2006-2012 Six-Year Plan

  1. The University's Mission and Goals
  2. Major Strategic Directions in 2006-2012
    1. Academic Quality and Effectiveness
    2. Accessibility and Affordability
    3. Public Engagement with the Commonwealth
    4. Other Institutional Priorities
  3. Conclusion
    1. Provide access to higher education
    2. Provide affordable higher education
    3. Offer broad range of mission-relevant academic programs
    4. Initiate continuous, rigorous assessment of academic programs
    5. Improve student retention
    6. Develop articulation agreements
    7. Stimulate economic development
    8. Engage in research
    9. Develop K-12 partnerships
    10. Prepare a six-year financial plan
    11. Institute efficient business affairs

I. The University's Mission and Goals

The University of Virginia is, first and foremost, a public university dedicated to providing an excellent education to students from all walks of life. Thomas Jefferson, the University's founder, believed that educated citizens are the key to sustaining democracy. By training leaders and citizens and instilling in them the desire for a lifetime of learning, the University aims to prepare its graduates to meet the challenges of our time and to make positive contributions to an increasingly technological and global society. The University's central mission remains providing instruction, research, and service, including healthcare, to the citizens of the Commonwealth and the world. Our vision is to remain a national model of excellence in undergraduate learning, as well as in graduate and professional education, within a modern research university.

The University of Virginia seeks to achieve its central purpose through the pursuit of the following long-term goals:

  • Promote, sustain, and improve the University's core educational mission at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels.
  • Fully develop the University's potential as a nationally prominent research University with superb doctoral programs.
  • Embrace diversity in the pursuit of educational excellence, and enhance a culture of inclusiveness and mutual respect.
  • Support the University's primary goal of enriching the minds and lives of all students by providing services and opportunities that uphold the core values shaping the student experience.
  • Foster the public engagement of our students and faculty so that our pursuit of excellence in research and learning improves lives in our community and throughout the Commonwealth, the nation, and the world.
  • Transform the University's physical and administrative infrastructure to support the activities of a top-ranked national research university.
  • In the health sciences center, deliver superior medical care to patients, operate competitively in the marketplace, and provide the best medical education to students.
  • Attract, retain, and support highly qualified faculty and staff.

II. Major Strategic Directions in 2006-2012

In support of the University's mission and long-term goals, we plan to direct our resources in certain strategic directions over the next six-years. We will develop new programs and take other steps to excel as an academic and research institution; make it possible for a greater number and diversity of students to attend the university; engage public partners in our community, across the state, and around the world in the search for solutions to the most pressing needs of our time; and bolster our human and physical resources.

Academic Quality and Effectiveness

The University plans to continue raising its stature as a preeminent academic and research institution in the 21st century, maintaining rigorous standards of program review and accreditation, and continuously evaluating and updating the curricula and offerings of each of our ten schools. Notably, our plans to enhance research and transform the study of science, engineering, and biomedicine at the University will benefit both students and the Commonwealth. Further, by introducing new possibilities for international study, integrating community-based teaching and learning into the curriculum, and emphasizing the fine and performing arts, the University will continue to provide its graduates with a lifelong love of learning, as well as relevant preparation for leadership, service, and public engagement in a changing world.

Program Review and Accreditation

The University has implemented, and plans to continue, a rigorous system of academic program review that consists of ongoing and rigorous peer reviews of all of the University's academic units and programs on a five-year cycle. The University's program review is designed to foster academic excellence, determine how to raise the quality of every department, and provide guidance in support of continual future improvement. Programs to be reviewed during the next six-years are listed in Part B of this Six-Year Plan.

Every ten years, the University's accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools' Commission on Colleges is subject to review. In 2006 and 2007, the University will submit a report demonstrating its compliance with the SACS Principles of Accreditation, as well as a Quality Enhancement Plan, a carefully designed and focused course of action that addresses a well-defined topic or issue related to enhancing student learning. Site visits will take place in 2007, with the review of the application for reaffirmation to be completed in December 2007. In addition, we expect successful re-accreditation of eligible University schools and programs, as described in Part B of this Six-Year Plan.

Revising Curricula and Developing New Programs

Throughout the University, schools are evaluating the relevance of current academic programs and developing new curricula and degree programs. Some of the University's schools (Architecture, Education, and the College of Arts and Sciences) currently offer undergraduates the opportunity to complete a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in five years, providing a valuable option both to undergraduates and to the Commonwealth by compressing the usual two years required for a master's degree. Other schools also intend to begin offering similar options. For example, working together, several schools are developing a proposal for a combined B.A. and M.P.P. program in Public Policy, probably to be launched late in 2006.

The Darden School will introduce a new MBA for Executives program in mid 2006, and other professional schools at the University expect to make innovative changes to their curricula and degree offerings. The School of Continuing and Professional Studies hopes to launch by 2008 a new Master's of Professional Studies Degree in Charlottesville and Northern Virginia to serve the needs of businesses and government agencies. Important developments in the study of nursing are described later in this narrative.

Commitment to Research

Fully developing U.Va.'s potential as a nationally prominent research university requires bolstering and advancing research in all programs and at all levels of instruction. For example, at the undergraduate level, we will make independent research, pursued collaboratively with faculty mentors, a hallmark of the student experience. By taking part in the research process, undergraduates gain insights and develop critical thinking skills that cannot be found in the classroom alone.

