address these topics. The heart of the program lies in its design studios, which afford an opportunity for intensive individual instruction. Special attention is given to history and theory as a means of providing a perspective on the design tasks of the present as well as a commitment to building, carefully and thoughtfully, with the land.

During the final semester, students may choose from three studio options: an independent studio, a landscape architecture studio, or an interdisciplinary studio in architecture, urbanism, or historic preservation. If an independent studio is pursued, students are required to take L AR 821 (Research Methods), during the prior semester as a means of preparation.

All Master of Landscape Architecture students in a two-year or longer program must take L AR 600 (The Quest for Order).

Path A Curriculum
The Path A program allows students with liberal arts undergraduate degrees or pre-professional undergraduate degrees (e.g. B.S. in Architecture) to obtain a first professional degree in landscape architecture. This requires three years plus an introductory summer session of 8 weeks duration. Each semester's work consists of a design studio and supporting history/theory, construction and natural systems courses.

A total of fifteen elective credits are required. Six of those credits (two courses) must be taken in the Department of Landscape Architecture. The remaining credits can be taken in any department of the School and throughout the University. Since students are coming from different backgrounds and experiences, it is expected that the electives can either be distributed to give students exposure to the different fields related to landscape architecture, or they can be focused to develop an area of expertise, such as design theory, historic preservation, ecological design and planning, or urbanism. Students can undertake an independent study with a faculty member as one of their electives, but those wishing to take more than one independent study must petition the faculty to do so.

In the final year, students may elect to undertake an independent studio. If so, L AR 821 (Research Methods) must be taken in the fall semester in order to develop a thesis, identify a faculty advisor(s), and prepare a theoretical basis for the spring term independent studio. L AR 821 counts as one of the elective courses.

Summer Session
L AR 501Introduction to Landscape Architecture Design3
L AR 502Introduction to Landscape Architecture Design3
L AR 503Landscape Architectural Drawing and Representation2
8
First Year
First Semester
L AR 601Design Studio I: Architecture and Landscape6
L AR 600The Quest for Order3
L AR 507Plants and Environment I3
L AR 531Construction I: Landform and Grading4
PLAN 511Information Technology in Planning: Imaging (recommended)(1)
16
Second Semester
L AR 602Design Studio II: Constructing Sites 6
L AR 512History of Landscape Arch.3
L AR 508Plants and Environment II3
L AR 535Intro to Sites: Applied Ecology4
PLAN 512Computers in Planning: GIS (recommended)(1)
16
Second Year
First Semester
L AR 701Design Studio III: Urban and Community Design6
L AR 514Theories of Modern Landscape Architecture3
L AR 713Construction II: Site Engineering4
Elective[1]3
PLAN 511Information Technology in Planning: Form 2 (recommended)(1)
16
Second Semester
L AR 702Design Studio IV: Urban Parks6
L AR 705Planted Form3
L AR 714Construction III: Material, Detail, Expression 4
AR H 502History of Architecture: Renaissance to Modern3
16
Third Year
First Semester
L AR 801Design Studio V: Options6
Electives[1]9
15
Second Semester
L AR 802Independent Studio VI[1]6
L AR 804Professional Practice3
L AR 825Construction IV: Road Design4
Elective[1]3
16
Total103

[1]Students are required to take two of their five electives in the Department of Landscape Architecture. The other three courses may be taken in any department in the University; one of these three may be an independent study advised by a member of the landscape architecture faculty. Students may petition the landscape architecture faculty if they care to undertake more than one independent study.

Path A Advanced Standing Curriculum
Students with accredited baccalaureate degrees in architecture are admitted with advanced standing and generally complete 64 hours of course work for the degree, depending upon the extent to which technical courses in landscape architecture were included in their architectural studies. The following program is representative, but may vary according to individual interest and prior work.

First Year
First Semester
L AR 701Design Studio III: Urban and Community Design6
L AR 600The Quest for Order3
L AR 507Plants and Environment I3
L AR 531Construction I: Landform & Grading 4
PLAN 511Information Technology in Planning: Imaging (recommended)(1)
16
Second Semester
L AR 702Design Studio IV: Urban Parks6
L AR 512History of Landscape Architecture3
L AR 508Plants and Environment II3
L AR 535Intro to Sites: Applied Ecology4
PLAN 512Computers in Planning: GIS (recommended)(1)
16
Second Year
First Semester
L AR 801Design Studio V: Options6
L AR 514Theories of Modern Landscape Architecture3
L AR 713Construction II: Site Engineering4
Landscape Elective3
PLAN 511Information Technology in Planning: Form 2 (recommended)(1)
16
Second Semester
L AR 802Independent Studio VI6
L AR 705Planted Form3
L AR 825Construction IV: Principles of Road Design4
L AR 804Professional Practice3
16
Total64

Path B Curriculum
Students with accredited baccalaureate degrees in landscape architecture are admitted with advanced standing and normally complete the degree in four academic semesters. Their programs are tailored to their individual design and research interests. They are required to complete at least 61 hours of course work, which includes four design studios and two landscape architecture electives. If an independent studio is pursued, it must be preceded by L AR 821 (Research Methods). The following program is representative but may vary according to individual interest and prior course work. Students are encouraged to enroll in courses in all departments of the School, and in related fields of study across the University.

First Year
First Semester
L AR 701Design Studio III: Urban and Community Design6
L AR 600The Quest for Order3
L AR 514Introduction to Theories of Modern Landscape Architecture3
Elective[1]3
15
Second Semester
L AR 702Design Studio IV: Urban Parks6
L AR 825Construction IV: Principles of Road Design4
Electives[1]6
16
Second Year
First Semester
L AR 801Design Studio V: Options6
Electives[1]9
15
Second Semester
L AR 802Independent Studio VI6
L AR 804Professional Practice3
Electives[1]6
15
Total61

[1]Path B students have eight elective courses, a minimum of two of which must be taken from the landscape architecture department offerings. An additional two electives may be taken as independent studies with landscape architecture faculty. It is anticipated that Path B students will use their electives to develop an area of expertise, and to round out the course work they took as undergraduates. Each student works closely with a faculty advisor to develop their elective curriculum.

Special Programs
Independent Studio and Interdisciplinary Options   The final semester of design course work provides the student with the opportunity to investigate an area of special interest through an independent studio, an interdisciplinary studio, or an advanced landscape architecture studio. If the student undertakes an independent studio in the spring term, it must be preceded by L AR 821 (Research Methods). Research Methods and Independent Studio are taken with a faculty adviser who works closely with the student in the development of a thesis, and the exploration of its design implications.

Historic Preservation Program   Admission to the Historic Preservation Program is subject to approval by the Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture and the Director of the Preservation Program. Students must also meet all normal requirements for admission to and completion of the Master of Landscape Architecture Program. See the section on interdisciplinary programs for a description of the program and the criteria for admission.

American Urbanism Program   Admission to the American Urbanism Program is subject to approval by the Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture and the Director of the American Urbanism Program. Students must also meet all normal requirements for admission to and completion of the Master of Landscape Architecture Program. See the section on interdisciplinary programs for a description of the program and the criteria for admission.

Accreditation   The Graduate Program in Landscape Architecture is accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board.

Programs Abroad   Landscape architecture students may, with approval, spend the fall semester of their third year in Venice participating in an interdisciplinary studio. They may also attend the summer program in Vicenza.


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