6: College of Arts and Sciences

General Information | Academic Information | Departments and Programs | Faculty

Afro-American and African Studies | Anthropology | Archaeology | Art | Asian and Middle Eastern
Asian Studies | Astronomy | Biology | Chemistry | Classics | Cognitive Science | Comparative Literature
Drama | Economics | English | Environmental Sciences | French | German | Government and Foreign Affairs
History | Latin American Studies | Linguistics | Mathematics | Medieval Studies
Middle East Studies | Music | Personal Skills | Philosophy | Physics | Political and Social Thought
Psychology | Religious Studies | Service Physical Education | Slavic | Sociology
Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese | Statistics | University Seminars | Women's Studies

African History | East Asian History | European History | Latin American History
Middle East History | South Asian History | General History | United States History

Course Descriptions

African History

HIAF 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in African History

An introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIAF 201 - (4) (Y)
Early African History

Study of the history of African civilizations from the iron age through the era of the slave trade, ca. 1800. Emphasizes the search for the themes of social, political, economic, and intellectual history which present African civilizations on their own terms.

HIAF 202 - (4) (Y)
Modern African History

Study of the history of Africa and its interaction with the western world from the mid-19th century to the present. Emphasizes continuities in African civilization from imperialism to independence that transcend the colonial interlude of the 20th century.

HIAF 203 - (4) (IR)
The African Diaspora

Study of the history of African peoples and their interaction with the wider world. Emphasizes historical and cultural ties between African diasporic communities and the homeland to the mid-19th century. Cross-listed as AAS 101.

HIAF 301 - (3) (IR)
North African History From Carthage to the Algerian Revolution

Survey introducing the main outlines of North African political, economic, and cultural history from the rise of Carthage as a Mediterranean power until the conclusion of the Algerian war for independence in 1962, and the creation of a system of nation-states in the region. It places the North African historical experience within the framework of both Mediterranean/European history and African history. Focuses mainly upon the area stretching from Morocco's Atlantic coast to the Nile Delta; also considered are Andalusia and Sicily, and the ties between Northwest Africa and sub-Saharan regions, particularly West Africa.

HIAF 302 - (3) (IR)
History of Southern Africa

Study of the history of Africa generally south of the Zambezi River. Emphasizes African institutions, creation of ethnic and racial identities, industrialization, and rural poverty, from the early formation of historical communities to recent times.

HIAF 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in African History

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. Seminar work results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIAF 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in African History

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIAF 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics in African History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly. Open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.

HIAF 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in African History

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member, any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.

HIAF 511 - (3) (IR)
Slave Systems in Africa and the Americas

Historical study of the growth and evolution of the systems of "slavery" in Africa, the American south, and Latin America (including the Caribbean).

East Asian History

HIEA 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in East Asian History

An introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIEA 201 - (3) (IR)
Chinese Culture and Institutions

An introduction to traditional Chinese social, political, economic and military institutions, major literary, artistic and intellectual movements, and developments in the medical and culinary arts.

HIEA 203 - (3) (Y)
Modern China: The Road to Revolution

Study of the transformation of Chinese politics, thought, institutions, and foreign relations since the Opium War. Emphasizes the development of modern nationalism and Communism.

HIEA 205 - (3) (IR)
Korean Culture and Institutions

An introduction to traditional Korean social, political and economic institutions, major literary, artistic, and intellectual movements. Emphasizes Korea as a peninsular expression of East Asian civilization.

HIEA 207 - (3) (IR)
Japan, From Susanno to Sony

A comprehensive introduction to Japan from the earliest times to the present, highlighting the key aspects of its social, economic, and political history, and illuminating the evolution of popular culture and the role of the military.

HIEA 311 - (3) (Y)
The Traditional Chinese Order, Antiquity-Sixth Century A.D.

A survey of the social, political and economic organization of traditional Chinese society, traditional Chinese foreign policy, and major literary, artistic and intellectual movements.

HIEA 312 - (3) (IR)
The Traditional Chinese Order, Seventh Century-Seventeenth Century

A survey of the social, political and economic organization of traditional Chinese society, traditional Chinese foreign policy, and major literary, artistic and intellectual movements.

HIEA 314 - (3) (IR)
Political and Social Thought in Modern China

Study of political and social thought from the early 20th century to the present, as reflected in written sources (including fiction), art, and films.

HIEA 321 - (3) (IR)
Japan's Economic Miracle

Examines the history of Japan since the early 19th century by exploring the causes and consequences of the economic and social changes that have made Japan one of the most important advanced industrial countries in the contemporary world.

HIEA 322 - (3) (IR)
Japan's Political History

Examines Japanese history since the early 19th century, exploring changes in political ideas, institutions, and behavior among both governing elites and the mass of Japanese citizenry.

HIEA 331 - (3) (Y)
Peasants, Students and Women: Social Movement in Twentieth-Century China

Study of rural revolution, student movements, women's liberation, and the transformation of the social order since the late 19th century.

HIEA 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in East Asian History

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIEA 402 - (4) (IR)
Colloquium in East Asia

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIEA 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics in East Asian History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly; open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.

HIEA 404 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in East Asia

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.

European History

HIEU 100 - (3) (S) Introductory Seminar in European History
An introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIEU 201 - (4) (Y)
Western Civilization I

A survey of the fundamental institutions and ideas that have shaped the Western world. Topics include great religious and philosophical traditions, political ideas, literary forms, artistic achievements and institutional structures from the world of the ancient Hebrews to the eve of the modern world (c. 3000 B.C. to 1600 A.D.).

HIEU 202 - (4) (Y)
Western Civilization II

A survey of the political and cultural history of the Western world in modern times. Emphasizes the distinctiveness of Western civilization, on the reasons for the rise of the West to global domination, and the relative decline of the West in recent times.

