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the history and prehistory of the puebloan southwest

American Southwest

 

This course will introduce students to the archaeology and history of the Ancestral Puebloan cultures of the southwestern United States. Combining in-class instruction with exploration of archaeological parks, historical sites, and present-day Native American communities, its goal is for students to learn the fundamentals of southwest archaeology within a framework of cultural enrichment outside the traditional classroom.

Course Dates:

May 19 - June 1, 2014

May 19, 20, and 21 - Lecturers at UVa from 1:00 - 3:15

May 22 - Arrive Albuquerque, NM by noon NM time.

June 1 - Class ends; depart Albuquerque

June 8 - Final papers due via e-mail or Collab.

ANTH 2589: The ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

3-Credits

HIUS 2559:The ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST (pvcc)

3-Credits

      This course will introduce students to the archaeology, prehistory and history of the Ancestral Puebloan cultures of the southwestern United States. Combining in-class instruction with exploration of archeological parks, historical sites, and present-day Native American communities, the goal is for students to learn the fundamentals of Southwest archeology within a framework of cultural enrichment outside the traditional classroom.
      The instructional focus of the trip includes visits to a series of archeological monuments operated by the National Park Service such as Chaco Canyon, Aztec Ruin and Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico and Mesa Verde in Colorado. We will also visit several present-day Native American communities who claim descent from the Ancestral Puebloans and whose reservations cover large portions of the area. We hope to visit the Hopi Mesas in Arizona, and to travel to Acoma, Zuni and Taos, NM. Taos Pueblo is the oldest continuously inhabited Native American community in the country and a UNESCO world heritage site. Time permitting we may also spend a day in Santa Fe, NM.
      Students in several disciplines will benefit from this class. In addition to anthropology, archaeology, and history majors, architecture and engineering students can investigate the techniques for building and maintaining great houses and cliff dwellings. Geology and astronomy majors can explore the famous landscapes, mesas, and night skies that were such integral features of Ancestral Puebloan culture. Art students can study the wealth of pottery, baskets, and textiles now housed in museum collections and digital archives.
      The class will begin in Charlottesville with three afternoons of lectures. Following the end of the class students will prepare a final paper based on their research in the field and their reading of scholarly literature. Students will also be required to keep a daily journal. In sum, the course offers an opportunity for students from a variety of disciplines to work and learn together in one of the world’s most unique physical and cultural environments.

Applications:

Application requires a ½ to 1-page statement of interest and one letter of recommendation. Materials should be sent to Rachel Most (rm5f@virginia.edu) BEFORE APRIL 1. Students will be accepted on a rolling basis so please apply early. Please contact Rachel Most at rm5f@virginia.edu with questions.

Tuition and Fees:

Virginia Resident

Tuition $334 per Credit
$1,002.00
Summer Fee  
$354.00
Course Fee * - Non-refundable
(approximately)    $1,550.00
Virginia Resident Total
$2,906.00
 

Non Virginia Resident

Tuition $1,176.00 per Credit
$3,528.00
Summer Fee  
$413.00
Course Fee* - Non-refundable
(approximately)    $1,550.00
Non-Virginia Total Costs
$5,491.00
    

* Course fee includes transportation, lodging, site visits, and food while traveling.
   (Airfare to Albuquerque, NM. is NOT included.).

Faculty:

Rachel Most, Professor, UVa
Colum Leckey, Faculty, PVCC