The University's Board of Visitors has developed an aggressive five-year plan to enhance scientific research at the University and to raise the national visibility of the University as a research leader in targeted areas of science, engineering, and biomedicine. Key objectives include attracting ten world-class investigators and their research teams to develop new centers of excellence in selected fields by 2009; dramatically increasing laboratory space and enhancing infrastructure; expanding research opportunities for students and faculty; and hiring and retaining the best faculty through more competitive compensation packages and other incentives. The plan also calls for increased efforts to facilitate technology transfer, some of which are described in Part B of our Six-Year Plan. Long known for its distinguished programs in the humanities, as well as its highly ranked professional schools, the University must establish equivalent strengths in its science, engineering, and biomedical programs and do its part to advance the scientific and technological discoveries that define our times.

Substantial increases in support for graduate students during the next six-years will be essential to realizing the University's research goals. Although graduate students come to the University to continue their education and to deepen their focus in an academic discipline, they are also invaluable contributors to the intellectual life of the institution. In the sciences, engineering, and biomedicine, as well as the humanities and social sciences, graduate students help to generate new ideas and new ways of thinking that lead to innovation and original scholarship. Because they are such an invaluable catalyst for intellectual creativity, gifted graduate students are vital to attracting gifted faculty.

Undergraduate participation in research, high quality faculty, and superb graduate students are only part of the equation. Without high quality research space we cannot expand our level of research activity. We have found that our single largest impediment to recruiting and retaining world-class research faculty is the lack of appropriate space. The University strongly urges the Commonwealth to consider a partnership with its research universities in constructing new, state-of-the-art facilities that will support the expansion of research and contribute to economic development throughout the state.

Internationalization

Impelled by world events, rapid changes in the global marketplace, and growing student and faculty interest in world affairs, the University is embracing an international outlook in its teaching, research, and public service missions. Our faculty includes eminent authorities on world history, politics, languages, law, and culture; our physicians and engineers strive to eliminate the root causes of disease and poverty in developing countries; and our students pursue opportunities for research, education, and public service overseas. The University has the targeted goal of internationalizing the curriculum on Grounds and expanding and diversifying its programs for study abroad at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. All schools have plans to globalize their course offerings and expand their international activities; new University programs are being developed in places as distant as Tibet, Africa, Asia, and Central America. In addition, the new and well-received Diplomat Scholar Program brings international experts from Washington, D.C., to Charlottesville, where they teach one day per week at the University and mentor students interested in international careers. To advance these initiatives, as well as to respond to new regulatory requirements, the University plans to expand the capacity of its International Studies Office.

Community-Based Teaching and Learning

Public engagement is one of the hallmarks of the University's founding and continues to shape the intellectual development of our students today. We intend to formalize and expand our support for educational experiences that challenge students to relate what they learn in the classroom with the concerns and problems facing society today. By engaging with communities as they learn, students deepen their intellectual exploration of an academic discipline and develop a capacity for applying and testing knowledge to solve problems and improve the quality of life for all citizens.

Fine and Performing Arts

We have made a fresh commitment to the arts at the University of Virginia, seeking to enrich the experience of students and faculty and to expand the cultural resources for the entire University and surrounding community. The process of creating art in any form entails problem solving, risk taking, and higher-order thinking. Whether they intend to pursue the arts as a career or as a way to personal fulfillment, our students will benefit enormously from our plans to expand and integrate our programs in the arts. Central to our six-year plans is the new Arts Grounds, which will encompass new, renovated, and expanded facilities for the fine and performing arts, creating a vibrant new hub of intellectual and imaginative activity near the historic heart of the University. With upgraded facilities, our arts programs will become a magnet for talent, attracting students and faculty alike. Also important are expanded performance opportunities, such as the new Cavalier Marching Band. A collaboration between the music and athletics departments, the band has generated substantial student interest and will help attract talented applicants interested in continuing their musical training at the University.

Accessibility and Affordability

We are taking important steps to ensure that a greater number of students and a greater diversity of students will be able to benefit from the intellectual opportunities available at U.Va. Not only have we increased our enrollment projections over the next ten years, but we are also reaching out to qualified students who might not think a university education is possible. We have made a new commitment to nurturing an environment that welcomes diversity, and we are extending new transfer opportunities to community college graduates throughout the Commonwealth.

Increased Enrollment Projections

In accordance with SCHEV-approved projections, the University has committed to increase its enrollment by 1,500 over the next ten years. The growth will be targeted in areas that are consistent with long-term strategic plans for the institution and areas of importance for the Commonwealth: the physical and natural sciences; engineering; the arts; undergraduate business; and undergraduate nursing. The optimal total undergraduate growth over the ten-year period would be approximately 1,100 students, with about 700 of those in the physical and natural sciences, 200 in engineering, and 200 spread between undergraduate business, undergraduate nursing, and the fine and performing arts. The optimal capacity for the institution also includes a growth of about 400 students in the graduate programs. The growth in enrollment will require commensurate growth in funding, faculty, staff, and space, with many of the additional faculty expected to be in the sciences. Since 1998, in-state students have accounted for 67% to 68% of each entering class, and we expect this pattern to continue.

Greater Access for Low-Income Students

As we strive to offer a more rigorous and rewarding student experience, we are assuring affordability for all who can benefit from that experience. Over the next six-years, we plan to expand AccessUVa, our groundbreaking financial-aid program designed to reduce or even eliminate debt burdens that can prevent undergraduates from achieving their educational goals. AccessUVa is a combination of loan-free packages for low-income students, caps on need-based loans for all other students qualifying for financial aid, and a commitment to meet 100 percent of demonstrated need for all admitted undergraduates. The program not only keeps a U.Va. education affordable for the lowest income students (those with family incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty level), but also addresses the concerns of middle-income families squeezed by the rising cost of attending the University. By limiting debt — or eliminating it altogether for students with the most need — AccessUVa offers assurances to prospective students that they can afford to attend the University. In fall 2005, the number of students at the University who qualified for loan-free support under AccessUVa rose 182 percent, to a total of 199. Also, we have begun offering full AccessUVa benefits to qualified transfer students from the Virginia Community College System; of the total number of community college students who entered U.Va. in fall 2005, thirty-three will receive benefits. By 2008-10, we intend to complete implementation of the program's final components, such as capping the amount of need-based loans offered to any student.