HIEU 203 - (3) (Y)
Ancient Greece

Study of the political, military, and social history of Ancient Greece from the Homeric age to the death of Alexander the Great, emphasizing the development and interactions of Sparta and Athens.

HIEU 204 - (3) (Y)
Roman Republic and Empire

A survey of the political, social, and institutional growth of the Roman Republic. focusing on its downfall and replacement by an imperial form of government, the subsequent history of that imperial form of government, and the social and economic life during the Roman Empire, up to its own decline and fall.

HIEU 205 - (3) (IR)
Economic History of Europe

Study of European economic history from the middle ages to the industrial revolution. Emphasizes the emergence of the market and the rise of capitalism in Great Britain. Cross-listed as ECON 205.

HIEU 206 - (3) (Y)
The Birth of Europe

Study of ways of life and thought in the formation of western Europe from the 4th century A.D. to the 15th. A survey of the development of society and culture in town and countryside, the growth of economic, political and religious institutions, and the impact of Muslim and Byzantine civilizations.

HIEU 207 - (3) (Y)
Early Modern Europe, 1500-1815

Analysis of the political, social, and economic developments from after the Reformation to the fall of Napoleon.

HIEU 208 - (3) (Y)
Modern European History Since 1815

Analysis of the political, social, and economic developments in Europe from the age of Napoleon to the present.

HIEU 211 - (3) (Y)
History of England to 1688

Study of England and the British Isles from earliest times to the accession of William III.

HIEU 212 - (3) (Y)
Modern England 1688-1945

A broad survey of the history of modern England--its rise and fall--from the late 17th century to the end of World War II.

HIEU 215 - (3) (Y)
History of the Russian Empire 1700-1917

Study of the history of Russia from Peter the Great to the Bolshevik Revolution and the establishment of Soviet power.

HIEU 216 - (3) (Y)
History of Russia Since 1917

Lectures and section meetings on the collapse of the Russian Empire and the rise of the Communist state. Emphasizes the social revolution, Stalinism and subsequent "de-Stalinization," national minorities, and the collapse of the Soviet regime.

HIEU 311 - (3) (IR)
Early Medieval Civilization

Study of early medieval civilization from late antiquity to the 11th century. Emphasizes selected themes in cultural history.

HIEU 312 - (3) (IR)
Later Medieval Civilization

A discussion of intellectual and cultural history, political and social theories, and religious movements from the 11th to the 16th centuries.

HIEU 313 - (3) (IR)
The World of Charlemagne

Exploration of the Byzantine, Muslim and European worlds in the 8th and 9th centuries. Compares political, institutional and social history, and the Catholic, Orthodox, and Islamic faiths.

HIEU 314 - (3) (IR)
Anglo-Saxon England

A survey of England and its Celtic neighbors in Wales, Scotland, and Ireland from the departure of the Romans in the early 5th century to the Scandinavian conquest in 1016. Emphasizes the human diversity and cultural and institutional creativity of the Anglo-Saxons.

HIEU 315 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Iberia, 411-1469

A survey of Iberian history from the collapse of Roman rules to the union of the crowns of Aragon and Castille in 1469, encompassing the development of regional identities, the interaction of Christian, Moslem, and Jewish cultures, and Iberia's relations with its European neighbors.

HIEU 316 - (3) (IR)
Byzantine Civilization

A survey of the political and cultural history of the Byzantine Empire and of Orthodox Christianity from late antiquity to the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

HIEU 317 - (3) (IR)
Eastern Christianity

Survey of the history of Christianity in the Byzantine world and the Middle East from late antiquity (age of emperor Justinian) until the fall of Constantinople. Emphasizes developments in theology, spirituality and art, and the relation of Christianity to Islam. Some consideration of Eastern Christianity in modern times.

HIEU 318 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Christianity

Detailed study of the development of Christianity in the Middle Ages and of how it reflected upon itself in terms of theology, piety, and politics. Cross-listed as RELC 325.

HIEU 321 - (3) (IR)
Medieval and Renaissance Italy

Survey of the development of the Italian city-state between 1050 and 1550, emphasizing the social and political context of Italian culture.

HIEU 322 - (3) (IR)
The Culture of the Renaissance

A survey of the growth and diffusion of educational, literary, and artistic innovations in Europe between 1300 and 1600.

HIEU 323 - (3) (IR)
Europe in the Age of Reformation, 1450-1650

A survey of the social, political, economic, and especially the religious changes that came over Europe during the period 1450 to 1650. Readings regularly include Thomas More, Martin Luther, Michel de Montaigne, and other major figures.

HIEU 324 - (3) (IR)
The Religious Reformations

A study of the disintegration of Medieval Catholicism and the rise of Protestant Christianity in the 16th century with special attention to the interaction of religious, social, and political issues. Cross-listed as RELC 326.

HIEU 325 - (3) (IR)
Imperial Spain and Portugal, 1469-1808

General survey of the Iberian peninsula from Ferdinand and Isabella to Napoleon, including the development of absolutism, the enforcement of religious orthodoxy, the conquest of the New World and the Iberian imperial systems, the price revolution, the "decline" of Spain and the Bourbon reforms, with attention to the arts and literature of the Golden Age.

HIEU 326 - (3) (IR)
History of Russia to 1700

Topics include the history of the formation of the Kievan State, the Appanage period, Mongol domination and the emergence of the Muscovite state; foundations of the first Russian state, evolution of its institutions, cultural influences from the origin to the decline; and the rise of successor states and particularly the multi-national state of Moscow.

HIEU 327 - (3) (IR)
Age of Russian Absolutism, 1613-1855

Intensive study of Russian history from the reign of the first Romanov tsar to the defeat in the Crimean War. Emphasizes the evolution of absolutism in Russia and the effects of the changes introduced by Peter the Great.

