10: School of Engineering and Applied Science

General Information | Degree Programs | Curricula | Course Descriptions | Faculty

Aerospace Engineering | Applied Mathematics | Biomedical Engineering | Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering | Computer Science | Computer Engineering (Computer Science) | Electrical Engineering
Computer Engineering (Electrical Engineering) | Engineering Science | Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering | Systems Engineering | Division of Technology, Culture, and Communication

Engineering Science

The Engineering Science Program offers the engineering student an opportunity to select a program of studies to meet special academic interests which do not fall within the other engineering degree programs offered at the University of Virginia. Students select engineering science to prepare for special areas in engineering and applied science, such as materials science and engineering, biomedical engineering, medical school, and engineering physics. In addition students may wish to obtain a broad engineering/science background as preparation for work in non-engineering fields (e.g., teaching, business, etc.). Because of the flexibility of this program in the last two years, it is also an ideal program for students wishing to enter the bachelor's/master's program at Virginia.

The engineering science student in collaboration with his or her advisor are expected to develop a meaningful degree program. Materials science and engineering and biomedical engineering programs both developed recommended courses for the technical electives to lead to undergraduate degrees in these areas. Those courses for the option in materials science and engineering are described in a later section and can lead to careers in materials science with a B.S. or preparation for graduate work. Engineering science students who follow the biomedical engineering track choose from among four options: a pre-med course of studies, or a course of studies that in addition to biomedical engineering includes electrical, mechanical or chemical engineering as an area of concentration. Their program of studies should be such that at the end of four years a substantial part of the course requirements in their chosen area of concentration will have been covered, in addition to the pre-med or biomedical engineering courses that they will have taken.

Engineering Science Curriculum [1]

First Semester
APMA 101Calculus I 4
CHEM 151Introductory Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 151LIntrodictory Chemistry for Engineers Laboratory1
ENGR 160Engineering Concepts 3
ENGR 164Engineering Design 3
TCC 101Language Communication and the Technological Society 3
Total17
Second Semester
APMA 102Calculus II 4
PHYS 142EGeneral Physics I 4
CS 182Introduction to FORTRAN Programming or
CS 101Introduction to Computer Science 3
CHEM 152Introductory Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 151LIntroductory Chemistry for Engineers Laboratory1
General Education elective[2]3
Total18
Third Semester
APMA 205Calculus III 4
PHYS 241EGeneral Physics II 3
PHYS 241LGeneral Physics Laboratory I 1
ENGR 203Electrical Science 3
ENGR 202Thermodynamics 3
General Education elective[2]3
Total17
Fourth Semester
APMA 206Differential Equations I 4
PHYS 242EGeneral Physics III 3
PHYS 242LGeneral Physics Laboratory II 1
ENGR 2__Core elective 3
Technical elective[3]3
TCC 2__TCC elective 3
Total17
Fifth Semester
APMA ___Advanced Math[4]3
Advanced Natural Science[5]3
Technical elective[3]3
Technical elective[3]3
Lab elective[6]2
General Education elective[2]3
Total17
Sixth Semester
APMA/CS ___Advanced Math/Computer Science[4]3
Advanced Natural Science[5]3
Technical elective[3]3
Technical elective[3]3
Lab elective[6]1
General Education elective[2]3
Total16
Seventh Semester
TCC 401Western Technology and Culture 3
Technical elective[3]3
Technical elective[3]3
Advanced Project[7]3
General Education elective[2]3
Total15
Eighth Semester
TCC 402The Engineer in Society 3
Technical elective[3]3
Technical elective[3]3
Advanced Project[7]3
General Education elective[2]3
Total15
132 credits - minimum required for graduation.

[1]Electives in an approved plan of study, which constitutes a "learning contract" between the student and the school, will be selected so as to form a coherent whole for a broad-based education in engineering science.
[2]One or two general education electives may be replaced by unrestricted electives.
[3]Technical electives should be chosen from ENGR 2__, CHEM 241, 242, 271, 272, or other 300-level (or above) technical courses appropriate to the student's program of study. At least two of the technical electives must be 400-level (or above) courses in the School of Engineering and Applied Science.
[4]The program must include two advanced math courses, 300-level or above, or one advanced math course and a computer science course beyond the level of CS 182/CS 101.
[5]Advanced sciences are 300-level or above courses in physics, chemistry, and/or biology, materials science, and/or environmental sciences.
[6]Laboratory electives must be an advanced lab.
[7]Students are expected to define a project to be completed in the fourth year.


Continue to: Materials Science and Engineering
Return to: Chapter 10 Index