We are also pleased to have launched, in conjunction with SCHEV's GEAR UP initiative, the College Guide Program with a grant from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. Under this program, the University selects and trains approximately 20 graduating seniors to help high school students learn how to apply to college, take standardized tests, obtain financial aid, and complete other steps that often stop academically qualified students from continuing their education after high school. Although the College Guide Program is currently operating as a pilot, the University hopes to continue the program. The College Guide Program, in combination with AccessUVa, will ensure that qualified students around the state have the opportunity to obtain a college degree.

Diversity

The Commission on Diversity and Equity, appointed by the President in spring 2003, has laid out a plan for breaking down walls of indifference and creating a safer and more nurturing atmosphere for all students, staff, and faculty, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, or socio-economic status. Key recommendations of the Commission's work include: expanding the First-Year Experience Program to include Sustained Dialogue, an effective catalyst for opening lines of communication among racial groups; developing and maintaining student and faculty exchanges between the University of Virginia and historically black colleges and universities; bolstering peer mentorship and other assistance programs; and establishing a Community Engagement academic program. Schools within the University have also set goals related to diversity. For example, the School of Nursing intends to increase student recruitment and retention services for men and racial minorities. And the Curry School of Education will recruit greater numbers of students from low-income and ethnic minority backgrounds into both on-grounds and off-grounds programs.

Increasing Opportunities for Community College Graduates

As described in Part B of our Six-Year Plan, the University will implement articulation agreements with community colleges throughout the Commonwealth. We also will increase our commitment to transfer-student enrollment and, as described elsewhere in this Plan, offer qualified VCCS transfer students full AccessUVa benefits. In addition, the University, through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies (SCPS), continues to make new opportunities available to community college students. In the next two years, SCPS plans to offer the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree throughout the Hampton Roads region and in Northern Virginia in partnership with local community colleges, expanding the program to other areas of the state in the subsequent two years, depending on market demand. Further, the School of Engineering and Applied Science will work with community colleges to ensure that their math, science, and engineering courses prepare students to make a smooth transition into the University's engineering programs.

Public Engagement with the Commonwealth

The University of Virginia takes seriously its responsibilities to the surrounding communities, the Commonwealth, and the nation. Over the next six-years, the University plans to expand and deepen its public engagement with neighboring localities and the citizens of Virginia, building on the many programs and services it already offers. Important plans will unfold in both credit and non-credit offerings. In particular, the University will continue to expand its capacity to educate teachers, nurses, and engineers for the Commonwealth, all of which are areas of need. We will continue to help prepare Virginia's emerging leaders through the Thomas C. Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership, with programs for high school students, college undergraduates, potential political candidates, residents of the Danville-Southside region and other citizens of the Commonwealth. Below we highlight particular aspects of our extensive engagement efforts.

Degree Programs in Shortage Areas

To help address the growing demand for nurses in the Commonwealth and nationwide, the School of Nursing expects to increase its total enrollment by at least 15% during the next six-years, producing not only more clinical nurses but also more nursing faculty. The School also plans several curricular changes in response to current nursing needs, including: implementation of a Master of Science in Nursing generalist program to prepare baccalaureate degree holders to become registered nurses; and development of a Doctor of Nursing Practice curriculum to prepare advanced practice nurses in specialty areas. The School also will launch an important career ladder program for nurses in Southside and Southwest Virginia. The Curry School of Education, in conjunction with the College of Arts and Sciences, plans to increase its production of teachers through the five-year BA/MT program, with most of this growth expected in math and science areas, where Virginia schools face the greatest shortage. The Schools of Nursing and Education are both limited by space, but hope to realize significant building expansions during the coming years.

Outreach Programs to Schools and Youth

In the next six-years, we will seek ways to build more collaborative and comprehensive relationships with community partners, focusing particularly on our desire to increase direct services to children and youth. Our public engagement with communities is critical to our institutional goal of increasing access to higher education for all children. Throughout the University, schools and departments have plans for significant outreach efforts. Through Teachers for a New Era, a national initiative funded by the Carnegie Corporation and the Ford and Annenberg Foundations, the University is developing innovative partnerships with public school systems to transform the training and support provided for new teachers, helping to ensure their success and retention in the profession. Research efforts under TNE are identifying the ways in which teacher training can have the most powerful impact on student achievement. In other areas, a proposal for a regional science education and outreach center will strengthen and expand current offerings in science, mathematics, and engineering, particularly in our work with K-12 educators and students. We are also seeking to create an Institute for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematic (STEM) Education to strengthen STEM connections between Virginia's K-12 and Community College systems and the University. The School of Continuing and Professional Studies will collaborate with other schools of the University to assist K-12 educators, for example through the nanotechnology program co-delivered by the School of Engineering and Applied Science. We will continue such influential outreach projects as the Center for Politics' Youth Leadership Initiative, which develops free K-12 civic education resources and sponsors mock elections.

The Darden-Curry Partnership for Leaders in Education will continue to offer management and leadership development opportunities to public school administrators, including participants in the Virginia School Turnaround Specialist Program (VSTSP) initiated by Governor Warner. With the help of a $3 million award from Microsoft during the next five years, the VSTSP and the Darden-Curry Partnership will increase district support for the turn-around specialists and develop a national model for the turn-around specialist concept. In addition, the University overall intends to ensure, by 2008-10, that the school system of every surrounding county has in place a collaborative partnership with U.Va. to improve student achievement, upgrade the knowledge and skills of teachers and other school personnel, and strengthen leadership skills of school administrators. Although our Curry School of Education will assume primary responsibility for these partnerships, we will seek ways to engage students and faculty across the University in the improvement of K-12 education.