HIEU 328 - (3) (IR)
Tudor England

Study of the history of England (and its foreign relations especially with Scotland, France and Spain) from the reign of King Richard III to the death of Queen Elizabeth I. Topics include the transition from medieval to early modern society and government, the English Reformation and its consequences, the mid- Tudor crisis, social and economic change, and the principal personalities of the period.

HIEU 329 - (3) (IR)
Stuart England

Study of the history of England (and its foreign relations) from 1603 to 1714, with commentary on some major themes of early Hanoverian England to the end of Sir Robert Walpole's ministry. Topics include newer interpretations on Stuart monarchy, the background and consequences of the Civil War, restoration ideology and politics in relationship to the Cromwellian Interregnum, the Revolution of 1688, social and local history, and the creation of the first British Empire.

HIEU 330 - (3) (IR)
France Under the Old Regime and Revolution

Study of the history of the Old Regime and the revolutionary period, emphasizing political, social, and cultural developments.

HIEU 331 - (3) (IR)
Social History of Early Modern Europe

A survey of social, economic, and demographic structure and change in pre-industrial Europe, with particular attention to social unrest and rebellions.

HIEU 332 - (3) (IR)
The Scientific Revolution, 1450-1700

Study of the history of modern science in its formative period (including the revolutions in astronomy, physics, and physiology, new ideas on scientific method, and the integration of theory and experiment) treated against the backdrop of classical Greek science and in the context of evolving scientific institutions and changing views of religion, politics, magic, alchemy, and ancient authorities.

HIEU 333 - (3) (IR)
Intellectual History of Early Modern Europe

Analysis of the main currents of European thought in the 17th and 18th centuries. Emphasizes major social movements and cultural changes.

HIEU 334 - (3) (IR)
Society and the Sexes in Europe From Late Antiquity to the Reformation

Exploration of the changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society, using primary texts and secondary studies, from late antiquity through the Reformation.

HIEU 335 - (3) (IR)
Society and the Sexes in Europe From the Seventeeth Century to the Present

Changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society, explored through primary texts and secondary studies, from the 17th century to the present.

HIEU 337 - (3) (Y)
The Impact of Printing, 1650-1900

Study of the impact of the printing press on western European culture.

HIEU 340 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth-Century Europe

A survey of the major social, economic, and political trends between the defeat of the Napoleonic Empire and the First World War. Stresses the developments in Western Europe as industrialization, democracy, nationalism, and representative institutions took root.

HIEU 345 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Europe

Study of the main developments in European history from the turn of the century to the eve of the Second World War.

HIEU 346 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Europe

Study of the main developments in European history from the outbreak of the Second World War to the present.

HIEU 350 - (3) (IR)
France Since 1815

Study of French politics and society from the defeat of Napoleon to De Gaulle's republic.

HIEU 351 - (3) (IR)
Modern Italy

Study of the history of Italy from the era of the French Revolution to the present.

HIEU 354 - (3) (Y)
Modern German History

Prerequisite: One completed history course
Introduction to the political, social and cultural history of modern Germany from the French Revolution to the present.

HIEU 356 - (3) (IR)
The Making of Victorian England, 1760-1855

Analysis of the history of England from the age of revolutions--American, French, industrial--in the late 18th century to the height of prosperity, power, and influence in the mid-Victorian era.

HIEU 357 - (3) (IR)
The Decline of England, 1855-1945

Analysis of the history of England during one of the most troubled periods in her national experience, from the age of equipoise in the mid-Victorian era to the age of total war in the first half of our own century.

HIEU 361 - (3) (IR)
Age of Reform and Revolution in Russia, 1855-1917

Intensive study of the changes brought about in the wake of reforms following the Crimean War. Explores the social and political effects of efforts to modernize and industrialize Russia, which led to the growth of political and revolutionary opposition and the overthrow of the monarchy.

HIEU 362 - (3) (Y)
Russian Intellectual History in the 19th Century

Study of the background of Westernization, rise of intelligentsia, development of radical and conservative trends, and the impact of intellectual ferment on Russian culture and politics to 1917.

HIEU 363 - (3) (Y)
Russia in the 20th Century

Analysis of the fall of the tsarist regime, the revolutions of 1917, the Leninist-Stalinist tyranny, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Gorbachev, Yeltsin and the Revolution of 1991. Emphasizes national minorities, diplomatic and social history, and Christianity and Islam.

HIEU 364 - (3) (Y)
National Minorities of Russia

Prerequisite: At least three credits of modern Russian, Chinese, South Asian, or Middle Eastern studies
Study of the ethno-historical origins and development Soviet minorities of the USSR from the earliest times to the present. Focuses on the Uzbek, Turkmen, Kirgiz, Kazakh, Uigur, and Azeri peoples. Three hours of lectures and discussion per week.

HIEU 365 - (3) (Y)
Russian and Soviet Diplomatic History, 1850-Present

Study of the foreign policy legacy of the Russian Empire to the present. Emphasizes World War I, foreign intervention in Russia, the Comintern, the Second World War and after, the Cold War, the expansion and decline of world communism, the collapse of the Soviet empire, and current Russian prospects.

HIEU 366 - (3) (Y)
Europe From the Atlantic to the Urals Since 1945

Analysis of relations between European states--from the Atlantic to the Urals--since 1945; the movement toward European unity from 1945 to the present; the realignment of nations and ideologies in Eastern Europe and the USSR since 1985; reintegration of Eastern Europe and USSR successor states into Europe; and challenges to and opportunities for free-market democracies--particularly the USA and Japan--arising from European unification.

HIEU 373 - (3) (IR)
European Social History, 1770-1890

A study of the evolution of private life from the era of early capitalism to the end of the nineteenth century. Focuses on family life, work experience, material conditions, women's roles, childhood, and youth.

HIEU 374 - (3) (IR)
European Social History, 1890-1980

A study of the evolution of private life from the end of the nineteenth century to the present day. Focuses on family life, work experience, material conditions, women's roles, childhood, and youth.