Economic Development

Our plans for advancing economic development are closely tied to our plans for enhancing research and graduate studies in science, engineering, and biomedicine, described elsewhere in this narrative, and for expanding our ventures in technology commercialization. All of these activities are overseen in a coordinated fashion by the University's Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies. Through its Virginia Gateway initiative, the University will continue to work with community partners in the areas of both technology commercialization and economic development; for example, by continuing to provide University inventors with opportunities to bring their ideas to fruition in a business incubator environment. Part B of this Six-Year Plan describes selected efforts to bolster economic development during the next six-years. Among them are: a collaboration with the Philpott Manufacturing Extension Partnership to create jobs in depressed areas of the state; an initiative with Virginia Tech, the University of North Carolina, and North Carolina State University to train the workforce for a nanotechnology corridor; and a proposed Institute for Engineering Innovation that would challenge students to link engineering discoveries with potential societal impact.

Other Institutional Priorities

The University is eager to pursue these goals over the next six-years, but it will require additional investment in fundamental assets: a superb faculty and staff, outstanding students, and a physical infrastructure and resources that support and advance the academic enterprise. Without bolstering both our human and physical resources, the University will not be able to achieve its ambitious agenda.

Faculty, Students and Staff

The quality of our faculty is crucial to achieving the University's goals. As we seek to excel as an academic institution, we must recruit outstanding faculty and retain the excellent faculty we have. We also will sustain new efforts to further the advancement and professional development of our faculty, including the mentoring of junior faculty; workshops for faculty at all levels on teaching, research and writing; and leadership training for mid-career faculty and department chairs. We will fortify our efforts to recruit and retain diverse faculty, and continue to take part in national initiatives to encourage women to enter and stay in careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Various schools have vigorous faculty recruitment and retention plans. For example, the College of Arts and Sciences intends to invest new resources in retaining the best faculty, and the Schools of Architecture, Nursing, and Engineering will all seek to increase salary levels. University-wide, we will require training for all members of search committees to improve the hiring process and help diversify the faculty.

Equally crucial to the University's future is its ability to attract and retain the best and brightest students. Our AccessUVa program, described elsewhere in this narrative, is expected to contribute significantly to our future success. To enrich the minds and lives of the excellent students who choose to attend the University, we will continue to provide programs and services that enhance the core values shaping the student experience: honor, academic rigor, self-governance, public service, diversity and multiculturalism, and health and wellness. Programs in multicultural education, leadership training for student leaders, and student wellness will receive special attention over the six-years. Our extensive attention and uncommon commitment to upholding the quality of the student experience contributes to our high level of retention, giving the University the highest graduation rate of any major public institution in the nation.

The University recognizes the essential role its many staff members perform, and seeks to provide a work environment in which human values and relationships are respected, where cultural diversity is welcomed, and where each person's worth and dignity are valued and nurtured. The University provides a wide variety of training and development opportunities to help staff develop satisfying jobs and careers; we expect to expand these efforts during the six-year period. For example, we have begun piloting a new Excellence in Supervisory Management certificate series; two other certificate programs are in the planning stages; and we plan to retool our leadership development programs. To inform University employees of the latest human resources news, information, and resources, we have recently begun publishing a bimonthly online newsletter, which will become an important communications tool in the coming years. Finally, we are working to make staff salaries and benefits more competitive over the six-year period.

Resources and Infrastructure

We plan to maintain and improve the University's infrastructure to support our ambitious activities. Notable among the resources necessary to sustain and advance the University's mission is a system of first-rate libraries. Six-year plans for our libraries entail expansion of print and digital collections as well as enhancements to services, such as The Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA), that benefit citizens of the Commonwealth. Further, we have recently launched a major project to develop a fully integrated student information and registration system that will improve University operations and respond to student needs.

The University will continue to make substantial investments in new buildings and renovations to uphold the quality of its academic and health-care programs. To meet strategic goals aimed at establishing new strengths, we will build the Arts Grounds, which will provide upgraded facilities for all programs in the fine and performing arts. New laboratory buildings are planned or under construction for research in the sciences, engineering, and biomedicine. New academic complexes housing classrooms, faculty offices, and common areas for students are planned for the humanities and social sciences, undergraduate business, engineering, medicine, and, as mentioned above, education and nursing. As it undertakes these construction projects, the University must maintain its 12 million square feet of existing buildings. Many are aging and in need of serious attention. A substantial number are of historical significance, including the Jeffersonian buildings and landscapes, which have been declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO. The Board of Visitors has approved a ten-year plan that calls for the reduction of the deferred maintenance backlog to an acceptable level while at the same time making sizeable annual investments in the maintenance budget so that any further accumulation of deferred maintenance can be avoided.

Critical to the University's capacity to provide a first-rate education are student support services that include but are not limited to student health services, transportation and parking, the bookstore, dining services, residence halls, and athletic and recreational opportunities. Plans are in development to add new first-year housing in order to meet expected enrollment growth as well as to replace existing housing that has reached the end of its useful life. At the start of the six-year planning period, the University will open the John Paul Jones Arena, the finest college basketball and special events arena in the country. The arena will be not only the new home of the Cavalier men's and women's basketball programs but also a multipurpose entertainment facility serving the central Virginia region. As the student population grows, many of the institution's support services will need to expand, and some will require new facilities. All will aim to deliver their services in the most cost effective manner possible.