HIEU 375 - (3) (IR)
Evolution of the International System, 1815-1950

Analysis of the evolution of great-power politics from the post-Napoleonic Congress of Vienna and the systems of Metternich and Bismarck to the great convulsions of the twentieth century and the Russo-American Cold War after World War II.

HIEU 376 - (3) (IR)
Homosexuality and Society in the Modern Western World

The study of this once taboo subject offers a unique perspective on the emergence of a distinct subculture (more recently of a reform movement) within Western society, and on the response--usually hostile, often savagely repressive--of society at large to that subculture. Its primary focus is on that tense relationship and on the light it throws on many facets of cultural, social, and political history in Europe and the United States.

HIEU 377 - (3) (IR)
Science in the Modern World

Study of the development of scientific thought and institutions since 1700, emphasizing the increasing involvement of science in economic, social, political, and military affairs and its relations with philosophical and religious thought.

HIEU 378 - (3) (SI)
Origins of Modern Thought, 1580-1943

Introduces central themes, theorists, and texts in secular European thought since 1580. Surveys the "age of reason," the Enlightenment, romanticism, historicism, positivism, existentialism, and related matters. Works by a variety of thinkers are read, explicated, and discussed.

HIEU 379 - (3) (IR)
Intellectual History of Modern Europe

Study of the main currents of European thought in the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasizes major social movements and cultural changes.

HIEU 380 - (3) (IR)
Origins of Contemporary Thought

Study of selected themes in intellectual history since the mid-19th century, focusing on Darwin, Nietzsche, Freud, Heidegger, and other thinkers, with considerable attention to the intellectual contexts out of which they came and to which they contributed.

HIEU 381 - (3) (IR)
Marx

Introduction to the social theory of Karl Marx. What Marx said, why he said it, what he meant in saying it, and the significance thereof. Situates Marx's writing in the context of 19th-century intellectual history. Attention given to the coherence and validity of the theory, and its subsequent history.

HIEU 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in European History

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIEU 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in European History

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIEU 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics in European History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors.

HIEU 404 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in European History

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.

HIEU 501 - (3) (IR)
Archaic Greece

Prerequisite: HIEU 203 or equivalent
Study of the rise of Greek civilization. Provides a political and constitutional history of the development of the Greek city-state, emphasizing classic Athens.

HIEU 502 - (3) (IR)
Greece in the Fifth Century

Prerequisite: HIEU 203 or equivalent
Examination of the political, diplomatic, and social history of Greece from the end of the Persian Wars in 479 B.C. to the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404/3 B.C. Investigates the origins, course, and importance of the latter war, a watershed in classical Greek history.

HIEU 503 - (3) (IR)
Greece in the Fourth Century

Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent
An advanced course in Greek history that examines in detail the social and economic history of Greece from the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 B.C. to the defeat of the Greek city-states at Chaeronea in 338.

HIEU 504 - (3) (IR)
Roman Republic

Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent
Study of the expansion of Rome from city-state to world empire to the death of Caesar.

HIEU 505 - (3) (IR)
Roman Empire

Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent
Study of the founding and institutions of the Principate, the Dominate, and the decline of antiquity.

HIEU 506 - (3) (IR)
Roman Imperialism

Prerequisite: HIEU 204 or equivalent
An examination of Roman transmarine expansion to determine how and why it happened and the consequences it had, both in Rome and abroad.

HIEU 510 - (3) (IR)
Early Christian Thought

Prerequisite: RELC 205 or permission of instructor
Intensive consideration of a selected issue, movement, or figure in Christian thought of the second through fifth centuries.

HIEU 511 - (3) (IR)
Early Medieval England

A documentary history of English society from the late Saxon period to the reign of King John.

HIEU 512 - (3) (IR)
Later Medieval England

A documentary history of English society from the reign of King John to the death of Richard II.

HIEU 513 - (3) (IR)
Medieval France

Study of societies and governments in medieval Francia from the 11th century to the 14th.

HIEU 516 - (3) (IR)
The Medieval Church

Study of the history of the Western church within the development of medieval society, from the time of Constantine through the 13th century, based on a study of selected texts.

HIEU 517 - (3) (IR)
Medieval Society: Ways of Life and Thought in Western Europe

An introduction to the social and intellectual history from Charlemagne to Dante.

HIEU 518 - (3) (IR)
Historians in the Middle Ages

A discussion of the ways in which important Latin writers of the medieval period looked at the past.

HIEU 519 - (3) (IR)
War and Society in the Middle Ages

A documentary history of warfare in western Europe from the ninth century to the 16th with a discussion of its effect on the political, economic, social, and religious development of the emerging nation states.

HIEU 520 - (3) (IR)
The Culture of the Renaissance

Prerequisite: undergraduates require permission of instructor
A survey of the writing of humanists who lived between 1300 and 1600. Topics include the contributions of humanists to the history of education, political theory, religion, gender relations, and artistic theory. Works by authors such as Petrarch, Machiavelli, Thomas More and Erasmus are studied.

HIEU 521 - (3) (IR)
Early Modern Germany, 1350-1750

Study of late medieval politics, economy, and culture, including the Reformation, Counter-Reformation, the Wars of Religion, pietism and the baroque.

HIEU 526 - (3) (IR)
Russian History to 1700

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings and discussion on selected topics in the evolution of the Russian peoples to the reign of Peter the Great.

HIEU 527 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Russian Absolutism, 1613-1855

Intensive study of Russian history from the reign of the first Romanov tsar to the defeat in the Crimean War. Concentrates on the evolution of absolutism in Russia and the effects of the changes introduced by Peter the Great.

HIEU 530 - (3) (IR)
Nationality, Ethnicity, and Race in Modern Europe

Prerequisite: Undergraduates must have taken one course in modern European history or permission of instructor
A colloquium on how categories of human identity have been conceived, applied, and experienced in Western and Eastern Europe from 1789 to the present. Topics include the construction of identities, national assimilation, inter-confessional conflict, colonialism, immigration, and the human sciences.