Health Care

In response to growing demands for health care, the University Medical Center has developed a strategy for continuing to deliver superior medical care to patients, while also operating competitively in the marketplace. Under this strategy, the Medical Center will provide clinical services not available elsewhere in the Commonwealth, work collaboratively with community providers (such as Riverside, Augusta, and Rockingham), as well as deliver services that are available elsewhere in a unique way. This approach will allow the Medical Center to meet the needs of the population as it ages, as well as to respond to the growing numbers of residents of Central Virginia and the Mid-Atlantic region. In addition, the Medical Center will continue its efforts to care for the underserved in such areas as Wise County and Southside.

To further these goals, we have developed a Master Facilities Site Plan that includes an addition to the University Hospital to provide new operating rooms and expanded facilities for treatment in several medical specialties. We are planning the construction of a new Clinical Cancer Center, which we hope the National Cancer Institute will designate as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (the first in Virginia). Funding to develop Medical Center facilities will come from the issuance of university general revenue bonds, operating income from the Medical Center, philanthropy, and, we hope, the Commonwealth. This funding scenario is predicated upon achieving the targeted operating margin established by the University's Board of Visitors, as well as continued full funding of the care provided by the Medical Center to medically indigent patients. During fiscal year 2004-05 over $81 million worth of care was provided to this population of patients. The facilities are projected to address a 30-year time horizon and will position the Medical Center to meet the needs of the Commonwealth into the 21st Century.

III. Conclusion

The landmark restructuring law passed this year provides new opportunities for Virginia's state colleges and universities. For the University of Virginia, restructuring is an important next step in a long commitment to public education. Our plans for the next six-years will enhance the University's ability to provide instruction and research, and to ensure that our efforts to discover and share knowledge benefit the citizens of the Commonwealth and the world. At the University of Virginia, we look forward to the future.

Goal Academic Activity/Support Service
2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
1. Provide access to higher education
  • Target underrepresented populations
  • Develop and meet enrollment projections
  • Develop and meet degree estimates

Continue to build socio-economic diversity of the student body through AccessUVa1, the University's new financial aid program designed to make a U.Va. education affordable.

Meet enrollment goal for low income undergraduate students in 2007-08: 900 (+/- 5%), up from 800 enrolled in 2004-05.

Provide college advising services to high school students for whom college may seem out of reach through College Guide program sponsored by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation and SCHEV/Gear-Up, which places recent U.Va. graduates trained to assist with admission, financial aid, and scholarship applications in selected public secondary institutions with low college matriculation rates throughout the Commonwealth.

Participate in SCHEV Commonwealth College Course Collaborative enabling high school seniors to receive college credit for work completed during high school.

Work with SCHEV on transfer coordination from the VCCS through participation in the State Transfer Committee and other means.

Increase the number of professional development and personal enrichment courses, certificates, and travel learning programs for lifelong learners, offered primarily through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies (SCPS).2

Meet SCHEV-approved enrollment projections. Current projected total on- and off-campus fall headcount enrollment for 2007-08: 23,782 (+/- 5%).

In light of growth in student enrollment, expand capacity of library, student affairs, and other services.

Meet SCHEV-approved degree estimates. Current total degrees projected for 2007-08: 6,144 (+/- 5%).

Implement final components of AccessUVa.

Meet enrollment goal for low income undergraduate students in 2009-10: 967 (+/- 5%).

Expand College Guide program into additional Virginia communities, seeking to meet community requests for Guides. Continue summer high school outreach component, in which 15 Gear-Up students live in university dormitories and receive intensive mentoring from College Guides.

Continue to participate in Commonwealth College Course Collaborative.

Continue to work with SCHEV on transfer coordination from the community colleges.

Continue to increase options for lifelong learners.

Continue to meet SCHEV-approved enrollment projections. Current projected total on-and off-campus fall headcount enrollment for 2009-10: 24,147 (+/- 5%).

In light of growth in student enrollment, continue to expand capacity of library, student affairs, and other services.

Continue to meet SCHEV-approved degree estimates. Current total degrees projected for 2009-10: 6,229 (+/- 5%).

Conduct comprehensive review of AccessUVa results from the first 5 to 7 years and adjust program initiatives as necessary.

Meet enrollment goal for low income undergraduate students in 2011-12: 1,033 (+/- 5%).

Assess success of College Guide program at increasing college attendance; expand program further, increasing SCHEV/Gear-Up-funded guides from 1 in 2005 to approximately 6, other guides from 13 in 2005 to approximately 20.

Continue to participate in Commonwealth College Course Collaborative.

Continue to work with SCHEV on transfer coordination from the community colleges.

Continue to increase options for lifelong learners.

Continue to meet SCHEV-approved enrollment projections. Current projected total on- and off-campus fall headcount enrollment for 2011-12: 24,582 (+/- 5%).

In light of growth in student enrollment, continue to expand capacity of library, student affairs, and other services.

Continue to meet SCHEV-approved degree estimates. Current total degrees projected for 2011-12: 6,367 (+/- 5%).

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
2. Provide affordable higher education
  • Assess impact of tuition and fees on applications, enrollment, and student indebtedness

Fully implement 1st two phases of AccessUVa, which will mitigate impact of tuition and fee increases to students qualifying for need-based aid by offering 100% of need and replacing need-based loans with grants for low income students.

Continue implementation of 3rd phase of AccessUVa, by capping need-based loans for 1st and 2nd yr undergraduate students (in 06-07) and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd yr undergraduate students (in 07-08) at 25% of the cost of an in-state undergraduate education.

Continue education and outreach efforts to ensure students are aware of available need-based financial aid to offset impression that a U.Va. education is not affordable.

Review application and enrollment statistics, including overall number of applications, diversity of classes, academic qualifications of applicants and admitted students.

Survey admitted students who do not matriculate as to reasons for selecting another institution.

Assess participation of financial aid recipients in study abroad, internships, volunteer work, and student activities to ensure cost of education is not limiting opportunities.

Assess post-graduate choices of financial aid recipients to ensure cost of undergraduate education and resulting indebtedness is not limiting opportunities.

Continue AccessUVa.

Fully implement 3rd phase of AccessUVa to all undergraduates.

Continue outreach efforts.

Continue to assess impact of price on applications and enrollments.

Survey admitted students who do not matriculate as to reasons for selecting another institution.

Continue to assess impact of price on participation in activities during undergraduate years.

Continue to assess impact of price and indebtedness on post-graduate choices.

Conduct comprehensive review of AccessUVa results from the first 5 to 7 years and adjust program initiatives as necessary.

Continue outreach efforts.

Continue to assess impact of price on applications and enrollments.

Survey admitted students who do not matriculate as to reasons for selecting another institution.

Continue to assess impact of price on participation in activities during undergraduate years.

Continue to assess impact of price and indebtedness on post-graduate choices.

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
3. Offer broad range of mission-relevant academic programs
  • Target offerings in shortage areas by discipline and geographic region

Maintain University commitment to offering a broad range of mission-relevant academic programs -- currently, Bachelors degrees in 48 primary disciplines, Masters degrees in 65 primary disciplines, Doctoral degrees in 56 primary disciplines, and First-Professional degrees in Law and Medicine.3

Audit programs for productivity and viability in line with SCHEV and U.Va. standards.

Consistent with university's mission, offer new programs and revise existing programs according to SCHEV and U.Va. approval processes.

Target degree offerings in shortage areas to be determined by SCHEV, for example:

- continue to increase enrollment in the BSN program;

- implement Clinical Nurse Leader MSN program;

- introduce online nursing master's program in Southside and Southwest Virginia; and

- expand BIS degree availability throughout Hampton Roads and Northern Virginia.

Maintain commitment to broad range of academic programs.

Act on results of program audits by discontinuing programs or by addressing enrollment issues.

Continue to offer new programs or revise existing programs according to SCHEV and U.Va. approval processes.

Continue to target degree offerings in shortage areas, for example:

- improve infrastructure to accommodate more course offerings in the Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program in areas that support the needs of state and local industries; and

- begin Master's of Professional Studies degree cohorts in southwest Virginia, Richmond, Hampton Roads, and Southside Virginia.

Maintain commitment to broad range of academic programs.

Audit programs for productivity and viability in line with SCHEV and U.Va. standards.

Continue to offer new programs or revise existing programs according to SCHEV and U.Va. approval processes.

Continue to target degree offerings in shortage areas, for example:

- increase admission and enrollment of students in the five-year joint BA-MT Program in Teacher Education in areas of greatest shortages; and

- use distance learning technology to offer the BIS and MPS degree throughout the Commonwealth.

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
4. Initiate continuous, rigorous assessment of academic programs
  • Review and improve academic programs, course availability, faculty productivity, and other relevant factors

Successfully complete reaffirmation of the University's SACS accreditation, based on continuous rigorous assessment, by December 2007.

Conduct rigorous program review consisting of ongoing, peer reviews of academic units and programs on a five-year cycle. Purpose is to foster academic excellence, raise the quality of every department, and provide guidance in support of continual future improvement.

Conduct Program Review for: schools of Engineering, Commerce, and Graduate Business; and departments of Media Studies, Jewish Studies, English, ASL, Creative Writing, ROTC, American Studies, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Statistics.

Provide sufficient course availability to allow timely graduation, as measured by percent of non-transfer undergraduate degree recipients completing degree within 125% of total credits required for graduation (excluding dual degree recipients).

Assess faculty productivity through promotion and tenure processes and annual reviews for all faculty, tenured and non-tenured.

Undergo specialized re-accreditation of schools and departments, including: Urban & Environmental Planning; Curry School of Education; Clinical Psychology; Communication Disorders; Counselor Education and Supervision; School of Medicine.

Conduct Program Review for: schools of Nursing, Law, Architecture, and Education; Aging Institute; and departments of Psychology, Religious Studies, Philosophy, History, Music, Art, Drama, Astronomy, and Environmental Sciences.

Set schedule for next five-year cycle of review.

Continue providing sufficient course availability to allow timely graduation.

Continue to assess faculty productivity through promotion and tenure, annual, and post-tenure reviews.

Undergo specialized re-accreditation of schools and departments, including: School of Architecture; McIntire School of Commerce; Darden Graduate School of Business; School of Law; Continuing Medical Education.

Begin new five-year program review cycle according to schedule determined in 2008-10.

Continue providing sufficient course availability to allow timely graduation.

Continue to assess faculty productivity through promotion and tenure, annual, and post-tenure reviews.

Undergo specialized re-accreditation of schools and departments, including: Landscape Architecture; Mental Health Counseling; School Counseling; School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; School of Nursing.

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
5. Improve student retention
  • Improve student retention to timely graduation
  • Increase number of degrees conferred as enrollment increases

Maintain high graduation rates. Current 6 and 4 year graduation rates: 92% and 83%, respectively (highest of any major public institution in the nation).

Examples of activities to improve student retention:

- expand College of Arts & Sciences Advising Fellows Program for first- and second-year students;

- implement peer education programs to seek to increase the retention and graduation rates of African-American and other minority students;

- cap the maximum amount of need-based loans for eligible students, according to AccessUVa program;

-operate Hoos Getting Started, a summer bridge program for 30 AccessUVa students that seeks to provide a smooth transition into the University and increase participants' likelihood of graduating;

- develop multicultural education program to provide students with the tools they need to live and learn in a diverse community, piloting program in residential areas; and

- continue to participate in SCHEV's Impacting Persistence effort to stay abreast of student retention best practices.