HIEU 545 - (3) (IR)
The History of Twentieth Century Europe, 1900-1941

An intensive study of the monograph literature dealing with the first half of the 20th century, concentrating on major problems which have been the subject of scholarly controversy.

HIEU 546 - (3) (IR)
The History of Twentieth-Century Europe Since 1941

An intensive study of the monographic literature dealing with controversial issues in European history since World War II.

HIEU 555 - (3) (IR)
The German World After 1918

Study of the problems in German Politics and society, including those of Austria, Switzerland, and such border areas as Alsace-Lorraine, Luxemburg and the German regions of Czechoslovakia.

HIEU 556, 557 - (3) (IR)
British History Since 1760

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings and discussion on selected topics in British history since the reign of George III.

HIEU 559 - (3) (IR)
The British Economy Since 1850

Study of the structure, performance and policy in the British economy since 1850, focusing on the causes and consequences of Britain's relative economic decline. Cross listed as ECON 507.

HIEU 561 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Reform and Revolution in Russia, 1855-1917

Intensive study of changes brought about in the wake of reforms following the Crimean War. Explores the social and political effects of efforts to modernize and industrialize Russia, which led to the growth of political and revolutionary opposition and the overthrow of the monarchy.

HIEU 562 - (3) (IR)
Russia Since 1917

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings and discussion of the causes for the collapse of the Tsarist regime and the triumph of the Bolsheviks. Examines the development of the Soviet state.

HIEU 564 - (3) (IR)
Russian and Soviet Diplomatic History

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Examination, through readings and discussion, of aspects of Soviet diplomatic history between the wars, attempts by the revolutionary regime to overthrow the capitalist states and to coexist with them, and the road to World War II.

HIEU 566 - (3) (IR)
Nineteenth-Century Russian Intellectual History

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings and discussion of seminal Russian intellectuals and their ideas under the later Romanov Tsars.

HIEU 567 - (3) (IR)
Russian Social History

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Readings and discussion on selected topics in Russian social history during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

HIEU 573 - (3) (IR)
European Social History

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading and discussion of the evolution of private life, emphasizing methodology and the interpretation of sources in social history.

HIEU 575 - (3) (IR)
Evolution of the International System, 1815-1950

Prerequisite: Graduate students and permission of instructor
Study of the evolution of great-power politics from the post-Napoleonic Congress of Vienna and the systems of Metternich and Bismarck to the great convulsions of the twentieth century and the Russo-American Cold War after World War II. Covers same thematic material as HIEU 375 on a more intensive level.

HIEU 577 - (3) (IR)
History of Modern Science

Reading and discussion on selected topics in the history of the natural and social science since 1600.

HIEU 578, 579 - (3) (IR)
European Intellectual History

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Reading, discussion, and papers on selected topics in European intellectual history since the 17th century.

HIEU 580 - (3) (IR)
Postmodernism: Contexts and Anticipations

Prerequisites: Some modest prior background in intellectual history, philosophy, literature, art, architecture, or music
Exploration of the notions of postmodernism and postmodernity. The names are recent and are much in dispute, but the various phenomena that they designate seem interesting and important. Attempts to play postmodernism off against modernism in its several senses (aesthetic, sociological, philosophical), and to examine earlier anticipations of the recent intellectual conflict.

Latin American History

HILA 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in Latin American History

An introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major history.

HILA 201 - (3) (Y)
Colonial Latin America, 1500-1824

An introduction to major developments and issues in the study of Latin American history from native American societies on the eve of the Spanish Conquest to the wars of national independence in the early 19th century.

HILA 202 - (3) (IR)
Modern Latin America, 1824 to Present

An introduction to the history of Latin America from national independence in the early 19th century to the present.

HILA 301 - (3) (IR)
Spanish Frontiers of the American Southwest

Study of the history of the Spanish and Mexican borderlands of the American Southwest (California to Texas) from the 16th century to 1848. Focuses on the timing and differences in exploration, occupation, settlement patterns, role of the church and the military, and Spanish/Indian and Spanish-Mexican/English-American relations in various provinces.

HILA 303 - (3) (IR)
Mexico From Conquest to Nation

Study of Mexican history from 1519 to 1854, emphasizing Spanish/Indian relations, problems of periodization in cultural, economic, and social history, the state and the church in public life, the significance of national independence, and regional variation in all of these subjects.

HILA 304 - (3) (IR)
Mexico, Revolution and Evolution, 1854 to Present

Study of Mexican history since the wars of reform in the 1850s. The Revolution, 1910-1920, its origins and meaning for modern Mexico, is the centerpiece. Topics include political ideas, church and state, the growth of nationalism and the state, economic changes, urbanization, land reform, and the intractable problem of inequality in the 20th century.

HILA 305 - (3) (IR)
Modern Central America

Study of the history of Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, and El Salvador from 19th century fragmentation, oligarchic, foreign, and military rule, to the emergence of popular nationalisms.

HILA 306 - (3) (IR)
History of Modern Brazil

A close exploration of Brazilian history from Independence to the present day. Through an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, the course examines the legacy of slavery, the importance of popular culture, and debates over national identity in the making of a distinctively ambiguous Brazilian "modernity," broadly understood.

HILA 311 - (3) (IR)
Public Life in Modern Latin America

A thematic introduction to the forces that shape the emerging nations of Latin America since independence, with an emphasis on the dynamic reproduction of hierarchies that correspond to the patrimonial, aristocratic, and populist legitimization of social, cultural, and political relations in city life.

HILA 401 - (4) (IR)
Seminar in Latin American History

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. Seminar work results primarily in the preparation of substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HILA 402 - (4) (IR)
Colloquium in Latin American History

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HILA 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics in Latin American History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly. Open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.