Increase number of degrees conferred: Projected undergraduate degrees for 2007-08: 3,442 (+/- 5%).

Continue to maintain high graduation rates. (Goal for 6-year and 4-year graduation rates: 92% and 83% respectively.)

Examples of activities to improve student retention:

- continue retention-focused peer education programs;

- continue to cap loan totals;

-continue Hoos Getting Started summer bridge program; and

- ensure that appropriate residential staff-to-student ratios are maintained (1-20 in first-year area) and achieved (1-80 in upper class) to support educational program and community objectives.

Increase number of degrees conferred: Projected undergraduate degrees for 2009-10: 3,452 (+/- 5%).

Continue to maintain high graduation rates (Goal for 6-year and 4-year graduation rates: 92% and 83% respectively.)

Examples of activities to improve student retention:

- continue retention-focused peer education programs;

- continue to cap loan totals;

-continue Hoos Getting Started summer bridge program; and

- continue to connect residential programs to academic life, based on premise that a key determinant of academic success is engagement in University life.

Increase number of degrees conferred: Projected undergraduate degrees for 2011-12: 3,520 (+/- 5%).

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
6. Develop articulation agreements
  • Forge agreements with VCCS that have uniform application to all 23 campuses
  • Forge agreements that meet general education requirements and provide additional opportunities for associate degree holders
  • Create dual enrollment programs with high schools

Implement articulation agreements with all 23 community colleges for student matriculation into U.Va. College of Arts & Sciences.

Expand BIS degree, currently offered with TCC, throughout Hampton Roads region and Northern Virginia.

Work with community colleges to design math, science, and engineering courses that prepare students to enroll in engineering degree programs.

Consistent with our mission, offer courses to select high school students. For example, expand pilot offering of introductory engineering courses to Governor's Schools and other high schools; and continue availability of summer foreign language institute4 and Community Scholar Program5 in area high schools.

Expand articulation agreements with all 8 community colleges having pre-engineering programs, for U.Va. School for Engineering and Applied Science.

Continue to expand the BIS degree to other areas of the state if there is demand.

Consistent with our mission, offer appropriate courses to high school students. For example, use distance learning technologies to expand access for high school students to courses not offered in local community colleges.

Introduce articulation agreements with all community colleges having introductory programs in nursing, architecture, commerce, and education, for U.Va. Schools of Nursing, Architecture, Commerce, and Education.

Increase enrollment of associate degree holders in BA/MT Program in Teacher Education

Consistent with our mission, assess other opportunities to offer appropriate courses to high school students.

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
7. Stimulate economic development
  • Engender local economic development in lag areas as it relates to income, employment, and other factors

Serve as host for Virginia's Philpott Manufacturing Extension Partnership (VPMEP), if accepted. Assist in connecting VPMEP staff with resources required to serve manufacturing clients.

In conjunction with the Tobacco Commission, launch a graduate Nursing training program in Danville, which will place 100 trained nurses in the Southside-Southwest hospitals over a 3-year period.

Expand reach of SCPS Workforce Development Academy, which trains community college and local government representatives in the specialized leadership skills needed for the constituencies they serve.

Support and promote VIVA, the Virtual Library of Virginia, by developing license agreements that provide maximum access for minimum cost.

Develop a leadership training program to provide local government and corporate leaders with advanced training and decision-making skills, though U.Va.'s Weldon Cooper Institute in partnership with Ferrum College and the Tobacco Commission. Graduate 25 trained managers into local economies per year.

Expand reach of SCPS Center for Executive Development, which offers custom-designed executive and professional leadership programs to organizations seeking to broaden and strengthen individual and organizational skills and knowledge to achieve higher performance.

Continue to promote library agreements and look for new opportunities.

Work with Institute for Advanced Learning and Research (Danville) in the development of a “Nanocorridors” economic development program in conjunction with Virginia Tech, UNC, and NC State, to develop a trained workforce to attract nanotechnology-based companies into the Southside region.

Using regional centers and distance learning technology, address marketing demands for open enrollment professional development programs in such areas as information technology, organizational behavior, leadership and ethics, customer services, entrepreneurship, the arts, and marketing.

Continue to promote library agreements and look for new opportunities.

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
8. Engage in research
  • Increase the level of externally funded research
  • Facilitate technology transfer to private sector

Increase level of externally funded sponsorship by hiring prominent researchers, expected to lead in fields aligned with national research priorities for multi-disciplinary, highly integrated science. For example, hire faculty in basic and applied biomedical sciences to complement existing research strengths in specific diseases and in development of break-through research, in order to take national lead in developing treatments for birth defects, diabetes, neuro-degenerative diseases and new treatments for tissue repair and organ regeneration.

Improve research facilities, for example by creating interdisciplinary state-of-the-art space in the new Advanced Research and Technology Building which will provide wet/dry lab space and vivaria for current and new faculty members. Other projects include: Material Science Engineering and Nanotechnology building; Information Technology Engineering building; and Medical Research Building-6, which will provide space for cancer, immunology, and infectious disease research.

Improve library collections and instructional and research support in high priority research areas, such as nanotechnology.

Achieve expected research expenditures by 2008: $253 million, including the hiring of 4 national academy level faculty members.

Develop internal technology commercialization process that is seamless, clear, and easy to access, including improvements in royalty distribution process and other internal processes (e.g., for research contracts, corporate gifts, faculty consulting, patents, and licensing).

Complete and make available Faculty Entrepreneur Guidebook.

If approved, create Institute for Engineering Innovation, with academic programs challenging students to link engineering discoveries with societal impact potential.