HILA 404 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in Latin American History

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.

HILA 501 - (3) (IR)
Colonial Latin American History

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduates with consent of instructor and graduate students with reading knowledge of Spanish
An intensive reading program in the historiography of major issues of the colonial field, in preparation for graduate-level research.

HILA 502 - (3) (IR)
Modern Latin American History

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduates with consent of instructor and graduate students with reading knowledge of Spanish
An intensive reading program in the historiography of major issues of the modern field, in preparation for graduate-level research.

Middle East History

HIME 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in Middle East History

An introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIME 201 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 570-ca. 1500

Explores the the historical evolution of the Middle East and North Africa from the birth of Islam to the establishment of the Ottoman state in the early 16th century. Topics include the Fertile Crescent, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Iran/Persia, and the Arabian Peninsula; Andalusia (Muslim Spain); North Africa, Anatolia; Central Asia; Islam as a religious system, way of life, and world civilization; and the historical development of cultural, social, legal, and political Islamic institutions.

HIME 202 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 1500-Present

As a continuation of HIME 201 (which is not a prerequisite), this course surveys the historical evolution of the Middle East and North Africa, i.e., the region stretching from Morocco to Afghanistan, and from the Balkans and Anatolia to the Arabian Peninsula. Topics include the main political configurations of the area from the birth of Islam until the Mongol aftermath; the rise of the "gunpowder Empires" of the 16th century; the Ottoman and Safavid (Iran) states; and the modern nation-state systems of the present century, ca. 1980. The dominant political, religious, economic, social, and cultural features of Middle Eastern peoples and societies are examined, as are relationships between the region and other parts of Eurasia, particularly Western Europe.

HIME 319 - (3) (IR)
Christianity and Islam

Study of Christianity in the Middle East in the centuries after the rise of Islam. Cross-listed as RELC 329.

HIME 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in Middle East and North Africa History

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIME 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in Middle East History

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topics of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIME 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in Middle Eastern History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors.

HIME 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Middle Eastern History

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member
any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.

HIME 502 - (3) (IR)
Revolution, Islam, and Gender in the Middle East

Prerequisites: One course in Middle Eastern history or politics, or permission of instructor
Comparative study of revolution in 20th-century Turkey, Egypt, Algeria, and Iran, with particular reference to colonial and post-colonial class, religion, and gender movements.

South Asian History

HISA 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in South Asia

An introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HISA 201 - (3) (IR)
History and Civilization of Classical India

Study of the major elements of South Asian civilization, from the Stone Age to 1200, including the Indus Valley, Vedic literatures, Buddhism, Jainism, Epic traditions, the caste system, Mauryan and Guptan Empires, and devotional Hinduism.

HISA 202 - (3) (IR)
History and Civilization of Medieval India

Study of the social, political, economic and cultural history of South Asia from 1200 to 1800, from the Turkic invasions through the major Islamic dynasties, especially the Mughal Empire, to the establishment of English hegemony in the maritime provinces.

HISA 203 - (3) (IR)
History of Modern India

A survey of 200 years of Indian history from the mid-18th century to the contemporary present, focusing on the imperial/colonial encounter with the British Raj before Independence, and the social and political permutations of freedom in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka since.

HISA 301 - (3) (IR)
History of Muslim India

The study of the nature of Islamic political dominance in a non-Muslim society; Turko-Afghan and Mughal political institutions; art, letters and learning under the Delhi Sultanate, regional rulers and Mughals; and religious and cultural life during the Muslim period in South Asia.

HISA 302 - (3) (IR)
India From Akbar to Victoria

Study of the society and politics in the Mughal Empire, the Empire's decline and the rise of successor states, the English as a regional power and their expansion, and social, economic and political change under British paramountcy, including the 1857 Revolt.

HISA 303 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century India

Survey of one hundred years of Indian history, defining the qualities of the world's first major anti-colonial movement of nationalism and the changes and cultural continuities of India's democratic policy in the decades since 1947.

HISA 311 - (3) (IR)
Social and Political Movements in Twentieth-Century India

A consideration of the relationships between land, people, and politics in modern South Asia.

HISA 312 - (3) (IR)
History of Women in South Asia

A survey of the evolving definitions and roles of women in the major social and cultural traditions of South Asia, i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.

HISA 401 - (4) (IR)
Seminar in South Asia

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HISA 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in South Asia

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HISA 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in South Asian History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors.

HISA 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in South Asia

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

HISA 502 - (3) (IR)
Historiography of Early Modern South Asia

Analysis of historical sources and historians of political systems in Muslim India until the rise of British power.

HISA 510 - (3) (IR)
Economic History of India

Analysis of regional economic systems prior to European penetration; the establishment and growth of European trading companies in the 17th and 18th centuries; commercialization of agriculture, the emergence of a unified Indian economy in the 19th century, and industrialization and economic development in the 20th century.

General History

HIST 100 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Seminar in History

An introduction to the study of history intended for first- and second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIST 301 - (3) (IR)
History of Canada

Study of the development of Canada from the early 16th century to the present. Emphasizes Canadian affairs after 1814, particularly the growth of Canadian political institutions, the interplay of the North Atlantic community countries, and the emergence of Anglo-French dualism in Canadian life.

HIST 302 - (3) (IR)
History of British West Indies

Study of development of the British islands in the West Indies from the period of settlement to the present.

HIST 304 - (3) (IR)
The British Empire in the 18th Century

Surveys the history of the First British Empire to 1815, with concentration on the 18th century and on the loss of the American Colonies as a breaking point. It explores problems inherent in the imperial relationship between Mother Country and colonies and is an introduction to studies in colonialism and imperialism as they relate to the histories of England, early America, the West Indies, and South Asia and Africa.

HIST 401 - (4) (Y)
Major Seminar

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 402 - (4) (Y)
Major Colloquium

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquial prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIST 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors.

HIST 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

HIST 405 - (4) (Y)
Distinguished Majors Program-Special Colloquium

Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program
Study of historical approaches, techniques, and methodologies introduced through written exercises and intensive class discussion. Normally taken during the third year.

HIST 406 - (3) (Y)
Distinguished Majors Program-Special Seminar

Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program
Analysis of problems in historical research. Preparation and discussion of fourth-year honors theses. Normally taken during the fourth year.

HIST 407 - (3) (Y)
Political and Social Thought Seminar

A seminar introducing the interdisciplinary study of political and social thought, focusing each year on a different topic.

HIST 501, 502 - (3) (IR)
Documentary Editing Procedures and Practice

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Study of the principles and methods in interpreting and editing historical manuscripts, emphasizing the colonial and early national periods.

HIST 503 - (3) (IR)
Quantitative Analysis of Historical Data

Prerequisite: An introductory course in statistics or permission of instructor
Study of the social scientific approach to historical inquiry, the formulation of theories, and their testing with historical data. Extensive directed readings in quantitative history and training in quantitative methods, including sampling, the organization of a data-set and data analysis.

HIST 504 - (3) (IR)
Monticello Internship

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Directed research, largely in primary source materials, on topics relating to Jefferson's estate, life, and times. Directed by senior members of the Monticello staff. The internships are restricted to graduate students in history and to fourth year undergraduate history majors. A maximum of two students each semester are admitted to the course.

HIST 505 - (3) (IR)
History, Memory, Subjectivity

Considers a portion of the very extensive, and growing, literature on issues of memory, subjectivity, and historical evidence. "Memory" is taken in a broad sense, to include not only the recall and narrativization of experience but also tradition and commemoration, since in the historical literature these different senses of memory are often mixed together. Students must find their own paper topics, and are encouraged to discuss the course with the instructor in advance.

HIST 506 - (3) (SI)
Philosophy of History

Examines the theoretical presuppositions of historical research and writing.

HIST 507 - (3) (IR)
Internship in History: Interpreting African-American Life at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

This internship program, devised and presented by Montecello staff, and offered in conjunction with the University of Virginia's Corcoran Department of History, is designed for students interested in the interpretation of African-American history to the public. The interns are trained as historical interpreters and present Monticello's Plantation Community Tour. This walking tour explores Mulberry Row, the center of plantation activity where enslaved African-American families lived and worked, and examines the philosophical issue of Thomas Jefferson and slavery. Lectures, discussions and readings cover the historical content and interpretive techniques that allow interns to develop their individualized Plantation Community tours.

HIST 513 - (3) (IR)
The Atlantic Slave Trade

Study of the growth and development of the international slave trade from Africa to the New World from the 15th to the 19th centuries.

HIST 520 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Public History

Overview of the issues and challenges involved in historical interpretation at public history sites. Includes a review of general literature on public history, exploration of diverse sources frequently used, and implementation of a public history project.

United States History

HIUS 100 - (3) (Y)
Introductory Seminar in U.S. History

An introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIUS 201 - (4) (Y)
American History to 1865

Study of the development of the colonies and their institutions, the Revolution, the formation and organization of the Republic, and the coming of the Civil War.

HIUS 202 - (4) (Y)
American History Since 1865

Study of the evolution of political, social, and cultural history of the United States from 1865 to the present.

HIUS 206 - (3) (Y)
American Economic History

Study of American economic history from its colonial origins to the present. Cross-listed as ECON 206.

HIUS 240 - (3) (IR)
History of American Catholicism

Survey of American Catholicism from its colonial beginnings to the present.

HIUS 271 - (3) (IR)
American Environmental History

Prerequisite: First-year writing course (e.g., TCC 101, ENWR 101)
An exploration of the historical relationship between people and the environment in North America from colonial times to the present. Topics include the role of culture, economics, politics, and technology in that relationship.

HIUS 301 - (3) (Y)
The Colonial Period of American History

Study of the English background and the development of colonial institutions, political, social, economic and ecclesiastical.

HIUS 303 - (3) (Y)
The Era of the American Revolution

Study of the growth of ideas and institutions which led to American independence, the creation of an American union, and a distinctive culture.

HIUS 305 - (3) (IR)
The Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-1845

Study of the history of the United States during the early national and middle periods, including political, constitutional, social and economic developments as well as the westward movement.

HIUS 307 - (3) (IR)
The Coming of the Civil War

An examination of the period from roughly 1815 to 1861 focusing on the interaction between the developing sectional conflict and the evolving political system, with the view of explaining what caused the Civil War.

HIUS 309 - (3) (IR)
The Civil War and Reconstruction

Examines the course of the Civil War and Reconstruction in detail and attempts to assess their impact on 19th century American society, both in the North and in the South.

HIUS 311 - (3) (IR)
The United States in the Gilded Age, 1870-1900

Study of the transformation of American society under the impact of industrialization, from 1870 to 1900. Examines how capitalists, workers, farmers, and the middle class attempted to shape the new industrial society to their own purposes and visions. Focuses on social and cultural experience and politics.

HIUS 313 - (3) (IR)
The Emergence of Modern America, 1870-1930

Analysis of the distinctive characteristics of American modernity as they emerge in the period from the end of reconstruction to the Great Depression. Explores the creation of big business and large-scale bureaucratic organizations. Topics include the first military-industrial complex of World War I, the invention of R & D, the growth of research universities, and the modern organization of knowledge. Describes the landscape of new large urban hinterlands; analyzes the difficult encounters of class, ethnicity, race, and gender both at home and at work; and studies the changing leisure patterns of a consumer culture.

HIUS 315 - (3) (IR)
United States Society and Politics, 1900-1945

The development of modern America is explored by considering the growing interdependence between its politics, economy, culture, and social structure in the first half of the 20th century.