Continue to recruit prominent faculty members in science, engineering, and biomedicine.

Continue to improve research facilities. Planned projects include new Cancer Medical Research Building (MR-7), new Life Sciences building, and significant renovations to existing buildings.

Continue to improve library collections and instructional and research support in high priority research areas, such as morphogenesis.

Achieve expected research expenditures by 2010: $284 million, including the hiring of 4 additional national academy level faculty members.

Successfully execute Coulter Foundation five-year Translational Research Partnership award, if granted, with the objective to increase the flow of Engineering and Biomedical mentored projects into commercialization and/or clinical practice.

Continue to recruit prominent faculty members in science, engineering, and biomedicine.

Continue to improve research facilities. Planned projects include a new Biomedical Engineering building and a major renovation to Cobb Hall, for administrative and teaching spaces.

Continue to improve library collections and instructional and research support in high priority research areas.

Achieve expected research expenditures by 2012: $307 million, including hiring of 1 additional national academy level faculty member.

Successfully execute Coulter Foundation endowment for translational research, if granted, leading to an enhanced and comprehensive technology transfer program at the University.

2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
9. Develop K-12 partnerships
  • Assist in efforts to improve student achievement
  • Upgrade the knowledge and skills of teachers
  • Strengthen leadership skills of school administrators

Continue numerous partnerships between Curry School of Education and school districts; for example, strategic alliance begun in 2005 with Charlottesville's Clark Elementary School. Partnership focuses on Clark's three-year improvement plan and seeks to help all students pass the English Standards of Learning test by end of 2006-07 school year.

Open new Science Education and Outreach Center, a university-wide initiative to coordinate and expand educational outreach programs in science, engineering, and mathematics for K-12 students and teachers.

Offer direct services to children and youth, geared toward improving student achievement, such as summer enrichment, Saturday enrichment, young writers' workshops, and Sorensen High School Leaders Program.

Provide college advising services to high school students through College Guide program, described in goal # 1.

Sustain progress initiated by major grant funded program, “Teachers for a New Era,” which improves teacher preparation through mentoring and professional development for K-12 teachers; hire faculty in collaboration with local school districts to continue work in mathematics and science education; expand induction partnership to include additional school districts.

Expand offerings for K-12 teachers in critical shortage areas such as mathematics, earth science, reading, library studies, and the arts. Develop stronger outreach program in math content and pursue other initiatives, such as Institute for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education to strengthen connections between Virginia's K-12 and community college systems, if approved.

Continue summer programs for K-12 teachers, e.g., M.A. in Physics Education.

Offer nanotechnology program for K-12 teachers.

Use regional centers to provide degree, endorsement, and other professional development opportunities for teachers and school personnel.

Continue Darden-Curry Partnership for Leaders in Education6, an executive education program for K-12 senior administrators charged with turning around low-performing schools in Virginia, which leads to a professional credential in educational turnaround management.

Expand partnerships with school districts in providing clinics for communication disorders, reading, clinical and school psychology, and counseling. Working in collaboration with local public school personnel, insure that all local and surrounding school districts have a partnership with U.Va. based on needs identified by K-12 professionals, to improve student achievement and upgrade the knowledge and skills of teachers, counselors, psychologists, and other personnel.

Fully implement and staff Science Education and Outreach Center, which will become a destination for school groups seeking to participate in “science in action” activities coordinated with state Standards of Learning.

Continue offering programs geared toward improving student achievement, such as Science Fair Mentoring Program, which provides guidance to elementary and secondary students who want to complete top-notch science fair projects.

Working in collaboration with local public school personnel, insure that all local and surrounding school districts have a partnership with U.Va. based on needs identified by K-12 professionals, to upgrade the knowledge and skills of teachers.

Continue to expand educational offerings for K-12 teachers in critical shortage areas, e.g., through fully utilizing new Science Education and Outreach Center and by expanding distance education opportunities to reach underserved populations.

Continue Darden-Curry Partnership for Leaders in Education and introduce curriculum development initiatives for leadership and management issues in education.

Working with local public school personnel, insure that local and surrounding school districts have a partnership with U.Va. to strengthen leadership skills of school administrators.

Continue offering outreach programs through the Science Education and Outreach Center, including distribution to K-12 schools of Learning Kits (prepackaged, theme-based tubs of learning materials, resources, interactive exercises, lesson plans, and specimens).

Continue offering programs geared toward improving student achievement, such as the Madison House7 Tutoring Program, matching University students with local school children to help improve their academic work.

In order to address teacher shortages, increase admission and enrollment of students in the five-year joint BA/MT Program in Teacher Education in areas of greatest shortages within the Commonwealth, recruiting a diverse population of students.

Continue to expand offerings for K-12 teachers in critical shortage areas.

Increase number of engineering graduates prepared to educate K-12 students.

Continue Partnership for Leaders in Education and curriculum development initiatives.

  2006 - 2008 2008 - 2010 2010 - 2012
10. Prepare a six-year financial plan
11. Institute efficient business affairs
[1]

http://www.virginia.edu/accessuva/

[2]

http://www.scps.virginia.edu/

[3]

The University's degrees are distributed among the following categories: architecture; area, ethnic, cultural, and gender studies; visual and performing arts; biological sciences; business; computer science; education; engineering; English; foreign languages; health professions; history; interdisciplinary studies; law; liberal arts and sciences; mathematics; natural resources and conservation; philosophy; physical sciences; psychology; social sciences.

[4]

http://www.virginia.edu/summer/SLI/index.html

[5]

http://www.scps.virginia.edu/communityscholar/

[6]

http://www.darden.virginia.edu/html/standard.aspx?menu_id=626&id=19292&styleid=3

[7]

http://scs.student.virginia.edu/~madison/index.html