HIUS 316 - (3) (IR)
Viewing America, 1940 to the Present

Built around news reels, photographs, television, films, and reviews, this course explores how Americans viewed some of the major events and trends in the post-war period.

HIUS 317 - (3) (IR)
United States Society and Politics, 1945-1990

This survey of post World War II U.S. politics uncovers the links between long range social and economic phenomenon (suburbanization, decline of agricultural employment, the rise and fall of the labor movement, black urbanization and proletarianization, economic society and insecurity within the middle class, the changing structure of multinational business) and the more obvious political movements, election results, and state policies of the last half century.

HIUS 321 - (3) (IR)
The History of New England

Study of New England from its founding in the 17th century through its "Indian Summer" in the late 19th century. Most attention is given to social, intellectual, and cultural development.

HIUS 323 - (3) (IR)
The South in the Nineteenth Century

Study of the economic, political, and cultural evolution of the Old South, the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the development of the New South.

HIUS 324 - (3) (IR)
The South in the Twentieth Century

A history of the South from 1900 to the present focusing on class structure, race relations, cultural traditions, and the question of southern identity.

HIUS 326 - (3) (IR)
The Trans-Mississippi West

Study of economic, social, and cultural history of the Far West from the Mexican War to World War II. Focuses on continuity and change in the region's history and the social experience of its peoples from the era of conquest, migration, and settlement to the era of agribusiness, Hollywood, and national park tourism.

HIUS 328 - (3) (IR)
History of Virginia to 1865

Study of the development of colonial institutions as influenced by frontier conditions and British policy and culture. A survey of Virginia history from colonial times to 1865.

HIUS 330 - (3) (IR)
The History of UVA in the Twentieth Century

Study of the local, regional, and national trends effecting higher education, relating these trends specifically to the University of Virginia. Students are active participants in recovering the institution's history through oral interviews with alumni, faculty, and administrators and through serious archival work.

HIUS 340 - (3) (IR)
Development of American Science

A history of the development of American science from the colonial period to the present, emphasizing the process of the professionalization of American science and on the relationships between the emergent scientific community and such concerns as higher education and the government.

HIUS 341 - (3) (IR)
American Business

Survey of the rise of the modern corporate form of American business and an analysis of the underlying factors which shaped that development.

HIUS 345 - (3) (IR)
History of Urban America

Study of the evolution of the American city from colonial times to the end of the nineteenth century. Emphasizes both the physical growth of the system of cities and the development of an urban culture, including comparisons with European and Asian cities.

HIUS 346 - (3) (IR)
History of Urban America

Study of the evolution of the American city from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Emphasizes both the physical growth of the system of cities and the development of an urban culture, including comparisons with European and Asian cities.

HIUS 347 - (3) (IR)
History of American Labor

Survey of American labor in terms of the changing nature of work and its effect on working men, women, and children. Emphasizes social and cultural responses to such changes, as well as the organized labor movement.

HIUS 348 - (3) (IR)
American Social History to 1870

Topics include demographic change, the emergence of regional social orders, the shaping of American religion, the impact of the industrial revolution, and the development of important elites.

HIUS 349 - (3) (IR)
United States Social History Since 1870

Topics include the development of a predominantly urban society, with particular emphasis on sources of stability, class and stratification, ethnic patterns, religious identities, social elites, education, etc.

HIUS 351 - (3) (IR)
Diplomatic History of the United States to 1914

Study of American foreign relations from colonial times to 1914.

HIUS 352 - (3) (IR)
Diplomatic History of the United States Since 1914

Study of American foreign relations from 1914 to the present.

HIUS 355 - (3) (IR)
The History of Early American Law

Study of the major developments in American law, politics, and society from the colonial settlements to the Civil War, emphasizing the period 1776-1860. Focuses on legal change. Approximately equal attention is devoted to constitutional law, legislation, and the common law.

HIUS 356 - (3) (IR)
The History of Modern American Law

Study of the major developments in American law, politics, and society from the era of Reconstruction to the recent past. Focuses on legal change. Approximately equal attention is devoted to constitutional law, legislation, and the common law.

HIUS 357 - (3) (Y)
Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States to 1865

Analysis of the main traditions of thought and belief in the relationship to significant historical events and cultural changes from the 17th century to the Civil War.

HIUS 358 - (3) (Y)
Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States since 1865

Analysis of the main traditions of thought and belief in the relationship to significant historical events and cultural changes from the Civil War to the present.

HIUS 361 - (3) (Y)
History of Women in America, 1600 to 1865

A study of the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.

HIUS 362 - (3) (IR)
History of Women in America, 1865 to Present

A study of the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.

HIUS 365 - (3) (IR)
Afro-American History to 1865

A study of the history of black Americans from the introduction of slavery in America to the end of the Civil War.

HIUS 366 - (3) (IR)
Afro-American History Since 1865

A study of the history of black Americans from the Civil War to the present.

HIUS 367 - (3) (Y)
History of the Civil Rights Movement

Examines the history of the southern civil rights movement. Beginning in 1900--but concentrating heavily on the activist years between 1955 and 1968--the aim is to familiarize students with knowledge of the civil rights movement's philosophies, tactics, events, personalities, and consequences.

HIUS 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in United States History

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIUS 402 - (4) (IR)
Colloquium in United States History

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIUS 403 - (4) (IR)
Topics in United States History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.

HIUS 404 - (1-3) (IR)
Independent Study in United States History

In exceptional circumstances and with permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

HIUS 405 - (4) (IR)
American Studies Colloquium

An introductory colloquium for third-year majors admitted to the American Studies Program. Cross-listed as ENAM 483.

HIUS 406 - (4) (IR)
Research Seminar in American Studies

A research seminar for third-year majors admitted to the American Studies Program who have completed HIUS 405.

HIUS 407 - (4) (IR)
Fourth Year Seminar in American Studies

A seminar for fourth-year majors in the American Studies Program.


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